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Sandi Whetzel’s Wine-Inspired Art: A Visual Elixir of Seductive Twists on Wine

Wine on the Vine ©Sandi Whetzel  For Details, click

(Please PIN THIS IMAGE FROM THE SITE ABOVE, NOT FROM HERE, to properly link it back to that source)

The Pacific Northwest’s regard for wine inspires me to celebrate the wine experience in my contemporary acrylic paintings. My images mirror the emotions, romance, fantasies or whimsy that consumption of wine fosters. My passion for sensual, curvy, shapes and scintillating color flows into the graceful wine vessels and alluring human forms infused in my creations.
I explore how to tickle viewers senses in ways they have not seen in typical wine-themed art. I imagine surprising, surreal wine scenarios: Sensual. Seductive. Tantalizing. Romantic. Playful. It’s almost as if I produce advertisements for the wine industry.
Cropping my wine narratives to a close-up of the pertinent elements dramatically zooms-in on an intimate view of the novel event —It suggests an engaging storyline and some mystery for the viewer. I think people are looking for a simple elegance in artwork that separates it from the ordinary. That is my goal in blending fantasy with reality. I aim to grab the viewers’ attention: “Wow! I’ve never seen anything like that!”
Most people don’t realize how much thought, creativity and risk of failure goes into each painting.  Like grapevines selected for wine production, the idea for a painting is nurtured, allowed to grow and take form through pruning and reshaping. As with wine after the harvest, the images are distilled and refined before they are served up for enjoyment. My art is a visual elixirof seductive, unexpected twistson wine.
My fascination with uncommon wine themes began when I competed creatively to promote a premiere wine event. Before this challenge, I created sensual floras, usually from some form of visual inspiration. The only inspiration this time was an imposed“Wine on the Vine” theme. I pondered all the “typical” wine images I had seen, but I wanted an exceptional conceptto illustrate that theme.
As a starting point, I considered abstract wine bottles among grapevines. While sketching some robust, curvaceous wine bottles, I got a brainsmack! I could encase a cluster of grapes inside open wine bottles growing from grapevines! I was juiced!
As I continued sketching, ideas for the painting flowed — glistening highlights, colored reflections and shadows in the grapes, bottles, and leaves revealed form and transparency. I added a pearly textured moon with light radiating around it into an evening sky. The wind-blown grape leaves, climbing tendrils and the skewed placement of the wind-tossed bottles, echoed the radiating pattern of the moonlit sky. It was an elegant, serene, scene that said, “Wine on the Vine” just about as well as anything could, in my opinion.
That experience, creating something entirely from my imagination, taught me what can bewhen I trust my imagination to lead me. Because that painting was so popular, I created more wine paintings. My wine images promoted the 2004 Art About Wine Exhibit, the 2005 Umpqua Valley Wine, Art & Music Festival and the Umpqua Valley Winegrowers Greatest of the Grapein 2006, 2011 and 2013. In 2009, one of my wine images won a wine label design contest for the Downtown Initiative for Visual Arts, (DIVA) in Eugene, OR.
When viewers connect emotionally with my art, when they experience it, the art is complete. I hope people feel about my art the way they feel about good wine — I hope it elicits pleasure and enhances your life experience.
See more of Sandi Whetzel’s art here

Continue reading Sandi Whetzel’s Wine-Inspired Art: A Visual Elixir of Seductive Twists on Wine

Sandi Whetzel’s Wine-Inspired Art: A Visual Elixir of Seductive Twists on Wine

Wine on the Vine ©Sandi Whetzel  For Details, click

(Please PIN THIS IMAGE FROM THE SITE ABOVE, NOT FROM HERE, to properly link it back to that source)

The Pacific Northwest’s regard for wine inspires me to celebrate the wine experience in my contemporary acrylic paintings. My images mirror the emotions, romance, fantasies or whimsy that consumption of wine fosters. My passion for sensual, curvy, shapes and scintillating color flows into the graceful wine vessels and alluring human forms infused in my creations.
I explore how to tickle viewers senses in ways they have not seen in typical wine-themed art. I imagine surprising, surreal wine scenarios: Sensual. Seductive. Tantalizing. Romantic. Playful. It’s almost as if I produce advertisements for the wine industry.
Cropping my wine narratives to a close-up of the pertinent elements dramatically zooms-in on an intimate view of the novel event —It suggests an engaging storyline and some mystery for the viewer. I think people are looking for a simple elegance in artwork that separates it from the ordinary. That is my goal in blending fantasy with reality. I aim to grab the viewers’ attention: “Wow! I’ve never seen anything like that!”
Most people don’t realize how much thought, creativity and risk of failure goes into each painting.  Like grapevines selected for wine production, the idea for a painting is nurtured, allowed to grow and take form through pruning and reshaping. As with wine after the harvest, the images are distilled and refined before they are served up for enjoyment. My art is a visual elixirof seductive, unexpected twistson wine.
My fascination with uncommon wine themes began when I competed creatively to promote a premiere wine event. Before this challenge, I created sensual floras, usually from some form of visual inspiration. The only inspiration this time was an imposed“Wine on the Vine” theme. I pondered all the “typical” wine images I had seen, but I wanted an exceptional conceptto illustrate that theme.
As a starting point, I considered abstract wine bottles among grapevines. While sketching some robust, curvaceous wine bottles, I got a brainsmack! I could encase a cluster of grapes inside open wine bottles growing from grapevines! I was juiced!
As I continued sketching, ideas for the painting flowed — glistening highlights, colored reflections and shadows in the grapes, bottles, and leaves revealed form and transparency. I added a pearly textured moon with light radiating around it into an evening sky. The wind-blown grape leaves, climbing tendrils and the skewed placement of the wind-tossed bottles, echoed the radiating pattern of the moonlit sky. It was an elegant, serene, scene that said, “Wine on the Vine” just about as well as anything could, in my opinion.
That experience, creating something entirely from my imagination, taught me what can bewhen I trust my imagination to lead me. Because that painting was so popular, I created more wine paintings. My wine images promoted the 2004 Art About Wine Exhibit, the 2005 Umpqua Valley Wine, Art & Music Festival and the Umpqua Valley Winegrowers Greatest of the Grapein 2006, 2011 and 2013. In 2009, one of my wine images won a wine label design contest for the Downtown Initiative for Visual Arts, (DIVA) in Eugene, OR.
When viewers connect emotionally with my art, when they experience it, the art is complete. I hope people feel about my art the way they feel about good wine — I hope it elicits pleasure and enhances your life experience.
See more of Sandi Whetzel’s art here

Continue reading Sandi Whetzel’s Wine-Inspired Art: A Visual Elixir of Seductive Twists on Wine

My Art Copied in Las Vegas Without My Permission: Should I Be Upset? What Was the Outcome?

Wine Affair ©Sandi Whetzel
Wino Wine Bottle

Imagine my surprise when I saw that a Las Vegas business intended to use an obvious imitation of my painting, Wine Affair, (above left) for one of their events.  For a nominal fee the restaurant and painting studio provides painting materials to guests who are guided through a re-creation of the featured painting of the evening.  Participants paint, socialize and dine on gourmet foods and partake of alcoholic beverages offered for purchase. What a novel concept for introducing people to a “painting experience” while capitalizing on the sale of food and beverages during the event!  It sounds like a lot of fun.  Above right, is the featured painting they intended to be re-created at the painting event April 17th, 2013.  Is it inspired by my painting?  Is it a copy of my painting?  I’d be interested in what you think.

I think there are too many obvious similarities in the two paintings to leave any doubt this version was copied from my painting.  First, I know my painting is an original.   I created it out of my head from scratch in 2010.  I had not seen anything like it anywhere before.  The goblet is from my cupboard, but I painted it abstractly.  I worked long and hard on several sketches of the goblet before settling on its shapely placement.
                          
The treatment, shapes and placement of the goblet, bottle and moon are nearly identical.  The swirls in and around the moon and around the bottle are another giveaway.  The colors and their placement in the bottle closely resemble those in my wine bottle.  The painter chose to use a shorter canvas format and alter the angles of the goblet slightly in an effort to change their version and avoid copyright infringement.  However, as complicated as it is to determine copyright infringement, one guideline is:

The test of an infringement is whether an ordinary person would determine that one work is copied from the other; the copying need not be exact.
My first gut reaction when I saw this painting was to smile and feel good that somebody was so inspired by my Wine Affair  painting that they wished to create their version of it for use in their business.  The familiar quote, “Imitation is the sincerest form of flattery” came to mind.  I had to laugh at the mere prospect  that my work might be famous enough to be copied!  If I had thought this imitation would reduce my ability to profit from reproductions of my painting, I would have been furious and demanded recourse.  However, I did not feel it would be a threat to the sale of my original or reproductions of it. 
Wino Wine Bottle is a playful piece.  The sad thing about this imitation is that several sacrifices in the re-design of the painting were made, either in an attempt to differentiate it from my painting, or maybe the artist just didn’t know about more aesthetically pleasing elements of design.  Even sadder is that they would have been encouraging their class participants to repeat those design flaws by copying the mistakes.  
Crowding the bottle and the moon too closely to the top of the canvas and squeezing the bottom of the goblet and bottle too close to the bottom of the canvas makes the composition look awkward and amateurish.   The weight of the goblet and bottle appear to be falling through the bottom of the canvas.
Allowing the goblet to share its edge with the curving silhouette of the bottle creates another awkward “crowded” sensation. One of the objects should be placed behind the other, or leaving some space between them would avoid the awkward look.  I also feel that the color of the wine next to the harsh white of the goblet appears garish.
If I were a vindictive person, I might have seen an opportunity to go after this business for their copyright infringement and possibly be awarded a large sum of money.  In this situation, I don’t feel it would have been worth the frustration.  What do you think? You can either email me your thoughts from the link at the right sidebar, or you can use the comments section below this post.

EPILOGUE:  Right after I first posted this blog I started thinking about the repercussions of having copied  versions of my painting floating around the country and the internet if the business had used it.  If people saw the copy and then saw my Wine Affair original, might someone question whether I had copied Wino Wine Bottle instead of it being the opposite situation?  And was it fair for participants not to know they were copying copyrighted art?  I also wondered how many other artists’ work might be exploited if I kept silent.   I contacted the restaurant and studio to inform them of their copyright infringement.  I am happy to report, they have ceased advertising Wino Wine Bottle as the featured painting and will not use it for their event. 

By the way, the original of Wine Affair  and reproductions of it and other of my paintings are available at my new print-on-demand website .   sensual wine art art

Continue reading My Art Copied in Las Vegas Without My Permission: Should I Be Upset? What Was the Outcome?

My Art Copied in Las Vegas Without My Permission: Should I Be Upset? What Was the Outcome?

Wine Affair ©Sandi Whetzel
Wino Wine Bottle

Imagine my surprise when I saw that a Las Vegas business intended to use an obvious imitation of my painting, Wine Affair, (above left) for one of their events.  For a nominal fee the restaurant and painting studio provides painting materials to guests who are guided through a re-creation of the featured painting of the evening.  Participants paint, socialize and dine on gourmet foods and partake of alcoholic beverages offered for purchase. What a novel concept for introducing people to a “painting experience” while capitalizing on the sale of food and beverages during the event!  It sounds like a lot of fun.  Above right, is the featured painting they intended to be re-created at the painting event April 17th, 2013.  Is it inspired by my painting?  Is it a copy of my painting?  I’d be interested in what you think.

I think there are too many obvious similarities in the two paintings to leave any doubt this version was copied from my painting.  First, I know my painting is an original.   I created it out of my head from scratch in 2010.  I had not seen anything like it anywhere before.  The goblet is from my cupboard, but I painted it abstractly.  I worked long and hard on several sketches of the goblet before settling on its shapely placement.
                          
The treatment, shapes and placement of the goblet, bottle and moon are nearly identical.  The swirls in and around the moon and around the bottle are another giveaway.  The colors and their placement in the bottle closely resemble those in my wine bottle.  The painter chose to use a shorter canvas format and alter the angles of the goblet slightly in an effort to change their version and avoid copyright infringement.  However, as complicated as it is to determine copyright infringement, one guideline is:

The test of an infringement is whether an ordinary person would determine that one work is copied from the other; the copying need not be exact.
My first gut reaction when I saw this painting was to smile and feel good that somebody was so inspired by my Wine Affair  painting that they wished to create their version of it for use in their business.  The familiar quote, “Imitation is the sincerest form of flattery” came to mind.  I had to laugh at the mere prospect  that my work might be famous enough to be copied!  If I had thought this imitation would reduce my ability to profit from reproductions of my painting, I would have been furious and demanded recourse.  However, I did not feel it would be a threat to the sale of my original or reproductions of it. 
Wino Wine Bottle is a playful piece.  The sad thing about this imitation is that several sacrifices in the re-design of the painting were made, either in an attempt to differentiate it from my painting, or maybe the artist just didn’t know about more aesthetically pleasing elements of design.  Even sadder is that they would have been encouraging their class participants to repeat those design flaws by copying the mistakes.  
Crowding the bottle and the moon too closely to the top of the canvas and squeezing the bottom of the goblet and bottle too close to the bottom of the canvas makes the composition look awkward and amateurish.   The weight of the goblet and bottle appear to be falling through the bottom of the canvas.
Allowing the goblet to share its edge with the curving silhouette of the bottle creates another awkward “crowded” sensation. One of the objects should be placed behind the other, or leaving some space between them would avoid the awkward look.  I also feel that the color of the wine next to the harsh white of the goblet appears garish.
If I were a vindictive person, I might have seen an opportunity to go after this business for their copyright infringement and possibly be awarded a large sum of money.  In this situation, I don’t feel it would have been worth the frustration.  What do you think? You can either email me your thoughts from the link at the right sidebar, or you can use the comments section below this post.

EPILOGUE:  Right after I first posted this blog I started thinking about the repercussions of having copied  versions of my painting floating around the country and the internet if the business had used it.  If people saw the copy and then saw my Wine Affair original, might someone question whether I had copied Wino Wine Bottle instead of it being the opposite situation?  And was it fair for participants not to know they were copying copyrighted art?  I also wondered how many other artists’ work might be exploited if I kept silent.   I contacted the restaurant and studio to inform them of their copyright infringement.  I am happy to report, they have ceased advertising Wino Wine Bottle as the featured painting and will not use it for their event. 

By the way, the original of Wine Affair  and reproductions of it and other of my paintings are available at my new print-on-demand website .   sensual wine art art

Continue reading My Art Copied in Las Vegas Without My Permission: Should I Be Upset? What Was the Outcome?

An Artful Valentine to My Art Fans: Abstraction, Romance, Elegance and Simplicity Revealed in My Recent Art

An Invitation to Romance 12×24 acrylic © Sandi Whetzel

How can abstraction and romance, elegance and simplicity all be used to describe my most recent paintings?  These terms may seem somewhat contradictory, but they are all revealed in my three most recent paintings.  Let me explain…

The first one, An Invitation to Romance, definitely suggests romance with the strewn rose petals leading the way to the elegant goblet and bottle of wine, waiting to be served up.  The drama of the elegant evening colors against the black and atmospheric blues is devoid of distracting, extraneous elements. This drama and simplicity, exude romance and eleganceby design.

Wine Dream 16×20 acrylic ©Sandi Whetzel

The second image, Wine Dream, is an abstraction of a wine pour in a delicate goblet shape that forms a woman bathing in wineful bliss.  Yes, the goblet itself is actually missing; adding to the abstraction of the piece.  The simplicity and drama of the red, gold and black, as well as the shapely woman could inspire romance. This concept, so minimal in design, needed more elements.  I decided to add the metallic gold and red ribbon-like strips and the red sentimental  words to add some more simplicity, elegance, romance and abstraction elements to the piece.

The third image, Simply Wine!, an abstraction of a wine bottle and goblets is a simple, contemporary design with minimal detail.  It’s that simplicity of design against the dramatic black background that gives it abstraction and elegance.
                                                          

Simply Wine! 12×24 acrylic ©Sandi Whetzel

So, to all my loyal art fans, I want to wish you a happy Valentines Day.  I hope I’ve inspired you to put a little romance into your life; even if it’s only to look at some contemporary romantic art.  That’s my Valentine’s gift to you.

I’ve included the fourth image, Grape de Menthe, because it is an abstraction of grapes and because the Umpqua Valley Winegrowers have selected it to promote the “Greatest of the Grape” event March 2nd.  To learn the inspiration behind that painting and details of the “Greatest of the Grape”, http://bit.ly/14TuaXk

To see more of Sandi’s art and order originals and reproductions in various print options,  visit Sandi’s website

 Follow @artistsandi

 wine bottle art

Continue reading An Artful Valentine to My Art Fans: Abstraction, Romance, Elegance and Simplicity Revealed in My Recent Art

Tantalizing, Artistic Wine Pairing at 2012 UV Wine, Art & Music Festival

“Mmm …” 12×24 acrylic ©Sandi Whetzel
Originally uploaded by sandiwhetzel

This tempting, sensual wine pairing will make it’s artistic debut at the 43rd Annual Umqqua Valley Wine, Art and Music Festival in Roseburg, OR, Sept. 8 and 9, 2012.

“Mmm …”  he’s thinking as he reaches for the wine bottle.  But what is she thinking?  If you could see a close-up of her facial expression she might be thinking, “Mmm, he’s cute. I’m looking forward to him choosing me.” Or, she could be thinking, “Mmm, could he be the one? Should I submit, or hold out for a better offer?”  It just might be a shift in the power play between them.  What’s your wine fantasy?

When I came up with this concept for my most recent painting, I realized it was a pretty simple composition that needed a little more detail other than the man’s hand reaching for the beautiful wine on a plain table. The addition of the checkered table cloth provided the necessary detail, as well as a little Italian restaurant ambiance.  In the bargain, the treatment of the table cloth added a sense of depth perception leading up to the wine bottle and beyond.  You might not realize how much thought and planning is required in the composition and execution of paintings I dream up.

Besides great wine and food and various artisan creations, festival attendees will be treated to thrilling music performances by the Lloyd Jones Band, DK Stewart Band, and Velvet Whiskey.  For entertainment schedules, directions and ticket information visit here

Admission to the festival Saturday, from 11 am – 10 pm is $10 and Sunday from 11 am – 5 pm is $5.  Children ages 12 and under are admitted free.  There will be free wine sensory and cooking with wine classes, as well as the Cool Rides Car Show.  Other activities include Umpqua’s Got Talent Finals, Motorcycle Show, Wiener Dog Races, German Band, Wineries, various Artisans, Beer and Food Booths and Family Fun Activities.

Lloyd Jones, Portland, OR roots artist, combines New Orleans rhythms, the simplicity of Memphis music and the rawness of the blues, all for the 21st century.  This music is not about louder and faster.  It’s about time, meter and groove.

DK Stewart has been a guiding force behind several North West bands that have gone on to national acclaim.  Tributes to New Orleans, Chicago blues, East coast swing and rockin’ boogie woogie can be heard in all the original music by this thrilling band.

If you attend this festival I hope you’ll stop by to see my art in my booth 10A and introduce yourself.  I’ll be serving up 6 new refreshing varietals among my growing series of wine acrylic paintings.  It will be a dose of visual intoxication without guilt or consequences. You can see more of my art here

Continue reading Tantalizing, Artistic Wine Pairing at 2012 UV Wine, Art & Music Festival

Tantalizing, Artistic Wine Pairing at 2012 UV Wine, Art & Music Festival

“Mmm …” 12×24 acrylic ©Sandi Whetzel Originally uploaded by sandiwhetzelThis tempting, sensual wine pairing will make it’s artistic debut at the 43rd Annual Umqqua Valley Wine, Art and Music Festival in Roseburg, OR, Sept. 8 and 9, 2012.”Mmm …”&nb…

Continue reading Tantalizing, Artistic Wine Pairing at 2012 UV Wine, Art & Music Festival