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Arts Vote Free Virtual Event

Arts Vote 2020 - Arts Vote Free Virtual Event Americans for the Arts and the Democratic National Convention

Coronavirus Relief Fund Cultural Support application now live!

Coronavirus Relief Fund Cultural Support

application now live!

Salem, Ore. – Applications are now live and open for Oregon’s Coronavirus Relief Fund (CRF) Cultural Support program. Funds allocated to the Oregon Cultural Trust will be available to Oregon cultural organizations facing losses due to the COVID-19 health crisis. The $25.9 million in funding was made available through a $50 million relief package for Oregon culture recently approved by the Emergency Board of the Oregon Legislature.

The distribution plan for the CRF Cultural Support program was approved at the Aug. 6 Cultural Trust Board of Directors meeting. Applications are due by noon on Monday, Aug. 24, and approved funds must be distributed by Sept. 15.

“We are grateful to the members of our Board for authorizing us to move forward with the distribution plan as soon as possible,” said Brian Rogers, executive director of the Cultural Trust. “We have worked hard to develop a statewide, equitable distribution plan and look forward to supporting our cultural community in surviving this unprecedented crisis.”

All Oregon cultural nonprofits and community venues are welcome to apply. Eligible grant recipients include, but are not limited to, cultural institutions, county fairgrounds, cultural entities within federally recognized Indian Tribes based in Oregon, and festivals and community event organizations. Funds will be distributed through the Cultural Trust statewide network of County and Tribal Cultural Coalitions. Funding will be determined based on eligible request amounts, an award allocation formula that establishes a base amount of funds per county or tribe and the organization’s fiscal size. COVID-19 expenses previously reimbursed by other federal CARES Act programs are not eligible.

Complete guidelines are posted on the Cultural Trust website.

The intended use of the CRF Cultural Support funds is to provide financial assistance to cultural nonprofit organizations and community venues that have canceled or postponed public programming because of public health executive orders associated with the COVID-19 pandemic. Guidelines for the funding are in accordance with theU.S. Department of the Treasury.

 

The federal CARES Act requires that CRF funding only be used to cover expenses that: are necessary expenditures incurred due to the public health emergency; were not accounted for in the budget most recently approved as of March 27, 2020 (the date of enactment of the CARES Act); and were incurred during the period that begins on March 1, 2020, and ends on Dec. 30, 2020.

The Cultural Trust is committed to serving Oregon’s culturally diverse and traditionally underserved communities.

Call to Action: Proposed Funding Cuts for Oregon Arts & Culture

We are reaching out today to urgently ask you to advocate for Oregon’s cultural sector.

Next week on Monday, August 10th a special session has been called to rebalance the state’s budget due to the impacts of COVID-19. The session will include proposed General Fund cuts to the arts of over $300,000, and specific cuts to the Cultural Resource Economic Fund (CREF)/lottery funded capital projects over $300,000. These projects include several significant historic and present-day community treasures that have relied on state commitments and that enrich our state for the future.

We need our advocates and members to urge Oregon’s legislature to reject these proposed cuts before Monday, August 10th. Please TAKE ACTION today by emailing the Oregon legislature. The form on our website will send your message to the legislators within your district based on your address. 

Oregon’s arts, culture, heritage and humanities are critical to our recovery as people. We will need a strong and growing cultural sector that is understood as one of Oregon’s most important economic drivers of tourism and commerce.

Thank you for your attention and advocacy.

Dr. Nancy Golden
President, Board of Directors
Cultural Advocacy Coalition

Click the link below to log in and send your message:
https://www.votervoice.net/BroadcastLinks/DmPkZO7LVP5tLbmco2q2SQ

John Lewis Statement Released Posthumously

John Lewis posthumous statement

The Honorable John Lewis wrote his last remarks to the nation to be published posthumously upon the day of his funeral in Atlanta, Georgia on July 30, 2020.  We honor him in publishing these inspiring words from one of the greatest men to walk the Earth, a civil rights giant who fought for Voter’s Rights, and a passionate arts advocate, who famously stated “Without the arts, without music, without dance, without drama, without photography, the civil rights movement would have been like a bird without wings.”

Together, You Can Redeem the Soul of Our Nation

By John Lewis

July 30, 2020

Mural of John Lewis in Atlanta, GA

While my time here has now come to an end, I want you to know that in the last days and hours of my life you inspired me. You filled me with hope about the next chapter of the great American story when you used your power to make a difference in our society. Millions of people motivated simply by human compassion laid down the burdens of division. Around the country and the world you set aside race, class, age, language and nationality to demand respect for human dignity.

That is why I had to visit Black Lives Matter Plaza in Washington, though I was admitted to the hospital the following day. I just had to see and feel it for myself that, after many years of silent witness, the truth is still marching on.

Emmett Till was my George Floyd. He was my Rayshard Brooks, Sandra Bland and Breonna Taylor. He was 14 when he was killed, and I was only 15 years old at the time. I will never ever forget the moment when it became so clear that he could easily have been me. In those days, fear constrained us like an imaginary prison, and troubling thoughts of potential brutality committed for no understandable reason were the bars.

Though I was surrounded by two loving parents, plenty of brothers, sisters and cousins, their love could not protect me from the unholy oppression waiting just outside that family circle. Unchecked, unrestrained violence and government-sanctioned terror had the power to turn a simple stroll to the store for some Skittles or an innocent morning jog down a lonesome country road into a nightmare. If we are to survive as one unified nation, we must discover what so readily takes root in our hearts that could rob Mother Emanuel Church in South Carolina of her brightest and best, shoot unwitting concertgoers in Las Vegas and choke to death the hopes and dreams of a gifted violinist like Elijah McClain.

Like so many young people today, I was searching for a way out, or some might say a way in, and then I heard the voice of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. on an old radio. He was talking about the philosophy and discipline of nonviolence. He said we are all complicit when we tolerate injustice. He said it is not enough to say it will get better by and by. He said each of us has a moral obligation to stand up, speak up and speak out. When you see something that is not right, you must say something. You must do something. Democracy is not a state. It is an act, and each generation must do its part to help build what we called the Beloved Community, a nation and world society at peace with itself.

Ordinary people with extraordinary vision can redeem the soul of America by getting in what I call good trouble, necessary trouble. Voting and participating in the democratic process are key. The vote is the most powerful nonviolent change agent you have in a democratic society. You must use it because it is not guaranteed. You can lose it.

You must also study and learn the lessons of history because humanity has been involved in this soul-wrenching, existential struggle for a very long time. People on every continent have stood in your shoes, through decades and centuries before you. The truth does not change, and that is why the answers worked out long ago can help you find solutions to the challenges of our time. Continue to build union between movements stretching across the globe because we must put away our willingness to profit from the exploitation of others.

Though I may not be here with you, I urge you to answer the highest calling of your heart and stand up for what you truly believe. In my life I have done all I can to demonstrate that the way of peace, the way of love and nonviolence is the more excellent way. Now it is your turn to let freedom ring.

When historians pick up their pens to write the story of the 21st century, let them say that it was your generation who laid down the heavy burdens of hate at last and that peace finally triumphed over violence, aggression and war. So I say to you, walk with the wind, brothers and sisters, and let the spirit of peace and the power of everlasting love be your guide.

Americans for the Arts

Oregon Legislature approves emergency relief funding for arts and culture

Oregon Legislature approves relief funding for arts and culture

Oregon Legislature approves emergency relief funding

for arts and culture

$25.9 million allocated to Cultural Trust for statewide relief

Salem, Ore. – The Emergency Board of the Oregon Legislature approved a $50 million relief package for Oregon culture Tuesday that includes $25,984,872 to Business Oregon for statewide distribution to cultural organizations by the Oregon Cultural Trust. The funding was made available through the federal Coronavirus Relief Fund to address the devastating impact the COVID-19 health crisis is having on Oregon’s arts and cultural community.
“We are extremely grateful to lawmakers for recognizing that preserving our culture is essential as we navigate through this unprecedented crisis,” said Chuck Sams, chair of the Cultural Trust Board. “Our collective culture is the glue that binds us together as Oregonians, especially during challenging times. Arts and culture cross all boundaries and inspire us to celebrate our diversity and resilience as a people.”
The Cultural Trust is working with the Oregon Arts Commission to develop statewide, equitable funding distribution to be administered through the Cultural Trust’s County and Tribal Coalitions, said Brian Rogers, executive director of the Cultural Trust and the Arts Commission. The statewide distribution plan is expected to be reviewed by the Cultural Trust Board of Directors at its July 23 meeting. Coronavirus Relief Funds are mandated to be distributed by Sept. 15, 2020.
The remainder of the relief funding package for culture was allocated directly to several statewide cultural organizations and to for-profit and nonprofit performing venues.
Since the crisis began, nonprofit cultural organizations across the state have cancelled thousands of performances, events and activities – including key fundraising events – and most have closed their doors to the public. The loss of projected earned income, lifeblood for most cultural organizations, has resulted in significant layoffs and furloughs. Many organizations are at risk of bankruptcy and permanent closure.
A recent survey of 330 Oregon cultural nonprofits by the Cultural Trust revealed that participants projected a collective loss of $40 million and average losses of $121,281 by June 30. The majority of respondents (54 percent) have annual revenues of less than $250,000 and operate outside of the Portland Metro area.
“Our distribution of the relief funds will ensure that cultural organizations in every county, serving every geographic region of our state, will benefit,” said Rogers. “At times like these we depend on our arts, history, heritage and humanities to help us persevere. These funds will go a long way in ensuring our cultural community survives this crisis.”
­­­­_________________

About the Oregon Cultural Trust

Created in 2001 by the Oregon Legislature, the Oregon Cultural Trust is a testament to how much Oregonians value culture. No other state provides a 100 percent tax credit to inspire cultural giving. As uniquely Oregonian as public beaches and the bottle bill, the Oregon Cultural Trust was designed as an ongoing funding engine for arts and culture across the state. Oregonians fund the Cultural Trust. We, in turn, fund the artists, potters, poets, acrobats and dreamers who define our famous quality of life.
In 2019 Oregonians gave $4.5 million to the Cultural Trust. Sixty percent of that went straight back to the field. The remaining 40 percent helped grow our permanent fund. Our three grant programs fund our five Statewide Partners, 45 County and Tribal Coalitions and 1,450+ qualified cultural nonprofits through competitive Cultural Development Grants.
More information at culturaltrust.org.

Unseen Sacrifices at Center for Contemporary Art

Unseen Sacrifices Center for Contemporary Art, Seattle Washington

The Center of Contemporary Art Seattle (CoCA) is pleased to present Unseen Sacrifices, an exhibition featuring artists Ashanté Kindle, Satpreet Kahlon and Holly Ballard Martz. Unseen Sacrifices will run from July 2 – August 22 with a virtual opening on First Thursday at 6:30pm.
Unseen Sacrifices seeks to open dialogue between community members about what emotional labor means both to them personally and also how it is used within our community at large. To encourage viewers to reexamine how invisible labor is valued, who is expected to perform it, as well as, reflecting on the emotional labor they have both given and received.
Exhibit Information:

Unseen Sacrifices

July 2 – August 22, 2020
Satpreet Kahlon, Ashanté Kindle and Holly Ballard Martz explore the term emotional labor in CoCA exhibition: Unseen Sacrifices

Kindle is a current MFA candidate of the University of Connecticut.

https://www.ashantekindle.com/about

Kahlon is a graduate of the Rhode Island School of Design, where she received a full-fellowship to pursue her MFA in sculpture. She has also been named one of the 35 most influential people in Seattle by Seattle Magazine.

https://www.satpreetkahlon.com/statement

Ballard Martz holds a BFA in printmaking and a BA in business administration from the University of Washington.

http://www.hollyballardmartz.com/about

Download (PDF, Unknown)

IMPORTANT PUA and PPP Info from Americans for the Arts

Americans for the Arts President's FY20 Budget Calls for Termination of Cultural Agencies Again

  • The deadline to apply for a Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) forgivable loan through a bank or online financial institution was officially extended from June 30 to August 8, 2020. Last week, Congress unanimously voted to extend the deadline and President Trump finally signed it into law over the weekend. Please note that this is only a deadline extension and not the opportunity to apply for a second PPP. There is still more than $125 billion available for first-time PPP borrowers who are self-employed, gig artists, contractors, or a corporation or nonprofit with W2 employees. Just remember that you cannot collect pandemic unemployment if you’re also paying yourself with a PPP forgivable loan during the same covered period.

 

  • The extra $600 of weekly federal Pandemic Unemployment Assistance (PUA) is still currently set to expire on July 31, 2020. For those of you who are self-employed, gig artists, or Form 1099 independent contractors and are currently collecting PUA, you may want to consider applying for a PPP loan on August 1st, which will allow you to then stagger rather than overlap federal economic relief assistance during this pandemic.

 

  • Americans for the Arts and the Arts Action Fund currently have an Action Alert that will enable you to send a quick email to your U.S. Representative and two U.S. Senators, urging them to approve both an extension of PUA benefits beyond 7/31/20, and allow a second round of PPP forgivable loans for existing borrowers. These two programs are particularly needed to those working in the arts, entertainment, tourism, and hospitality industries. Send your emails to Congress through our Arts Action Center.

 

  • On July 1st, the National Endowment for the Arts announced the names of the 855 national, state, and local nonprofit and governmental arts organizations, who were awarded $45 million in CARES Act emergency arts funding. This is in addition to the supplemental $30 million that was quickly passed through to every state and regional arts agency in April for purposes of re-granting locally within their geographic areas.

 

  • If you haven’t done so yet, please remember to complete your 2019 federal income tax return by July 15th, or at least request a filing extension to October 15th. The CARES Act had extended this year’s filing deadline from April 15 to July 15, but this extension does not necessarily apply to the filing deadline of your state income tax return.

 

Resources to Assist You:

  1. Office Hours with Nina (Free Q&A forum about the CARES Act on M, W, F @ 11am EDT)
  2. Book Nina for Your Own Webinar (Free service to share tips on CARES Act and legislation)
  3. CARES Act Table Updated 6/24/2020
  4. PPP Loan Forgiveness Application
  5. ArtsU on-demand videotaped training webinars on the CARES Act
  6. Americans for the Arts Coronavirus Resource and Response Center

Thank you for everything you do to enrich people’s lives through the arts. If possible, please also consider contributing to the Arts Action Fund PAC.

2021 NEA Budget Increase Proposed

Americans for the Arts
            
July 7, 2020

Earlier today, the U.S House Interior Appropriations Subcommittee strongly rejected President Trump’s fourth consecutive annual budget request to eliminate both the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) and the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) by instead appropriating $170 million in funding for each for fiscal year FY 2021! This represents an increase for both agencies of $7.75 million each over the current FY 2020 funding level of $162.25 million and it is the same amount that we recommended to Congress.

Americans for the Arts and Arts Action Fund President and CEO Robert Lynch and ArtsVote 2020 Chair and Arts Action Fund Board Member Ben Folds testify before the U.S. House Interior Subcommittee on February 6, 2020.

As you will recall, Americans for the Arts and Arts Action Fund president and CEO Robert Lynch and our ArtsVote 2020 Chairman and musician Ben Folds testified in support of the $170 million budget request on February 6, 2020. (Watch Ben’s testimony here.)

Additionally, we are very pleased to share that the House bill includes specific language requested by Americans for the Arts and the Arts Action Fund to enable the NEA to waive financial matching grant requirements and to allow grantees to use the federal funds for general operating support as a result of the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.  These new funds would not limit eligibility to only recent NEA grantees and would apply to FY 2021 grants as well as any outstanding FY 2020 and 2019 grant funds.

Stay tuned. This bill will proceed next to the full U.S. House Appropriations Committee, then the House floor before moving to the Senate chamber for consideration over the coming weeks and months.

Arts advocacy makes a difference. Thank you for everything you do to enrich people’s lives through the arts. If possible, please also consider contributing to the Arts Action Fund PAC.

Nina Ozlu Tunceli
Executive Director

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URGENT! MAKE YOUR VOICE HEARD FOR OUR CULTURAL VENUES BEFORE TUESDAY.

URGENT! MAKE YOUR VOICE HEARD FOR OUR CULTURAL VENUES BEFORE TUESDAY.

As you may have heard the Oregon Legislature is meeting this week in both an Emergency Board session and a special session. We need your voice.

Our colleagues have been working hard to convince our policymakers to allocate federal CARES dollars to keep our performing arts and culture venues open. We call this “life support for venues” (with thanks to Jim Brunberg!). Led by Representative Rob Nosse and the Independent Venue Coalition, this effort makes it clear that funding nonprofits and small businesses is critical to Oregon’s COVID-19 recovery. We must be at the table for economic support if we are to recover.

The time is now! The Emergency Board will vote on Tuesday to make this allocation.

Please let members of the Emergency Board know how important this investment is to your communities and to Oregonians all across this state.

We need letters, emails, and phone calls to these members who are listed below.

Key points to make:

  • We support life support for Oregon’s venues where art and culture live.
  • Venues are statewide. If you live outside of Portland, your voice is especially important.
  • Venues are ALL independent in Oregon, we want to keep them that way. Money spent in Oregon venues stays in Oregon.
  • These are places where families meet and gather. Where couples meet and families start. Culture and community.
  • Jobs, jobs, jobs. Thousands of livelihoods.
  • Economic impact: over a billion.
  • People move here to be part of music and arts performance network. It’s something Oregon is proud of.
  • These stages give voice to the voiceless, to perspectives that would otherwise not be heard.

The Emergency Board Contact Emails:

[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]

(Full names available on our website)

Thank you for joining us in this effort!
Cultural Advocacy Coalition

Southern Oregon Artists Resource editor’s note: We sent a lengthy email touching all the bases listed above to all the representatives and senators listed above as we reposted this article. Please make time to write a thoughtful email putting all these important points into your own words TODAY!

 


Cultural Advocacy Coalition of Oregon   

SOSA June 2020 Newsletter

SOSA June 2020 newsletter