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URGENT! MAKE YOUR VOICE HEARD FOR OUR CULTURAL VENUES BEFORE TUESDAY.

URGENT! MAKE YOUR VOICE HEARD FOR OUR CULTURAL VENUES BEFORE TUESDAY.

As you may have heard the Oregon Legislature is meeting this week in both an Emergency Board session and a special session. We need your voice.

Our colleagues have been working hard to convince our policymakers to allocate federal CARES dollars to keep our performing arts and culture venues open. We call this “life support for venues” (with thanks to Jim Brunberg!). Led by Representative Rob Nosse and the Independent Venue Coalition, this effort makes it clear that funding nonprofits and small businesses is critical to Oregon’s COVID-19 recovery. We must be at the table for economic support if we are to recover.

The time is now! The Emergency Board will vote on Tuesday to make this allocation.

Please let members of the Emergency Board know how important this investment is to your communities and to Oregonians all across this state.

We need letters, emails, and phone calls to these members who are listed below.

Key points to make:

  • We support life support for Oregon’s venues where art and culture live.
  • Venues are statewide. If you live outside of Portland, your voice is especially important.
  • Venues are ALL independent in Oregon, we want to keep them that way. Money spent in Oregon venues stays in Oregon.
  • These are places where families meet and gather. Where couples meet and families start. Culture and community.
  • Jobs, jobs, jobs. Thousands of livelihoods.
  • Economic impact: over a billion.
  • People move here to be part of music and arts performance network. It’s something Oregon is proud of.
  • These stages give voice to the voiceless, to perspectives that would otherwise not be heard.

The Emergency Board Contact Emails:

[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]

(Full names available on our website)

Thank you for joining us in this effort!
Cultural Advocacy Coalition

Southern Oregon Artists Resource editor’s note: We sent a lengthy email touching all the bases listed above to all the representatives and senators listed above as we reposted this article. Please make time to write a thoughtful email putting all these important points into your own words TODAY!

 


Cultural Advocacy Coalition of Oregon   

SOSA June 2020 Newsletter

SOSA June 2020 newsletter

TOUCH, A Virtual Exhibition at Woman Made Gallery

Woman Made Gallery - Touch virtual exhibition

TOUCH, A Virtual Exhibition

Juror/Curator: Gina Lee Robbins
June 5–30, 2020
Facebook Live Opening: Saturday, June 13 | 2–3 p.m.

CHICAGO ––
Inspired by the current pandemic, this exhibition looks at something that many of us have had to completely do without: TOUCH. Most of the world is under order to shelter in place, practice social distancing, stay 6 feet away from each other. This is particularly punishing given that the tactile is such an integral part of the way we develop human relationships. In fact, our use of the word “touch” in English has long referred to how we stay connected–even from a distance.

In curating the 430 entries, Gina Lee Robbins looked for very specific personal responses to the theme. She began to see touch as its own complex language. Robbins selected works that convey the myriad ways we use touch to communicate with ourselves, others and the world around us, and how we respond emotionally to its presence or absence. Among these are representations of comfort, healing, tenderness, love, control, pain, fear, grief and loss.

In her photograph “Panic” Maha Alasaker from Kuwait expresses her anxiety: ” My heart is racing. I can’t catch my breath. I’m going to be sick. I try to focus, but the panic is hard to fight. I can’t think, the manic pace of my thoughts race across the landscape of my consciousness. Numbness creeps over my body as though my soul and body are out of harmony. I know the signs. It’s coming. Having anxiety and being in a defined space, doesn’t help… But we are all in it .. and I keep reminding myself of that.”

Exhibiting Artists: Bhagya Ajaikumar, Ngozi Akande, Maha Alasaker, Valerie Alsbrook, Angela Amias, Liala Amin, Nikki Renee Anderson, Ara-Lucia, Charuka Arora, Lisa Marie Barber, Anoush Bargamian, Jenny Belin, Julie Black, Marit Block, Kelly Boehmer, Shelly Bond, Tara Booth, Dimitra Bouritsa, K. Johnson Bowles, Fran Bull, Alexandra Buxbaum, Rebecca Casement, Kristin Cass, Olivia Chapman, Nicole Chaput, Jenny  Chernansky, Angela Chostner, Nancy Ciesiel, Rae Clatch, Bobbye Cochran, Andrea Cook, Carrie Cooper, Renee Couture, Deborah Crandell, Alicia Dawn Criswell, Yvette Cummings, Melanie Deal, Rachael Marie Demeo, Nicole Denton, Sally Brown Deskins, PJ Desrochers, Kelly Devitt, Hyunhee Doh, Janice Elkins, Deborah Emerson, Ally Emrich, Alison Erazmus, Carol Estes, SP Estes, Sève Favre, Dea Fischer, Lauren Flaaen, Suzanne Forbes, Susan Fraerman, Sarah Freeland, Stacy Frett, Victoria Fuller, Kathleen Marie Garness, Gill Gatfield, Helen Geglio, Bettina Gellinek Turner, Sarah Genematas, Leah Golberstein, Lea Goldman, Donna Goode, Jeanette Green, Anna Brooke Greene, Karen Gubitz, Autumn Guntor, Millie Rose Guy, Jenny Halpern, Rebecca Hamlin Green, Muriel Hansen, Kelly Harrington, Katie Haseeb, Ali Headley, Alison Hixon, Kelsey Ann Horn, Marilyn Hrymak, Ellie Hueneke, Tonia Hughes, Malika Jackson, Sarah Kaiser-Amaral, Heather Ryan Kelley, Venise Keys, Steff Korsage, Barbara Krantz, Dorothy Simpson Krause, Stephanie Krellwitz, Juliane von Kunhardt, Kimi Kuniyoshi, Angela M. LaMonte, Capri Landi, Betty Jane Lau, Kim Laurel, Christine LaValley, Irena Lawruszko, Gwladys Le Roy, Laurie LeBreton, Fiona Lee, Sabrina Lee, Susan Lehman, Susan Lenz, Jennifer Lindemer, Casey Lowry, Elaine Luther, Hannah Jo Malaczynski, Roberta Malkin, Jennifer Mannebach, Claire Marcus, Zana Mariño, Betsy Marsch, Maureen May, Linda McCune, Bethan McFadden, Vatsala Menon, Lynn Merel, Rosemary Meza-DesPlas, Xanthe Miller, Indrani Nayar-Gall, Judy Nemer Sklar, Kai Nemra, Louise Noakes, Mary Jo Parker O’Hearn, Heather Olker, Greta Olson, Erin ONeill, Luisa Otero Prada, Katherine O’Truk, Hanna M. Owens, Patricia Panopoulos, Tonya Patrick, Theodora Pavlou, Wendy Peer, Lauren Peterson, Laurel Pierce, Diane Ponder, Rebecca Potts, Felicia Grant Preston, Ann Quinn, Cherry Rahn, Angela Rebrec, Milana Reedus, Mia Risberg, Kathleen Roman, Caren Helene Rudman, MahlÕt  S A N S O S A, Red Sagalow, Fran Sampson, Nelly Sanchez, Paula Schiller, Johanna Sarah Schlenk, Heather Sepanik, Carol Shikany, Alma Shoaf, Michele Silvetti-Schmitt, K Smith, Payton Spinosa, Patricia Stewart, Susanne Swanson-Bernard, Laurie Talbot Hall, Sumire Taniai, Cheryl Thomas, Marlene Trauth, Star Trauth, Nina Urlichs, Carol Van Alstine, Gwynneth VanLaven, Carolina Velez Muñiz, Alyssa Vignone, Katie Vota, Natalie Walser, Julie Waltz-Stalker, Melissa Wang, Marybeth Ward, Sofia Wehrle, Jennifer Weigel, Lisa Wicka, Christina Williams, Rachael Zur.

Juror/Curator: Gina Lee Robbins is a visual and teaching artist who creates sculptural objects in clay, fiber and other tactile materials. Largely self-taught, she has been working with ceramics and found materials for over 30 years. Her work has been exhibited in solo, invitational and juried group shows and competitions throughout the United States, and her sculptures are part of private and corporate collections worldwide.  https://www.ginaleerobbins.com

CLICK HERE TO VIEW EXHIBITION ONLINE

Woman Made Gallery
2150 S Canalport #4A-3 | Chicago, IL 60608
312-738-0400 | [email protected] | www.womanmade.org

Please Donate | http://womanmade.org/donate

Banner Image: artwork by (top): Fran Bull, Olivia Chapman, Jenny Chernansky.
(bottom): Carolina Velez Muñiz, Heather Olker, Nelly Sanchez

Woman Made Gallery
2150 S. Canalport #4A-3
Chicago, IL 60608
312-738-0400 | [email protected] | www.womanmade.org

We have postponed events at WMG until further notice. Email questions: [email protected]

Please Donate to Woman Made Gallery

HOME, A Virtual Exhibition
Exhibition Opens: July 3, 2020
Final Entry Due Date: June 11, 2020
Notification: June 18, 2020

Curator/Juror: Jennifer Weigel

CLICK HERE TO SUBMIT WORK. 
https://womanmadegallery.submittable.com/submit

(One theme-related artwork from each submission is guaranteed to be included.)

Please note: “Woman Made reserves the right to refuse entries that do not comply with the entry requirements or Woman Made’s mission. In such an event, Woman Made will refund any entry fees for the submitted work.” 

LOSS, A Virtual Exhibition
Exhibition Opens: August 1, 2020
Entry Due Date: July 3, 2020
Notification: July 17, 2020

Curator/Juror: Felicia Grant Preston

CLICK HERE TO SUBMIT WORK. 
https://womanmadegallery.submittable.com/submit

(One theme-related artwork from each submission is guaranteed to be included.)

Please note: “Woman Made reserves the right to refuse entries that do not comply with the entry requirements or Woman Made’s mission. In such an event, Woman Made will refund any entry fees for the submitted work.” 

Survey reveals devastating impact of COVID-19 on Oregon culture

impact COVID-19 Oregon culture

Cultural Trust survey reveals devastating impact

of COVID-19 on Oregon culture

Salem, Ore. –The majority of Oregon’s cultural organizations are facing suspension of operations or permanent closure due to the COVID-19 impact, reveals an Oregon Cultural Trust survey released today.
The most comprehensive survey of Oregon’s cultural community since the crisis began, the survey includes data and comments from 330 cultural nonprofits representing 83 percent of Oregon counties. Participants project a collective loss of $40 million and average losses of $121,281 through June 30. The majority of respondents (54 percent) have annual revenues of less than $250,000 and operate outside of the Portland Metro area.
More than half (51 percent) of respondents have not applied for the federal Payroll Protection Program (PPP), likely due to the fact that 44 percent employ less than one full-time staff member – relying mostly on a volunteer workforce. Of the 49 percent that did apply for PPP, only 73 percent have received funds to-date. More than 90 percent of those that did receive PPP funds report the funding is “not adequate to support their financial losses.”
“The PPP loan is a financial band-aid for the short term, but for us to continue to provide our essential service…there will be a need for continued relief funding well into the next fiscal year and possibly beyond,” reports the Tillicum Foundation, which operates nonprofit radio stations in Astoria, Tillamook and Warrenton.
“Quite frankly right now it looks grim,” reports the Oregon Coast Council for the Arts, “when the PPP monies are gone we may be looking at a ‘staffless’ OCCA for a while.”
Because most cultural organizations rely on large gatherings for ticket and rental revenue, they rank at the top of Oregon business sectors most severely affected by the crisis. They also will be the slowest to reopen, given the indefinite ban on large gatherings due to COVID-19. “Without any earned revenue, we are relying entirely on philanthropy and government support,” reports the Portland Art Museum.
“[Without relief funding,] we will have to close our doors and lose the investment of our community over 30 years,” reports the Gilbert House Children’s Museum in Salem.
The survey also revealed particular hardship for cultural organizations in rural areas. Bend’s High Desert Museum reports that “museums and cultural organizations in more rural areas will be hit hardest immediately and will have a much longer recovery period – we saw this during the recession and the indicators point to a similar pattern now…funding to help organizations like the High Desert Museum be resilient for the next 12-24 months is critical.”
Survey comments also reflect the concern cultural organizations have for the vulnerable populations they serve. The Shadow Project, which provides learning support for children with disabilities, reports that “during COVID-19 these children are even more vulnerable, at highest risk of falling further behind and exacerbated mental health disorders.”
“Underserved rural populations define the youth and families we serve,” reports the Drexel H. Foundation in Vale, where 21 percent of the population lives in poverty.Their outreach programs are “free to all, reducing economic barriers to learning, cultural experiences and art participation for all ethnic groups. Grantors have cancelled funding opportunities we had counted upon….[t]oo many resources have disappeared.”
The Cultural Trust is currently awaiting Legislative consideration of its Emergency Cultural Relief Fund proposal, which would deploy up to $10 million of its$29 million permanent fund to create an emergency relief funding program for Oregon’s cultural organizations.
impact COVID-19 Oregon culture

CHAP Statement - Black Lives Matter

A Message From CHAP

Children’s Healing Art Project (CHAP) stands in support of the Black Community and believes that Black Lives Matter. We oppose racism, discrimination, police brutality, and violence of all kinds. The senseless killings of George Floyd, Ahmaud Arbery, Breonna Taylor and many others are heartbreaking examples of systemic racism that must end.

In recent weeks, we have been listening and learning with open hearts and minds. This has been a time of clarity and reflection. We believe everyone in our community is impacted – including the children and families CHAP serves. We know there is more to learn and more to do as we continue our mission – to bring the healing power of art to children and families facing medical challenges.

CHAP is committed. Period. We will take action and share our progress.

With CREATIVITY + HEALING,
Lori Long, President, Board of Directors 
and                             
Barb McDowell, Executive Director

OAC Statement on Racial Justice

Oregon Arts Commission Racial Justice graphic

OAC Statement on racial justice: Facebook Join My List Logo

Mourning their loss is not enough

Dear Arts and Culture Community,

We must act now. We at the Oregon Arts Commission and the Oregon Cultural Trust stand in solidarity with those who are outraged by the killing of George Floyd and many other Black victims of despicable racial violence.

In the words of Governor Kate Brown, “mourning their loss is not enough. We must commit ourselves to racial justice.” These unforgivable acts of violence are a tragic symptom of a society that tolerates systemic racism, police brutality, white supremacy and oppression.

Now is the time to say enough. All of us, including the thousands of artists and cultural organizations that call Oregon home, must commit ourselves to immediate action. We must examine ourselves and our business practices to ensure we hear, and respond to, the voices that call for change.

We at the Arts Commission and the Cultural Trust promise to listen and learn from Black voices and other voices of color as we navigate our actions forward. We will continue to advocate for, amplify and stand beside the artists, cultural activists and arts professionals who work toward changing long-standing systems of power so that Black people experience equal rights and access, and are free from threat and violence.

To the Black community: we see you, we hear you and we support you. We are working to establish and implement better ways of serving artists of color, especially with artist relief funding. We hope to share details on a program soon.

We ask that you also commit to action now. Begin by reading this compelling open letter from Marcus C. Mundy, the executive director of Oregon’s Coalition of Communities of Color – in it he outlines steps he believes the justice system needs to take immediately.

Please join us in saying YES, Black Lives Matter – then back up those words by working for positive change in Oregon now.

Sincerely,

Anne Taylor, Chair, Oregon Arts Commission

Chuck Sams III, Chair, Oregon Cultural Trust

Brian Rogers, Executive Director, Oregon Arts Commission/Cultural Trust

All Commissioners, Board Members and Staff

PS: More information and ways to get involved in the call for racial justice are available from Don’t Shoot Portland, the Black United Fund, The Portland African American Leadership Forum, The Urban League of Portland, NAACP Oregon and the MRG Foundation.

https://www.oregonartscommission.org/sites/default/files/news/file/Call%20for%20racial%20justice%20letter%20June%202020.pdf

Ashland Apartment for Rent

Our unit, downstairs apartment in Ashland is for rent. I’m advertising on CraigsList but word of mouth is always the best so you just never know…you might know someone who knows someone. The one-bedroom unit is reasonable rent, clean, new, all that good stuff. Our last person was here for 4 years! It’s a lovely space.

See pictures on the CraigsList page:  https://medford.craigslist.org/apa/d/ashland-br-apartment-stunning-views/7129681702.html

New Studies Show Devastating Impact on Arts Sector

Americans for the Arts President's FY20 Budget Calls for Termination of Cultural Agencies AgainWe have some tough economic data to share with you about the arts sector, but with your advocacy help, we can work on recovering and rebuilding. Following up on Friday’s action alert on the HEROES Act legislation, we hope you will take five minutes to urge your members of Congress, especially your Senators, to increase support for pro-arts policies as negotiations continue on the next legislative package of COVID-19 relief.

The coronavirus continues to have a devastating impact on America’s arts sector. Last week, the U.S. Census Bureau released Small Business Pulse Survey data showing three-quarters of responding “Arts, Entertainment, and Recreation” businesses saying the pandemic has had a “Large Negative Effect”—second only to “Accommodations and Food Services.” Unfortunately, by several measures, arts businesses are not getting the same level of relief as other sectors of the economy despite being more severely impacted.

U.S. Census Bureau Small Business Pulse Survey, April 26 to May 2, 2020

Nationally, financial losses to nonprofit arts organizations are estimated to be $5.5 billion, to date. These organizations and companies have also lost 210 million admissions due to cancelled events, resulting in a $6.7 billion loss in event-related spending by audiences (restaurants, lodging, retail).

Two-thirds of the nation’s artists are now unemployed, as jobs in the “Arts, Entertainment & Recreation” sector have shrunk by 54.5%.

On a positive note, earlier this month, 140 Chambers of Commerce from 39 states offered support of cultural institutions to Congressional leadership through a joint statement that reads, “These institutions are important to every community, exposing residents to creativity and education and enhancing their quality of life.” We are very appreciative of the Association of Chambers of Commerce Executives (ACCE) for this leadership.

Similarly, a group of 23 mayors have signed on to a pro-arts statement to congressional leaders highlighting their support for the federal cultural agencies, paycheck support and the self-employed and freelance creative workforce. Their advocacy was led by San Francisco mayor London Breed and the local arts alliance.

Last week, the U.S. House of Representatives narrowly approved the Health and Economic Recovery Omnibus Emergency Solutions (HEROES) Act which includes substantial funds for state and local governments, school districts, Community Development Block Grants, small businesses and self-employed, and funds for the National Endowment for the Arts, National Endowment for the Humanities, and museums.

May and June are the most strategic times to increase your advocacy to Congress—Please take five minutes to urge Congress to increase support for pro-arts policies as negotiations continue on this next legislative package of COVID-19 relief.

Americans for the Arts and the Arts Action Fund will continue to work for increased support for our sector as we deal with this global pandemic. In addition to the continuing damage reports being collected through our national economic snapshot survey and dashboard and our up-to-the-minute COVID-19 Resource Center updates, we continue to produce a series of webinars through our ArtsU platform to present experts and guidance to the field to help navigate through these new federal provisions during this challenging time.


1000 Vermont Avenue NW
6th Floor
Washington DC . 20005
T 202.371.2830
F 202.371.0424
One East 53rd Street . 2nd Floor
New York NY . 10022
T 212.223.2787
F 212.980.4857
[email protected]
www.AmericansForTheArts.org
www.ArtsActionFund.org

Oregon Cultural Trust May 2020 Update

Oregon Cultural Trust News and Updates

Oregon Cultural Trust News and Updates

May 2020

*******

Anis Mojgani named Oregon’s 10th Poet LaureateNewly appointed Oregon Poet Laureate Anis Mojgani

Governor Kate Brown has named Anis Mojgani (AH-neess Mozh-GAH-nee), a two-time individual champion of the National Poetry Slam and an International World Cup Poetry Slam winner, to a two-year appointment as Poet Laureate of Oregon. Anis succeeds Kim Stafford, who has held the post since 2018, to become Oregon’s 10th Poet Laureate.

“Anis is the pragmatic optimist Oregon needs in these unprecedented times,” says Governor Brown. “His words breathe fresh air into the anxiety and negativity that we all feel. He urges us to resolutely reflect in the moment and with each grounding breath, our hearts ‘come closer and come into this.’”

Born in New Orleans to Black and Iranian parents, Anis first called Oregon home in 2004. He is the author of five books of poetry including his latest, “In the Pockets of Small Gods.”

Watch Anis perform “Come Closer.”

Read the full release.Newly appointed Oregon Poet Laureate Anis Mojgani. Photo by Ryan Longnecker.

Updated COVID-19 resources for cultural organizations

The Cultural Trust continues to update relief resources for cultural organizations impacted by the COVID-19 health crisis. New to the list is $450,000 in funding from Oregon Humanities made possible by the CARES Act funding to the National Endowment for the Humanities and The Western States Arts Federation’s WESTAF CARES Relief Fund for Organizations, which opened May 6.

The Business Oregon Small Business Navigator is updated daily, with many resources open to nonprofits.

Panelist grant application review process begins

Artifacts at the Portland Chinatown Museum, a FY2020 Cultural Development grant award recipient.

Artifacts at the Portland Chinatown Museum, a FY2020 Cultural Development grant award recipient.

Soon after the May 8 application deadline for the Cultural Trust’s FY2021 Cultural Development Program, volunteer grant panelists will begin their review process. Applications are reviewed and scored by individuals chosen for their diverse cultural expertise and geographic, ethnic and gender diversity. The review panels will meet between June 9 and 18 and their scores are used to rank the applications.

Based on panel ranking, Trust staff prepares funding recommendations that are reviewed and acted on by the Cultural Trust Board of Directors in July. Grant awards will be announced in August.

Cultural organizations among hardest hit by health crisis

A recent survey by Business Oregon revealed that the arts, creative and recreation industry ranks at the top of business sectors suffering losses due to the COVID-19 health crisis. If able, cultural donors are urged to consider making donations early this year to help sustain the organizations that make a difference in their community.

As always, matching donations to the Cultural Trust prior to June 30 will increase the funds available for FY2021 grant making. The funding pool for grants is calculated based on fiscal year donations, with up to 60 percent allocated for grant making and the remainder for permanent fund growth.A recent survey by Business Oregon shows that the arts, entertainment and recreation industry has suffered more than any sector except accommodations during the COVID-19 health crisis.

A recent survey by Business Oregon shows that the arts, entertainment and recreation industry has suffered more than any sector except accommodations during the COVID-19 health crisis.

Cultural Trust survey to capture COVID-19 relief needs

While awaiting Legislative consideration of its Emergency Cultural Relief Fund proposal, the Cultural Trust is reaching out to Oregon’s 1,400+ cultural nonprofits to survey them on COVID-19 impacts and progress in securing other relief funding.

The survey will be distributed via direct email on Friday, May 8, with a deadline of May 17. Results will help to build a case for passage of the Cultural Relief Fund.Like most performing arts groups, the Little Ballet TheatrLike most performing arts groups, the Little Ballet Theatre in Warrenton has cancelled all classes and performances during the COVID-19 health crisis. Little Ballet Theatre in Warrenton has cancelled all classes and performances during the COVID-19 health crisis.

Oregon Arts Commission | Oregon Cultural Trust | 775 Summer Street NE #200, Salem, OR 97301

May 2020 Oregon Arts Commission News

Oregon Arts commission logo

May 2020 Oregon Arts Commission News & Updates

A call for Governor’s Arts Award nominations, updated COVID-19 resources, a live Facebook event to celebrate 2020 Poetry Out Loud students and 2020 Individual Artist Fellows announced!

Deadline May 26

Nominations open for 2020 Governor’s Arts Awards

Governor Kate Brown recently opened nominations for the 2020 Governor’s Arts Awards. The Arts Awards recognize and honor individuals and organizations that have made significant contributions to the arts in Oregon. They are held periodically as funding allows.
The Governor’s Arts Awards are open to any individual, organization or community that currently resides in or has a significant presence in Oregon and has made outstanding contributions to the arts in the state. A special category for 2020 recognizes virtual arts engagement during the COVID-19 health crisis.
Awardees will be honored on Saturday, Sept. 12, at the Chehalem Cultural Center in Newberg. Note: If social distancing prevents a public gathering, the event will be produced as a live-streamed Facebook event.
Nominations are due by 5 p.m. on Tuesday, May 26. The 148 past recipients of an Award are not eligible. Read the full release.
Traditional American Indian storyteller Esther Stutzman, a 2017 Governor’s Arts Award recipient.
Traditional American Indian storyteller Esther Stutzman, a 2017 Governor’s Arts Award recipient.

CARES Act funding awarded to Operating Support recipients

Relief funding awards will soon be distributed to more than 130 Oregon arts organizations who have previously received Operating Support grant awards from the Arts Commission. Made possible through CARES Act funding awarded to the National Endowment for the Arts, the awards require review for artistic merit and quality, which is included in Operating Support panel review. Awards will range from $2,000 to $10,000 depending on budget size.
In approving the awards at its May 1 meeting, the Arts Commission also called for the creation of an Ad Hoc committee to discuss FY2021 grant fund allocations.
Youth Symphony of Southern Oregon, an Operating Support grant award recipient.
Youth Symphony of Southern Oregon, an Operating Support grant award recipient.
WESTAF cares relief fund for arts organizations

Updated COVID-19 resources for arts organizations

The Arts Commission continues to update relief resources for arts organizations impacted by the COVID-19 health crisis. New to the list is $450,000 in funding from Oregon Humanities made possible by the CARES Act funding to the National Endowment for the Humanities and The Western States Arts Federation’s WESTAF CARES Relief Fund for Organizations, which opened May 6.
The Business Oregon Small Business Navigator is updated daily, with many resources open to nonprofits.

The Oregon high school students who qualified for Oregon’s State Poetry Out Loud Contest will be celebrated in a live Facebook event at 6 p.m. on Wednesday, May 27. The State Contest was cancelled due to the COVID-19 health crisis, as was the national Poetry Out Loud contest.

Live Facebook event to celebrate Poetry Out Loud students –

Mark your calendars!

The Oregon high school students who qualified for Oregon’s State Poetry Out Loud Contest will be celebrated in a live Facebook event at 6 p.m. on Wednesday, May 27. The State Contest was cancelled due to the COVID-19 health crisis, as was the national Poetry Out Loud contest.
“The students worked so hard to prepare their poems for the State Contest,” said Deb Vaughn, who coordinates the Arts Commission’s Poetry Out Loud contest. “They deserve this opportunity to share their achievements.”
Poetry Out Loud is a national contest for high school students, organized in Oregon by the Oregon Arts Commission in collaboration with the National Endowment for the Arts and the Poetry Foundation.

2020 Individual Artist Fellows announced

Nine Oregon artists have been awarded 2020 Individual Artist Fellowships by the Oregon Arts Commission. The 2020 fellowships recognize and support artists working in the visual arts.
The visual artists awarded 2020 fellowships are: Julia Bradshaw, Corvallis; Melanie Flood, Portland; Erik Geschke, Portland; Colin Ives, Eugene; ruben garcia marrufo, Portland; sidony o’neal (Shipley Fellow), Portland; Kaj-anne Pepper, Portland; Maya Vivas, Portland; and Sarah Wertzberger, Portland.
Fellows are recommended by a panel of Oregon arts professionals who consider artists of outstanding talent, demonstrated ability and commitment to the creation of new work(s). The Arts Commission reviews and acts on the panel’s recommendations.
sidony o'neal, “And Now, Square Trees,” Installation View, Fourteen 30, 2019
sidony o’neal, “And Now, Square Trees,” Installation View, Fourteen 30, 2019

Americans for the Arts surveys national relief success

Americans for the Arts recently launched The CARES Act Arts Funding Tracker to learn who in the arts has applied for federal relief funds (PPP, disaster relief, NEA, etc.) and their success as well as harvest stories about how the arts are being used in local pandemic response or recovery efforts.

Upcoming grant deadlines

Operating Support Program: Monday, June 1. Contact: Kat Bell
Arts Learning Program: Wednesday, June 17. Contact: Deb Vaughn
Oregon Arts Commission | Phone 503-986-0082 | www.oregonartscommission.org