Trending Articles

Friends of SOAR

For great posts about the business of art, check out The Artsy Shark HERE!
ArtistsBillofRights.org reviews competitions and appeals seeking creative content, listing those that respect your copyrights and highlighting those that don't. Art Matters! publishes calls to artists, and not all of them may be compliant with ABoR's standards. Visit their site to learn more.
We support the Embedded Metadata Manifesto.  Metadata is information such as copyright notice and contact info you can embed in your images to protect your intellectual property, save time when uploading to social sites and promote your art. Click to visit the site and learn more.

Cultural Advocacy Colatition to Fight for Arts Funding in Salem on Arts and Culture Advocacy Day 2017

Cultural Advocacy Coalition Advocacy Day 2017

By now we have all heard about President Trump’s push to eliminate federal funding for a host of cultural agencies and nonprofits. Last week, President Trump doubled down, and proposed additional cuts the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) and the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA)—in the current budget year. These cuts would hit in the final six months of the budget cycle, crippling grants and programs that are planned and approved this year.

Oregon Humanities depends on the NEH for almost half of our funding. Thanks to this funding, we are able to work with hundreds of organizations around the state in communities large and small, urban and rural. The federal dollars that come to Oregon Humanities from the NEH make it possible for people from Klamath Falls to Portland and Enterprise to Astoria to do the ongoing work of building trust and strengthening community.

In addition to my work as Executive Director of Oregon Humanities, I serve on the board of the Cultural Advocacy Coalition. The Coalition is Oregon’s only statewide advocacy organization that lobbies legislators on behalf of the cultural community, and defends funding for the Oregon Cultural Trust, Oregon Arts Commission, Oregon Heritage Commission, State Historic Preservation Office and Oregon Humanities.

So, while we continue to pressure Congress to reject budget proposals which harm community-based programs like Oregon Humanities’ Conversation Projects and others, we are also in the midst of a challenging session here in Oregon—and we need your help!

We hope you will consider taking a few hours out of your day on Monday, April 24, 2017 to join us in Salem for Arts and Culture Advocacy Day 2017, at the Oregon State Capitol.

By visiting oregonculture.org/take-action right now you can sign up–and then immediately request a constituent meeting with your own legislators. If you have already registered, be sure you take a moment to request your constituent meeting, then help spread the word by sharing the link with friends and colleagues!

If you can’t make Advocacy Day, and are not yet a Coalition member, please consider joining with a membership gift of $50, $100 or $250 today to help preserve arts, heritage and the humanities, promote the creative economy and protect Oregon’s cultural life.

With your help, the Cultural Advocacy Coalition will continue to speak to those in power on behalf of our values; protecting and amplifying the voices of artists, historians, storytellers, community-builders and creatives whose essential work enriches our lives. With your help, we will withstand these very real threats to veterans’ programs in Central Oregon and North Portland, education programs for low income adults and the rich exploration of individual and community values facilitated by Oregon Humanities through community conversations throughout our state.

Can we count on you to join us April 24, 2017 for Advocacy Day, and to join the Coalition with a membership gift today?

It will take all of us working together, participating in the legislative process and communicating with our elected representatives to protect arts and culture in Oregon and across the nation. Please take the time to join us.

With gratitude,
Adam Davis
Executive Director, Oregon Humanities
Board Member, Cultural Advocacy Coalition

Click the link below to register for the event:
https://www.votervoice.net/BroadcastLinks/TrYESaI0YjA1ecDuDP4qFA

Caldera Honored at the White House

Dec. 29, 2015
Caldera Executive Director Tricia Snell (right) and youth representative Alena Nore (center) visit the White House Nov. 17 to accept an award from First Lady Michelle Obama.
Caldera Honored at the White House with national award

Congratulations to Caldera, one of 12 national creative youth development organizations to receive the 2015 National Arts and Humanities Youth Program Award from First Lady Michelle Obama. Caldera Executive Director Tricia Snell and youth representative Alena Nore accepted the award at a Nov. 17 White House awards ceremony.

Caldera is the first Oregon organization to ever receive the award, the nation’s highest honor for creative youth programs. It recognizes the country’s best programs while highlighting the positive role that arts and humanities play in youth academic achievement, graduation rates and college enrollment.

In addition to the national recognition bestowed by the prestigious award, Caldera will also receive $10,000 to support its programming and build the long-term sustainability of the organization.
Former Arts Commission Chair Ron Paul passes

It was with heavy hearts the arts community learned of the passing of former Arts Commission Chair Ron Paul.

Ron was best-known as a chef and restaurateur, with the artistry and sustainability of food defining his professional identity. His work with the City of Portland engaged him at the intersection of politics and policy. As chief of staff to former Portland City Commissioner Charlie Hales, he helped shape plans to develop a year-round, food-focused Public Market. He also led the city’s lobbying for the creation of the Oregon Cultural Trust.

Ron recently served as executive director of Portland’s forthcoming James Beard Public Market.
Ron Paul
Oregon’s White House tree features recycled ornaments

Another feather in Oregon’s environmental cap — It is the only state to have its President’s Park (White House) tree decorated with recycled garbage!Incredibly beautiful marine garbage, transformed into art by Angela Haseltine Pozzi, the founder of The Washed Ashore Project in Bandon.

Trees representing all 56 states and territories are annually displayed at the White House park and each year different artists are invited to create the ornaments.


Arts Commission on tour
The Arts Commission took a tour of Northwest Portland galleries, including the Elizabeth Leach Gallery (pictured), following its Dec. 4 meeting at the Pacific Northwest College of Art. Pictured (left to right) are: Vice Chair Libby Tower; Public Art Coordinator Meagan Atiyeh; Commissioner Avantika Bawa; Community Art Coordinator Brian Wagner; Commissioner Christopher Acebo; Chair Julie Vigeland; Commissioner Anne Taylor; and Executive Director Brian Rogers.

Upcoming grant deadline

 

Applications for the Oregon Media Arts Fellowship are due by 5 p.m. on Monday. Feb. 1.

John Tess Matches Donations to Oregon Culture Made Before June 30

Dear friends,

As a board member of the Cultural Advocacy Coalition for nearly 10 years, I have seen how the Coalition’s dedication to our future has made a difference in protecting funding and reinvesting in culture and preservation in Oregon.

Right now we need your help. Our Coalition is working for passage of critical legislation and increased funding. Funding for arts and culture is precarious in the best of circumstances and we know some would eliminate our funding entirely if given the chance. I feel so strongly about the importance of our work, right now, that I will match the first $1,000 in new or increased membership donations received through June 30, 2015.

Until this session closes, we will have funding and policy issues at stake. Legislation we are supporting will significantly strengthen culture in Oregon and legislation we oppose could have long-term devastating effects.

  • SUPPORT – SB 441 Increases arts and culture grants to nonprofits, allows for greater investment return and adds much needed Trust staff
  • SUPPORT – HB 2962 Designates Cultural Trust as exclusively for arts & culture purposes
  • SUPPORT – HB 3526 Creates and funds Oregon Main Street Revitalization grant program
  • SUPPORT – HB 5525, HB 5528, HB 5502, HB 5030 Funds a range of cultural activities and agencies
  • OPPOSE – HB 2137 Taxes art valued above $250,000 (including art sold or temporarily stored in Oregon)

Our Coalition is entirely member-funded and cannot advocate effectively without our support. I have seen firsthand how important effective advocacy is in our state legislature–to protect the Oregon Cultural Trust, preserve Historic Preservation incentives, defend Oregon’s landmark percent for art program and the Oregon Arts Commission. This work is vital to all of us. I hope you will take advantage of my offer to match the first $1,000 in new or increased membership donations received through the end of this month. Join us, support our work, become a member of the Cultural Advocacy Coalition and protect our future.

John Tess
President, Heritage Consulting Group
Board Member, Cultural Advocacy Coalition
Trustee, Oregon Cultural Trust

PS. Building our coalition to advocate on behalf of the cultural community is so important that I have committed to match the first $1,000 in new and increased membership gifts received before June 30, 2015. Take advantage of my offer to match your gift, and help us protect arts and culture–and finish the session strong!

100% Tax Credit for Donations to Oregon Cultural Trust

Donate to The Oregon Cultural Trust for a 100% Tax Credit!
bkgd_donate_match_header 2
IT’S EASY! CLICK HERE FOR THE 3 SIMPLE STEPS!

Town Meeting with Oregon Arts Commission and Oregon Cultural Trust

Town Meeting with Oregon Arts Commission and Oregon Cultural Trust hosted in the Rogue Gallery’s Main Gallery on November 3rd from 1:00 – 4:00pm. 

If you are involved in the arts in Southern Oregon, we encourage you to attend this important meeting to give your input to these organizations.

Registration is not required but does help in planning. Register at: https://www.regonline.com

The Oregon Arts Commission is a vital resource for the Oregon arts. Each year the Arts Commission awards millions of dollars to Oregon artists and arts organizations. The Oregon Cultural Trust works with five partners: Oregon Arts Commission; Oregon State Historic Preservation Office; Oregon Humanities; Oregon Heritage Commission; and the Oregon Historical Society to promote and preserve Oregon culture.

oregon arts commission logo 2

Oregon-Cultural-Trust 2

Building a Cultural Tourist Destination Presentation, Nov. 5, 12 -1pm
Please join us on Thursday, Nov 5th from 12:00 to 1:00 pm at the Rogue Studio for the presentation “Lessons from Appalachia: Leveraging the Arts & Crafts as a Major Economic Development Strategy for Southern Oregon” by Jerry Works.
Cammy Davis, local artist and Edgy in October organizer says, “I saw a presentation by Jerry Works about how Appalachia converted poverty to a multi-million dollar economy through the arts.  There were so many similarities between that region and the Rogue Valley, I wanted to bring it to the Medford business and arts community as well.  I think this short presentation will inspire you and give you insight on how to help build cultural tourism in our area.”
Exhibit your artwork at Rogue Gallery!
membersgallerydropoff 2Members’ Gallery Drop-off
All members are invited to bring in three new pieces to be juried into the Members’ Gallery. The work will be displayed from November 15, 2014 – March 10, 2015. Drop-off days:
  • Friday, November 7, 10-5
  • Saturday, November 8, 11-3

Accepted work can be posted on our website. For pointers about e-mailing photos of your work, register for the free class taking place Thursday, October 30, 4-5pm in Rogue Studio.

Annual Members Show Drop-off
Be a part of our annual members show in the Main Gallery! Members are encouraged to bring in one piece of art inspired by this year’s theme “The Sky is the Limit”.  All media welcomed. Maximum size is 40 x 40 inches. This is a non-juried show and all exhibit ready work will be included. The show runs November 21- December 19, 2014.
Drop-off days:

  • Friday, November 14, 10-5
  • Saturday, November 15, 11-3

2016 Main Gallery Submissions
Whether you are an artist that would like your work shown in our Main Gallery, or know one who would be a great addition to a show, remember that we are currently accepting Main Gallery proposals. Artists working in all media are encouraged to apply. Reserved for work of the highest quality, the Main Gallery features emerging, mid-career, and established artists from the region and beyond. The deadline for the Main Gallery 2016 exhibition series submission is December 2, 2014.  Submission guidelines available HERE.

Community Art Events
Ashland Art Center’s annual event Art Inspires Ashland is coming up November 14, 15 & 16. For information see the website artinspiresashland.org

The Annual Clayfolk Pottery Show & Sale is coming up Nov. 21-23 at the Medford Armory. For more information visit clayfolk.org.

Call to Artists from Artists in Action for the downtown Salem show Something Red. For more information and entry form go their website: www.somethingred.org.

Arts Alliance Update, Oregon Cultural Trust Town Hall Meeting

Arts Alliance of southern Oregon logoGreetings! We will be announcing the next Arts Alliance of Southern Oregon public meeting soon. It will be held in late November or early December in Grants Pass.
Until then, you are encouraged to attend a town meeting in Medford hosted by the Rogue Gallery & Art Center and presented by the Oregon Arts Commission and the Oregon Cultural Trust: Monday, 11/3 from 1-4pm.
Thank you for supporting arts & culture in our community!
Come one, come all! 

Brian Rogers and the staff of the Oregon Arts Commission and the Oregon Cultural Trust will hold 14 statewide town meetings between now and Dec. 12 to hear from Oregonians about arts and culture issues. The information gathered will develop independent plans to guide each organization over the next five years.

“Hearing from our stakeholders, which include every Oregonian, is a vitally important part of the planning process,” said Rogers. “The themes that emerge from these meetings will form the framework of our plans.” 

Each of the three-hour meetings, which kick off in The Dalles Oct. 20 and conclude in Eugene Dec. 12, will be hosted by a local arts and culture partner. Registration is encouraged but not required. The meetings are free and open to the public.

For more information to register: http://bit.ly/1yAtiIg
Town Meeting-Medford 

Monday, November 03, 2014 1:00 PM – 4:00 PM (Pacific Time)

Rogue Gallery
40 S Bartlett St
Medford, Oregon 97501
United States
 
Map and Directions
The Oregon Arts Commission and the Oregon Cultural Trust are pleased to announce a series of 14 town meetings across Oregon to gather information about local, regional and statewide issues in arts and culture. We encourage you to attend, participate, share and learn in this important process.  The Commission and Trust will use the information we gather to develop independent plans that will guide each organization over the next five years.
We also would like you to help spread the word and invite your board members, people you serve and community leaders to these town meetings.
Registration is not required, but encouraged to help us in our logistics.  Each town meeting will be hosted by a local partner who are helping make these important meetings possible.
We also invite you to submit written testimony, especially if you are unable to attend a town meeting.
You may email testimony to [email protected] or mail to:


OAC / OCT Planning Process
775 Summer Street NE Suite 200
Salem OR 97301

Brian Rogers named Executive Director of Oregon Arts Commission and Oregon Cultural Trust

Brian Rogers, New Executive director of the Oregon Arts Commission and Oregon Cultural Trust
June 3, 2014
Brian Rogers of Pennsylvania named Executive Director of Oregon Arts Commission and Oregon Cultural Trust 

Brian Rogers –  an accomplished painter, arts and culture consultant and the former deputy director of the Pennsylvania Council of the Arts – has been named the next executive director of the Oregon Arts Commission and Oregon Cultural Trust. Rogers was appointed today by Business Oregon Director Sean Robbins following a months-long search that culminated with community forums in Portland and Salem Monday.

“The strength of the arts and culture throughout Oregon not only drives economic impact on its own, but is critical to attracting talent for our growing companies and providing a quality of life that we all value in our communities,” said Robbins. “This extensive and inclusive search process has provided a candidate that has a demonstrated track record of moving state arts initiatives forward, and I am eager to work with him.”

“We’re delighted by this appointment,” said Julie Vigeland, chair of the Arts Commission, and Bob Speltz, chair of the Cultural Trust board of directors. “Brian is an experienced leader and arts administrator who is clearly adept at systems and strategy. We believe he will be a persuasive and compelling advocate for the arts, heritage and humanities.

“Rogers also was the choice of the Oregonians who participated in the process,” they added. “We are very grateful to those who took the time to attend the forums and share their feedback.”

During his 21 years with the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts (PCA), Rogers also served as deputy director of administration, program director for art museums and fellowship manager. Since leaving the council in 2013, he has consulted with state arts agencies across the country about grant programs and funding.

Rogers played the key leadership role in the development and implementation of the “Cultural Data Project (CDP),” the public/private partnership of an innovative and groundbreaking data collection and reporting tool. He also served on the governing body for the CDP and as the state’s task force manager. In addition, he implemented several PCA programs and services including Picture Pennsylvania, a state-wide traveling exhibition program.

Among Rogers’ accomplishments in Pennsylvania were decentralized funding partnerships and initiatives for alternative funding options. He also implemented four strategic planning processes, one of which resulted in the nationally recognized re-organization of PCA’s responsive funding programs, providing a higher level of service and more than doubling the number of applicants funded.

Rogers holds a bachelor’s in fine arts from Tyler School of Art at Temple University, where he majored in painting, and a masters in fine arts from the Graduate School of Art at the University of Arizona.

He will begin his new role in July.

News form the Oregon Arts Commission and Survey with Sunday deadline...

February 12, 2014
Editor’s Note:  After a long hiatus, we are happy to revive the Oregon Arts Commission e-newsletter.  If you have suggestions for timely arts updates please contact [email protected].
Survey calls for input on executive director search
What qualities do you believe are most important in the next executive director of the Oregon Arts Commission and the Oregon Cultural Trust? A stakeholder survey invites your insights and perspective on the attributes you believe we should be looking for during an upcoming national search to fill the position. The survey takes about five minutes to complete and will be live until Sunday, Feb. 16. Responses will be compiled and used to develop the ideal candidate profile, which will guide the selection process. All survey participants will be notified of a subsequent public session at which the recruitment plan and job posting will be adopted.
Link to the survey here.
(Clockwise from left) Kristin Calhoun of the Regional Arts and Culture Council, Cary Clarke of Young Audiences, April Baer of Oregon Public Broadcasting and Diane Syrcle of the Oregon Symphony deep in discussion at the 2013 Oregon Arts Summit in Portland. Photo: Andie Petkus

Feedback leads to regional summits

 

In response to audience feedback from last year’s Oregon Arts Summit in Portland, the Arts Commission is considering a new regional approach to meetings for the fall of 2014. A statewide summit in Portland will be scheduled for 2015.

 

Survey results revealed that while the larger statewide summit is highly valued for networking and discussion of broad topics, many feel the need for more focused conversations around regional issues and strategies. This feedback led to a rethinking of the current model and a decision to pilot regional convenings in 2014. The number, locations and dates of the meetings will be identified in collaboration with regional groups.

 

We welcome your ideas and suggestions as we embark on a more innovative approach to meeting the needs of regional arts leadership. Please contact David Huff, assistant Oregon Arts Commission director, at [email protected] or 503-986-0086 with questions or concerns.

Christopher Acebo
Alyssa Dawamana
Macy
Avantika Bawa
Leadership, Commission transitions announced;
new officers elected

We want to take this opportunity to thank Chris D’Arcy, former Oregon Arts Commission and Oregon Cultural Trust executive director, for 19 years of dedicated and transformational service. Among D’Arcy’s many accomplishments during her tenure were the creation of the Arts Builds Communities program and the development of the Oregon Cultural Trust. Shannon Planchon, assistant director of the Arts Commission from 2005 to 2013, agreed to serve as interim executive director until D’Arcy’s successor is named.

We also bid farewell to several members of the Commission who have stepped down in recent months: Jean Boyer Cowling; Roger Hull; Royal Nebeker; Henry Sayre; and Maurizio Valerio. Their leadership and commitment to the Arts Commission is deeply appreciated and they will be missed.

We are, however, excited to welcome three new members to the Commission. Christopher Acebo,the associate artistic director of the Oregon Shakespeare Festival, and Alyssa Dawamana,development specialist with the Native Arts and Cultures Foundation, were appointed by Gov. John Kitzhaber in November. Avantika Bawa,an assistant professor of fine arts at Washington State University Vancouver, Wash., joined the Commission in December.

Finally, the Commission voted on a new slate of officers at its February meeting. Julie Vigeland was elected to a second one-year term as chair and Libby Tower was elected vice chair.

Art in Action:  Horatio Law’s Paris residency
Visual artist Horatio Law, one of 23 recipients of the most recent round of Career Opportunity grants, is currently in Paris completing a four-month residency at the Cité Internationale des Arts made possible by his grant. We recently checked in with Law and learned he was working on an installation he expected to finish this week. He shared this photo of “studio experiments with vellum and found objects,” part of his preparation for the installation. “Paris is a culturally diverse city, and the Cité is a united nation of artist residencies providing amazing opportunities and exposure to global culture,” says Law. Law received $1,500 from the Oregon Arts Commission and an additional $3,569 from The Ford Family Foundation to support his residency.

Upcoming grant deadlines

 

Deadlines are rapidly approaching for two of the Commission’s grant programs. Applications for Art Acquisition Funding must be received by March 25; Arts Learning grant proposals are due by April 1 (note revised deadline).

Nominations sought for next poet laureate

 

Seeking “a bold and articulate voice for culture across the state,” the Oregon Cultural Trust, Oregon Humanities and Oregon State Library jointly request nominations for Oregon’s next poet laureate. Paulann Petersen, who has served since 2010, completes her second term in April 2014. The nominating period runs through Feb. 28th.

 Like us on Facebook!

Art in the Parks: Celebrating Folk Art in Oregon with a Special Presentation of “The Art of Fly-Tying”

At Joseph Stewart Park Recreation Area on June 15th there will be a demonstration of “The Art of Fly-Tying,” by fly fisher and fly-tier Sherry Steele and folklorist Riki Saltzman, in collaboration with the Rogue Gallery and Art Center in Medford. Steele will demonstrate fly-tying and discuss fly-tying’s significance in Oregon fishing traditions and folk art and also showcase the many types of materials used to make flies.

First Session 10AM-12 noon:

Kick start your family fun summer with tying your first fly and learning the basics of Fly Tying.

Welcome Kids and Adults that have still have the kid in us. All tools and materials will be provided.

Second Session 7PM-9PM:

This presentation will be about the history, cultural significance and traditions of the craft of fly tying – when, where and how it all started. Take close up look at the materials that create these fishing flies and classic art beauties. Learn how this art of fly tying can reach far into the lives of families that live and visit Oregon.

“Art in the Parks” is sponsored by the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) along with the University of Oregon’s Oregon Folklife Network (OFN), the Oregon Arts Commission, and the Oregon Cultural Trust. “The program is a great opportunity to work with heritage and arts organizations to showcase cultural traditions in Oregon while also bringing people out to enjoy scenic state parks,” said Roger Roper, deputy state historic preservation officer with OPRD.

All events are free and open to the public, and all ages are welcome—no registration is required. For more information about the Oregon Folklife Network, visit http://ofn.uoregon.edu. For directions to the parks, visit www.oregonstateparks.org. For more information on the Rogue Gallery & Art Center visit www.roguegallery.org.

Oregon Arts Commission Seeks Assistant Director

Assistant Director Recruitment 
The Oregon Arts Commission is recruiting for an Assistant Director, our primary budget and fiscal officer, responsible for grants and budget management and office operations. Major duties include: oversight of all Arts Commission grant programs; lead for ADA and access issues; budget management for the Arts Commission and Oregon Cultural Trust; serving as the primary contact with the National Endowment for the Arts; and oversight of information systems.
The Commission is seeking candidates with experience working in the arts, heritage and the humanities; exceptional interpersonal skills; experience in effective team and coalition building to achieve agreed upon goals; who are capable of communicating complex facts to various audiences through written, oral and on-line presentations; are strategic thinkers and committed to the mission of the Arts Commission; and have the ability to understand finances and budgets and connect those with goals.
Applications will be accepted until January 25, 2013. Read the full posting at http://bit.ly/TJINZB

Now Online: Video Catalogue
2012 Oregon Arts Summit

The fourth annual Oregon Arts Summit on October 12, 2012 offered a frame for attendees’ exploration of leadership “lessons learned”. Summit ideas reverberated across the state and beyond, courtesy of the Summit’s grad student tweeting reporters from University of Oregon’s Arts Administration Department. The stimulating stories told by national and Oregon presenters are now available on the Oregon Arts Commission website.

Each of the day’s sessions is available, including a 250-second “day in review” video, a keynote by Eric Booth, and presentations by Max Williams, Dr. Rudy Crew, Dan Wieden, Congresswoman Suzanne Bonamici and all 12 Pecha Kucha presenters. Shot by Oregon Convention Center video crew and edited by The Canoe Group and Cam Williams, the videos will be permanently archived on our site.

Click through to http://www.oregonartscommission.org/programs/oregon-arts-summit to relive the Summit, to share it with others… or to experience it for the very first time.

Oregon Culture Earns its Own Field Guide

Did you know that more than 1,300 arts, heritage, and humanities non-profits produce and protect cultural activities on behalf of Oregonians? Now, for the first time, those activities are being catalogued in one place. Visit OregonCultureFieldGuide.org for more information.

The site includes a series of informational videos showcases Cultural Trust-funded attractions in the seven regions of Oregon. Original portraits by photographer Holly Andres include subjects such as author Cheryl Strayed, wine industry pioneer Susan Sokol Blosser, advertising guru Dan Wieden, and Grammy-winning musician Esperanza Spalding. The site is accepting nominations to build its debut selection of featured activities and anyone can participate. Users give a “thumbs up” to their favorites, and a live tally of “Trending Activities” displays the most popular.

2012 Summit Snapshot: Eric Booth
A Call for “Authentic Leadership”

Your personal leadership, your work within institutions, and the responsibility we all share for leadership within our community… I hope you discover kinds of leadership that you didn’t know you had… and get back to where the impulse for the arts came from, that original place.

Keynote speaker and arts education leader Eric Booth introduced the Summit framework of leadership tools (listening, wayfinding/decision, storytelling and including/empowering), offered a compelling keynote address on authentic leadership and encouraged the reflective learning in the closing session. Begin exploring Eric Booth’s remarks with this keynote excerpt.

New Creative Oregon Stories Posted

Be sure to follow this link to read the new Creative Oregon online stories by Portland writer Lisa Radon:

  • Career Opportunity grant recipient Linda Hutchins draws and makes music with thimbles.
  • Marie Watt creates skyscrapers with folded blankets, creating work that reflects story and ritual embodied in everyday objects.
  • Poet and publisher margareta waterman of Winston has released 70-some books and chapbooks of poetry through her press, nine muses books.