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URGENT! MAKE YOUR VOICE HEARD FOR OUR CULTURAL VENUES BEFORE TUESDAY.

URGENT! MAKE YOUR VOICE HEARD FOR OUR CULTURAL VENUES BEFORE TUESDAY.

As you may have heard the Oregon Legislature is meeting this week in both an Emergency Board session and a special session. We need your voice.

Our colleagues have been working hard to convince our policymakers to allocate federal CARES dollars to keep our performing arts and culture venues open. We call this “life support for venues” (with thanks to Jim Brunberg!). Led by Representative Rob Nosse and the Independent Venue Coalition, this effort makes it clear that funding nonprofits and small businesses is critical to Oregon’s COVID-19 recovery. We must be at the table for economic support if we are to recover.

The time is now! The Emergency Board will vote on Tuesday to make this allocation.

Please let members of the Emergency Board know how important this investment is to your communities and to Oregonians all across this state.

We need letters, emails, and phone calls to these members who are listed below.

Key points to make:

  • We support life support for Oregon’s venues where art and culture live.
  • Venues are statewide. If you live outside of Portland, your voice is especially important.
  • Venues are ALL independent in Oregon, we want to keep them that way. Money spent in Oregon venues stays in Oregon.
  • These are places where families meet and gather. Where couples meet and families start. Culture and community.
  • Jobs, jobs, jobs. Thousands of livelihoods.
  • Economic impact: over a billion.
  • People move here to be part of music and arts performance network. It’s something Oregon is proud of.
  • These stages give voice to the voiceless, to perspectives that would otherwise not be heard.

The Emergency Board Contact Emails:

[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]

(Full names available on our website)

Thank you for joining us in this effort!
Cultural Advocacy Coalition

Southern Oregon Artists Resource editor’s note: We sent a lengthy email touching all the bases listed above to all the representatives and senators listed above as we reposted this article. Please make time to write a thoughtful email putting all these important points into your own words TODAY!

 


Cultural Advocacy Coalition of Oregon   

Survey reveals devastating impact of COVID-19 on Oregon culture

impact COVID-19 Oregon culture

Cultural Trust survey reveals devastating impact

of COVID-19 on Oregon culture

Salem, Ore. –The majority of Oregon’s cultural organizations are facing suspension of operations or permanent closure due to the COVID-19 impact, reveals an Oregon Cultural Trust survey released today.
The most comprehensive survey of Oregon’s cultural community since the crisis began, the survey includes data and comments from 330 cultural nonprofits representing 83 percent of Oregon counties. Participants project a collective loss of $40 million and average losses of $121,281 through June 30. The majority of respondents (54 percent) have annual revenues of less than $250,000 and operate outside of the Portland Metro area.
More than half (51 percent) of respondents have not applied for the federal Payroll Protection Program (PPP), likely due to the fact that 44 percent employ less than one full-time staff member – relying mostly on a volunteer workforce. Of the 49 percent that did apply for PPP, only 73 percent have received funds to-date. More than 90 percent of those that did receive PPP funds report the funding is “not adequate to support their financial losses.”
“The PPP loan is a financial band-aid for the short term, but for us to continue to provide our essential service…there will be a need for continued relief funding well into the next fiscal year and possibly beyond,” reports the Tillicum Foundation, which operates nonprofit radio stations in Astoria, Tillamook and Warrenton.
“Quite frankly right now it looks grim,” reports the Oregon Coast Council for the Arts, “when the PPP monies are gone we may be looking at a ‘staffless’ OCCA for a while.”
Because most cultural organizations rely on large gatherings for ticket and rental revenue, they rank at the top of Oregon business sectors most severely affected by the crisis. They also will be the slowest to reopen, given the indefinite ban on large gatherings due to COVID-19. “Without any earned revenue, we are relying entirely on philanthropy and government support,” reports the Portland Art Museum.
“[Without relief funding,] we will have to close our doors and lose the investment of our community over 30 years,” reports the Gilbert House Children’s Museum in Salem.
The survey also revealed particular hardship for cultural organizations in rural areas. Bend’s High Desert Museum reports that “museums and cultural organizations in more rural areas will be hit hardest immediately and will have a much longer recovery period – we saw this during the recession and the indicators point to a similar pattern now…funding to help organizations like the High Desert Museum be resilient for the next 12-24 months is critical.”
Survey comments also reflect the concern cultural organizations have for the vulnerable populations they serve. The Shadow Project, which provides learning support for children with disabilities, reports that “during COVID-19 these children are even more vulnerable, at highest risk of falling further behind and exacerbated mental health disorders.”
“Underserved rural populations define the youth and families we serve,” reports the Drexel H. Foundation in Vale, where 21 percent of the population lives in poverty.Their outreach programs are “free to all, reducing economic barriers to learning, cultural experiences and art participation for all ethnic groups. Grantors have cancelled funding opportunities we had counted upon….[t]oo many resources have disappeared.”
The Cultural Trust is currently awaiting Legislative consideration of its Emergency Cultural Relief Fund proposal, which would deploy up to $10 million of its$29 million permanent fund to create an emergency relief funding program for Oregon’s cultural organizations.
impact COVID-19 Oregon culture

Oregon Cultural Trust May 2020 Update

Oregon Cultural Trust News and Updates

Oregon Cultural Trust News and Updates

May 2020

*******

Anis Mojgani named Oregon’s 10th Poet LaureateNewly appointed Oregon Poet Laureate Anis Mojgani

Governor Kate Brown has named Anis Mojgani (AH-neess Mozh-GAH-nee), a two-time individual champion of the National Poetry Slam and an International World Cup Poetry Slam winner, to a two-year appointment as Poet Laureate of Oregon. Anis succeeds Kim Stafford, who has held the post since 2018, to become Oregon’s 10th Poet Laureate.

“Anis is the pragmatic optimist Oregon needs in these unprecedented times,” says Governor Brown. “His words breathe fresh air into the anxiety and negativity that we all feel. He urges us to resolutely reflect in the moment and with each grounding breath, our hearts ‘come closer and come into this.’”

Born in New Orleans to Black and Iranian parents, Anis first called Oregon home in 2004. He is the author of five books of poetry including his latest, “In the Pockets of Small Gods.”

Watch Anis perform “Come Closer.”

Read the full release.Newly appointed Oregon Poet Laureate Anis Mojgani. Photo by Ryan Longnecker.

Updated COVID-19 resources for cultural organizations

The Cultural Trust continues to update relief resources for cultural organizations impacted by the COVID-19 health crisis. New to the list is $450,000 in funding from Oregon Humanities made possible by the CARES Act funding to the National Endowment for the Humanities and The Western States Arts Federation’s WESTAF CARES Relief Fund for Organizations, which opened May 6.

The Business Oregon Small Business Navigator is updated daily, with many resources open to nonprofits.

Panelist grant application review process begins

Artifacts at the Portland Chinatown Museum, a FY2020 Cultural Development grant award recipient.

Artifacts at the Portland Chinatown Museum, a FY2020 Cultural Development grant award recipient.

Soon after the May 8 application deadline for the Cultural Trust’s FY2021 Cultural Development Program, volunteer grant panelists will begin their review process. Applications are reviewed and scored by individuals chosen for their diverse cultural expertise and geographic, ethnic and gender diversity. The review panels will meet between June 9 and 18 and their scores are used to rank the applications.

Based on panel ranking, Trust staff prepares funding recommendations that are reviewed and acted on by the Cultural Trust Board of Directors in July. Grant awards will be announced in August.

Cultural organizations among hardest hit by health crisis

A recent survey by Business Oregon revealed that the arts, creative and recreation industry ranks at the top of business sectors suffering losses due to the COVID-19 health crisis. If able, cultural donors are urged to consider making donations early this year to help sustain the organizations that make a difference in their community.

As always, matching donations to the Cultural Trust prior to June 30 will increase the funds available for FY2021 grant making. The funding pool for grants is calculated based on fiscal year donations, with up to 60 percent allocated for grant making and the remainder for permanent fund growth.A recent survey by Business Oregon shows that the arts, entertainment and recreation industry has suffered more than any sector except accommodations during the COVID-19 health crisis.

A recent survey by Business Oregon shows that the arts, entertainment and recreation industry has suffered more than any sector except accommodations during the COVID-19 health crisis.

Cultural Trust survey to capture COVID-19 relief needs

While awaiting Legislative consideration of its Emergency Cultural Relief Fund proposal, the Cultural Trust is reaching out to Oregon’s 1,400+ cultural nonprofits to survey them on COVID-19 impacts and progress in securing other relief funding.

The survey will be distributed via direct email on Friday, May 8, with a deadline of May 17. Results will help to build a case for passage of the Cultural Relief Fund.Like most performing arts groups, the Little Ballet TheatrLike most performing arts groups, the Little Ballet Theatre in Warrenton has cancelled all classes and performances during the COVID-19 health crisis. Little Ballet Theatre in Warrenton has cancelled all classes and performances during the COVID-19 health crisis.

Oregon Arts Commission | Oregon Cultural Trust | 775 Summer Street NE #200, Salem, OR 97301

Oregon Cultural Trust January 2020 News and Updates

Oregon Cultural Trust January 2020 News and Updates

Grant seekers alert!

2020 “Conversations” series features more funders than ever

The 2020 Conversations with Funders and Partners tour will begin in Portland on Feb. 19 and conclude in Bend on March 12 with eight stops overall.
“Conversations” are informal information sessions that enable grant seekers to learn about funding programs available and have the opportunity to discuss their projects and programming.
More funders than ever before will join the Cultural Trust, including the Oregon Arts Commission, Oregon Heritage, Oregon Humanities and the Oregon State Historic Preservation Office as well as The Oregon Community Foundation, the James F. and Marion L. Miller Foundation, Travel Oregon, Oregon Parks and Recreation, the State Library of Oregon, the Marion Soil and Water Conservation District, Business Oregon’s Regional Development Officers and Portland’s Regional Arts and Culture Council, among others.
Special note: Free grant writing workshops, presented by Travel Oregon, will be held in conjunction with the events in Coos Bay, Pendleton and Bend.
Read the release, with full schedule and registration links for the free grant writing workshops.
Alana Garner, working with the La Grande Main Street Downtown program, shows her economic development spirit during the 2018 La Grande Conversations event.

Guidelines now posted for FY2021 Cultural Trust grants

Among the funding opportunities discussed at the upcoming “Conversations with Funders and Partners” sessions will be the Cultural Trust’s FY2021 Cultural Development Program (awards to be announced summer of 2020).
Grant guidelines are now posted for a Friday, April 17, application deadline. The application link with go live in February.
In 2019 the Cultural Trust awarded more than $2.7 million in statewide grants. Cultural Development Program grants represent one third of the annual funding the Cultural Trust provides to Oregon’s cultural nonprofits. Other funding includes grants to the Trust’s five statewide partners – to support their mission goals and respective funding programs – and to 45 county and tribal cultural coalitions that fund local initiatives, projects and programs.
FY2021 Cultural Development Program grants are for projects and activities that will occur between Sept. 1, 2020, and Aug. 31, 2021.
For more information contact Aili Schreiner at [email protected] or 503-986-0089.
A scene from the Willamette Light Brigade's 2019 Portland Winter Light Festival
A scene from the Willamette Light Brigade’s 2019 Portland Winter Light Festival. The 2020 Winter Light Festival, scheduled for Feb. 6-8, is supported by a FY2020 Cultural Development grant award from the Cultural Trust.

2019 Give!Guide donations set all-time record

While the Cultural Trust’s 2019 fundraising results are still being finalized, there is one number worth celebrating now. Cultural Trust donations on the Willamette Week Give!Guide reached an all-time high of more than $443,000. The previous Give!Guide record was $407,000, set in 2017.
The Cultural Trust is incredibly grateful to its partners at Willamette Week – and to Give!Guide donors – for their steadfast support of Oregon culture.
A theme graphic from the 2019 Willamette Week Give!Guide.

Grant Project Spotlight

Theater enhances learning at Beaverton Civic Theatre

Supported by a FY2020 Cultural Development grant award, the Beaverton Civic Theatre’s Young Audience series integrates theater with early literacy practices, serving as a brain-building resource for parents and caregivers.
Next up in the series is “Naked Mole Rat Gets Dressed: The Rock Experience” on Feb. 8, 9 and 15. Wilbur, played by Jonathan Moothart, surprises his fellow naked mole rats by discovering a love for clothing and style – eventually proving there’s no need to be just like everyone else.
The 10 a.m. events on Feb. 8 and 15 are sensory performances, designed for children with autism spectrum disorder, sensory sensitivities and other disabilities.
All tickets are $5 and are available here.
The cast of Beaverton Civic Theatre’s “Naked Mole Rat Dressed: The Rock Experience.”

Roberta Kirk of Warm Springs honored with national spirit award

Congratulations to Roberta J. Kirk of Warm Springs on her First Peoples Fund 2020 Community Spirit Award! The award honors Roberta for her traditional beadwork and regalia as well as her devotion and service to her community and tribe. A master artist in the Oregon Folklife Network’s Traditional Arts Apprenticeship Program, Roberta was nominated by Riki Saltzman, the executive director of the Folklife Network.
“I believe it is because of her deep cultural knowledge that Roberta is able to imbue her regalia-making with such spirit and devotion,” says
Riki. “She embodies the Indigenous values of integrity, community and generosity.”
Roberta J. Kirk wearing one of her traditional Plateau Shell dresses
Roberta J. Kirk wearing one of her traditional Plateau Shell dresses.

Oregon’s Cultural Tax Credit Is More Valuable Than Ever!

News and Updates

Double the impact of Giving Tuesday!

If you participated in #GivingTuesday with a gift to any one or more of these cultural nonprofits, you are eligible to double the impact of your gift with Oregon’s Cultural Trust tax credit.
There’s no reason to wait until the end of the year to match these gifts.

New tax laws make cultural tax credit more valuable

The recent change in federal tax laws had the unintended consequence of discouraging charitable giving by reducing the number of taxpayers claiming a deduction for their gifts, which makes the Cultural Trust tax credit an even more important tool for Oregon taxpayers. The tax credit is unaffected by the 2018 tax law changes. Working with the Oregon Department of Revenue, the Trust recently posted frequently asked questions and answers on its website.
The chart below shows total tax savings, net cash outlay and value of contributions for taxpayers that do not itemize. Similar information for taxpayers who itemize on both their state and federal returns, as well as those that itemize on their state return can be found here. The IRS provides more detailed rules on charitable contributions and state or local tax credits or deductions on its website.
Please review these materials and assure all your friends that the benefits of the cultural tax credit are alive and well!

Donor profile

McLaren Innes protects Astoria’s cultural heritage

Fiber artist and activist McLaren Innes is passionate about protecting the cultural heritage of Astoria, her home for the last 41 years.
“I am honored to be retired here. I donate to local organizations that produce music, art and other creative offerings that strive to preserve our cultural history,” says McLaren. “I give because they need it and they are incredibly important to our community.”
A Cultural Trust donor since 2003, McLaren makes her donation to the Cultural Trust online using some Required Minimum Distribution funds from her retirement. “That way I avoid taxes on those funds,” she says.
“The Cultural Trust is the best investment Oregonians can make in their culture,” says McLaren. “It’s a no brainer when a donation that nurtures a worthy nonprofit also provides a significant tax advantage to the donor.”

McLaren Innes

Five more FY2020 grant awards announced!

Five more Oregon cultural nonprofits will receive FY2020 Cultural Development funding from the Oregon Cultural Trust.
The additional grant awards are the result of funds being returned by two previous awardees (whose projects are not moving forward) and brings the total of FY2020 grant awards to 139!
Congratulations to our new awardees:
Applegate Regional Theatre, Eugene: $9,558
Astoria Visual Arts, Astoria: $5,072
Ballet Fantastique, Eugene: $5,000
Classical Up Close, Tigard: $5,000
Imago Theatre Mask Ensemble, Portland: $10,000

Astoria Visual Arts’ iLLUMiNART 2018

Impact story

Eugene-Springfield Youth Orchestras empower students

Nothing conveys the incredible impact a donation to the Oregon Cultural Trust can have more than the adorable students in the Eugene-Springfield Youth Orchestras’ String Academy sharing their pride and delight.
Because people like you took the time to donate, for which the state of Oregon will reimburse you at tax time, the orchestra is a bright spot in the lives of 145 children who might not otherwise have access. And that truly is something you can’t put a price on.

The impact of the Cultural Trust, in the
words of students.

Mark Renard of Lake Oswego
appointed to Cultural Trust Board

Mark Renard, the executive vice president of Johnstone Financial Advisors in Lake Oswego, has been appointed to the Oregon Cultural Trust Board of Directors by Gov. Kate Brown.
For several years Renard has applied his financial acumen to advocating on behalf of the Cultural Trust, authoring opinion pieces and founding AccessArt, a co-op marketing and art exhibition program. AccessArt connects business, the community and artists at quarterly events hosted at Johnstone’s historic building in downtown Lake Oswego.
.
“Mark has been a great champion of the Cultural Trust for years,” said Charles Sams III, chair of the Cultural Trust Board. “We are extremely fortunate that he has agreed to make his passion for our work official by joining the Board of Directors.”

Mark Renard

Oregon Arts Commission | Oregon Cultural Trust | 775 Summer Street NE #200Salem, OR 97301

OAC Update on grant awards, Art in Public Places Roster now open and the first-ever tour of our State Capitol’s art collection!

August 2019

News & Updates

Update on grant awards, Art in Public Places Roster now open and the first-ever tour of our State Capitol’s art collection!

Grant award timeline update

OSG, ALG awards to be announced in September

Due to the new biennium budget process, the announcement of grant awards for the Operating Support and Arts Learning programs is delayed until September.
The Arts Commission is awaiting a final approved budget from the Legislative Fiscal Office and the Business Oregon fiscal office, as well as action by the Arts Commission board, so that grant awards can be finalized and distributed.
Final approval of grant awards is expected at the Arts Commission board meeting in early September. Official notification of application status and funding awards will happen after the Arts Commission board meets.
In recognition of the challenge presented by awards being announced after activity starts, the staff is developing a new timeline for the next funding cycle and may move the activity start period to Oct. 1.

Eric Asakawa plays the role made famous by Kevin Bacon in Broadway Rose Theatre Company’s current production of“Footloose” running through Sept. 1. Broadway Rose received a FY2019 Operating Supporting Grant award. Photo by Craig Mitchelldy.

Call to artists

Oregon Art in Public Places Roster now accepting applications

Regional, national and international artists are invited to submit qualifications for the Oregon Art in Public Places Roster for 2020-2022. Applications will be accepted until 11:59 p.m., MDT (Mountain Daylight Time), on Tuesday, Sept. 10. All materials must be submitted through CaFE™.
The Oregon Arts Commission manages the Percent for Art program for the State of Oregon. The Oregon Art in Public Places Roster serves as a resource for Percent for Art selection panels to identify artists most suitable for specific project needs.
The Roster is completely refreshed every three years. Artist who were selected for a previous Oregon Art in Public Places Roster must reapply to be considered for the 2020-2022 Roster.

George Johanson, “Day and Night,” 2012. Acrylic and oil on canvas. Oregon Department of Transportation.

Corvallis artist Greg Pfarr exhibits in Governor’s Office

Corvallis artist Greg Pfarr will exhibit “A Sense of Place: Time, Memory and Imagination in the Pacific Northwest” in the Governor’s Office of the Capitol Building in Salem through Sept. 26. A “meet the artist” reception is scheduled from 2 to 5 p.m. on Thursday, Sept. 5.
Place has always been a central focus of Greg’s art. He grew up roaming the woods and creeks of southern Ohio, where he found his first inspiration. Early backpacking experiences in the Smokey and Rocky Mountains convinced him that he had to live near wilderness. A move to Oregon in 1980 made it possible.
An exhibit in the Governor’s office is a “once in a lifetime” honor for selected Oregon artists.

Greg Pfarr, “Three Glaciers, Prince William Sound, Alaska,” 2014. Etching and woodcut. 24 x 36 inches (image). Courtesy the artist.

American Artist Appreciation Month

First-ever tours of State Capitol art offered in August

Explore the vast art collection inside the Oregon State Capitol during American Artist Appreciation Month in August. For the first time, State Capitol visitor services will provide guided tours of the Art of the Time Collection, publicly displayed throughout the building.
Tours will depart from the state seal in the rotunda at noon Monday through Friday,
Aug. 19-30. The collection includes more than 175 American (and many regional) artists, featured on the Percent for Art Collection website.
For a schedule of upcoming events and exhibits at the Capitol, visit www.oregoncapitol.com.

Sally Haley, “Camellias,” before 1979. Acrylic on canvas. Photo: Frank Miller.

At Liberty honors Royal Nebeker

Former Arts Commissioner and beloved Oregon artist Royal Nebeker (1945-2014) is being celebrated in a retrospective of his work on exhibit at At Liberty in Bend through September.
A prominent teacher, Nebeker left a tremendous legacy of work. A broad representation of his life’s work assembled for the tribute show.
Royal once said, “This process of painting resembles looking through a night window. I peer out, observing and at the same time see the reflection of the interior conditions of my own reality. It is my intent that as the viewer peers into my painting, he will not only see a visual record of meaning in my life, but will discover the reflection of meaning in their own, as in a night window.”

Pictured at the Royal Nebeker exhibit opening: (left to right) Kaari Vaughn, a founding partner of At Liberty; Sarah Nebeker, Royal’s widow and a Clatsop County Commissioner; Hannah Nebeker, Royal’s daughter; Rene Mitchell, a founding partner of At Liberty; Jenny Green, a founding partner of At Liberty; and Brian Wagner, Arts Commission community development coordinator. .

Florence public mural celebrates local culture

“Stitching Time, Weaving Cultures,” a public mural celebrating local culture and heritage, was recently dedicated in Florence. Commissioned by The City of Florence and the City’s Public Arts Committee, the mural was created by Portland artist-team Marino-Heidel Studios.
Almost three years in the making, the mural showcases folk arts and speaks to cultural interchange. It also “stitches” together ideas that represent the Florence area. The design incorporates the iconic Siuslaw Bridge and native flora and fauna of our region and pays homage to the Siuslaw people.
The project was a partnership between enthusiastic citizens, members of the PUD, Tribal leaders and City of Florence staff.

(Left to right) Harlan Springer of the Florence Public Arts Committee, Catherine Rickbone of the Oregon Coast Council for the Arts and Michal Dalton, Oregon Arts Commissioner.

Upcoming grant deadlines

Oregon Arts Commission | Phone 503-986-0082 | www.oregonartscommission.org

STAY CONNECTED

Ensuring Oregon’s Arts and Culture Are Protected

Hello Advocates,

We have good and bad news this week as some major legislation we’ve been advocating for has passed, but other important bills are hanging in the balance.

Most of our legislative work is contained in the larger omnibus budget and program changes bills that are assembled and passed in the last few days of session. If the Legislature does not resume its business before June 30th, the date by which the body must adjourn—many of our priorities might be lost. Right now, there’s not much we can do since the political breakdown is occurring between the governor and the legislative leadership.

In good news, the Oregon Cultural Trust and the Oregon Arts Commission budgets were passed. Both agencies are funded at the governor’s recommended levels. We are working to find other ways to cover growing administrative costs estimated by agency leadership that were not approved and thus will impact the grant budget. Other good news—the House passed a tax credit package yesterday that includes renewal of the tax credit and extension of the special assessments for historic preservation. But this still needs to be approved by the Senate.

These bills were all moving along positively, so if the legislature resumes business, we expect good results:

— Renewal of the Cultural Trust tax credit for 6 years
— Extension of special assessments for historic preservation for 2 years
— 5 capital projects targeted for lottery bonding or General Fund contributions (Oregon Nikkei Center, Patricia Reser Center for the Arts, Cottage Theatre, High Desert Museum, and the Lincoln City Cultural Center)
— Lifting the expiration of license plate revenue for marketing of the Trust

If you’ve been an advocate or used your voice in any way this year, THANK YOU. This year’s work in Salem is evidence that our Coalition and its supporters are crucial in ensuring Oregon’s arts and culture are protected. Please stay tuned for more news in the coming days. 

Thank you.

Cultural Advocacy Coalition
Executive Director
Sue Hildick


Cultural Advocacy Coalition of Oregon   

Your Voice Is Needed to Continue the Cultural Trust Tax Credit!

Your Voice Is Needed to Continue the Cultural Trust Tax Credit!

Hello Friends of Arts and Culture in Oregon!  The time to engage with policymakers is now!

We’ve been preparing for all the action in the 2019 legislative session and the opening move is coming on Monday, February 18th when the House Committee of Economic Development will hold a hearing on HB 2052 — a bill to extend the sunset on the cultural tax credit for the next ten years.  We hope you will contact your legislators to encourage them to support HB 2052 and to share with them the priority that you and other Oregonians put on access to creative expression in this state. 

Oregon is unique in the Nation in having the Cultural Trust but we are far from the $200 million fund that was originally envisioned.  We need to collectively raise our voices in support of building this fund and using tax incentives to help do it — remember dollars in the Cultural Trust are distributed to every county and to tribal partners.  This tax credit is an important engagement tool for this state and critical to our cultural ecosystem.  Please add your voice!  Best — Cultural Advocacy Coalition

Send your support letter for HB 2052 in by Friday, February 15th to:  [email protected]


Cultural Advocacy Coalition of Oregon   

Staff Update from Arts Commission and Cultural Trust November 2018

November 2, 2018
Dear Arts and Culture Colleagues,
It is with both great pride and some sadness that I share with you that Arts Commission and Cultural Trust Assistant Director David Huff has resigned effective next week to accept the new position of City Arts Manager with the City of Portland.
While we will miss him tremendously, we are very excited for David and wish him the best. He is a truly positive force in supporting artists and arts/cultural organizations across Oregon and the city will be lucky to have him.
During his five years as assistant director, David has provided invaluable input to our planning and implementation of grant programs, helping to ensure we are having the greatest possible impact with our limited funding. He has also made important contributions to our financial oversight systems and has been a strong advocate for accessible service to underserved groups.
David has been a great colleague to our team and has always brought forward ideas to respond to the changing environment. I greatly appreciate his work, thoughts and service, and I look forward to working with him in his new capacity.
As the city’s Arts Manager, David will work in partnership with the Commissioner of Arts and Culture, city bureaus and the Regional Arts and Culture Council to build on Portland’s long-standing commitment to a thriving arts and culture ecosystem.
David’s last day in the office will be Tuesday, Nov. 6. We are working with Business Oregon to develop an interim plan to cover his responsibilities while we consider opportunities to fill the position. In the meantime, please send your grant inquiries to [email protected] and all other concerns to [email protected]. You are also welcome to contact another member of the Arts Commission or Cultural Trust team.
Please let me know if you have any questions and join us in wishing David the best in his new position.
Sincerely,
Brian Rogers
Executive Director
Oregon Arts Commission | Oregon Cultural Trust,775 Summer Street NE #200, Salem, OR 97301

Cultural Advocacy Colatition to Fight for Arts Funding in Salem on Arts and Culture Advocacy Day 2017

Cultural Advocacy Coalition Advocacy Day 2017

By now we have all heard about President Trump’s push to eliminate federal funding for a host of cultural agencies and nonprofits. Last week, President Trump doubled down, and proposed additional cuts the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) and the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA)—in the current budget year. These cuts would hit in the final six months of the budget cycle, crippling grants and programs that are planned and approved this year.

Oregon Humanities depends on the NEH for almost half of our funding. Thanks to this funding, we are able to work with hundreds of organizations around the state in communities large and small, urban and rural. The federal dollars that come to Oregon Humanities from the NEH make it possible for people from Klamath Falls to Portland and Enterprise to Astoria to do the ongoing work of building trust and strengthening community.

In addition to my work as Executive Director of Oregon Humanities, I serve on the board of the Cultural Advocacy Coalition. The Coalition is Oregon’s only statewide advocacy organization that lobbies legislators on behalf of the cultural community, and defends funding for the Oregon Cultural Trust, Oregon Arts Commission, Oregon Heritage Commission, State Historic Preservation Office and Oregon Humanities.

So, while we continue to pressure Congress to reject budget proposals which harm community-based programs like Oregon Humanities’ Conversation Projects and others, we are also in the midst of a challenging session here in Oregon—and we need your help!

We hope you will consider taking a few hours out of your day on Monday, April 24, 2017 to join us in Salem for Arts and Culture Advocacy Day 2017, at the Oregon State Capitol.

By visiting oregonculture.org/take-action right now you can sign up–and then immediately request a constituent meeting with your own legislators. If you have already registered, be sure you take a moment to request your constituent meeting, then help spread the word by sharing the link with friends and colleagues!

If you can’t make Advocacy Day, and are not yet a Coalition member, please consider joining with a membership gift of $50, $100 or $250 today to help preserve arts, heritage and the humanities, promote the creative economy and protect Oregon’s cultural life.

With your help, the Cultural Advocacy Coalition will continue to speak to those in power on behalf of our values; protecting and amplifying the voices of artists, historians, storytellers, community-builders and creatives whose essential work enriches our lives. With your help, we will withstand these very real threats to veterans’ programs in Central Oregon and North Portland, education programs for low income adults and the rich exploration of individual and community values facilitated by Oregon Humanities through community conversations throughout our state.

Can we count on you to join us April 24, 2017 for Advocacy Day, and to join the Coalition with a membership gift today?

It will take all of us working together, participating in the legislative process and communicating with our elected representatives to protect arts and culture in Oregon and across the nation. Please take the time to join us.

With gratitude,
Adam Davis
Executive Director, Oregon Humanities
Board Member, Cultural Advocacy Coalition

Click the link below to register for the event:
https://www.votervoice.net/BroadcastLinks/TrYESaI0YjA1ecDuDP4qFA