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Gene Black & Bret Levick at Platt Anderson Cellars

Saturday, April 13 from 6:00 to 8:00 pm. Platt Anderson Cellars (located in Ashland Art Center). Gene and Bret will be playing some of your fave tunes, including orignals. Great Music/Great Wine… see you there!

Artists and Inspiration

That Stuck Place

Collage Artist Susanne Petermann recently wondered what other artists do when inspiration isn’t forthcoming. Here are some tips from a few Ashland Art Center studio artists, on what they do when they get stuck:

Susanne Petermann: Working on a collage, I often reach a point that one friend of mine used to call “craft stress.” Well, to me, collage isn’t exactlly craft, but the idea stuck with me. How well I know that feeling of overthinking a particular piece, but continuing to work at it anyway!

Denise Kester: I try to make decisions about art from my belly, not my head. When I get stuck while doing a piece of art, I take three deep breaths into my belly.  This gets me out of my head and into my body. My body knows what to do. My head just asks a lot of questions, has doubts, worries, and overrides what my belly and heart know.

Katherine Dron: Go back to the books.  Look at the professionals’ strategies and see how they solved certain problems.  Either online or in my library.

Dana Feagin: I put the piece aside and start something new. Most paintings go through that “it’s-not-worth-working-on” phase.  Then I just take a break and come back to it later. Usually I have 7-8 paintings I’m working on, to allow dry time between sessions, and also for this weird struggle period.

Marta Marthas: 1. I go for a walk to help my body and mind relax. 2. I work on a different piece for a while. 3. If I am stuck for longer periods, I consult another artist for help or advice, because another point of view is useful in working through being stuck.

Darlene Southworth: I set the piece aside where I can see it. I work on something else, but look at it every few days (for up to a year). I revise it or take it apart.

Jo Ann Manzone: I’ve learned to walk away from the piece I’m working on and do something else that allows my mind to be still.  From that stillness comes ideas.

Carolee Buck: 1. Turn it upside down. 2. Show it to Elaine [Frenett]. 3. Do something to change my focus, like walk, doodle, read, or go outside.

Marcy Greene: I take a new piece of paper, slather it with paint, and just start scribbling.

Thank you Sanctuary One: Our March Community Sponsor

Meet Sanctuary One staff and volunteers at the Art Center on First Friday, March 1 and find out more about the upcoming “Year of the Pig.” celebration. Ashland Art Center is partnering with Sanctuary One for this fun-filled event in June, a special day to help animals and support local artists too!

Sanctuary One:
People, Animals & the Earth.
Better Together.

At Sanctuary One, people of all ages have the opportunity to volunteer on a real working farm and experience nature’s healing power firsthand. We offer educational tours that open people’s hearts and minds. We invite groups from schools and youth-serving nonprofit organizations to visit the farm for fresh air, exercise and hands-on service-learning. We help teens who are in legal trouble learn how to make better choices. We mentor interns who dream of becoming the next generation of care farmers. We promote the ethics of mindful, sustainable living. And we provide a safe, loving home to rescued farm animals and pets. It’s all part of a practice called care farming.

Care farms like Sanctuary One demonstrate how farming for health can be an affordable, natural and effective means of healing people. They serve as models for treating animals humanely and honoring their intrinsic physical and spiritual value. And they illustrate how the environment that sustains us all can be steadily improved through organic and permaculture-inspired farming practices.

At Sanctuary One, we envision a future where care farms are as commonplace in the United States as they are in Europe. For example, in the Netherlands there are more than 1,000 established care farms. Great Britain has hundreds, and there are dozens more in other European countries. We hope to enliven and motivate our visitors at Sanctuary One and, ultimately, inspire more Americans to start up care farms in their communities.

For more information visit: https://sanctuaryone.org

Thank you Sanctuary One: Our March Community Sponsor

Meet Sanctuary One staff and volunteers at the Art Center on First Friday, March 1 and find out more about the upcoming “Year of the Pig.” celebration. Ashland Art Center is partnering with Sanctuary One for this fun-filled event in June, a special day to help animals and support local artists too!

Sanctuary One:
People, Animals & the Earth.
Better Together.

At Sanctuary One, people of all ages have the opportunity to volunteer on a real working farm and experience nature’s healing power firsthand. We offer educational tours that open people’s hearts and minds. We invite groups from schools and youth-serving nonprofit organizations to visit the farm for fresh air, exercise and hands-on service-learning. We help teens who are in legal trouble learn how to make better choices. We mentor interns who dream of becoming the next generation of care farmers. We promote the ethics of mindful, sustainable living. And we provide a safe, loving home to rescued farm animals and pets. It’s all part of a practice called care farming.

Care farms like Sanctuary One demonstrate how farming for health can be an affordable, natural and effective means of healing people. They serve as models for treating animals humanely and honoring their intrinsic physical and spiritual value. And they illustrate how the environment that sustains us all can be steadily improved through organic and permaculture-inspired farming practices.

At Sanctuary One, we envision a future where care farms are as commonplace in the United States as they are in Europe. For example, in the Netherlands there are more than 1,000 established care farms. Great Britain has hundreds, and there are dozens more in other European countries. We hope to enliven and motivate our visitors at Sanctuary One and, ultimately, inspire more Americans to start up care farms in their communities.

For more information visit: https://sanctuaryone.org

The Emerging Artists Gallery

On March 1st from 5:00 pm to 8:00 pm, culinary artists from both Ashland Middle School and High School will be displaying and serving in the gallery and classroom. We invite the community to come out and support our budding young artists.

Plant an artist, watch them grow.
As part of our new Emerging Artist youth program, the main gallery now features a space for children and young adults to exhibit and sell their artwork among our other showcasing artists.

The Art Center is passionate about providing a nurturing environment where our community’s youth can explore their creative skills and seek professional development early on. Our classes are affordable and meet a variety of budgets with scholarships provided for those in need.

Our Community’s youth is our future, we invite you to come and add your support!

Fiber Artist Jo Ann Manzone

Host David “Glamour Dave” Nienow interviews Ashland Art Center artist Jo Ann Manzone to discuss the art process in the production of her artwork.

Click here to view the entire interview with Jo Ann.

“My love of fiber began at an early age when I learned to knit and sew.  In my many years as a fiber artist and felter, I have made clothing and accessories for celebrities, galleries and markets.  My work is influenced by the ever changing fashion of the 60’s.  I have  taught felting workshops and retreats in various locations, including Create Mixed Media Retreats in Southern California, private women’s groups on the West Coast, in The Design Studio and at  Ashland Art Center.  I have also taught felting classes at the local sewing guild conference and love teaching felt making to children and at-risk teens.  I have had the opportunity to study under the guidance of Polly Sterling, who along with her partner Sachiko Kotaka invented nuno felt process.  I have been playing with natural dyes and botanical printing to create beautiful pieces of fabric and scarves.

Most days, I can be found in my working studio at Ashland Art Center, 357 E. Main where I create and teach my favorite felting and printing techniques. My creative focus is on combining natural elements with my felt and fabric to create unique textiles”.
~ Jo Ann Manzone

Rogue Artisans and Crafters is a public access show produced through Rogue Valley Community Television, RVTV in Ashland, Oregon. The show is a 1/2 hour talk show that gives exposure to local artists in Southern Oregon and can be seen on Channel 15 on the Ashland Home Network. Viewing is available for the rest of Southern Oregon via Charter Cable on Channel 182. 

The Ashland Forge- Our February Community Partner

Dennis DeBey, operates the Ashland Forge. A Los Angeles native, Denny came to Ashland in 1969 from Humboldt State College, seeking a master’s degree in Outdoor Education at Southern Oregon College, with a goal of being a naturalist.

In a chance encounter, DeBey met master blacksmith Al Bart here and got mentored for several months, picking up a good foundation for a career. The work furthered his values of simplicity and kindness to the planet, as he was able to recycle and re-purpose castoff metal and find antiquated tools with lots of life left in them.

For 44 years DeBey has been standing, hammer in hand, over his 2,400-degree forge and anvil, creating iron art and fixing the broken stuff of everyday life — wood stoves, gates, rails, statues, candelabras — things that would otherwise end up in the dump in a throwaway society such as ours.

Thank you Denny for supporting your community of fellow artists at Ashland Art Center.

Ashland’s First Friday Art Walk, February 1, 2019 from 5 to 8 PM

Ashland Gallery Association Exhibit Openings & Artist Receptions

First Friday Art Walk, February 1st from 5 to 8 PM

Stroll the galleries and take in the visual delights in downtown Ashland and the Historic Railroad District.  Enjoy this free year-round community event, filled with a diverse array of artwork, live music, artist demonstrations, refreshments and lively conversation!

For more information about all of our exhibits and to download the February Gallery Tour map, please visit: www.ashlandgalleries.com  

Ashland Gallery Association – February Spotlight Exhibits

Hanson Howard Gallery

40th Anniversary: Works from the Collection of Hanson Howard Gallery

2019 is our 40th anniversary and that has us feeling like taking a trip down memory lane. Over the years, the gallery has amassed a healthy collection of exceptional regional artists who have at some point been represented by us. Was there an artist that you loved and no longer see at the gallery? Maybe you wish you had collected one of their works.  Now you may have a second chance.

Join us in February for an exhibition of works from the Hanson Howard Collection made available for purchase at original prices, maybe even with some flexibility as we may have held onto a little too much work….who can blame us?!

Show runs February 1st – 26th.  Opens First Friday, February 1st, 5-8 pm.

Judy Howard, “Park Shadows”

Judy Howard, “Park Shadows”

Photographers’ Gallery

Featuring Debra Harder

Debra Harder’s new show, The Comforts of Home, opens on Friday, February 1st at The Photographers’ Gallery At The Ashland Art Center.  

Photographing in the comforts of home on cold winter days is one of Debra’s favorite things to do.  She enjoys creating still life scenes reminiscent of old paintings.  These images include some of her beloved possessions such as her collection of English White Ironstone.  The natural light streaming in from nearby windows is all that is needed to “paint” the items being photographed.  Debra’s still life images truly reflect her personal style not only in photography but also in her home.

Debra Harder, “Two Pears and a Book”, photograph

Debra Harder, “Two Pears and a Book”, photograph

Shepherd’s Dream

“Pictorial Lullabye” Paintings by Lindy Kehoe

Lindy Kehoe’s fantastical illustration style is its own mythos. This Pittsburgh native received her B.F.A in 2001 at Ohio University. Her adventurous spirit led her to the West Coast in 2005, where she began exhibiting with the Visionary Artist Community. She has been living on the Rogue River in S. Oregon with her California-born husband who has been a deep inspiration to her work. Landscapes depicting dreamy characters and animals can be seen throughout her paintings.  Lindy works in a variety of mediums, including oils, acrylics, ink and watercolor, as well as, graphite.  Her intention of creation is steeped in the celebration of the child-heart wonder.  Lindy also has expertise in live painting during her exhibitions and this month is no exception. 

She says of her work…”My work is inspired by serendipity, a momentary feeling of interconnected magic, that often feels like a dream.  I am motivated to create images that bring peaceful energy to the viewer, a place of remembrance, a place of innocence.  The Oracular tendency keeps me fascinated by the mystical process.” 

She will be joined by a special musician of her choice and a foodie to round out our February event.   

Lindy Kehoe, painting

Lindy Kehoe, painting

Ashland Art Center

Shades of Blue:  Dyeing with Indigo

Studio Artist Shared Exhibit, “Shades of Blue,” features Marta Marthas, Jo Ann Manzone, Peggy Biskar, Janine Twining and Gayle Erbe-Hamlin.

This group of studio artists at Ashland Art Center share a passion for textile design and using natural dyes, especially Indigo. They explore multiple ways of using Indigo hues in their textile art.

Botanical sources of the blue dye, Indigo, have been used for thousands of years by people of many cultures to color natural fibers. This exhibit will demonstrate the wide color range that can be achieved with natural Indigo dyes and outline the process used to dye with Indigo plants. Handmade garments and textile wall art pieces dyed with Indigo will be featured.

Featured Gallery Artist: Jennifer Anne Nelson

Show: Freed from the Halls of Amenti

Medium: eco oil paint, soldering iron, ink

 

Jennifer Anne holds a B.A. degree from UC Berkeley in Art Practice, and is currently living in southern Oregon where she is a gallery artist at The Ashland Art Center. Her artworks investigate the mysteries transcribed in ancient legends, working in partnership with the materials to allow archetypes, symbols, and wild landscapes to emerge.

Jo Ann Manzone, print, Rust

Jo Ann Manzone, print, Rust

 

Please see the attached “Spotlight Exhibits” and February Gallery Tour Map: 

Download (PDF, Unknown)

Thank you for your support of the Visual Arts in our communities!

Carolee Buck Art Exhibit in February

Ashland Art Center Artist, Carolee Buck is showing her work in February at LaBaguette Music Cafe. Her original Oil Paintings of animals and landscapes from Africa, Micronesia, England and the Netherlands will be on display.
Cafe hours are Monday-Saturday 7am to 2 pm with a breakfast and lunch menu.
Lite dinner menu during evening performances.
LA BAGUETTE MUSIC CAFE & BAKERY 340 A STREET, ASHLAND
labaguettemusiccafe.com
(541) 482-0855

PHOTO: Carolee Buck and Merrill Smith (owner La Baguette Cafe)

First Friday music with Hollis Peach

Jan. 4 – 5:30 pm to 7:30 pm NO COVER

Hollis Peach, an Indie Songwriting & Vocal Duo, creates not only exceptional music, but also an extended community of artists, students, & performers. Their musical arrangements and harmonies are lush, intricate, and often hypnotic in their elegance. Kenneth Pattengale, of the Grammy-nominated The Milk Carton Kids, describes Dan as, “…a monster guitar player.” And this is true, as their phrasing artistically expresses in the cleverest and subtlest of ways.

Daniel has been performing (guitar & banjo) with world-renowned theatre company Oregon Shakespeare Festival, in their production of OKLAHOMA! Which has gotten reviews in the New York Times, PBS NEWS HOUR, NPR’s Here & Now etc…After theatre season they will be touring in promotion of their second release, “Sun Sits Low,” with crowd favorites Yukon River & St. Jude’s Fire. Eager to give back and be of service to the larger community Daniel also teaches at Southern Oregon University.

They’ve also started a songwriting/performing movement called the Ashland Folk Collective | www.ashlandfolkcollective.com. “We want artist’s to make a living wage when they come to Ashland, we are doing our part to create a new culture around music and it’s patronage,” says Jacqui. As founders of the Collective they’ve performed and produced with/for Shook Twins, Rainbow Girls, John Craigie, Max Gomez, Sean Rowe, John Stickley, Anna Tivel…and more.

See more at hollispeach.com