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Governor’s Arts Awards nominations due June 30

The hands of master Native basketweaver Pat Courtney Gold at work. Gold is the recipient of a 2001 Governor’s Arts Award from Gov. Ted Kulongoski.

 Call for nominations!

Governor’s Arts Awards nominations due June 30

Do you know someone who has had a dramatic impact on the arts in Oregon? Consider nominating him or her for a Governor’s Arts Award! Individuals and organizations are eligible.

A call for nominations is now posted on the Arts Commission website; nominations are due by 5 p.m. on Friday, June 30. Awardees will be announced during the Governor’s Arts Awards ceremony from 8 to 9 a.m. on Friday, Oct. 6, at the Portland Hilton Downtown.

A partnership between the Office of the Governor and the Arts Commission, the Governor’s Arts Awards recognize and honor individuals and organizations that have made significant contributions to the arts in Oregon.
The Governor’s Arts Awards are open to any individual, organization or community that currently resides in or has a significant presence in Oregon and has made outstanding contributions to the arts in the state. Previous awardees are not eligible (see past recipients ).

Arts and Politics in the Trump Era

View the #AFTACON session presentation on Arts and Politics in the Trump Era

Federal Advocacy Update

Read the latest update on federal advocacy.

How Arts Advocates Plan to Save the NEA

Arts Action Fund Executive Director Nina Ozlu Tunceli quoted in a recent article for Variety.

Details of Trump Budget Released

Today, the White House released the official details of its proposed FY2018 “skinny budget” that President Trump proposed back in March.

Art Advocacy Day 2017 Roundup from Americans for the Arts

This was a record-breaking year for our 30th annual Arts Advocacy Day.  Over 700 advocates (new record), including 88 National Partners, came to Washington, DC from all over the country to speak out for the arts on March 20-21.

Here are some further highlights on Arts Advocacy Day and further congressional news.

Arts Advocacy Day 2017 Highlights:

  • Arts Advocacy Day attendees had over 400 face-to-face meetings with Congressional leaders and their staff on Capitol Hill.

    Arts Advocacy Day 2017 roundup

    Ben Vereen, Brian Stokes Mitchell, House Democratic Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-CA), and Gabrielle Ruiz at the Congressional Arts Kick Off

  • One of the key items we ask of Members of Congress is to sign the annual letter in support of federal funding for the National Endowment for the Arts.   Because of advocates like you, the U.S. House of Representatives letter led by the Congressional Arts Caucus Co-Chairs Reps. Leonard Lance (R-NJ) and Louise Slaughter (D-NY) has garnered a record number of 154 signatures!  We had more bipartisan support than ever on this important letter.  Thank you for all your efforts!
  • A similar letter in the U.S. Senate was led by Senator Tom Udall (D-NM).  This year, 40 Senators signed in support!
  • At the Congressional Arts Kick Off, Senator Tom Udall and Representative Debbie Dingell (D-MI) announced their introduction of the CREATE Act in the U.S. Senate and U.S. House of Representatives.
  • About 150,000 messages to Members of Congress have been sent by advocates like you from across the country participating from home.

Congressional News:

  • The House and Senate are currently in a 2 week recess and will be working from their home districts until April 25.
  • April 28th, just a few days after Congress returns, funding levels for all the federal government, including the National Endowment for the Arts, expires.  We’ll keep you informed about what happens next with arts funding for FY 2017.

    Rep. Jim Langevin (D-RI) leads extended debate on the U.S. House floor in support of the NEA and NEH

    Rep. Jim Langevin (D-RI) leads extended debate on the U.S. House floor in support of the NEA and NEH

  • On April 6, seven Members of Congress, led by Rep. Jim Langevin (D-RI), spoke out through a rare “Special Order” series of speeches in support of the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA), National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH), and the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS).
  • The Senate Cultural Caucus has two new co-chairs: Senator Susan Collins (R-ME) and Senator Tom Udall (D-NM) replaced Senator Mike Enzi (R-WY) and Barbara Mikulski (D-MD), respectively. Senators Collins and Udall are both committed to maintaining federal support for the NEA and NEH and Americans for the Arts looks forward to supporting the Caucus’ activities.

Thanks for supporting the arts and arts education!

National Endowment for the Arts is vital to our community

The Press-Enterprise published an op-ed today on the importance of the NEA.

Bipartisan Spending Bill Preserves Funding for the Arts

Philanthropy News Digest covers the newest bill to preserve arts funding in FY2017.

Congress Gives the Arts a Funding Boost

Today, Congress has reached a bipartisan agreement on a bill to fund the nation’s federal agencies and programs for the remaining balance of the current FY2017 fiscal year, which ends on September 30, 2017.

Oregon Arts Commission News - April 2017

April 2017
Alexis Rockman (American, b. 1962), Evolution, 1992, oil on wood, 96 x 288 in., George R. Stroemple Collection, Lake Oswego, Oregon. Featured in curator and writer Linda Tesner’s essay “Thoughts on a Museum of Wonder,” which was commissioned for the Ecology Project.
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Arts Commission and The Ford Family Foundation
Launch Visual Arts Ecology Project

The Oregon Visual Arts Ecology Project is now live at www.oregonvisualarts.org.

The online magazine and archive attempts to further explore the depth and expand the breadth of Oregon’s visual arts ecology. The Project is a joint effort of the Oregon Arts Commission and The Ford Family Foundation to create an accessible, permanent and interactive virtual collection documenting Oregon’s visual arts landscape, and the interconnected realms of artist, institution, patron, curator and arts writer.

The collection is a beginning, with historic and contemporary content drawn from the archives of the Arts Commission and visual arts partners across Oregon.

Read the full release.
Listen to the Jefferson Public Radio interview with Visual Arts Coordinator Meagan Atiyeh.
Watch Live!

Oregon’s Megan Kim to compete
at Poetry Out Loud National Finals April 24-26

Megan Kim, an 18-year-old senior at Medford’s Cascade Christian High School, will represent Oregon in the April 24-26, 2017 Poetry Out Loud National Finals in Washington, D.C. The competition will be live-streamed here.

Megan is scheduled to compete during the third semifinal, with other upper Northwest and Western states’ contestants, from 2 to 5 p.m. on Tuesday, April 25. If she advances, she also will compete in the finals 4 to 6:15 p.m. on Wednesday, April 26 (Pacific Daylight Time).

Megan, who lives in Ashland, reads poetry for fun and serves as editor of the school’s literary magazine. Her plans are to attend college (she’s considering several) and to major in English.

Enjoy an excerpt of Megan’s performance of Carmen Gimenez Smith’s “Bleeding Heart” and the moment she was named our state champion. Read is a profile of Megan from The Ashland Tidings.
Megan Kim

Breaking news

National report shows Oregon ranks near top
for arts and culture jobs

Oregon is one of seven states- including Alaska, California, Colorado, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and Utah- that exceed the national rate for arts and cultural workers by nine to 17 percent, says a new national study. Only three states (New York, Washington and Wyoming) rank higher.
By Flickr user Aaaarrrrgggghhhh! Courtesy of the NEA.

The research was unveiled April 19 by the National Endowment for the Arts and the Bureau of Economic Analysis. It represents the first authoritative federal data on arts and culture employment and compensation.

The data, gathered in 2014, reveals that overall arts and culture contributed $729.6 billion, or 4.2 percent of the Gross National Product (GDP), to the U.S. economy. Oregon employed 69,712 arts and culture workers earning a total of $3.9 billion that year.

Read the full report.
Upcoming application deadlines 

Arts Learning Grants: June 1

 

Oregon Arts Commission | Oregon Cultural Trust,775 Summer Street NE #200, Salem, OR 97301