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Oregon Cultural Trust News

News and Updates November 2020
“You literally saved Camelot”


Gratitude pours in for Coronavirus Relief Funding for Cultural Support Tears of joy. That was the response from many cultural leaders when they learned they were among the 621 recipients of $25.7 million in Coronavirus Relief Fund (CRF) Cultural Support grant awards distributed by the Cultural Trust. The funding not only saved, but also gave needed hope, to many organizations. Below are just a few of the heartfelt notes the Cultural Trust has received from across the state.

“Thank you and the Trust for the award. You literally saved Camelot,” Dann Hauser, executive director, Camelot Theatre, Talent.

“This grant made us all SMILE for the first time in over a month!!!” Sue Densmore, executive director, Friends of Oregon Caves and Chateau, Grants Pass.

“We are grateful beyond words. Your work has meaning, it is inspirational/aspirational and has impacted our community. We thank you from the bottom of our hearts.” Maureen C Ter Beek, vice chair, Curry County Cultural Coalition.

“You all make me believe that when you do good, good happens eventually.” said Sushmita Poddar, founder, Bollywood Movez, Portland.

“The award notice brought us close to tears of relief… this grant is a lifeline. Without it, I’m not sure we would have survived.” Ruth G. Shelly, executive director, Portland Children’s Museum
Read more notes of gratitude


Cate O’Hagan (far left) from the Deschutes County Cultural Coalition presents Coronavirus Relief Fund Cultural Support checks to Sisters cultural organizations: (left to right) Chris Schaad of Sisters Rodeo; Marla Manning of Silent Echo Theater Company; Dawn Boyd of Sisters Outdoor Quilt Show; and Crista Munro of Sisters Folk Festival.



Talent’s Camelot Theatre miraculously survived the fires that destroyed buildings just across the street. Year-end campaign focused on protecting Oregon culture Despite the incredible impact of the CRF Cultural Support relief funding, the continued ban on large gatherings means a majority of cultural organizations are still suffering losses. The focus of the Cultural Trust’s fall fundraising appeal is to urge more Oregonians to contribute to cultural nonprofits and then to leverage those dollars by participating in the cultural tax credit program to ensure funds for next year’s cultural grant programs.

Ads for the campaign will build on the shared anticipation for a return to in-person events while encouraging donors to help protect culture. As always, support from the cultural community in spreading the word is incredibly appreciated.

One easy way to support the fall campaign is to invite a Cultural Trust representative to make a presentation at a virtual board meeting. The 10-minute presentation ensures understanding of how the cultural tax credit works and how easy it is to claim.

“This has been a challenging year for cultural organizations,” says Aili Schreiner, trust manager, “but we know that when Oregonians support each other, we succeed.” To schedule your board presentation, email Schreiner at [email protected].


Annual grants also awarded $2.7 million awarded to 128 cultural organizations Amidst the flurry of news about the CRF Cultural Support program, the Cultural Trust hasn’t yet properly congratulated the 128 organizations that shared $2.7 million in grants awarded through our annual grant programs.

The awards include a total of $676,760 to the Cultural Trust’s five statewide partners (Oregon Arts Commission, Oregon Heritage Commission, Oregon Humanities, Oregon Historical Society and the State Historic Preservation Office); $676,760 to 45 County and Tribal Cultural Coalitions – for regranting in their communities; and $1,353,520 in competitive Cultural Development Program awards to 78 cultural organizations serving most geographic regions of the state.

Many of the Cultural Development grant awards support engagement efforts during social distancing. Highlights include: preserving and sharing Hawaiian traditional cultural practices online and in person by first-time grant recipient Kapi Oanuenue in Ashland; cultural programs to reengage the community by the Tower Theatre Foundation in Bend; “From the Streets to the Symphony,” a documentary of new music by houseless young filmmakers and Oregon Symphony creative chair Gabriel Kahane by Outside the Framein Portland; and the development of the first Oregon Online African American Museum by Oregon Black Pioneers in Salem.

First-time Cultural Trust grant award recipient Kapi Oanuenue of Ashland.


A 1953 photo of the Bear-Sleds Ranger Station, to become the new home of the Wallowa History Center, supported by a FY2021 Cultural Trust grant award. Giving guides go live in Portland, Central Oregon In addition to its longstanding sponsorship of the Willamette Week Give!Guide in Portland, this year the Cultural Trust also is participating in the Central Oregon Gives Guide presented by The Source Weekly in Bend. The Portland Give!Guide is live now. Central Oregon Gives, which raised more than $500,000 for local nonprofits in its first year (2019), goes live on Nov. 14.

Both guides showcase local arts and culture organizations and promote the cultural tax credit opportunity. They also offer donor incentives and prize opportunities, including a Give!Guide McMinnville Wine Country Package on Dec. 29, sponsored by the Cultural Trust. Check them out!
Oregon Arts Commission | Oregon Cultural Trust | 775 Summer Street NE #200, Salem, OR 97301

NY Times Article on Joe Biden’s Support of the Arts



              

Joe Biden and the Arts: No R.B.G. but a Loyal Promoter of Culture

The former vice president has been an intermittent consumer of the arts, but cultural leaders credit him as a key source of government financial support. 

By Graham Bowley

Oct. 30, 2020, 11:21 a.m. ET

Joseph R. Biden Jr. is no aesthete. Not many presidential nominees have been, though some, after a stint in the White House, have decided to take up painting — with varying degrees of success.

But if Mr. Biden’s tastes run to 1967 Corvettes, Grisham novels and “Crocodile Rock,” he is, nonetheless, someone arts leaders say has always embraced the practical usefulness of the arts as an economic engine, political action trigger and community builder.

Mr. Biden’s attitude is “less from a consumer point of view and more about the inspirational value and transformational value of the arts,” said Robert L. Lynch, president and chief executive of Americans for the Arts, a national arts advocacy organization, who has tracked Mr. Biden’s support for the arts for decades. “It’s not, ‘Look, I loved this piece, or this song.’ It’s more about the bigger role of the arts in society.”

America already has a good idea of President Trump’s approach to the arts, which largely regards the world of culture as the habitat of effete liberalism and relies instead on promoting his support from celebrity performers like Ted Nugent, Lil Wayne or Kid Rock.

Mr. Trump’s signature cultural policy directive has been an effort to strip all funding from the National Endowment for the Arts and the National Endowment for the Humanities, two grant-giving agencies that have, nonetheless, survived despite conservative views that their missions are outside the core responsibilities of government.

But Mr. Biden’s perspectives on the arts, and what sort of impact his presidency might have on cultural organizations, has received little attention, particularly in a rancorous campaign dominated by the pandemic, health care and other contention issues.

The leaders of cultural organizations say that as a Democratic Senator from Delaware, and then as vice president, Mr. Biden was a consistent advocate for government funding for the arts. Last month, he won the endorsement of the Actors’ Equity Association, the union for actors and stage managers, only the second time in its history it has made a presidential endorsement. (It backed Hillary Clinton in 2016.)

“Vice President Biden understands that the arts are a critical driver of healthy and strong local economies in cities and towns across the country,” said Kate Shindle, president of Actors’ Equity, in a statement.

Jane Alexander, the actress who was chairman of the National Endowment for the Arts from 1993 to 1997, recalled walking with Mr. Biden from Union Station to Capitol Hill shortly after the Republicans had taken both houses of Congress in the 1994 elections and some were assailing the organization she ran. He was not making fiery speeches, but she said she knew she could count on his support.

“He said, ‘You have a very tough job,’” Ms. Alexander said. “I remember him being very sympathetic with the work that I had to do, and he had been supportive of the N.E.A. all along.”

So even though he never made culture a focus of his legislative legacy, like Edward M. Kennedy, who was one of the founders of the Senate’s arts caucus, Mr. Biden has received high marks for his voting record from arts executives. As a senator, Mr. Biden co-sponsored the bill creating the American Folklife Center at the Library of Congress, supported initiatives for cultural diplomacy, and in 2001, was one of the original co-sponsors of legislation establishing the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture. He attended the opening as vice president in 2016.

“Everything we hoped for, he voted for,” said Mr. Lynch of Americans for the Arts.
In comparison to a public figure like Ruth Bader Ginsburg, whose attendance at the opera was routine, Mr. Biden’s profile as an arts aficionado is modest, his regular trips with his family to see Broadway shows notwithstanding. As vice president for eight years, he attended at least seven events at the Kennedy Center, including a National Symphony Orchestra program, a Washington National Opera gala, a theater master class, a ballet performance and the opening concert for the 2016 Ireland Festival, according to Eileen Andrews, a spokesman. The Bidens also hosted a reception for Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater at the vice president’s residence in Washington.

Cultural officials at the Delaware Theater Company, the Delaware Art Museum and Wilmington’s Grand Opera House describe him as a supportive presence, if an infrequent visitor. In 2012, a museum official recalled, Mr. Biden and his wife, Jill, attended the opening of an exhibition of works by the Delaware artist Mary Page Evans, a friend, whose works they hung in the vice president’s residence in Washington, the official said. And Mr. Biden appeared at the Grand Opera House for political events with Barack Obama, spoke on a tribute video for the theater, and in 2018 spoke onstage during his “American Promise” book tour.

“If you are unable to show up at a museum every week, or every month, we are going to figure it’s because you are out there doing what you do best,” said Tina Betz, director of cultural affairs for the city of Wilmington. “We need him in Washington banging his fist, stamping his feet, making sure the N.E.A. and the N.E.H. stay intact.”

As vice president, Mr. Biden is credited with helping negotiate the 2009 stimulus bill in the wake of the financial crisis that included $50 million for the arts that many institutions viewed as critical.

“We had a lot of resistance from members of Congress, especially on the Senate side to get this money in there,” said Nina Ozlu Tunceli, executive director of the Americans for the Arts Action Fund. “The only way it got in there was an agreement between Nancy Pelosi and the White House, and Joe Biden was the lead negotiator for the White House and Nancy Pelosi was the lead negotiator for the House. It was handwritten into the deal in the last minute.”

The Obama administration was the first to enter office with a presidential arts platform. So far, Mr. Biden’s current campaign has not come forward with a similar program of specific policies for the arts, though the Democratic platform acknowledges the economic worth of the arts and in an interview in August with Lin-Manuel Miranda, Mr. Biden went further.

“The future of who we are lies in the arts,” he said. “It is the expression of our soul.”
The White House of John F. Kennedy, who had Robert Frost read a poem at his inauguration, is often cited as one where the importance of the nation’s cultural life was made manifest with the routine celebration of artists at state dinners and other events. But the John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum suggests in its presentations that J.F.K. was not a cultural sophisticate but rather a person who preferred Broadway show tunes over Beethoven. It quotes Jacqueline Kennedy as quipping that his favorite song was “Hail to the Chief.”

Mr. Biden’s taste in music, based on his playlists, runs toward the Beatles, Springsteen, Coldplay and Rod Stewart. The band he would like to play with, he has said, is the Chieftains, the Irish folk group. (He said he would sing “Shenandoah.”) His favorite film, he has said, ​​​​​is “Chariots of Fire.”

James Joyce is among his favorite writers, an affinity for Irish culture that links up with Mr. Biden’s heritage. His taste in poetry also runs toward the Irish. He quoted from“The Republic of Conscience” by Seamus Heaney, the Irish poet, when President Obama awarded him the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 2017.

Poetry has had a great impact on Mr. Biden’s life. As a boy, he has often recalled, he stuttered badly and was bullied at school. To cope he memorized long passages of works by writers like Emerson and Yeats, reciting them alone to his bedroom mirror so he would learn to relax his face and gain confidence. “Meek young men grow up in libraries,” was a favored Emerson quote.

Today, as a politician now known for his loquacity, he regularly quotes from Heaney’s “The Cure at Troy.” He recited some of it during his acceptance speech in August at the Democratic National Convention.

Politics, of course, is not poetry. Constrained by the realism of budget deficits, the will of Congress and competing claims for other projects, a new president may not be able to put arts at the forefront of his thinking.

But a poem can be a powerful campaign tool, as Mr. Biden made evident again Thursday when a favorite stanza from Heaney’s “Cure at Troy” went out on the candidate’s Twitter feed.

Graham Bowley is an investigative reporter on the Culture Desk. He also reported for The Times from Afghanistan in 2012. He is the author of the book “No Way Down: Life and Death on K2.”

Thanks to Americans for the Arts – Arts Action Fund for bringing this article to our attention.

Oregon Arts Commission


News & Updates
Deadline coming right up for the Artist Relief Program, plus a pitch for the new Artists Sunday movement and a shout out to an Oregon artist who just won a big award! Visit our Website

Artist Relief Program deadline Tuesday, Nov. 10
As the Nov. 10 deadline looms, more than 700 Oregon artists have already applied to the Oregon Arts Commission’s new Artist Relief Program, offered in partnership with Oregon Community Foundation and the James F. and Marion L. Miller Foundation. Awards ranging from $1,000 to $5,000 will be distributed until the program fund, totaling just over $1.25 million, is depleted.

“Without our artists, there would be no art in Oregon,” says Brian Rogers, executive director of the Arts Commission. ”We are very grateful to our funding partnership to help artist through this difficult time.”

The program supports professional artists from specific disciplines who have experienced or anticipate experiencing loss of revenue of $1,000 or more between March 1 and Dec. 31, 2020.

Watch a KGW story featuring Governor’s Arts Award recipient Darrell Grant and Corvallis theater artist Tinamarie Ivey.
Performing artists such as members of Third Angle New Music Ensemble have been hit particularly hard by the ongoing ban on large gatherings.


Join us to celebrate Artists Sunday on Nov. 29 The Arts Commission is one of 12 Oregon partners in a new national movement to support artists as entrepreneurs – Artists Sunday. Think of it as Black Friday or Small Business Saturday except the focus is holiday shopping for art! Search on the website to discover Oregon artists who have joined the movement.
Scheduled for Saturday, Nov. 29, Artists Sunday celebrates artists and craftspeople and helps local artists sell more of their work. Members include 650 individual artisans as well as 125 state art agencies, municipalities, counties, chambers of commerce and non-profit organizations, representing thousands of additional artists.
Artists who would like to join can register here.


19 organizations receive FY2021 Arts Learning grant awards
Nineteen arts organizations received $10,000 grant awards to support their educational projects in partnership with Oregon schools through $190,000 in FY2021 Oregon Arts Commission Arts Learning funding announced today.

“Given the challenges Oregon communities are facing, due to the pandemic and the devastating wildfires, this is an especially important time to protect our students’ social and emotional well-being,” says Arts Commission Chair Anne Taylor, who chaired the review panel. One of the organizations receiving funding is Rogue World Music, to support virtual arts instruction for students in the Phoenix Talent School District – recently devastated by wildfires. Rogue World Music is working creatively with teachers to ensure those students will still have access to the program.
See the release listing all awards.


Students at Talent Elementary School learn an African gumboot dance as part of the Rogue World Music Songbirds project in fall 2017. Rogue World Music pledges to begin the program online with a FY2021 Arts Learning Grant award from the Arts Commission.

Arts Access Reimbursement grants now available
Organizations may now apply for grants to fund expenses related to providing access to arts activities and programs, including virtual events.

Access reimbursement grants fund: offset of expenditures for specific access expenses; public access to all individuals who want to participate in arts activities offered by Oregon arts nonprofits; activities to comply with the Americans with Disabilities Act; and the identification of best practices in accessibility throughout Oregon.

For more information contact [email protected].


Sign language at Portland Playhouse courtesy of Oregon Art Beat.
Watch on demand

2020 Governor’s Arts Awards Celebration now posted
The 2020 Governor’s Arts Award Virtual Celebration, held Thursday, Oct. 15, is now available for on-demand viewing on the Arts Commission’s YouTube Channel . Oregon’s highest honor for exemplary service to the arts, the 2020 Governor’s Arts Awards were presented to: Darrell Grant, a jazz musician and educator from Portland; Roberta J. Kirk, a traditional artist and educator from Warm Springs; John Laursen, a writer, designer, editor and typographer from Portland; Toni Pimble, the founding artistic director of the Eugene Ballet; and Portland Gay Men’s Chorus in Portland.


“Wanderers Delight,” one of the 2020 Governor’s Arts Award objects created by wood artist Jim Piper. Metal artist Sara Thompson wins national honor Oregon congratulates Sara Thompson of Portland on winning the prestigious Eric Berg Memorial Prize for Excellence in Metal at the 2020 Philadelphia Museum of Art Craft Show.

Thompson has been working on her craft since she was a child. Apprenticing for a bench jeweler from age 11 to 16, she learned metalsmithing while gaining experience in making a living as a jeweler. She received a bachelor of fine arts in craft with a metal specialty from the Oregon College of Art and Craft in 2017.

Thompson is drawn to the simplicity of taking a flat, two-dimensional sheet of silver and hammering it into her three-dimensional utilitarian objects and vessels, which she does by using an ancient metalsmithing technique

.

Silver nesting bowls and serving tray by Sara Thompson.

Oregon Arts Commission | Phone 503-986-0082 | www.oregonartscommission.org
Oregon Arts Commission | Oregon Cultural Trust | 775 Summer Street NE #200, Salem, OR 97301

2020 Congressional Arts Report Card

   
              
                                                 ​​​​​October 19, 2020


Election Day is November 3rd and early indicators show 2020 will reach historic voter turnout levels in every state. As a result of the Coronavirus pandemic, the great majority of states have encouraged mail-in/absentee voting and expanded in-person early voting.

While the national headlines focus on the presidential election, it’s important to note that all 435 U.S. House of Representative seats and one-third of the U.S. Senate are also up for election. Thousands more state and local office holders will be on the ballots as well.

The Arts Action Fund Political Action Committee (PAC) is pleased to provide you a copy of our 2020 Congressional Arts Report Card, analyzing and scoring the arts support (or lack thereof) of incumbent candidates looking to get re-elected to Congress. The Arts Action Fund PAC relies on this report to choose which pro-arts Congressional incumbents to support financially.

This Congressional Arts Report Card is also your one-stop guide to learn if members of your Congressional delegation support (or not support) the arts and arts education. I’m pleased to say that the majority of House members (252) received a passing pro-arts letter grade and a majority of Senators (54) received a “Thumbs Up” in our Report Card.

Can you help us raise $30,000 by Election Day to support our ArtsVote: Make Your Vote Count campaign?

CONTRIBUTE TO THE PAC
Thank you and be sure to make your vote count!
Nina Ozlu Tunceli
Executive Director P.S.  Be Sure to download your ArtsVote State Voter Factsheet!    
 

NEW Oregon Artist Relief Program!

Oregon Arts commission logo

Oregon artists may now apply to a new Artist Relief Program created by the Oregon Arts Commission in partnership with The Oregon Community Foundation and the James F. and Marion L. Miller Foundation. Awards ranging from $1,000 to $5,000 will be distributed until the program fund, totaling just over $1.25 million, is depleted.

“Without our artists, there would be no art in Oregon,” said Brian Rogers, executive director of the Oregon Arts Commission. “We feel strongly that, in addition to the significant relief we were able to provide to arts and cultural organizations through federal CARES Act funds allocated to the National Endowment for the Arts and the Oregon Cultural Trust, we need to offer relief funding to struggling Oregon artists as well. We are extremely grateful to The Oregon Community Foundation and the Miller Foundation for joining us in that effort.”

The purpose of the Artist Relief Program is to provide relief funding to Oregon artists who have experienced financial hardship during the COVID-19 pandemic due to cancellations of exhibitions, performances, rehearsals or other activities with a stipend, events, teaching opportunities, book signings or other professional presentation opportunities. Guidelines are now posted on the Arts Commission website.

“In times of crisis, artists help us make sense of our world and stay connected to one another,” said Martha Richards, executive director of the Miller Foundation. “The Miller Foundation stands with Oregon artists in this difficult time because we recognize the critical roles they play in our communities and our lives–they are the foundation of our state’s arts ecosystem.”

“Oregon Community Foundation is thrilled to be a partner in this new Artist Relief program,” added Jerry Tischleder, Oregon Community Foundation’s program officer for arts and culture. “We recognize that independent and freelance artists are vital to the recovery of our communities, bringing hope and inspiration to the world while using their creativity to help process the collective trauma, grief and loss we’ve all experienced in these unprecedented times.”

The program supports professional artists from specific disciplines who have experienced or anticipate experiencing loss of revenue of $1,000 or more between March 1 and Dec. 31, 2020.

The artistic disciplines supported are: Literature (creative non-fiction, fiction, play writing and poetry); dance (including choreography); music (composition and music performance); theatre and performance art; folk and traditional arts; visual arts (crafts, drawing, painting, photography, printmaking, sculpture, mixed media and new media); design arts; and media arts.

Applications are due by 5 p.m. on Tuesday, Nov. 10. Awards must be spent by July 31, 2021.

Artists from underserved communities, including (but not limited to) rural communities and communities of color, as well as artists with disabilities, are especially encouraged to apply.

Almeda Fire Resources for Artists

Almeda Fire Resources for Artists. On September 8, 2020, the southern Oregon art community suffered devastating losses. Along with the wider community, many artists lost their homes and all their belongings in the Almeda fire. This is a tragic loss for anyone, but for artists it also meant that their home studios, all their supplies and equipment, and their entire life’s work in art was reduced to smoke and ashes. Coming after months of restricted movement due to the COVID-19 pandemic, it was crushing. Furthermore, some artists found this was a massive insult added to other horrific injuries to their lives and careers that they had suffered the previous month.

Southern Oregon Artists Resource cares deeply about each and every artist in southern Oregon. Our hearts are shattered at the destruction they have suffered. And a great number of them are our personal friends, too. Whether or not they are members of SOAR, they are vital to our overall community’s economic, educational and mental health. Moreover, they bring beauty, healing and hope in times of crisis. Now they need our help, and that’s why we’ve assembled these Almeda Fire Resources for Artists.

After shaking off the shock that hit us as it did everyone in the Rogue Valley, we reached out to SOAR members, asking how they had been affected and what they need. As time has gone on, we have assembled a list of valuable resources that artists should take advantage of as they work to rebuild their lives. We have also received generous donations of art supplies, so when you’re ready to begin restocking, please contact us to make an appointment and come pick up what you need. Several have already come by and connections have been made that resulted in artists getting artists getting supplies they need. We want to see you creating again, both to help yourself heal and recover from the profound emotional toll this has had on you and to begin replenishing your catalog of works available for sale.

We know there are many more out there who need assistance. However, you may still be occupied with the stressful and urgent search for housing (in a county where housing availability was already extremely limited) and basic necessities. At some point you will have at least a temporary situation from which you can start painting/creating again. This horrific experience will surely be the source of much inspiration— painting out the trauma and creating through the grief will help us all to heal. If you are already doing this and don’t mind sharing, please send a shot of what you’ve done and tell us your story. But there’s no rush. We will be here for you when you’re ready.

Almeda Fire Resources for Artists

Here is a list of resources that can help you get back on your feet.

General Help

https://wildfire.oregon.gov/ If you sustained uninsured losses or damage due to wildfires beginning Sept. 7, 2020, you may be eligible for disaster aid. Federal funds are available to help eligible individuals recover from wildfire in Clackamas, Douglas, Jackson, Klamath, Lane, Lincoln, Linn and Marion Counties. To apply, call 1-800-621-FEMA (3362); TTY, call 1-800-462-7585; 711 or Video Relay Service, call 1-800-621-FEMA (3362). Click here for more FEMA information or apply online at www.DisasterAssistance.gov

Added 10/21/20: More important information, advice and resources can be found at these two websites:

Rogue Valley Recovers

Rogue Valley Rebuilds (A site sponsored by Jackson County)

Talent Maker City has a page with links to a lot of important resources here.

The Rogue Valley Relief Fund will go directly to help people most impacted by the fires. In the short term, this fund will be used to directly meet the needs of those who have been displaced by fires—tents, meals, gas, and other supplies folks need immediately. In the long term, we hope that this fund will support people who have lost their homes in these fires as they rebuild their lives, prioritizing those who have the least access to aid. www.mrgfoundation.org/rogue-valley-relief-fund1

Added 10/18/20 – Oregon Artist Relief Fund: This might not apply directly to the fire situation, but if you’ve seen sales drop off this year AND were affected by the fire, it could help you, too. Deadline to apply is November 10, 2020.:

Oregon artists may now apply to a new Artist Relief Program created by the Oregon Arts Commission in partnership with The Oregon Community Foundation and the James F. and Marion L. Miller Foundation. Awards ranging from $1,000 to $5,000 will be distributed until the program fund, totaling just over $1.25 million, is depleted.

“Without our artists, there would be no art in Oregon,” said Brian Rogers, executive director of the Oregon Arts Commission. “We feel strongly that, in addition to the significant relief we were able to provide to arts and cultural organizations through federal CARES Act funds allocated to the National Endowment for the Arts and the Oregon Cultural Trust, we need to offer relief funding to struggling Oregon artists as well. We are extremely grateful to The Oregon Community Foundation and the Miller Foundation for joining us in that effort.”

The purpose of the Artist Relief Program is to provide relief funding to Oregon artists who have experienced financial hardship during the COVID-19 pandemic due to cancellations of exhibitions, performances, rehearsals or other activities with a stipend, events, teaching opportunities, book signings or other professional presentation opportunities. Guidelines are now posted on the Arts Commission website.

“In times of crisis, artists help us make sense of our world and stay connected to one another,” said Martha Richards, executive director of the Miller Foundation. “The Miller Foundation stands with Oregon artists in this difficult time because we recognize the critical roles they play in our communities and our lives–they are the foundation of our state’s arts ecosystem.”

“Oregon Community Foundation is thrilled to be a partner in this new Artist Relief program,” added Jerry Tischleder, Oregon Community Foundation’s program officer for arts and culture. “We recognize that independent and freelance artists are vital to the recovery of our communities, bringing hope and inspiration to the world while using their creativity to help process the collective trauma, grief and loss we’ve all experienced in these unprecedented times.”

The program supports professional artists from specific disciplines who have experienced or anticipate experiencing loss of revenue of $1,000 or more between March 1 and Dec. 31, 2020.

The artistic disciplines supported are: Literature (creative non-fiction, fiction, play writing and poetry); dance (including choreography); music (composition and music performance); theatre and performance art; folk and traditional arts; visual arts (crafts, drawing, painting, photography, printmaking, sculpture, mixed media and new media); design arts; and media arts.

Applications are due by 5 p.m. on Tuesday, Nov. 10. Awards must be spent by July 31, 2021.

Artists from underserved communities, including (but not limited to) rural communities and communities of color, as well as artists with disabilities, are especially encouraged to apply.

On Facebook:

There are a few groups of truly caring and reliable people working to help people recover from the fires. You can find information in the Southern Oregon Fire Info group. Now that some time has passed, many are no longer allowing GoFundMe links where you can donate cash, due to numerous incidents of fraud that were uncovered. These are groups that have been found to be trustworthy:

Southern Oregon Fire Victim Sponsorship Program

Medford Area Citizen Cares

Adopt A Family From The Ashes ALMEDA

Rogue Valley Relief Fund

Important to Know if You DID Have Insurance

A web design client told us that if you DID have insurance and are dealing with them to establish a claim, you need to be VERY specific about your losses. For example, if you lost a set of 150 Sennelier (or whatever brand) professional artist pastels, be sure to say what brand or they will compensate you for the least expensive pastels possible. Do this for every item you are seeking compensation for, including clothes and other essentials.

Studio Space

The Ashland Art Center is formulating ideas on how to effectively provide some assistance in the aftermath of the fires. Please see attachment. They offer temporary studio space at no cost. Priority consideration will be given to artists who have lost their working spaces due to the fire. Please share this information with anyone needing a place to resume working on their art. (All types of art mediums). For more info, email [email protected].

Art Supplies

Central Art Supply tells us that they have set up several accounts for specific artists as well as a relief fund for local art groups and organizations that people can donate to. Please contact [email protected] or go to Central Art for more information.

Donated Art Supplies are available at SOAR. Please click to see our spreadsheet with everything that has been donated thus far. Some has already been shared, some hasn’t yet been added to the spreadsheet, and more is on its way, so if you don’t see what you need, send us an email and we will be happy to tell you what’s new. Contact us to set up an appointment to pick up what you need.

Sign Up as a Beneficiary of November Benefit Show

Art Presence Art Center is having a benefit show in November, offering donated works by their members. All proceeds will go to artists affected by the fire. They ask that affected artists fill out this form so they can prioritize according to need and contact you after the show to offer you aid from the proceeds. They also have forms on the front counter at the gallery, so stop in and pick one up when you find yourself in Jacksonville. Art Presence is located at 206 N 5th Street, next to the historic courthouse. Contact [email protected]

Donations on Standby – Tell Us What You Need and We Will Connect You

  • A generous SOAR member has wood frames and canvases she would be happy to donate to an artist in need. Contact us and we will help you make arrangements to see and pick up what you need.
  • Another generous SOAR member is eager to help any one who needs it in any way that she can. “We are here for anything, any way for any one who needs comfort. Just let me know. I am in for any way I can be of help – watercolor supplies, my home for a cuppa or glass of ? or supplies that are needed. Painting supplies includes other arts…any knitters?” Contact us and we will help you make arrangements to see and pick up what you need.
  • Yet another SOAR member has an almost new easel. It’s tall and really gorgeous. Wood. Wheels. Adjustable. She’s glad to donate it to an artist who suffered the loss of their own easel in the fire. 
  • A former SOAR member has gently used pastels, surfaces and a tabletop easel she would like to share with an artist in need. Contact us and we will connect you.
  • A glass artist who is a friend of SOAR has plenty of sheet glass to share. Bullseye mostly but also Oceana, Yogi, Kokomo etc. It’s in her garage in 18”x30”x18” plastic craft bins. They will set a table up so you can look. No big sheets but about 6 bins of 12×12 and large scrap. “We would open the garage door wear masks and be safe too. If they didn’t have a place to take it to yet, we can mark it and keep it in the garage till they can come get it.”  Contact us and we will help you make arrangements.
  • Masterpiece Fine Arts Foundation is a member of SOAR. Jeanne, the organization’s director, said her artists would be happy to donate whatever they have that artists need. Be sure to let me know what you need so I can pass it on to her and find out who can help you!
  • Jessica Lee Findleton Can help with photographing/documenting damage. She also started a GoFundMe campaign to raise funds for artists who lost their studios and artwork in the fire. Please contact her through the campaign to learn more about how to access aid. https://www.gofundme.com/f/25c56q5qeo.
  • Renee Childs of Harmonic Designs in Talent can retrieve art archives for those who have scanned their artwork with her.  “If anyone has extra thumb drives to donate… I am happy to fill them with beauty.” [email protected]

FOR DONORS – Artists Who Need Help

Below are our Almeda Fire Resources for Donors. Please note that the GoFundMe links we include below are for artists we know and are safe to donate to.

GoFundMe campaign to raise funds for artists who lost their studios and artwork in the fire. Please contact Jessica through the campaign to learn more about how to access aid. If you are a donor, please share to increase donations to this one! https://www.gofundme.com/f/25c56q5qeo

  • Felix Matchett at SO Clay Distributors says several potters have lost their homes. Contact [email protected] for details on how you can help.
  • Judy Benson LaNier has lost everything! We do not have her contact info but you can send her an email through her website https://s2naturalimages.com/contact.html She had been slated to show at Art du Jour in October and they should be able to help you contact her with your offer of help.
  • Andre Angermann: I am one of the people who lost everything in the Almeda fire. I had moved into the Bear Creek Mobile Home Park in the beginning of August and had brought my very last load of things there on Saturday September 5. For now I am OK staying in a temporary situation. Amazingly enough I had my new computer with me and the flash drives with the original files. Once I get a new copy of CorelDraw, the software I used to create them with, I can get new prints and offer them to customers. I also have jpg’s of different sizes which can be used to make prints. If there is anybody who either has a copy of CorelDraw or has access to buy one at a student price that would be very helpful as I need the program for any modification or resizing. [email protected]
  • Sheri Croy: “Like so many others, I lost my house and with it all my supplies, completed works for sale and in process pieces. My main medium is paper on glass and I lost 10 years’ accumulation of curated glass pieces for this work – more than 600 vessels, votives and candle holders, hundreds of assorted glass ornaments, magnets and jewelry pieces as well as several glass lamps, all my colored paper, hand-dyed and specialty papers, scissors, punches and blades. Over the last 2-3 years, I had diversified into alcohol inks and wood burning and had assembled gear to begin exploration of block printing and screen printing. I also lost all my colored pencils, sharpies, acrylics, pastels and watercolors along with my substrates of all sizes shapes and types. Losing the house and all of our belongings is devastating, losing the ability to work through the pain creatively and remember all the unique pieces of glass I’d been inspired to collect is just heartbreaking. I do not have a website, but my works can be seen on both Facebook and Instagram under Sheri Croy Artist.”  https://www.facebook.com/sheri.croy.artisthttps://www.instagram.com/sheri.croy.artist/ — GoFundMe page: https://gf.me/u/yxzipf
  • GoFundMe links:
  • Miles Frode – Lived in Talent and lost his house and 30 years of artwork. This talented artist, who specializes in abstracts/cubism and more, needs a place to live. We’ve been able to provide Miles with art supplies to get him through this, but there may still be things he needs. https://www.gofundme.com/f/miles039s-lost-art-alameda-fire
  • Norm Rossignol: It’s so hard to start from scratch when you’re over 70! But with your help, that’s exactly what Norm will do. We’ve been able to provide Norm with art supplies to get him through this, but there may still be things he needs.  GoFundMe link – https://gf.me/u/yxrrwp
  • Janet London: Janet formerly did pressed flower mandalas that were an amazing source of joy, just like she is. Earlier this year she was doing some amazing things in acrylic, preparing to make a comeback. That was cut short, as her husband just passed away from cancer, her mother passed away, and now their Talent home, her studio, and all her art is a pile of ashes. GoFundMe link – https://gf.me/u/yxzcvq
  • Jannie Ledard: Janie is a brilliant glass artist and a dear, loving person. No words can express how hard it is to begin again with nothing at 80+ years of age. GoFundMe link – https://gf.me/u/yyiggb
  • Steph Waaser shared this link tree of GoFundMe and PayPal accounts for OSF staff who lost everything. Most of these folks had also been laid off back in April due to the pandemic. They need all the help they can get: https://linktr.ee/memegarcia
  • Bridget Reynolds (from Ashland Art Center): Lost her home in Talent, Oregon along with all of her belongings and art work. She is going to have to start over from scratch: finding housing, getting clothes and toiletries, basic household items, as well as replacing her art supplies so she can continue to paint and create. She fled with the clothes she was wearing and a few personal items she grabbed when she left her home. She has selflessly volunteered for hospice, end of life care for many many years and could really use the community’s support to help her navigate the next steps to rebuild.  Funds raised here will be used only by Bridget to secure new housing, replace furniture, personal household goods, new clothing, toiletries, food and to get a paintbrush back in her hand. Many thanks to Patrick Beste, who donated art supplies to Bridget. We do not know at this time if she is stil in need of more. GoFundMe page: https://gf.me/u/yxykbf
  • Daniel Verner lost everything including his entire life’s work of art and all but one of his collection of musical instruments. We’ve been able to provide Daniel with art supplies to get him through this, but we had run out of acrylic paints by the time he made it to us. If you have acrylics you can share, please let us know. GoFundMe page: https://www.gofundme.com/f/verner-oregon-fire-relief/

More Heartbreaks and How You Can Help

We have learned that Cecilia Pestlin, a lovely artist who we met when she was associated with Art Presence, suffered a stroke in early August and wasn’t sure she would ever paint again. Then, on 8/19, her 102 year old mother died (not COVID-related). And THEN, she and her husband lost their home in the fire. Imagine going through either one of those second two events while trying to recover from a stroke!! They have a safe place to stay in Medford, but she is so deeply traumatized that she doesn’t want to talk to anyone. However, cards and letters are welcome (flat mail only, please). Her new address is PO Box 928, Talent, OR 97540. Whether or not you know her, and if you were affected by the fire or not, please send poor Cecilia a card and let her know she’s loved.

Free Association Gallery – Philippo LoGrande Fundraiser Saturday, November 14, 4–10 pm: We’ve all seen Philippo out painting the historic buildings of Ashland and Jacksonville. Well, his home burned down in August. Then he was diagnosed with inoperable, metastatic brain tumors. As a result, he has lost most cognitive function. He is now receiving treatment in California, and the friends who are caring for him need help covering his expenses—diagnostic tests, consultations, medicine, food and lodging—so this month’s event is a fundraiser to benefit Philippo and his caregivers. Please join us at 120 North 4th Street, Jacksonville, Oregon. Call 541-200-4184 to discuss ways you can help privately.

Almeda Fire Resources for Artists: Southern Oregon Artists Resource SOAR new logo

Empty Bowls 2020 Virtual Event

Empty Bowls 2020

Empty Bowls Event Featured Image_2014

WHEN: Empty Bowls 2020 Online Silent Auction: October 9th-15th, 2020 with an Event Broadcast at 6PM on October 12th

WHERE: Virtually! Text ‘EmptyBowls’ to (406) 302-5086 to get a link to bid or visit https://go.eventgroovefundraising.com/joco-emptybowls-2020 directly.

FUNDRAISER BENEFICIARY: Options for Southern Oregon and Josephine County Food Bank. Proceeds will help food insecure adults, children and families in our community access food.

CONTACT PERSON: Sarah Small, Development and Integrated Health Coordinator at (541) 476-2373 or email at [email protected].

Empty Bowls 2020 is a grassroots effort led by Options in partnership with the Josephine County Food Bank that includes artists and restaurants in our community. This event raises funds to feed the hungry and people experiencing food insecurity in our community.

Empty Bowls has historically been held at the Parkway Christian Center in Grants Pass. This year, however, we are implementing a virtual event to raise funds to help feed people experiencing food insecurity in our community. Instead of an in-person event, we will be holding a virtual silent auction featuring unique ceramic bowls and art pieces.

Participation in the silent auction will be free and open to all, but individuals will need to register to participate. Individuals will also have the option to purchase a VIP Attendee “ticket”, which will allow them to pick out an event bowl, much like our usual Empty Bowl experience.

The auction will begin on Friday, October 9th and will close on Thursday, October 15th. In order to keep the spirit of our in-person Empty Bowls event, we will hold a video broadcast with messages from the benefiting agencies, sponsors, and past supporters. The broadcast will take place at 6PM on our regularly scheduled event day of October 12th. We will end the virtual experience by hosting a drive-through event at the Josephine County Food Bank on Friday, October 16th from 10AM-2PM, where our VIP Attendees will be able to pick up their preselected bowl. All proceeds from this event will be split between Options for Southern Oregon’s food barrier removal fund and the Josephine County Food Bank.

2017 Empty Bowls Throw-a-thon - Empty Bowls Pizza Party at Ashland Art Center on April 8, 2015! Make you bowl to donate to this year's Emty Bowls event in Ashland!

We would like to extend a special thank you to our 2020 restaurant sponsors. Sponsors include Casa Amiga, The Laughing Clam, Twisted Cork, Wild River Brewing & Pizza, Ma Mosa’s, The Vine, Taprock Northwest Grill, Climate City Brewing Company, Vinfarm, and The Train Depot. While they will not be donating soup for this year’s event, they have kindly donated gift certificates and filmed soup making demonstrations and messages to our supporters. Clayfolk potters and other local artists have generously donated their time and talent to make more than 250 beautifully handcrafted bowls for this year’s event.

Event sponsors are AllCare CCO, Banner Bank, and Clayfolk. Please join us for the 14th Empty Bowls event and help alleviate food insecurity in Josephine County. Learn more about how to keep our community healthy and see how YOU are making a difference!

“Elevation” – Art on Ashland’s Bandersnatch Trail

Ashland public art

“Elevation” – First artwork of three as you walk Bandersnatch trail
Artist: Cheryl Garcia
Ashland Public Art series

Introducing the artist

Cheryl Garcia has loved art ever since she could pick up a crayon. I will describe her artistic journey after I introduce her Ashland public artwork entitled “Elevation.”

Creation of Elevation

The “Watershed Art Group” (originally Stef Seffinger, Pam Marsh, Sue Springer and a few others) wanted to place public art along the Bandersnatch trail above Lithia Park. Their goal was to bring attention to the importance of the Ashland Creek watershed, where we source our drinking water. Three sculptures have now been placed along the trail: Elevation, Pacific Fisher and Water is Life. They received funding primarily from the Haines & Friends art fund.

When you walk the Bandersnatch trail, the first of the three sculptures you will see (just before the trail starts) is Elevation by Cheryl Garcia. Cheryl is a metal artist, and Elevation is made of steel. Her initial concept for Elevation included a poem by Edward Abbey with three small birds flying above it. 

Ashland public art
Cheryl Garcia’s original concept drawing for Elevation. (photo by Cheryl Garcia)

Over time, the design became three large birds representing the “elevation” you experience as you walk up Bandersnatch trail, as well as a hope for elevation in our spirits through art and nature. 

Ashland public art
Elevation, with a view of trail continuing to the right of the sculpture. (photo by Peter Finkle, 2020)

My question: What brought you to metal art?

I asked Cheryl how she came to love metal art. She replied: “It goes back to my love of junky old iron as a kid. My grandfather was a collector of artifacts. I loved going into his garage and digging around in all of his artifacts and playing around with tools. I loved going around collecting rusty old iron in the canyons of southwest Colorado where I grew up. I fell in love with the material first.”

As a child, Cheryl entered many local art contests, whether it was a coloring contest or who could draw a scene from Mesa Verde National Park the best. 

“I won quite a few art contest prizes as a kid, including a year’s supply of free fountain sodas from a local convenience store.” 

Cheryl Garcia

She laughed as she told me, “I was a popular kid,” and then “I think they didn’t do that [contest] any more after I won it, because I was down there every single day getting my free sodas with my friends.”

After a couple years off from school, when she worked drawing illustrations for archeological digs in the Four Corners area, she took every art class at Fort Lewis College in Durango, Colorado. During trips to Santa Fe, she was inspired by the large scale metal art sculptures there. Since welding was not offered at Fort Lewis College, she switched to a vocational school and became a certified welder in 1993. That opened the door to metal working and metal art.

Love at first sight

When she lived in Missoula, Montana for a year to enjoy the music scene there and work as a welder, she met her husband Criss. It was a case of “love at first sight” – not the sappy movie kind, but the lasting real-life, through the ups and downs to this day kind.

It was through Criss that they decided to move to Ashland in November 1996. “It was just what we were looking for.” Her first Southern Oregon job at Medford Fabrication enabled her to save enough money to purchase her own metal work and welding equipment. 

“Living my dream”

Cheryl Garcia
Cheryl Garcia in 1998. (photo by Criss Garcia)

Now that she owned her own equipment, Cheryl said goodbye to the 9-to-5 in order to “live my dream.” She began by making garden ornaments that she sold at the Growers and Crafters Markets in Ashland and Jacksonville.  

Cheryl Garcia
Garden ornaments Cheryl sold at Growers Markets in 1998. (photo by Criss Garcia)

People who bought her garden ornaments started asking her to make gates and handrails for them. She found out that making structural art required a contractor’s license. Dedicated to growing both her skills and her business, she went to Rogue Community College and got the license. Since then, she has made many bright-colored nature-inspired sculptures both large and small, gates, fences, vessels, sacred art and more. 

She is especially proud of a large spiral staircase she built for a private customer, a project that required her to draw upon all of her skills and creativity.

Cheryl Garcia
Spiral staircase by Cheryl Garcia in a private residence. (photo by Cheryl Garcia)

Public art

Though she accepts many private commissions, Cheryl especially enjoys creating public art: “I certainly enjoy the public commissions the most, because they’re reaching a bigger audience. I know the joy and wonder I am trying to put out in the world is affecting more lives than just a private commission.”

Cheryl Garcia

Cheryl is a visible artist in Southern Oregon. If you have been to Jacksonville in the past few years, you may have seen her huge poppy flowers in the vineyard just outside of town. (photo by Peter Finkle)

Ashland public art

If you drive by Walker School on Walker Street in Ashland, you may have seen her large flowers on the school grounds.

Sunflower by Cheryl Garcia at Walker School. (photo by Peter Finkle, 2020)

Cheryl Garcia, Britt Festival

If you have been to Britt Music Festival in the past few years, you have walked by her huge flower sculpture at the Britt entrance.

Cheryl Garcia poses with her Brittillaria sculpture at the Britt Festival grounds. It is named for the fritillaria flower.

(photo by Rita Ashley)

Elevation: the artistic process

Cheryl Garcia at work in her studio. (photo by Jim Craven)

Now let’s look in detail at the piece called Elevation, which was installed near the beginning of the Bandersnatch trail. Elevation began with a Corten steel plate, a stainless steel plate, steel posts, more steel plates for the base, nuts, bolts, paints and more.  Corten steel is a quick-rusting steel often used for outdoor installations. The different pieces were each cut out and worked on individually before they could be put together.

This 4-minute video shows an overview of the entire process of creating Elevation. https://www.youtube.com/embed/0uJyhCveXoY?version=3&rel=1&fs=1&autohide=2&showsearch=0&showinfo=1&iv_load_policy=1&wmode=transparent

To complement the video, here is my summary of the steps involved, illustrated with photographs taken from the video. First, the heart of Elevation is the Corten steel plate. Cheryl drew a complex design on the steel, then cut precise holes in the steel with a plasma cutting tool. 

Ashland public art
tPlasma cutting tool at rest.

Second are the rigid side-poles that support the Corten steel plate and anchor it to the base. 

Third is the steel base, which in this case required two large pieces of steel with bolts anchoring it both to the sculpture above and to the concrete foundation below. In most of her jobs, Cheryl makes the concrete foundation as well as the metal sculpture. “That’s why part of my contractor’s license is certification in concrete work as well,” she said. In this case, the Parks Department was responsible for the concrete foundation. 

Ashland public art
Steel base for Elevation, showing the mounting bolts. (photo from the Cheryl Garcia video)

Fourth, the three birds were cut out of stainless steel. The steel had to be ground, sanded and buffed until it was smooth to the touch, without sharp edges. 

Ashland public art
Stainless steel birds being painted. (photo from the Cheryl Garcia video)

After each individual part was done, she finally put it all together. The birds were welded to the Corten steel plate from the back side. After they were attached, everything was masked off in order to apply anodized, long lasting industrial paint for the blue color of the birds.

Ashland public art
Corten steel of Elevation before the rusting process. (photo from the Cheryl Garcia video)

Finally, the rusting process is a key part of the artwork that we see but don’t normally think about. Cheryl painted a chemical solution on the Corten steel, which is made to rust quickly. She said, “It [the Corten steel] takes a chemical solution I can put on. The rusting itself takes some finessing as well; I don’t want it to go too far, and I don’t want it to be too little. So I need to use the right amount of chemical solution to get the perfect rust and then neutralize it with a neutralizer, then rinse it all down before the installation.” 

There is so much that people don’t see, including “a lot of grinding” that goes into every piece of artwork. Cheryl summed up, “It is very labor intensive.”

Ashland public art
Detail of Elevation showing the Corten steel on site after the rusting process. (photo by Peter Finkle, 2020)

Installation and Dedication

Elevation was installed at the site in June of 2018. The dedication ceremony didn’t happen until September 2018. As it turned out, the dedication for both Elevation and Water is Life (also on Bandersnatch trail) were held on the same day.

Ashland public art
Ribbon cutting for Elevation.

Where to find Elevation

My wife and I first walked the Bandersnatch trail to see the three public art sculptures there in July 2020. Just above Lithia Park, the Bandersnatch trail is one of the easiest Ashland trails to access. It begins not far from the swimming hole on Ashland Creek. If you are driving or biking, take Granite Street south to the swimming hole, then turn left on Glenview Drive. After 2/10 of a mile, you’ll see a parking area on the right that can accommodate about eight cars, followed by a larger parking area on the left. If you are in a car, park here.

Ashland trails
Sign near the parking area on Glenview Drive pointing the way to Bandersnatch trail. (photo by Peter Finkle, 2020)

Near the parking area is this sign that says, “Waterline Trail >” and “To Bandersnatch Trail 820′.” Keep an eye out for mountain bikers zooming by in this section of the trail because this section is a multi-use trail. When you reach the Bandersnatch trail, it will be only for pedestrians and equestrians.

You’ll know you are heading the right way if you pass this gate and sign.

Ashland trails
Next clue that you are heading in the right direction to see Bandersnatch trail artworks. (photo by Peter Finkle, 2020)

You will reach the Elevation sculpture about 1/10 of a mile from the parking lot, while you are still on the Waterline trail.

Ashland trails

Next to the Elevation sculpture, you will see this sign.

Continue up to the Bandersnatch trail if you want to see the other two sculptures on this art walk: Pacific Fisher and Water is Life. Continue to keep an eye out for mountain bikers until you reach Bandersnatch trail. Built in 2012, Bandersnatch trail is 1.7 miles long and intersects multiple trails, so you can hike in a loop or just go straight up and back.

Ashland trails
Not far past Elevation is the official beginning of the Bandersnatch trail, where you will find the other two works of public art. (photo by Peter Finkle, 2020)

What is a Bandersnatch?

You may be wondering, as I did, “What is a bandersnatch?” It is found in the unusual world of “Alice in Wonderland.” Here is how it is described.

“Beware the Jabberwock, my son!
The jaws that bite, the claws that catch!
Beware the Jubjub bird, and shun
The frumious Bandersnatch!”

Lewis Carroll, from the poem Jabberwocky in Through the Looking-Glass and What Alice Found There, 1872)

Cantrall Buckley County Park

Because I am writing about Cheryl Garcia’s artwork, I want to briefly introduce you to the sculptures being installed at 88-acre Cantrall Buckley county park, located along the Applegate River near Ruch. The park and community have collaborated to raise funds for what has become an Art Walk at the park. 

The art in the park began with concrete and mosaic artwork Applegate Valley artist Jeremy Criswell created for the playground at the park. 

Cantrall Buckley park
Tortoise mosaic and concrete sculpture by Jeremy Criswell, located in the children’s playground at Cantrall Buckley County Park. (photo by Peter Finkle, 2020)

Jeremy is the sculptor of the Ashland public art piece on the Bandersnatch trail called “Pacific Fisher.”

He introduced community members to Cheryl Garcia, which resulted in a plan for Cheryl to create eleven metal art pieces that embody local flora and fauna in the Applegate Valley. She has completed eight so far as of August 2020, with three more to go.

Cantrall Buckley park
Mock Orange by Cheryl Garcia, at Cantrall Buckley County Park. (photo by Peter Finkle, 2020)

The community group A Greater Applegate wrote: “Art enthusiasts are delighted to see the numerous sculptures in the Educational Sculpture Art Walk series installed near the river. Cheryl Garcia, our very talented Jacksonville artist, completed the first awe-inspiring metal rendition, “The Mock Orange,” in the Fall of 2018. This spectacular 12-foot sculpture depicts the large and beautiful white blossom of this tender but tough native species.”

Cheryl enthusiastically described the project to me, and said, “It will become Southern Oregon’s first sculpture park!” 

If you would like to learn more about Cheryl’s work, her website is GreatMetalWorks.com.

Cantrall Buckley park
Northern Flicker by Cheryl Garcia, at Cantrall Buckley County Park. (photo by Peter Finkle, 2020)

Ashland Public Art map

A map at the link below shows City of Ashland public art, from the city website. Photos of the art are by Graham Lewis.
https://gis.ashland.or.us/publicart/

References:

Anon. “Ashland Public Art Collection: A map tour of Public Art installations in the City of Ashland, Oregon,” City of Ashland website.

https://gis.ashland.or.us/publicart/

A Greater Applegate, http://agreaterapplegate.org/cantrall-buckley-park/

Jackson County Parks, https://jacksoncountyor.org/parks/Day-Use/Cantrall-Buckley

Anon. “Cantrall Buckley Sculpture Park Takes Shape, Jacksonville Review Online, June 5, 2018. https://jacksonvillereview.com/cantrall-buckley-sculpture-park-takes-shape/

Garcia, Cheryl. Interview and personal communications, August 2020.

Seffinger, Stef. Interview and personal communications, August 2020.

Author: Peter Finkle

My name is Peter Finkle. I moved to Ashland in 1991. My email is walkashland-at-ashlandhome.net. I am a Husband, Father, Poet, Writer and Herbal Health Researcher. View all posts by Peter Finkle

Arts Vote Free Virtual Event

Arts Vote 2020 - Arts Vote Free Virtual Event Americans for the Arts and the Democratic National Convention

Coronavirus Relief Fund Cultural Support application now live!

Coronavirus Relief Fund Cultural Support

application now live!

Salem, Ore. – Applications are now live and open for Oregon’s Coronavirus Relief Fund (CRF) Cultural Support program. Funds allocated to the Oregon Cultural Trust will be available to Oregon cultural organizations facing losses due to the COVID-19 health crisis. The $25.9 million in funding was made available through a $50 million relief package for Oregon culture recently approved by the Emergency Board of the Oregon Legislature.

The distribution plan for the CRF Cultural Support program was approved at the Aug. 6 Cultural Trust Board of Directors meeting. Applications are due by noon on Monday, Aug. 24, and approved funds must be distributed by Sept. 15.

“We are grateful to the members of our Board for authorizing us to move forward with the distribution plan as soon as possible,” said Brian Rogers, executive director of the Cultural Trust. “We have worked hard to develop a statewide, equitable distribution plan and look forward to supporting our cultural community in surviving this unprecedented crisis.”

All Oregon cultural nonprofits and community venues are welcome to apply. Eligible grant recipients include, but are not limited to, cultural institutions, county fairgrounds, cultural entities within federally recognized Indian Tribes based in Oregon, and festivals and community event organizations. Funds will be distributed through the Cultural Trust statewide network of County and Tribal Cultural Coalitions. Funding will be determined based on eligible request amounts, an award allocation formula that establishes a base amount of funds per county or tribe and the organization’s fiscal size. COVID-19 expenses previously reimbursed by other federal CARES Act programs are not eligible.

Complete guidelines are posted on the Cultural Trust website.

The intended use of the CRF Cultural Support funds is to provide financial assistance to cultural nonprofit organizations and community venues that have canceled or postponed public programming because of public health executive orders associated with the COVID-19 pandemic. Guidelines for the funding are in accordance with theU.S. Department of the Treasury.

 

The federal CARES Act requires that CRF funding only be used to cover expenses that: are necessary expenditures incurred due to the public health emergency; were not accounted for in the budget most recently approved as of March 27, 2020 (the date of enactment of the CARES Act); and were incurred during the period that begins on March 1, 2020, and ends on Dec. 30, 2020.

The Cultural Trust is committed to serving Oregon’s culturally diverse and traditionally underserved communities.