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Ashland Gallery Association First Friday Art Walk, November 1st 2019 from 5 to 8 pm

Join us for the First Friday Art Walk festivities! 

Ashland Gallery Association Exhibit Openings & Artist Receptions

First Friday Art Walk, November 1st from 5 to 8 pm

Stroll the galleries and take in the visual delights in downtown Ashland and the Historic Railroad District.  Venture further to explore out-skirting galleries!  Enjoy this free year-round community event, filled with a diverse array of artwork, live music, artist demonstrations, refreshments and lively conversation! 

Ashland Gallery Association First Friday Art Walk, November 1st 2019 from 5 to 8 pm

November Spotlight Exhibits

Art & Soul Gallery

“Color Notes” oil painting on linen by Jenay Elder

Artist Jenay Elder resides in Southern Oregon. Her impressionistic oil paintings are known for their textured notes of color, representational quality and their sensitive subject matter. Jenay sold her first Monet inspired, impressionistic landscape online at the age of fifteen in 2001 and has been making and selling art ever since. Her artwork can be found in regional gallery shows and plein air events as well as in private collections around the world. She is a recent recipient of the Haines Foundation grant and has participated in numerous paint outs and shows, including the UVAA 30 under 30 exhibit. Jenay is also an artist member of Oil Painters of America and Laguna Beach Plein Air Painters associations. 

Live music of First Friday will be provided by “Sidewalk Café.”  The trio – Beth Martin, violinist and singer, Craig Martin, guitarist, and Todd Ragland, fretless bassist play swing, Gypsy jazz and bossa nova.

Jenay Elder, “Reset on Harris Beach" oil on linen

Jenay Elder, “Reset on Harris Beach” oil on linen

Ashland Natural Medicine

“Dream Garden” paintings by Linda Kehoe


Lindy Kehoe paints from a pure place of imagination. Nothing obstructs her vision. She weaves in magical themes of storytelling about nature, animals, Mother Earth, music, dance, childhood, mystical, unconsciousness, joy, divinity, feminine, masculine, peace and prayer just to name a few…

Lindy writes, “My work is inspired by serendipity, a momentary feeling of interconnected magic, that often feels like a dream.  I am motivated to create images that bring peaceful energy to the viewer, a place of remembrance, a place of innocence. The Oracular tendency keeps me fascinated by the mystical process.”

Lindy Kehoe, “Durgalina,” mixed media painting

Lindy Kehoe, “Durgalina,” mixed media painting

Studio 151

Guest Artist Rob Jaffe, photography

November’s First Friday at the studio features a joint show of mixed media figures and wall art by Elizabeth York and works by guest artist, photographer, Rob Jaffe.

In the words of one of his admirers: “Robert Jaffe’s lens and eye are a gateway to a realm of transcendence. The scope of his work ranges from the close-up to expansive vistas. Whether his photographs are the astonishing insides of a raspberry or a full moon over Mount Shasta, you feel that perhaps you are experiencing these worldly wonders for the first time. Jaffe combines his consummate technical skill with the poetry of his vision. The camera captures reality, but Jaffe transforms the ordinary into the extraordinary. His work takes you to unforgettable moments and locations – a dove ascending from a monastery’s ledge in Assisi, Italy, or the Oregon Coast – filled with luminous rock and the calligraphic underbelly of driftwood.

Jaffe’s photographs remind me of a line from Rumi: “We are tasting the taste, this minute of eternity.” The viewer will leave Jaffe’s exhibition, with that experience.” ~Rebecca Gabriel

The studio will be open on First Friday from 5-8.  www.robjaffe.com

Ashland Property Management

“Aileron Flares” New & recent works by Jarrett Rex Davidson


Jarrett Rex Davidson is a Southern Oregonian who has returned to paint and teach art practices.  His works are amalgamations of memory and folklore that result in grand depictions of cultural iconography.  Standing before his paintings, the viewer senses an accumulated vocabulary of imagery reflected by life encounters in the Northwest, as well as travels in Mexico and Italy.  Informed by traditions of biological illustration, religious art and pop culture, Davidson navigates depictions of intersecting myths and symbolic narratives.

With a vita that includes a Bachelors of Studio Art from Southern Oregon University, Davidson was the Art Technician for the Portland Art Museum, Oregon Historical Society, Laura Russo Gallery in Portland and Art Handler for Connect Art International in San Francisco. In addition to painting, Davidson is currently gaining his Master of Arts in Teaching at Southern.  He is presently working with Ashland Middle School students on an exhibit of artwork that will be displayed at the Ashland Public Library for a Dia de los Muertos celebration from October 28th into November.

Selected pieces of the First Friday Reception at Ashland Property Management will be on sale with 100% proceeds going to The Young Center for Immigrant Children’s Rights.

Jarrett Rex Davidson, “Aileron Flares” watercolor on paper

Jarrett Rex Davidson, “Aileron Flares” watercolor on paper

For more information about all of our exhibits and to download the November Gallery Tour map, please visit: www.ashlandgalleries.com  

 

Thank you for your support of the Visual Arts in our communities!

2020 A Taste of Ashland Poster Art Competition

Ashland Gallery Association

2020 A Taste of Ashland Poster Art Competition

2019 a taste of ashland poster, 2020 A Taste of Ashland Poster Art Competition

The Ashland Gallery Association is seeking artwork for its 2020 A TASTE OF ASHLAND event.  All southern Oregon artists are encouraged to submit images of their work. AGA Gallery, Associate, and Neighboring Arts Organization members may also submit images for artists they represent.  Artists are not required to be AGA Members to submit artwork.

The winner will be publicized in the 2020 Ashland Gallery Guide, the ‘Taste’ Event Guide, on the AGA website, and on ‘Taste’ promotional materials including the poster, postcard, and social media. The Ashland Gallery Guide is distributed to about10,000 patrons of the arts each year. The Event Guide is distributed to about 1,000.

The winning poster artist will receive 2 weekend tickets to 2020 A Taste of Ashland.

Submission deadline: December 5, 2019.  The poster art will be selected at the December 10, 2019 AGA General Membership meeting at Ashland Art Center. The meeting will begin at 6:30 and members will vote on the submissions.   Winners will be notified shortly after this meeting.

 

Submission address:  Routing: send by email to AGA Administrator, Kim Olson:[email protected]

 

Important:  The ATOA committee is seeking strong, colorful and broadly appealing images – ones that convey a feeling of joy and fun with friends, and the feeling of “Come to Ashland for great food, wine and art”.  The submissions don’t have to be literal depictions of food and wine, although they can!  

See HYPERLINK “http://www.atasteofashland.com” to view last year’s image. 

Additional Submission Guidelines:

·      One image may be submitted per artist.

·      Submit by email in one of the following files types: JPG (preferred), GIF, TIFF, or PDF (Files not in one of these formats will not be guaranteed to be part of the selection)

·      Submissions must be medium-to-high resolution, and must include the artist’s name, phone number, mailing address, and email address.

·      Images should be in color and no more than 10MB in size (anything larger will be rejected by the mail server).

·      Artwork may be existing or created specifically for the “Taste”.

·      Any art medium that can be photographed and printed is eligible.

·      The winning artist will be responsible for providing a high-quality image for the printer.

·      Any artist who has already been honored becomes eligible to submit again after an interval of five years.

The winning poster artist grants the AGA the right to reproduce his/her artwork for the poster and for publicity of A Taste of Ashland. All proceeds from the promotional use of the image will benefit A Taste of Ashland. The Artist will be credited, where possible, on promotional materials using his/her image.

Thanks so much for submitting your work.  A Taste of Ashland is the Ashland Gallery Association’s annual fundraising effort and a themed image is important for marketing the event.

We look forward to your submission!

Kim

Kim Olson

Administrator
Ashland Gallery Association
541.488.8430

Art du Jour Gallery’s November 2019 News

SeaBat, (aka- Sebastian) was in character as security guard for Art du Jour's October Third Friday event. Guitarist Rod Petrone, who will also be performing for 3rdFri November 15th, plays in the background. Roy Musitelli photo 10/18/19

SeaBat, (aka- Sebastian) was in character as security guard for Art du Jour’s October Third Friday event. Guitarist Rod Petrone, who will perform for 3rd Friday November 15th, plays in the background. Roy Musitelli photo 10/18/19

November 2019 at Art du Jour Gallery

Art du Jour’s featured wall for October 2019 is a collaboration of participating member’s work focused on the theme “Celebrating Fall Colors”. -Roy Musitelli photo 10/2/19

Art du Jour Gallery, 213 E. Main Street in Medford will continue it’s seasonal exhibit of Jeanne LaRea-Lagano work in our salon through November.  Our monthly exhibit on the featured wall will be offering a creative mix of work in recognition of the glorious colors of fall. For Third Friday (November 15th, 5pm-8pm) classical guitarist Rod Petrone has once again agreed to perform his splendid classical guitar. Please go to our Facebook page (www.facebook.com/ArtduJourGallery) for any further updates.

Featured Wall Celebrating Fall Colors will Transition to a Winter Themed Exhibit

When one of our artist members must leave the co-operative, or for one reason or another is unable to fulfill their Featured Artist month, our board of directors must scramble to fill an open slot. This month a combined exhibit by participating AdJ members built around the theme Celebrating Fall Colors” has received positive reviews from our art loving friends and visitors.  In the interest of keeping with our motto “Always Something New”, the remainder of 2019 will see a transition from autumn to winter for a special treat for the upcoming holiday season.

Guest Artist Jeanne LaRae-Lagano in Salon through November

"Winter Approaching", 9X12 oil painting by Jeanne LaRea-Lagano. Image provided by the artist

“Winter Approaching”, 9X12 oil painting by Jeanne LaRea-Lagano. Image provided by the artist

Jeanne LaRae-Lagano’s resume lists many accomplishments as an exhibiting and published artist.  Her current duties with the Ashland Art Center includes gallery curator and manager, studio artist, window display, and instructor. She is also a board member “Artist Liaison” with the Ashland Gallery Association.  As her exhibit continues into November Jeanne has also planned a transition into the winter season with some new paintings depicting appropriate winter scenes. This will provide an opportunity to those who have already seen her October display another chance to see more of what makes her work so captivating.

For more information on this artist go to her website at: http://www.jeannelarae.com

Calling All Rogue Valley Artists!!!

November will also bring a new look throughout the gallery as we undergo our quarterly change-out with a lot of fresh materiel ready to be presented.  We still actively seek new artists living in the Rogue Valley region who would like to join our co-operative and display their work to the Medford community. Membership includes an active role in the Art in Bloom festival in May, as well as our monthly Third Friday event. Media to be juried for membership includes pottery, sculpture, photography and jewelry.  Contact the gallery by email at [email protected], or log into our website (www.artdujourgallery.com) for full membership information.

Art du Jour Gallery
213 E. Main Street
Medford, OR 97501
(541) 770-3190
OPEN Tues – Sat., 10AM – 4PM

Dana Saulnier

 

Untitled Study, 2014, oil on canvas, 42″ x 56″

I can say that my drive to make art is a desperate issue for me. If I was motivated narrowly by my desire to place myself in some kind of professional situation, where I was primarily concerned with the work’s status within a narrow set of theoretical discourses, then I am not sure that I could proceed with the faith and doubt necessary to the work. I want the work to make sense to people whether they are educated in art theory or not. Like good music I hope good art takes you in. It is hard work to make art and I want to think that it matters to people. That it enlarges our capacity for living.

                                                                                                                         —Dana Saulnier

In an interview a bit harder to penetrate than this lucid remark in the middle of it, Dana Saulnier offers a couple of tangentially related thoughts. I spotted his work in the recent exhibit at Manifest Gallery, so I delved deeper into the paintings already familiar to me from his show at First Street. In this brief observation, Saulnier resists the professionalization of art.  It sounds as if he’s saying that he refuses to find his place in whatever happens to be going on theoretically or, as I would put it, conceptually, in the art world. He doesn’t need to belong. I like this, because he’s asserting his individuality, but also because theory comes second here. Starting from conceptual premises works against painting’s ability to convey an awareness more oceanic than conscious thought–so it’s ass backwards to make a painting to illustrate an idea or a theory of art. To look for significance in visual art can obscure what it’s actually doing. An industry of critical thought depends on the need to extract significance from creative work. As Tom Wolfe pointed out in The Painted Word, to make work that depends on criticism for elucidation or justification upends the relationship between creativity and critique: the critic rules the creator. Postmodernism depends on this. Painting begins to obey the need to be significant in such a way that it will attract critical approval. What gets put aside is attention to what a painting can do, in contrast to what, say, a novel does. Work that arises out of a theory of art, or any conscious purpose, reduces a painting to the role of “signifier” which has, at least, the virtue of keeping critics busy. It sounds as if maybe Saulnier wants to sidestep all of that and allow his work a more elusive impact—though his own critical thought about his work throughout the rest of the interview would seem to argue otherwise.

In this short reflective comment, though, he also says he wants his work to be available and effective, in some way, for people who know little or nothing about art in general—again suggesting that a painting’s work is unmediated, requiring neither commentary nor training. Looking is required; thinking optional and not advised. (Tolstoy’s theories of art toward the end of his life took a similar stance, repudiating much of the Western canon that most educated people would have considered sacrosanct—and quite a bit I would hate to lose, personally. But his intent was to remain true to the wisdom he earned after narrowly avoiding the impulse to kill himself over his inability to understand life intellectually, all of which he dramatized in Anna Karenina.) Granted, some of the most thrilling and powerful visual art has significance in the sense that it conveys much that can be clarified by criticism and commentary and training. It represents ideas, it has significance, the way language does. Yet, for me, the greatest painting has no significance whatsoever, but is instead a perceptual catalyst, a representation only in the sense that an aroma represents a meal. A scent doesn’t signify anything but its provenance—it’s an element of its life-sustaining origin and it brings you toward that origin in the way a painting by Braque could be said to embody the world it invites the viewer to inhabit. How it does this is utterly mysterious, and that isn’t a reality that offers much mileage to critical conversations about it.

Will You Be The One To Solve This Creative Caper at Central Art?

Central
                                                          Art Logo

 

Was it Colonel Mustard? Mr. Green? Perhaps Professor Plum was the perpetrator! Something is most assuredly afoot at Central Art, and we need you to help us get to the bottom of it!

 

Using the clues we’ll reveal each day on our Facebook page during the week of Halloween (Monday – Saturday, 10/28 – 11/2), you get to use your brilliant deductive and observational skills to determine “Clue-Done-It”, what they used, and in which room the deed was done!

 

Be sure to pick up your “Detective Notes” in-store, check our Facebook page each day for a new clue, and work the case until you have made your ultimate conclusion.

 

Still stumped? Stop in Wednesday, Oct. 30th to talk to the suspects in person! Miss Scarlett, Col. Mustard, and the rest of the characters will be appearing in costume and ready for your interrogation.

 

Each Notes slip must be filled out and turned in by Saturday, Nov. 2nd to be entered to win an exclusive Evidence Bag filled with goodies!

 

The winner will be announced by Monday, Nov. 4th.

 

Come and play with us!

VISIT CENTRAL ART!
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Inspiration Center
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Explore a world of art essentials at Central Art.
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Plug in to the local art & education scene!
Click Here
centralartsupply.com, 101 N. Central Ave., Medford, Oregon

Remember Me – It’s About Blogging & Leaving Talent OR

Remember: Talent Railroad Depot

Yes, do you remember me?

Remember Me? From the blog login page

Remember Me.

As I logged into my website in preparation to write this blog post, I noticed the small remark at the bottom of the page.  It read “Remember Me”.   Though the statement was about my password, it made me wonder, will you remember me?

 

Blog Slow Down.

This past year has not been one of my better blogging years.  As I remember, things were slow to begin with and, then, I  practically stopped writing for the month of August and September.  Not surprising, these two months coincide with our move.  That is to say, my husband and I have left Talent, OR and moved to Ilwaco, WA.

Hard Getting Started Again.

I thought that when we moved into our new place, it would be easy to pick up the keyboard and start blogging again.  Silly me; there is a lot of work to setting up a household.  And, my studio space, for example, is only about a third of the way unpacked.  I do have my drawing table unpacked.  Pencil and paper are always at the ready, so things are looking up.

All that being said, I have wanted to start writing again.  Here we go then and, I do hope that you remember me.

Farewell Talent, Oregon.

So, I’d like to say a fond farewell to Talent, OR.  I thoroughly enjoyed our seven years there.  And, while there, I did some sketches of some of the places around town.  I have included a few just for fun.

Rail Depot.

One of my favorite buildings in town is the old rail depot.  I did a few sketches and here is my favorite watercolor and ink version.  The forward part of the building as space for a cafe.  Currently, it is the home of “Sweet Beet Station”.

Remembering Talent Rail Depot

“Funky Fashions”.

The old building that used to be the home of “Funky Fashions” is also a favorite.  “Funky Fashions” was owned by our neighbor when we moved in to Talent back in 2012.  Since then it has changed businesses a couple of times.  Now, it’s the home of “Biscuits and Vinyl”.

Remember Funky Fashions

“Downtowne Coffee”

One business that did not change while we were there was “Downtowne Coffee”.  It is situated in what was once a gasoline station.  I recommend the espresso at “Downtowne Coffee”; it tastes so good!

Remember Talent OR

Gas Station.

Come to think of it, I did do a sketch of one of the gas stations that is still a gas station.  The employees were nice and this is one of my favorites.

Remember Talent: 76 Gas Station

Fond Memories.

I will remember Talent and the people who live there with fondness.

 

 

 

 

 

 

The post Remember Me – It’s About Blogging & Leaving Talent OR appeared first on Margaret Stermer-Cox.

Living Large on Little: Part 3

And one more installation from my forthcoming mini book: Living Large on Little: How to See the Invitation in Limitation. This vignette is from the section on patience….

When I taught high school on a tiny, Micronesian island, far, far away, I learned to make weekends sacred. I tried to get out and enjoy the ocean, which was my favorite thing to do there. 

One Saturday morning, I stopped at the local outdoor market and bought a coconut to take to Wings Beach. With any luck, I’d have that northern nook of the island to myself. It was an  unprotected beach, as in: no coral reef to create a lagoon and keep the sharks out. I was always a bit afraid of swimming in those waters, and I would force myself to do it.

My car lurched down the pocked, coral road, and I arrived to—delight!—a deserted beach. 

I laid out my sarong on the sand and sipped the coconut juice through the straw sticking from the hole that the man at the market had machete’d open for me. When I finished the juice, I thought: I want to eat the coconut meat inside. But this was the entire coconut—thick, green outer casing and all.

Limitation: I had no machete. 

Invitation: How else can I open it?

I will not admit how long it took me to break that thing open. It involved much hefting and not a few rounds of bashing against rocks. I’m glad there were no witnesses but the coconut crabs, scuttling for cover. 

When I finally heard that shell crack in half, I felt an ancient thrill that no modern equipment of convenience can give. 

I sat on my sarong and scooped out the coconut meat. I ate it with revelry, facing the sea and sky in their many hues of blue. 

When I had scraped out the last of the sweet fruit, I stacked the two shells and ran my hands through the sand—sand that had once been stone or coral and was now soft enough to comfortably sit on. 

So much is worth waiting for. 

Sometimes, that waiting is passive, but many times, it’s a muscle’d waiting, filled with sweat and repetition like the tides. Or the sound of continuous thudding of coconut on stone. 

PS: The official book launch is November 9 at The Miners’ Bazaar in Jacksonville, Oregon, from 5-7 PM.  More info here. 

The Exciting Night is Nearing – RSVP by Oct. 21st

A Delicious and Revealing Event
| A NEW DOOR |  |LET’S OPEN IT! |

RSVP BY OCT. 21ST

2019 Masterpiece Benefit Event Saturday, Nov. 2nd
@Ashland Hills Hotel

Enjoy a stellar evening of exhibits, delicious buffet, new Biblically themed art, silent auction, music and most recent updates.  Hear about ways we are reaching culture for Christ through Masterpiece Christian Fine Arts Foundation.

Including our exciting Capital Campaign for our Magna Deo project in Ashland.
Come Open this New Door with us!

Saturday, Nov. 2nd6:00 Social and silent auction, inspiring art
( Bid on an epic helicopter adventure over Crater Lake and so much more!)

6:30 Dinner & program
with speaker

Head Pastor @ The Story Ashland

Tickets $35 per person

or introduce others to the work we do to connect culture
to Christ through fine art and

Sponsor a table for 10
$350 

Please reserve your place by Oct. 21st.

Buy my tickets now

For more information email [email protected]
or call 541-601-7496.

I cannot attend but would like to support the work Masterpiece does to bring truth, grace, beauty and nobility to culture through fine art

Donate now
Dan Chen Lucite etching
Dan will be with us Nov. 2nd and  introducing his newest sculpture “Ascension”
Copyright © 2019 Masterpiece Christian Fine Arts Foundation, All rights reserved.

Our mailing address is:
Masterpiece Christian Fine Arts Foundation
17575 Highway 66
Ashland, OR 97520-9406

October Third Friday at Art du Jour

Art du Jour’s featured wall for October 2019 is a collaboration of participating member’s work focused on the theme “Celebrating Fall Colors”. -Roy Musitelli photo 10/2/19

October Third Friday:

Art du Jour Gallery, 213 E. Main Street in Medford is featuring Jeanne LaRea-Lagano in our salon for September through November.  Our monthly exhibit on the featured wall we will be offering a mix of work in recognition of the glorious colors of fall. For Third Friday (October 18th, 5pm-8pm) classical guitarist Rod Petrone is scheduled to perform. Please see our Facebook page (www.facebook.com/ArtduJourGallery) for updates.

Guest Artist Jeanne LaRae-Lagano in Salon through November

Jeanne LaRae-Lagano has a resume listing many accomplishments as an exhibiting and published artist.  Her current duties with the Ashland Art Center includes gallery curator and manager, studio artist, window display, and instructor. She is also a board member “Artist Liaison” with the Ashland Gallery Association. In her artists statement she writes:

“I am an artist. I am enthralled with color, value, shapes, design and I can’t seem to let things go by that capture my attention. My opportunities to paint Alla Prima and Plein Air are what I love most… They are loose and fresh, and they portray what I am most excited about with the view in front of me. I began to take a strong liking to landscape painting because of the daily need to show landscaping in my renderings. I escaped outside to paint landscapes and found my love for Plein Air painting.”

“Like a composer conducting a symphony, I am in the middle of it all, I get to orchestrate the bass cello creating the darks and the main shapes, then the violins leading the viewer through the path of color with the final bells and frills of highlights and details making the light dance and the crescendo to fulfill my mission as I step back into the silence of my surroundings.”

“I was born into a family that enabled me to be who I am, as unique, true to myself, individual, creating my own path. Creative thinking was encouraged, and I decided at an early age to take a path leading to an art career. Painting is my spiritual meditation as I am connecting to my subject through my soul using my acquired knowledge to guide me on my adventurous endeavors, always exploring and pushing myself for greater personal achievements. My photography helps me paint in the studio and because it is something I love, I get lost in photographing for future paintings. I am captivated and drawn to people and I photograph their emotions as events take place. My love for photography enhances my art and my love for art enhances my photography.”

For more information on this artist go to her website at: http://www.jeannelarae.com

"Autumn Casting Color", 24 X 24 oil painting by Jeanne LaRae-Lagano. Image provided by the artist

“Autumn Casting Color”, 24 X 24 oil painting by Jeanne LaRae-Lagano. Image provided by the artist

Featured Wall Celebrating Fall Colors

Occasionally an artist scheduled for the back wall in our beautiful gallery must leave our co-operative for one reason or another before their Featured Artist month arrives. When this happens our board of directors must scramble to fill the open slot. This month we will have a combined exhibit by participating AdJ members built around the theme Celebrating Fall Colors.  We think that our friends and visitors will enjoy this presentation in recognition of the splendor of the autumn season.

Calling All Rogue Valley Artists!!!

Art du Jour is happy to welcome two new artists into our membership ranks, Max Brown and MaryAnn Macey.  We think their work will be complementary to that of our other artists and look forward to their presence. We are still actively seeking new artists living in the Rogue Valley region who would like to join our co-operative and display their work to the Medford community. Membership includes an active role in the Art in Bloom festival in May, as well as our monthly Third Friday event. Media to be juried for membership includes pottery, sculpture, photography and jewelry.  Contact the gallery by email at [email protected], or log into our website (www.artdujourgallery.com) for full membership information.

Art du Jour Gallery
213 E. Main Street
Medford, OR 97501
(541) 770-3190
OPEN Tues – Sat., 10AM – 4PM

Opportunity in the overlooked

Laid Down, Erin Raedeke, oil on canvas

I first noticed Erin Raedeke’s paintings when she was a member at First Street Gallery in Chelsea some years ago and was immediately charmed by her handling of color. Her delicate, playful images of birthday party detritus, strewn across the field of view, gave her endless ways to improvise with tones that created deeply felt, personal color harmonies. The work was representational but also “all over,” without the negative space typical in a still life, the objects in the foreground against an empty background. The work was fine-tuned, with attention to unique details, but gracefully and effortlessly executed. If she worked from photographs, it didn’t show. My first thought was that Fairfield Porter would love the work. Nothing is overdone; the paintings appear to be first responses to whatever she sees without much going back over earlier marks. I saw her work again in 2015 at a group show curated by Matt Klos at Anne Arundel Community College. The painting in that show was simpler and harder to read, but still executed in the same steady, quiet and idiosyncratically personal insistence on representing humble objects in recognizable space in order to come up with results as close to abstraction as representation.

Her birthday party images give her an ample and varied palette of hues—almost any color can be made to fit into an image. Conical hats and flaccid balloons could be strewn across a surface to create patterns and shapes at will, though she was sedulous about keeping her subjects as random-looking, as “found” as possible. Departing from the party leftovers, she has used layered fabrics to create quasi-minimalist abstractions, some almost as radically simplified as Rothko or a Barnett Newman zip. The top layer of fabric would be torn or punched in places to reveal the color or pattern of what was underneath. Some of these paintings were as large as five feet tall, adding to their sense of kinship with abstracts from the mid-20th century. Yet even in this flat, minimal work, Raedeke has been just as diligent in capturing factual detail—the frayed tendrils of thread bristling from a torn edge running across a canvas as demarcation between large areas of nearly uniform color. She has an insistence on rendering lines as thin as spiderweb. Such minute detail in a sea of color seems like a pyrrhic effort to pull back from the larger strategy of enveloping the viewer—but it works. Oh, OK, we’re looking at cloth. There is something compulsive in this, in the way that much of what’s best in a particular artist’s style represents a surrender to inarticulate instincts about what needs to happen simply to make a picture come alive. Yet that adherence to minor detail makes even these larger, more amorphous paintings approachable, humble, amiable—when you recognize what’s been represented they snap back into insignificance, studies of what nearly anyone else wouldn’t even have bothered to notice. The fabric even looks a little stained. 

Her recent work is included in Manifest’s Painted, and it seems like a culmination, in a way, of what she’s been doing over the past decade, from the versatile color of her birthday party messes to the almost ascetic renunciations of the fabric paintings where she seems to want to improvise as simply as possible with color and form and space and yet still show you something you might actually see on the surface of a bed or countertop. She’s sticking with fabric, but there’s more depth—and the patterns of this fabric give her room to vary color and line and shape It hangs like a curtain, and its decorative print gives the painter a way of bringing back the musical tones. In this case, it’s just a pair of muslin sheets, it seems, decorated with floral patterns, a scattering of blue pansies on the cool side of the painting. The fabric hangs in supple folds, against a deep red background that shows as a slash of color at the bottom, beneath the hems. It’s as humble and unspectacular as possible, but the patterns are rendered with care, almost gratitude for the opportunities they offer.

The particular integrity she brings to her work shines through in this insistence on painting nothing but what she sees—even if it’s merely the torn edge of monotone, porous cloth—in order to create a nearly flat field of color. If you allow for varying degrees of flatness, this is a pursuit common to countless painters, but she brings a lyrical, almost wistful quality to her images, as if she’s nostalgic for the moment, a few seconds ago, that she last glanced at her subject. And in the work I enjoy the most from her, the impression of flatness gives way to depth—albeit the shallow relief of curtains or layers of wrapping paper under a half-eaten hamburger. They’re fragments of a larger experience, not signifying anything but rather saturated with her sense of how life feels.