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How can we measure the impact of art and creativity?

Imagine you want to help young people in West Africa use their creative skills to engage their peers in political dialogue about gender violence. Or you want to train artists and scientists to collaborate on truly innovative and creative ways to teach people about pressing science issues like climate change. Or you want to create a performative ritual for formerly incarcerated people that reintroduces them into their communities. These projects have amazing objectives, but how do you know if you’re accomplishing what you set out to do?

When it comes to social change projects that work at the level of culture, and reaching people through emotion and creativity, it can feel intimidating to try to understand what “works.” How might we all best understand the effect AND affect of projects that combine creativity and social change?

We’ve been working on this challenging question for a number of years, and we’ve been loving putting it into practice through our most recent Assessment Advising work.

The examples above – the West Africa youth, the artist-scientist collaborations, and the ritual performance – are from our recent work advising Action Aid, Guerilla Science, and A Blade of Grass. We’ve been helping them measure and understand the impact of the fantastic work they’re doing at the intersections of culture, creativity, and social change movements. Read these case studies here, and learn more about how we do this work.

Land That I Love: Scenes From the Cascade Siskiyou

Purchase artworks featured in the show here. Artwork can be picked up or delivered locally after July 13. Contact Sarah at [email protected] with questions. Shipping available.

Photograph Bobcat in tree

“Bobcat 23”

Framed Photograph by Dan Elster
Framed dimensions 39” x 27”

$395.00

“Trying to Help” Gopher Snake

Framed Photograph by Dan Elster Framed size 19” x 23”

$185.00

“Looking Toward the Light” Northern Spotted Owl

Framed Photograph by Dan Elster
Framed size 19” x 23”

$185.00

Camas

Screen print by Amy Godard
Ready to hang
17” x 20”

$100.00

Rose Hip

Woodcut Print by Amy Godard
17” x 20”
Ready to hang

$125.00

Red Cedar

Framed Woodcut Print by Amy Godard

Framed dimensions 12” x 14”

$100.00

Garry Oak

Framed Silkscreen Print by Amy Godard
Framed dimensions
16” x 18”

$125.00

Mount Shasta California

Framed Oil Painting by Sarah F Burns
16” x 20”

$580.00

Vesper Meadow with Mount Pitt

Framed oil painting by Sarah F Burns
20” x 35”

$1,150.00

Plant Diversity In the Siskiyou Mountains

Oil Painting by Deb Van Poolen

$7,000.00

Spring Buttercups at Vesper Meadow

Oil on Canvas by Jeanine Moy
10” x 10”

$250.00

Old Juniper

Framed photograph by Matt Witt framed dimensions 13″ x 17″

$100.00

Flowers at Horseshoe Ranch

Framed Photograph by Matt Witt
13” x 17 “ frames dimensions

$100.00

View From Soda Mountain Range

Framed Photograph by Matt Witt

$100.00

View Toward Grizzly Peak

Framed photograph by Matt Witt
Framed dimensions 13” x 17”

$100.00

“The Sentinels”

Gouache and Varnish on Panel, Framed Painting by Katy Cauker 11″ x 14″

$475.00

“Rock to Mountain”

Gouache and Varnish on Panel, Framed Oil Painting by Katy Cauker 12″ x 9″

$445.00

“Peak to Peak”

Acrylic on Canvas Framed Painting by Katy Cauker, 18″ x 36″

$833.00

“Hi-Lo Country”

Oil Painting by Nikolai Klein 40″ x 60″

$1,500.00

“Juniper Along the PCT” Oil Painting by Sarah F. Burns SOLD

Stop Hate for Profit: Facebook Ad Boycott

The Anti-Defamation League, the NAACP, and the Color Of Change have called for business to boycott advertising on Facebook “to stand in solidarity with our most deeply held American values of freedom, equality and justice.”

Their effort is gaining momentum, with brands singing on like Patagonia, the North Face, REI, Magnolia Pictures, and Ben & Jerry’s.

Stop Hate For Profit Logo

What would you do with $70 billion?

We know what Facebook did.

They  allowed  incitement  to  violence  against  protesters  fighting  for racial justice in America in the wake of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor,  Tony  McDade,  Ahmaud  Arbery,  Rayshard  Brooks  and  so  many others.

They named Breitbart News a “trusted news source” and made The Daily Caller a “fact checker” despite both publications having records of working with known white nationalists.

They  turned a blind eye to blatant voter suppression on their platform.

Could they protect and support Black users? Could they call out Holocaust denial as hate? Could they help get out the vote?

They absolutely could. But they are actively choosing not to do so.

99% of Facebook’s $70 billion is made through advertising.

Who will advertisers stand with?

Let’s send Facebook a powerful message: Your profits will never be worth promoting hate, bigotry, racism, antisemitism and violence.

Please join us.

Over two years ago we published an op-ed in ArtNet News about the Center for Artistic Activism’s withdrawl from Facebook. We tried to make the case for other non-profits to exit by focusing on the data and financial side while touching on moral and ethical issues. It’s not too late.

Alumni Anne Basting’s Creative Care

Anne Basting (alumni of our School for Creative Activism) is a pioneer in dementia and elder Care. She “developed a radical approach that combines methods from the world of theater and improvisation with evidence-based therapies that connect people using their own creativity and imagination.”

Her new book is called Creative Care: A Revolutionary Approach to Dementia and Elder Care.

Here’s a note from Anne

I have always felt an urgency to getting these tools to caregivers. But in this historical moment, the need is multiplied 1000-fold by the closing of social programs for people with dementia and the desperate need for meaningful engagement with elders now on lockdown.

This book chronicles my story of how I came to find the power of creative care; the elements of it and how it can be infused into care relationships; and how creative care practices can help transform our care systems themselves.

In the moment of COVID19, everyone is a caregiver. And creativity not only is a helpful tool, it’s our new way of being in this unprecedented time.

I hope you find these stories both soothing and inspiring. The team at my non-profit TimeSlips is working furiously to bring more and more creative engagement tools to caregivers in every setting. Sign up for their newsletter to get a weekly dose of Creative Care – inspiring prompts to help spark your imagination and engagements.

I’m offering a daily dose of Creative Care on my Facebook page.

Let your imagination soar… and may you be well.

— Anne

Inkjet Technologies

This post is presented courtesy Giclée Yoshimatsu at Giclée Yoshimatsu.

For fine art reproduction purposes, there are just two major inkjet technologies. Both are known as drop-on-demand but differ significantly in design. Before we go there, let’s first examine basic inkjet technology.

Inkjet printers (ijp) work by spraying tiny droplets of ink through a nozzle onto media, aka substrate. By tiny, we are talking in terms of 3-5 picoliters. A picoliter is 1 trillionth or 1/1000000000000 of a liter. As you might imagine, a single picoliter by itself would barely be visible on a sheet of paper but, when combined with millions or billions of picoliter size dots, the result is a visible image.

IJPs combine these droplets in many ways including layers, side-by-side, overlap, random and other proprietary patterns as seen below to create a visible image. The dots are not arranged in neat rows and columns or some other discernible pattern.

 

Northlight_P7000 head

Each white pad has nozzles for two colors. This head had 10 colors.

Northlight_dot pattern

Not every nozzle fires every time so the dot pattern appears random.

Of course, there is a method to this seemingly random placement once the final image is visible. Also, no one except geeks views prints at this distance.

Now that you have an idea of the precision we’re dealing with, the monumental task of ejecting a 3 to 5 picoliter droplet at the exact moment to land at a precise location becomes clearer.

To add to the complexity, printers capable of creating fine art reproductions usually use between 6 to 10 inks. It’s not just one nozzle firing at a time. Depending on the printer’s native resolution, the head can have anywhere from ~3000 to ~6000 nozzles and fire up to 50,000 droplets per second. Finally, keep in mind, the paper is being advanced as the drops are deposited so it’s a moving target, if you will.

This is where the two major brands diverge. Canon uses a thermal process while Epson uses a piezoelectric mechanism. Whether one is better than the other is a matter of debate and preference.

Canon’s FINE (Full-photolithography Inkjet Nozzle Engineering) print heads use heat to propel ink droplets out of the nozzle. A chamber above the nozzle fills with ink. At the precise moment, a heating element above the chamber heats the ink causing it to rapidly expand and shoot out of the nozzle. Think about that for a moment. Six thousand chambers full of ink being heated to a precise temperature that causes the ink to expand and jet out of six thousand nozzles to place ink at precisely the desired location then refills with more ink to prepare for the next droplet. This cycle repeats as much as 50,000 times per second.

Epson TFP print heads, on the other hand, uses a proprietary piezoelectric system for ejecting ink at about the same rate. In Epson’s system a piezo element flexes when an electrical charge is applied. Based on this phenomenon, a tiny ink chamber is fitted with a piezo element. With the chamber full of ink, an electrical charge causes the piezo element to flex which, in turn, forces a droplet of ink out the nozzle. As the piezo element returns to its original state, it creates a vacuum that sucks more ink into the chamber.

Photos in this article are ©Keith Cooper, Northlight-Images.co.uk, a commercial photographer and printing expert based in Leicester, UK and used with permission.

The post Inkjet Technologies appeared first on Giclée Yoshimatsu.

New Small Works

These images are just completed. I’m attempting to move away from cutting mats, dealing with heavy glass and framing my work. I’m too old to deal with it. These are lightweight! I like the immediacy of the images. All are acrylic on paper adhered to wood panels.They are sealed and UV treated for easy care. I’m all for easy these days and am loving the exploration.

New Small Works

“Earth Protectors” 15″X11″

New Small Works

“Red Flash” 15″X11″

New Small Works

“Coral Reef” 15″x11″

New small works

“Eb and Flow” 15″X1″

Everything is fertile

Marcel Proust

From the man who discovered an entire world in a cup of tea:

We have put something of ourselves everywhere, everything is fertile, everything is dangerous, and we can make discoveries no less precious than in Pascal’s Pensees in an advertisement for soap.

–Marcel Proust, The Fugitive

Fine Art Reproduction Inkjet Paper

This post is presented courtesy Giclée Yoshimatsu at Giclée Yoshimatsu.

There are literally hundreds of different media types (paper, canvas, poster board, metal & vinyl) in many surface textures (matte, satin matte, smooth matte, glossy, high gloss, linen, etc.) Many are available in both cut sheets as well as rolls. Some printers pride themselves in being media mavens, always ready to suggest a different paper or canvas. Giclee Yoshimatsu specializes in reproducing fine art that closely matches the original. Since most paintings and drawings are produced on paper or canvas, this is what we focus on. At a client’s requests, we can produce prints on other media but that may delay the process while printer profiles are created, tested and verified.

Paper for fine art reproduction generally has a matte surface but, even among matte media, there are significant differences. Matte smooth is different from matte textured and different still from matte velvet. In canvas media, there are matte, satin and, even, glossy surfaces. That doesn’t mean the canvas is smooth and slick like a photographic paper, just that the ink-receptive coating is satiny or glossy. The underlying canvas is still textured, just like canvas used for paintings.

Another criteria of critical importance to fine art reproductions is the inclusion or absence of OBAs (optical brightening agents,) chemical additives used to create an appearance of a brighter, whiter finish to the media. Since most media are produced from wood pulp, the natural color tends to age toward yellow/orange. OBAs are added to make the media appear whiter and brighter. The downside of OBAs is that they comprise unstable molecules that can yellow over time, leading to discoloration. For this reason, we recommend that only non-OBA papers be used for fine art reproductions you plan to sell.

Canvas can also have the same issue as most are made from natural products such as cotton, linen and flax. The same cautions apply to canvas prints containing OBAs, even when the print is coated and displayed under UV glass. To avoid OBAs, we recommend Epson Exhibition Canvas Natural (Matte, Satin or Gloss.) Below are two prints on Epson Exhibition Canvas Matte with OBAs. The one on the right is straight out of the printer with no protection while the one on the left has been sprayed with two coats of different varnishes. They’ve been left out in bright, hot summer sun for several weeks for an accelerated aging process. (These photos are simulations. I’ll post the true images in a few weeks.)

   

This is a good point to address varnishes. There many types of coatings and varnishes for fine art reproductions. I’ve tried about a dozen but, at this time, have reduced my choices to PremierArt Print Shield ($15 at ITSupplies,) PrintGuard ($18.95 at Dick Blick) and Krylon Conservation Varnish ($10.50 at Jerry’s Art-A-Rama.) I don’t yet have a favorite and am waiting for the results of long-term testing. Regardless, almost every print, paper or canvas, can benefit from a varnish coat. Many varnishes claim to make the print waterproof but, in general, a better term would “water resistant.”

Having said all this, keep in mind not all OBAs are the same and not all prints require the same longevity. If print permanence is not a primary concern, this may all be moot in your circumstances. To quote Prof. Walter Kotschnig from a speech at Holyoke College, 1937, …keep your minds open—“but not so open that your brains fall out.” Also, new OBAs from reputable companies are much better than older chemicals so it’s possible the OBA issue will fall by the wayside in the future.

Bottom line, we recommend heavy matte papers and natural canvas media without OBA from the company that produced the printer. Epson printers should use Epson media and Canon printers should use Canon media. As always, there are exceptions such as Hahnemuhle, Canson, Moab and a some others but their higher quality may not always justify their higher costs. The bottom line will almost always dictate the best cost/quality equation.

 

The post Fine Art Reproduction Inkjet Paper appeared first on Giclée Yoshimatsu.

Solstice Eve


Solstice Eve
On the longest
day of the year,
I want to choose
the shortest path
to joy—the one
with no distance,
no time. The one 
we can know
as close as our skin
& in any season. 
I want to go to sleep
& come awake
to this lengthy day, 
to sun—to all 
that’s possible
in hours of light. 
But may I remind
myself of all I can also 
do when darkness 
begins again—when 
joy will dress in shadow
but still glow, 
nevertheless. 

GPMA Art in the Garden Virtual Tour

Art in the Garden

Virtual Tour

Art in the Garden has been a beloved event since its inception in 1996. This year we have a prepared a virtual tour for you.

All of the gardens that were to be featured this year agreed to be on next year’s tour! We have included all eight gardens, plus 21 local artists’ work.

To purchase artwork, simply contact the artist at the contact information they have provided.

We hope you enjoy the “tour” and buy lots of art. Feel free to spread the word and share the fun.

We look forward to seeing you at the 2021 Art in the Garden.

Click here for the virtual tour:

Art in the Garden Virtual Tour Book

-Grants Pass Museum of Art