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Screamer on the Snake River

As I translated a watercolor sketch to oil the painting seemed to take on a life of its own. Believe it or not, the brush actually moved itself! In my shock and awe I barely noticed the flashing lights and loud hums coming from outside my studio. I woke up several hours later and this […]

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Things I hear while painting

Greg Proops on Kevin Pollak’s Chat Show: “This year I did Oslo, Amsterdam, Paris . . . I try to take it all around. There’s always an English-speaking crowd. We did a show in Oslo. We went to the Munch Museum. He painting The Scream, the most abject depiction of terror and despair in the […]

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The Great Meteor Procession of 1913, by Gustav Hahn

Meteor Procession of 1913, by Gustav Hahn

One hundred years ago today the Great Meteor Procession of 1913 occurred, a sky event described by some as “magnificent” and “entrancing” and which left people feeling “spellbound” and “privileged”. Because one had to be in a right location, outside, and under clear skies, only about 1,000 people noted seeing the procession. Lucky sky gazers — particularly those near Toronto, Canada — had their eyes drawn to an amazing train of bright meteors streaming across the sky, in groups, over the course of a few minutes. A current leading progenitor hypothesis is that a single large meteor once grazed the Earth’s atmosphere and broke up. When the resulting pieces next encountered the Earth, they came in over south-central Canada, traveled thousands of kilometers as they crossed over the northeastern USA, and eventually fell into the central Atlantic ocean. Pictured above is a digital scan of a halftone hand-tinted image by the artist Gustav Hahn who was fortunate enough to witness the event first hand.

Continue reading The Great Meteor Procession of 1913, by Gustav Hahn

The Great Meteor Procession of 1913, by Gustav Hahn

One hundred years ago today the Great Meteor Procession of 1913 occurred, a sky event described by some as “magnificent” and “entrancing” and which left people feeling “spellbound” and “privileged”. Because one had to be in a right location, outside, and under clear skies, only about 1,000 people noted seeing the procession. Lucky sky gazers — particularly those near Toronto, Canada — had their eyes drawn to an amazing train of bright meteors streaming across the sky, in groups, over the course of a few minutes. A current leading progenitor hypothesis is that a single large meteor once grazed the Earth’s atmosphere and broke up. When the resulting pieces next encountered the Earth, they came in over south-central Canada, traveled thousands of kilometers as they crossed over the northeastern USA, and eventually fell into the central Atlantic ocean. Pictured above is a digital scan of a halftone hand-tinted image by the artist Gustav Hahn who was fortunate enough to witness the event first hand.

Continue reading The Great Meteor Procession of 1913, by Gustav Hahn

Call to Artists from Nature...Why? Krakatoa's explosion in 1883 put a new spark in art!

Watching the PBS Newshour last night, I was struck by a follow-up interview after coverage of Iceland’s volcano eruption where Jeffrey Brown spoke with Simon Winchester, author of “Krakatoa: The Day the World Exploded.” (view the video here) Among other interesting facts about the many ways that massive eruption in 1883 affected mankind, he said the intense and lovely sunsets it created resulted in some very interesting art. William Ashcroft of England sat by the River Thames and painted one sunset after another, one every 10 minutes, until he had about 500 of them! Almost like creating animation cells or time-lapse photography, the sequence, now on display at the Natural History Museum in London, shows the incredible colors and their movement across the sky at that time.

Volcanic Skies over Brielle, Netherlands, captured by Dennis Put, Apr. 14, 2010

As it turns out, Edvard Munch said “The Scream” was

Continue reading Call to Artists from Nature…Why? Krakatoa’s explosion in 1883 put a new spark in art!