Trending Articles

Friends of SOAR

For great posts about the business of art, check out The Artsy Shark HERE!
ArtistsBillofRights.org reviews competitions and appeals seeking creative content, listing those that respect your copyrights and highlighting those that don't. Art Matters! publishes calls to artists, and not all of them may be compliant with ABoR's standards. Visit their site to learn more.
We support the Embedded Metadata Manifesto.  Metadata is information such as copyright notice and contact info you can embed in your images to protect your intellectual property, save time when uploading to social sites and promote your art. Click to visit the site and learn more.

The Best Advice For Plein Air Painting Artist EVER !

In this video Stefan Baumann talks to his students and give them The Best Advice For Plein Air Painting Artist EVER !
Inspiring Millions to paint outdoors This video is about Touch Move and Inspire. Get a free Book at his website www.StefanBaumann.com. The paintings of Stefan Baumann reveal the true spirit of nature by transporting the viewer to distant lands that have gone unseen and undisturbed. With the huge success of Baumann’s weekly PBS television series “The Grand View: America’s National Parks through the Eyes of an Artist,” millions of people witness for themselves the magic Stefan portrays on canvas, his passion for nature and the American landscape. By distilling his love of nature into a luminous painting of brilliant, saturated color that transcends conventional landscape and wildlife art, Baumann has captured the hearts and imaginations of a generation. Each painting becomes an experience rather than merely a picture – a vivid manifestation of his special and personal union with nature and the outdoor world. Through his mastery of light, color and artful composition, Baumann invites you to experience nature in its purity. It is no wonder that for many years distinguished American collectors, including former presidents and financial icons, have sought out his work.

The post The Best Advice For Plein Air Painting Artist EVER ! appeared first on Stefan Baumann – The Grand View: Paintings by Stefan Baumann.

Plein Air Painting Tips and Great Advice

Inspiring Millions to paint outdoors This video is about Touch Move and Inspire. Get a free Book at his website www.StefanBaumann.com. The paintings of Stefan Baumann reveal the true spirit of nature by transporting the viewer to distant lands that have gone unseen and undisturbed. With the huge success of Baumann’s weekly PBS television series “The Grand View: America’s National Parks through the Eyes of an Artist,” millions of people witness for themselves the magic Stefan portrays on canvas, his passion for nature and the American landscape. By distilling his love of nature into a luminous painting of brilliant, saturated color that transcends conventional landscape and wildlife art, Baumann has captured the hearts and imaginations of a generation. Each painting becomes an experience rather than merely a picture – a vivid manifestation of his special and personal union with nature and the outdoor world. Through his mastery of light, color and artful composition, Baumann invites you to experience nature in its purity. It is no wonder that for many years distinguished American collectors, including former presidents and financial icons, have sought out his work.

The post Plein Air Painting Tips and Great Advice appeared first on Stefan Baumann – The Grand View: Paintings by Stefan Baumann.

The Fine Art of Painting With Palette Knife with Stefan Baumann

The Fine Art of Painting With Palette Knife Inspiring Millions to paint outdoors This video is about Touch Move and Inspire. Get a free Book at his website www.StefanBaumann.com. The paintings of Stefan Baumann reveal the true spirit of nature by transporting the viewer to distant lands that have gone unseen and undisturbed. With the huge success of Baumann’s weekly PBS television series “The Grand View: America’s National Parks through the Eyes of an Artist,” millions of people witness for themselves the magic Stefan portrays on canvas, his passion for nature and the American landscape. By distilling his love of nature into a luminous painting of brilliant, saturated color that transcends conventional landscape and wildlife art, Baumann has captured the hearts and imaginations of a generation. Each painting becomes an experience rather than merely a picture – a vivid manifestation of his special and personal union with nature and the outdoor world. Through his mastery of light, color and artful composition, Baumann invites you to experience nature in its purity. It is no wonder that for many years distinguished American collectors, including former presidents and financial icons, have sought out his work.

The post The Fine Art of Painting With Palette Knife with Stefan Baumann appeared first on Stefan Baumann – The Grand View: Paintings by Stefan Baumann.

New Work: Fawn’s Early Light

Stefan Baumann

Artist of the American Wilderness

“Fawns Early Light”

24 x 36 Oil on Panel By Stefan Baumann

Gallery in Mt. Shasta $9,000

-Journal Note June 13, 2017
 
“If you want to see the world for the first time, take a walk with an artist!”
I’m inspired every time I take walk in the forest located behind The Grand View Ranch and I’m always surprised at what I encounter. Often I see a family of Red Foxes running about. Once in a while I have come face to face with a black bear as he walked aimlessly through the woods, unaware of my presence until we see one another. It is an artist’s creed to live a life in harmony with the rest of the world including the animals in the forest and to experience the little effects and details that often get missed by the general public.
 
Artists are passionate about capturing insights within their soul as they ponder, digest, work through, and interpret a view that is different and often contrary to what the general public sees. Artists help others look at life differently and develop new ways of seeing what it is to be human. One can only see when the mind is open, and being present requires solitude, to travel slowly, and to absorb fully with all the senses. To see, listen, smell, and touch requires one to be comfortable with oneself. To be able to turn off the internal dialog and be one with nature requires continuous practice, and it is important to me that my paintings reflect the feelings that I feel when I go for a walk in nature.
 
After surviving a winter that kept sending us huge amounts of snow, I was impatient for spring to come and reveal the secrets hidden under the cloak of snow.  And, I’m always concerned to see the damage created by the heavy snows that weigh down the boughs of our Dogwood trees. Fallen bird’s nests remind me of the life that lived high in the branches last spring are now are scraps of straw at my feet. Spring brings renewed hope along with birds above that busily create new homes for their new families. Soon the cycle will start again.
 
Morning sunrises at The Grand View Ranch are magical. The sunlight makes its way through the fresh green leaves causing brilliant dappling effects on the forest floor. The light makes patterns that give me ideas for future paintings to create in my studio. My eyes dart over the forest floor searching for interesting natural objects to bring back to my studio to include in my wildlife paintings. I walk along a well-traveled deer path that loops around our ranch, when something catches my eye. I wander through the fallen snags of trees that could not survive the weight of the snows, stepping carefully while searching for clues that would explain what I saw.
 
Suddenly, I saw a young doe that had just given birth to twins. I watched as the mother cared for her new born fawns and played in our newly finished pasture made for our horses. It seemed that they enjoyed the new open space and I laughed as they raced from end to end playing a little game of Catch Me, Catch Me. Every year I see fawns but this is the first time that I found their lair.  Apparently the mother had ventured away to get some greens, and one of the fawns was left to hide from predators. Fawns have no sense of smell and can hold still even when confronted face to face. The dappled white spots that were on the fawn’s body mixed with the dappled light of the sun provided a great camouflage to hide in plain sight. Motionless, I stood there observing the fawn and her desperate fear for her survival while making mental notes of the setting so that I could recreate the scene on my canvas. In the distance I could hear that the mother was agitated because I was so near her fawn so I retreated into the forest. I hurried to my studio with my newly found treasures and inspiration and began this painting inspired by a baby fawn called “Fawns Early Light.”
-Stefan Baumann
Your questions and comments are always welcome!
For information on acquiring paintings, call 415-606-9074 or email: [email protected]
Purchase paintings directly through my secure website at www.StefanBaumann.com

The post New Work: Fawn’s Early Light appeared first on Stefan Baumann – The Grand View: Paintings by Stefan Baumann.

Saturday Fireside Chat – Plein Air or Studio Painting?

 stefan baumann saturday fireside chats - image of artists istting around a campfire at the grand view ranch, mt shasta, california

Plein Air or Studio Painting?Old Pump House by Stefan Baumann

This week I finished several studio paintings of the property located behind The Grand View Ranch. I have also been thinking about the hurricane in Florida and all the people who had to leave their homes to go to safer areas to wait for the storms to pass. I hope that when they return home all is not lost.

My heart goes out to all of you, and I send wishes that you all have a safe trip back home. The air in Mt. Shasta is filled with smoke like all of California and it is a constant reminder that our ranch is venerable to fire. I can relate to your fears and hope that we all are able to resume living the lives we love.

 

Around the campfire tonight, we were talking about what is preferable – Studio painting or Plein Aire painting, and I took a moment to share my thoughts.

When I first started Plein Aire painting, the term “Plein Aire” was not even used. When we painted outdoors, we called it “painting from nature.” Very few artists painted in a studio, let alone painting in nature, in Lake Tahoe where I grew up. As a child, I took painting lessons from artists who visited Lake Tahoe, and one of these teachers insisted that we paint from life. I often thought that my painting was the worst painting that was ever painted by any artist dead or alive.

My painting, “On The Truckee River” soon had the infamous reputation of being called “The Bad Dream in Green”. When my mother saw my painting, she told me that she would never pay for another art class EVER!  It’s a good thing that my mother was very kind, and before long, she forgot the incident and I was able to resume my painting classes.

Plein Aire paintings on small canvases were first created to allow the artist to sketch information at the location and then take them back to the studio to be painted on a full-sized canvas. When the “Impressionists” showed up, everything changed because they believed that the only way they could add light to the painting was to see and paint light on location. However, they were often challenged by the reality that light changes every 7 minutes.

 

Most people who want to learn how to paint on location don’t really understand that painting an oil painting outdoors in 7 minutes is impossible. Many skills are needed to paint outdoors and it is challenging to master. It requires years of practice, yards for canvas, and tenacity to learn how to paint on location. Once you learn how to paint outdoors, you have a skill that allows you see and enjoy the beauty in nature and enjoy the social connections that spring up around plein air painting,

 

Studio artists also have to master the craft of painting. Many studio artists paint from “still life” setups in the studio and others work from sketches and photos. Often, studio paintings are more crafted with brush techniques and color balance. Some studio artists do traditional paintings from sketches painted outdoors, but their works are usually larger in contrast to the many small paintings done  en Plein Aire. Also, studio paintings often demand a higher cash value when sold.

The method of painting does not matter; outdoor, in the studio or both. The important thing is that we create art, and art done any way is better than not having art in your life at all. My suggestion is to do both ~ paint in your studio and go out and see the light in the world. And if you paint outdoors, go back to your studio and expand on what you have seen – paint something bigger and grander than you have ever imagined! Art is the greatest gift that god ever granted mankind! Don’t waste it!

PS: If I had listened to my mother, I would not be writing this now!

In my classes, workshops and coaching I give answers to the question: “What is that?” Once you learn to “Paint what you See” then the next step is “Paint what You see!

 

I invite you to attend my workshop in October to get a in-depth understanding of what “Paint what You see” means, along with many more insights that will improve your art forever! 

To enroll in my October 20-21-22 2017 Workshop, type in or go to

http://www.stefanbaumann.com/register/

I have coached many students over the years. My goal as a coach is to help students discover their own style by instructing with a method that allows them to grow as they are. If you want increase your knowledge and skill to bring your art to the next level, I invite you to watch my YouTube videos, consider phone coaching with me, or attend a workshop in Mt. Shasta where we discuss art, passion and life with other artists around the campfire. All the information is on my website, www.stefanbaumann.com.

There are some openings for my workshop in October, go to my website today !

Call me for information on workshops or coaching 415-606-9074

Paint with me in Italy the fall of 2018!

The Grand View | 1151 Maple St., Hammond Ranch, CA 96069

Saturday Fireside Chat -The Best Advice Your Will Ever Get to Improve Your Paintings

 

The Very Best Advice You Will Ever Get To Improve Your Painting Luminism Baumann

We have just finished fencing our pasture so that our horses can run free and now we are ready to begin building our barn before the winter sets in. My next Plein Air Workshop takes place on October 20-21-22, just a few weeks away. We are excited to have artists paint at the ranch and enjoy more Campfire Chats about art, love and life with the artists who attend.

Recently, one of my students that I coach asked me a question and I thought it would be a good subject to discuss around the campfire. The question was, “What is your secret of painting great Art?” I thought for a moment, as I loaded another marshmallow onto my stick and held it over the fire, about the words that a prominent painter shared with me so many years ago.

When I was 20, I met a lady whose name was Mrs Goggelinsky. She was a 90 year-old Polish woman who spoke little English. She had been an artist and had painted all of her life. She studied the Old Master’s style of painting in France when she was in college at a time when women were just beginning to get into art and painting. I hoped that she would tell me her secrets of painting and creating art.  What I learned from her really was the key that inspired me to create great art.

When I met with her, she required my attention and patience. After spending hours sitting with her in a stuffy room drinking really bad, cold tea, I asked her, “What is your secret of painting great works?” My youth did not allow me to wait for her words of wisdom. I kept asking her what she remembered when she was young, when artists were the old masters, and their secrets where passed down from artist to apprentice but were never written down. Instead, they were carefully hidden from competing artists.

She told me about her experiences in broken English, and unfortunately, I couldn’t really understand what she was sharing with me. Frustrated, I went home feeling defeated and upset. I worried that the knowledge that could be passed down from generation to generation would be lost forever if she couldn’t share it with me.

I called her back, determined to acquire the answers to the many questions I had, and she told me to come back the next day. I returned to the same cramped apartment and drank another cup of cold tea.  But this time, a lifetime collection of her paintings were stacked three feet deep and 5 feet high for me to look through, and all of the paintings were as magnificent as a Caravaggio masterpiece.

The one piece of advice she gave me became the underlying theme that I teach. It was and is a simple concept, yet requires the most discipline of any fundamental insight. It requires you, the artist, to remove what you think you know, and replace it with questions. It is so easy, yet almost all artists resist it, fight it, and argue with it…just as I did so many years ago.

The secret to knowing how to paint is to “Paint What You See.” Most of us look but we never really see, and in order to understand and know what you see, you have to learn to see what is there. Everything an artist needs to see is right in front of them – color, value, shape, temperature, and form are all there, but if we don’t have the knowledge of how to interpret what we are looking at, we won’t see what is there.

In my classes, workshops and coaching I give answers to the question: “What is that?” Once you learn to “Paint what you See” then the next step is “Paint what You see!

 

I invite you to attend my workshop in October to get a in-depth understanding of what “Paint what You see” means, along with many more insights that will improve your art forever! 

To enroll in my October 20-21-22 2017 Workshop, type in or go to

http://www.stefanbaumann.com/register/

I have coached many students over the years. My goal as a coach is to help students discover their own style by instructing with a method that allows them to grow as they are. If you want increase your knowledge and skill to bring your art to the next level, I invite you to watch my YouTube videos, consider phone coaching with me, or attend a workshop in Mt. Shasta where we discuss art, passion and life with other artists around the campfire. All the information is on my website, www.stefanbaumann.com.

There are some openings for my workshop in October, go to my website today !

Call me for information on workshops or coaching 415-606-9074

Paint with me in Italy the fall of 2018 Information link is below

The Grand View | 1151 Maple St., Hammond Ranch, CA 96069

How to Build Better Composition By Using Light

in this video Stefan Baumann talks to his students about light and How to Build Better Composition By Using Light
Making a composition by creating will change the way you think about setting up a composition don’t worry about traditional thinking of how people painted in the pass just pile a wall of stuff with a theme and create interest with effects.

Inspiring Millions to paint outdoors This video is about Touch Move and Inspire. Get a free Book at his website www.StefanBaumann.com. The paintings of Stefan Baumann reveal the true spirit of nature by transporting the viewer to distant lands that have gone unseen and undisturbed. With the huge success of Baumann’s weekly PBS television series “The Grand View: America’s National Parks through the Eyes of an Artist,” millions of people witness for themselves the magic Stefan portrays on canvas, his passion for nature and the American landscape. By distilling his love of nature into a luminous painting of brilliant, saturated color that transcends conventional landscape and wildlife art, Baumann has captured the hearts and imaginations of a generation. Each painting becomes an experience rather than merely a picture – a vivid manifestation of his special and personal union with nature and the outdoor world. Through his mastery of light, color and artful composition, Baumann invites you to experience nature in its purity. It is no wonder that for many years distinguished American collectors, including former presidents and financial icons, have sought out his work.

The post How to Build Better Composition By Using Light appeared first on Stefan Baumann – The Grand View: Paintings by Stefan Baumann.

Saturday Fireside Chat - Painting With Temperature - Stop Muddy Paintings Forever!

 

Painting With Temperature – Stop Muddy Paintings Forever!Baumann Old State Cabin

I love the Fireside Chats that we have on Saturday nights at The Grand View Ranch. This week, a group of artist friends helped us prepare our ranch for my Plein Air Workshop on October 20-21-22. Although we painted just a little this week, we did make time to have an art chat. One of the artists asked. “How do I prevent my paintings from getting muddy when painting outside on location?”

 

I replied…. “Muddy paintings happen because of temperature issues. Very few artists really understand how to use color temperature, and most artists are unaware that temperature is an essential element to create good compositions. There is no such thing as a muddy color. The muddy color that you think that you have created could ultimately be the color of the shadow on a face of a young angel. It is the relationship of a color temperature next to other colors that makes the color appear muddy. For example, muddy paintings happen when only warm colors are used. To correct this, there must be a warm color next to a cool color to balance a painting.”

 

In my workshops I include an in-depth discussion about color temperature theory and why it is important to use correct color temperatures in your paintings. I discuss how temperature, not value, is the secret key to creating great paintings

 

One suggestion that can help artists identify warm and cool temperatures is this. When you place your colors on your palette include both warm and cool colors. For example, on your palette place a warm yellow, a warm blue and a warm red on the left hand side of your palette, and then place a cool blue, a cool red, and a cool yellow on the right side. If you understand that muddiness comes from an overuse of warm temperatures in your paintings, you will be able to locate the cool colors on your palette and use them more effectively so that your paintings will never be muddy again.

Since we are talking about muddiness in your paintings, what about chalky paintings? If a painting is chalky, it is because the artist is using all cool colors with no warm colors. If you add more warm colors, the balance of warm and cool temperatures will be reinstated.

 

Of course, the study and use of temperature is more complex than what I just mentioned. If you want to get an entire overview and understanding of the use of temperature to improve your paintings instantly, I invite you to attend my next workshop in Mount Shasta on October 20-21-22 and learn a new way to understand and use temperature and color in your paintings!

I have coached many students over the years. My goal as a coach is to help students discover their own style by instructing with a method that allows them to grow as they are. If you want increase your knowledge and skill to bring your art to the next level, I invite you to watch my YouTube videos, consider phone coaching with me, or attend a workshop in Mt. Shasta where we discuss art, passion and life with other artists around the campfire. All the information is on my website, www.stefanbaumann.com.

There are some openings for my workshop in October, go to my website today!

Call me for information on workshops or coaching 415-606-9074

Paint with me in Italy the fall of 2018! Information link is below

The Grand View | 1151 Maple St., Hammond Ranch, CA 96069
Unsubscribe [email protected]
Update Profile | About our service provider
Sent by [email protected] in collaboration with
Try it free today

8/20/17 Fireside Chat with Stefan Baumann

8/20/17 Fireside Chat with Stefan Baumann

Developing a Style of Painting

While talking about my upcoming workshop in October with a group of students around the campfire after a day of Plein Air painting at The Grand View Ranch, one of the students asked, “How do you find your own style of painting?”  Developing a style of painting is not something that you set out to do. It is something that develops over time. Usually, an “artist’s style” begins with you being interested in other artists’ style, brushstrokes and color harmony. Or it may be the subject matter or mood that influences the development of your artistic style,
Location has a lot to do with a style. Many artists join groups who share similar interests and they develop a style based on the environment. For example, there is a style of painting that can be found in Pasadena that focuses on warm Southern California scenes, and other groups in Maine who focus on the rocky shores of the Atlantic. Even Northern California where are The Grand View is located has a style. The natural scenes that are available to paint influence the works of the artists painting there. The truth is style partly is autobiographical and has a lot to do with where you live, what your parents were like, the school you went to, and the people you hang with.

The Art Market

Often artists paint a location for a gallery because they want clients and want to make sales. They take workshops from artists who are popular to learn how to paint in their style.  Often, artists who teach can only teach the way they paint, and students end up surrendering their own style and genius.
Sex has a lot to do with a style. Men often chose a different way of painting than woman. Men paint subjects like flowers and little girls seem unique to the historic iconic way men painted in the past. When we think of men painting we think of cowboys or bold imagery that make up the male stereotype. Although there are many women that dominate and thrive as masculine artists, most are pigeonholed in painting feminine paintings. These stereotypes also often have artists choosing a style as opposed to developing there own unique way of painting.
Choosing a style is limiting, When a talk with artists they say they want to paint like Monet or Picasso. Why would you want to paint like them? Their style was developed not chosen, so painting like them is impossible, and why would you? You are unique and the way you paint should be too.

Style

To successfully develop your own style, it’s essential to paint from life. Painting from life allows you to experience your reactions to a subject in the moment.  The value of setting up a still life or choosing a location to paint is that you are painting purely what inspires you in the moment including subject matter, composition, color and value. You are arranging, choosing, and molding an idea, arranging the format and the media along with the colors. You choose your brushstrokes and paint colors as you react to what is in front of you.  And then you paint something and you say, “WOW, I like that” and discover something that you may repeat in future paintings. All you need is about 10,000 more moments like this and you will have developed your own style
I have coached many students over the years. My goal as a coach is to help students discover their own style by instructing with a method that allows them to grow as they are. If you want increase your knowledge and skill to bring your art to the next level, I invite you to watch my YouTube videos, consider phone coaching with me, or attend a workshop in Mt. Shasta where we discuss art, passion and life with other artists around the campfire. All the information is on my website, www.stefanbaumann.com.

Call me for information on workshops or coaching 415-606-9074

Fireside Chat with Stefan Baumann – Fear of Judgment

 Fireside Chat with Stefan Baumann - title image of Baumann talking with a group of artists around a campfire

The Artist’s Greatest Fear 

Fireside Chat with Stefan Baumann - image of painting of a rocky mountain goat by Stefan BaumannThis week we were sitting around the campfire after a day of Plein Air painting and the question came up “What is the greatest fear that all artists have?” I thought for a moment and said “The Fear of judgment.” “Judgment from others, from peers, and from themselves.  And, for a good reason, because all artists are impostors.”

Artists prefer showing what worked and only what they want you to see. They will seldom show you the stack of paintings that did not turn out well and they have hidden under the bed.

Children have a natural attraction to drawing. They’re fearless when they use crayons and paper. In fact, when asked to draw anything, they will spontaneously burst into joyful creative activity. There is no end to the multitude of colors and creative compositions that flow effortlessly from their imaginations. But sadly, this all comes to an end for most people.   Why? At an early age around 3 or 4 when this burst of creative genus begins, it is so natural to make a mark on paper or even on walls.  Just like the drawings that the first cavemen drew in caves art has always been a way to communicate. This free expression has lead to some of most fantastic art ever created thousands of years ago.

Children create freely and endlessly the moment they see paper and any device that can make a mark.    When I ask students In high school “Why don’t you create art?” they most often say, “I’m not taking an art class.” Students in College say, “Its not my major.” Later in life the excuse is “I have to focus on a real career.” Then later, working people say, “I don’t have the time” and then finally, retired people say, “I don’t have talent.”

What happened to the Child, the free-thinking, creative spirit that inspired thousands of drawings and pictures? Art is one of the first things that children can do freely that they own.  In a world of “NO! Be Quiet! Sit-down!” art is something they can do that has no rules.  You can make a purple cow and a sun that looks like a star as long as it is yellow, until some day, Mom shows up and says “Billy, There is no such thing as a purple cow. And, by the way, that cow looks more like a dog. Let me show you how.” This critique is given as a learning opportunity by the parent, but the child experiences that he or she has done something is wrong. The free flowing creative moment is gone, replaced by rules and expectations.

I have coached many people over the years who long to be creative and learn how to paint. And very often, overcoming the fear of failing again as they felt at the age of 3 is as important as painting itself.

If you are interested in exploring your creative child or if you want to take your art to he next level, I invite you to go to my YouTube channel, consider phone coaching with me, and attend a workshop here in Mt. Shasta where we discuss life, art, and creative passion with other artists around the campfire.

Please visit my website at www.StefanBaumann.com for more information.

Call me for information on workshops or coaching 415-606-9074