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All of the Above


On one of the rare weekends this summer we weren’t camping, my husband and I attended our church’s outdoor service. We sat beneath an umbrella on a beautiful morning, the sky broad above us. Our friend, Niesje was leading worship. Before beginning a song about bringing Heaven to Earth, she reminded the congregation that, with God, anything can happen. 


God often speaks to me in wordplay (I like to call Him the Wordsmith). As Niesje spoke, I heard in my heart the phrase “all of the above.” Such words and phrases usually arrive simultaneously with layers of meaning, and it can take me a moment to unfurl them. One layer to “all of the above” was Heaven, as in: all of what is higher, all of what is possible. At that moment, beneath the expansive sky, I was reminded of the vastness of possibility. 


But “all of the above” also referred to that pesky option on multiple-choice tests. 


I was never a good test taker. I could study, and I did—hard. But because I didn’t have the knack of knowing what test makers expected, I spent way too much time trying to memorize things instead of learning their context and how they worked together. 


When required to answer essay questions, I could “show” my work and explain nuances, which helped. But for multiple choice tests, there is just one right answer. Pretty black and white. Unless there is the shades-of-gray option D: All of the above. 


In school, I loved and hated “all of the above.” It meant there was more than one correct answer (which I secretly believed about most everything). But it also meant I’d have to know the subject well enough to know that A, B, and C were all correct, too. 


That Sunday beneath the Heavens, I recognized that I’d been slipping back into old patterns of limited, either/or thinking—of believing I’d have to choose just A, B, or C. I was reminded that God is big enough to be both/and—even big enough to offer an alphabet-length set of options and for all of them to be possible! He is big enough to offer all of the above.


I was recently reading about dialectics, which is basically a fancy way to say “both/and” thinking. It’s the paradox of seemingly contradictory things being true, like feeling sad and hopeful at the same time. In other words, there is usually more than one “correct” answer—or at least more than one way to arrive at it. 


Life will throw tests at us—both essay and multiple choice. But it helps to remember that God offers more answers than any test key. It also helps to remember that He is not sitting around in Heaven with a big red pen, waiting to tally our mistakes and write a low score across our lives. In fact, I have a feeling God isn’t really into tests. Humans? For some reason, we seem to like them. So here’s a test on subject matter I’m trying not to memorize but to learn, to embody: 


A. God is not a test maker, waiting to fail us


B. God is love, and love is BIG: bigger than our closed either/or thinking and bigger than our most open and noble imaginings


C. He invites us to dream with Him and Heaven—to get to know Him well and to embrace the mystery of what we do not know


D. All of the above

 

 

Brief Beauty

So brief, these.

So long from seed to blossom

then so quick to drop their petals.

But worth the pink while.

AGA June Spotlight Artists

Art & Soul Gallery

Following the Circuitous Thread: Mixed Media Paintings by Eve Margo Withrow

I take great delight in creating one-of-a-kind paintings using mixed media and collage materials. My paintings are magical, surrealistic, impressions reflecting the essential feeling ingredients of an experience or place. Many of my favorite and most exciting works are the result of finding creative solutions to things run amok a few times over. I play and adventure with my expressions, following threads here and there, thus entering the flow of my creative process; head and heart awake and in balance. – Eve Margo Withrow

Eve Margo Withrow, Moonlit Grove, Mixed Media

A reception will be held from 4:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m. on June 4 during First Friday.

Hours:
Thursday and Sunday 12:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.
Friday and Saturday 10:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. and by appointment.

Address and Contact Information:
247 East Main, Ashland, OR 97520
541-488-9006
www.artandsoulgallery.com

Jay Gordon Art Studio

After extensive forays into music as a professional acoustic and electric bassist, and medicine as a pediatrician, Jay decided in 2014 to devote herself to learning how to draw and paint, and since then has been constantly experimenting with all kinds of art, including portraiture, still life, figure drawing, illustration and printmaking. She is affiliated as a painter and illustrator with Enclave Studios and Gallery in Ashland.

Jay Gordon, Botanicals, Acrylic

Hours: Appointment Only

Address and Contact Information:
1661 Siskiyou Blvd #3
Ashland, OR 97520
http://www.jaygordonart.com/contact

Hanson Howard Gallery

John/Robin Gumaelius & Robert Koch

Robin and John Gumaelius, collaborating artists and husband and wife, create articulated human and birdlike sculptures. They combine ceramic, steel, and wood as they form highly inventive sculptures that are often comical or bizarre. Elements of children’s stories, religious icons, reliquaries, Medieval and Renaissance history, African skin decoration, and holy relics from Germany can be seen in their work.

Gestural strokes and spontaneous marks collide with color blocks in Robert Koch’s narrative vignettes. Often prompted by found photographs, Koch takes the liberty to make his subjects humans or creatures inhabiting the same world. Having the appearance of quickness and even naiveté, Koch’s deft drawing skills mean each mark is playful and intentional at the same time.

Robert Koch, Runaway, Acrylic on Panel

Hours:
Thursday – Saturday from 12:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. and by appointment.

Address and Contact Information:
89 Oak Street
Ashland, OR 97520
541-488-2562
http://www.hansonhowardgallery.com/

Fiber Arts Collective

In July 2020, Tanya Bemis gathered a group of fiber artists in Lithia Park to discuss the possibility of starting a Fiber Arts Collective in an available building in downtown Ashland. Out of that meeting, in the middle of a pandemic, an amazing community resource was born. In a short time it has become a creative inspiration to fiber and textile artists throughout the area, offering a fabric store and an art gallery space for fiber artisans in its Ashland location. Once the pandemic is over, the Fiber Arts Collective will offer classes and resources for the community. Meanwhile, it supports local social justice issues and encourages efforts to recycle and upcycle fiber resources.

The work of approximately 30 artisans is featured. From sewing, dyeing, knitting, crocheting, embroidering, and felting to binding, collaging, painting, printing, stenciling, beading, and creating assemblage pieces, their artisans are hard at work adding beauty to the world.

Julie Simon, Untitled, Fiber

Hours:
Wednesday – Saturday from 10:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m.

Address and Contact Information:
37 N 3rd Street
Ashland, OR 97520
541-708-6966
https://fiberartscollective.com

The Ashland Gallery Association is a non-profit organization dedicated to the promotion of the visual arts in our communities.

Of literature & Landscaping

 

I am being lazy on the literary front by not writing something fresh for this post, but all my spring creativity has been going toward landscaping!

So for this month, I’ll just say: I am delighted to have won an Oregon Book Award for my poetry collection, Hope of Stones. It was far more rewarding than making my own mulch! Immense gratitude to everyone at Literary Arts for honoring these poems and to dear Press 53 for publishing them. 

Here’s to words and wheelbarrows and wonder,

Anna 

The Poet Wonders

Nationally, it has been poetry month, but personally, it has been gardening month (with plenty of gravel schlepping!). In the realm of poetry, my collection Hope of Stones was nominated as a finalist for the Oregon Book Awards. I wait to hear the results. In the realm of gardening, I planted seeds. I wait to see the results. 

 

I’ve always honored the timeless metaphor of a garden, but it’s one thing to write about it. It’s another to prepare the soil and plant the physical seeds. 

 

Since I’ve spent far more time with a shovel than a pen this month, I thought I’d pull out a poem from Hope of Stones. Unlike the opening line, it is still the “month of April & maybes.” So much waiting. And even more than the results of the book awards, I am excited to see what this coming harvest season will bring. 

 

The Poet Wonders

Oregon, October

 

The more I wonder, the more I love.—Alice Walker

 

It is no longer the month of April & maybes. 

It’s October & root vegetables—the soil-

pulled concretions of harvest. What we seeded 

in spring has grown up & down & waits 

for us to lift it from the skin of earth. 

 

How silent prayer was revelation & heresy.

 

The clouds roll in. The leaves redden. 

The cat’s coat thickens. We gather 

the tangible close & prepare for cold. 

 

How physics is the science of prayer.

 

One friend is dying. Another is trying to love 

someone who doesn’t love her back. 

 

I visit the first friend, & we sit on his deck 

watching tractors in the adjacent forest dig 

foundations for new houses he will never see. 

 

I visit the other friend & notice the old 

potatoes she keeps on a shelf. They’ve 

shriveled a bit but have new eyes—new shoots 

already looking for somewhere else to grow.  

 

How a perennial can inspire prayer.

 

Oregon Fringe Festival Opening Celebration

Join the Oregon Fringe Festival on Wednesday, April 28, 2021 at 6:00 p.m. to celebrate the opening of this year’s festival!

Dean Kyle, Ashland, Oregon percussionist
Dean Kyle, percussionist

Meet artists and producers and enjoy an evening of performances and visual arts exhibitions, a mixed drink demonstration from Hearsay Restaurant, Lounge, and Garden, Honorarium Recipient Awards from Festival Director, Paige Gerhard, and more…

Performances will feature Alexandra Doyle and Lily Gelfand, dancer and composer from Brooklyn, NY, and Dean Kyle, percussionist from Ashland, OR.

(Ashland, Ore.) Each spring, the Oregon Center for the Arts produces the Oregon Fringe Festival (OFF), a multi-day event bringing together emerging creators and real-world artistic practitioners to share their respective experiences and to engage with each other’s work. The festival’s mission is simple: to provide a boundary-breaking platform for free expression and to celebrate unconventional art and unconventional spaces.

This year, we are excited to announce that the OFF will feature over 50 acts from over 40 different artists. From live virtual performances to artist lectures/workshops, an extensive virtual gallery, and outdoor art installations, viewers will have the opportunity to interact with a variety of creative work.

Individuals with disabilities are encouraged to attend our events. If you are a person with a disability who requires accommodation(s) in order to participate in this festival, then please contact Disability Resources at [email protected] in advance.

The OFF is committed to providing a boundary-breaking platform for free expression that amplifies the voices of those who are all too unrepresented in the creative arts industry. A lens focusing on equity, diversity, and inclusion will filter our selection process for all projects submitted.

Alexandra Doyle and Lily Gelfand
Alexandra Doyle and Lily Gelfand

– OCA at SOU –

About the Oregon Center for the Arts:

The Oregon Center for the Arts at Southern Oregon University serves as a creative catalyst for the mixture of students, educators, and artists from the state, the nation and the world. The beautiful Southern Oregon mountain setting provides a special place to learn, explore and train in all of the arts disciplines.

Visit: oca.sou.edu

About Southern Oregon University:

Southern Oregon University is 175 acres of beautifully maintained campus with outstanding facilities, occupied by a committed and well-respected faculty and talented students. SOU’s vision is to be an inclusive, sustainable university for the future. Faculty, staff and leadership collaborate to achieve those ideals, and are united in their dedication to the students who will create lives of purpose and fulfill our region’s

promise. SOU enhances the economic, cultural and social well-being of southern Oregon, and helps its students learn the skills to work both independently and collaboratively, be adaptable and embrace creativity. Its diversity gives SOU both texture and strength. Students’ thoughtfully shared points of view are valued and respected.

Visit: sou.edu

Oregon Fringe Festival 2021 Schedule

2021 Oregon Fringe Festival is HERE!

Thursday, April 29 – Saturday, May 1, 2021

This year’s festival will take place online and feature outdoor art installations located on the SOU campus.

https://oregonfringefestival.org/2021-off

This is a free, virtual, and in-person event. Submission fees do not apply.

The Oregon Fringe Festival is excited to announce that this year’s schedule is HERE! Please visit our website or review the pdf below (it’s a large file, so please give it a moment to load and/or refresh the page if it doesn’t display) for a complete list of performances and exhibitions. We’ve included dates and times, descriptions, performance links, and more. Don’t forget to follow us on social media either! Festival highlights will be covered in addition to other pertinent information.

Facebook and Instagram: @oregonfringe

(Ashland, Ore.) Each spring, the Oregon Center for the Arts produces the Oregon Fringe Festival (OFF), a multi-day event bringing together emerging creators and real-world artistic practitioners to share their respective experiences and to engage with each other’s work. The festival’s mission is simple: to provide a boundary-breaking platform for free expression and to celebrate unconventional art and unconventional spaces.

This year, we are excited to announce that the OFF will feature over 50 acts from over 40 different artists. From live virtual performances to artist lectures/workshops, an extensive virtual gallery, and outdoor art installations, viewers will have the opportunity to interact with a variety of creative work.

Individuals with disabilities are encouraged to attend our events. If you are a person with a disability who requires accommodation(s) in order to participate in this festival, then please contact Disability Resources at [email protected] in advance.

The OFF is committed to providing a boundary-breaking platform for free expression that amplifies the voices of those who are all too unrepresented in the creative arts industry. A lens focusing on equity, diversity, and inclusion will filter our selection process for all projects submitted.

About the Oregon Center for the Arts:

The Oregon Center for the Arts at Southern Oregon University serves as a creative catalyst for the mixture of students, educators, and artists from the state, the nation and the world. The beautiful Southern Oregon mountain setting provides a special place to learn, explore and train in all of the arts disciplines.

Visit: oca.sou.edu

About Southern Oregon University:

Southern Oregon University is 175 acres of beautifully maintained campus with outstanding facilities, occupied by a committed and well-respected faculty and talented students. SOU’s vision is to be an inclusive, sustainable university for the future. Faculty, staff and leadership collaborate to achieve those ideals, and are united in their dedication to the students who will create lives of purpose and fulfill our region’s promise. SOU enhances the economic, cultural and social well-being of southern

Oregon, and helps its students learn the skills to work both independently and collaboratively, be adaptable and embrace creativity. Its diversity gives SOU both texture and strength. Students’ thoughtfully shared points of view are valued and respected.

Visit: sou.edu

The Personality of Process: On the Enneagram, the house we built, and marriage

The house foundations last August


Blobs, spots, specks, smudges, cracks, defects, mistakes, accidents, exceptions, and irregularities are the windows to other worlds.—Bob Miller

 

Part One: In Which I Vent About the Enneagram (Though I Love It, Too)

 

If you know a bit about the Enneagram, you know that you are likely one of nine types—and that each type has specific fears and desires and motivations. Learning about this framework helps us understand ourselves and others. 

 

However…I’ve also learned that you can come into this world as one type but can learn to adapt into another type that appears to serve you or others better. And then you can be very confused.

 

There are various schools of the Enneagram, and many of the types have different names according to which one you study. I believe I came into this world a Four—the Romantic or Individualist. But the world rewarded my ability to be a One: the Perfectionist or Reformer. I joke that I’m either a Perfecting Romantic or Romanic Perfectionist.

 

From my school years through the first months of my marriage, I lived pretty well as a Perfectionist-Reformer One. Even my creativity was highly structured; I’d embark on a series of 100 portraits, 30 days of painting-poems, et cetera, et-orderly-cetera. It didn’t help that most organized religion and education love achievers—and boy could I achieve. In grade school, I memorized whole chapters of Corinthians for our church version of the Girl Scouts, The Missionettes. (Somewhere, there exists a photo of myself wearing a turquoise polyester sash with all of my badges). I worked to be high school valedictorian. Then I worked even harder to be undergraduate summa cum laude. By grad school, I let myself breathe and settled for magna cum laude. And that was probably because, while I shaped my poetry thesis, I rediscovered a wild creativity longing to play free—uncaged by a rigid grid of quantification.   

 

And then, decades later, I got married. Funny thing about marriage: your True Self emerges in a way it never did before. True union eventually squeezes out anything false. And when two become one, a lot of shit has got to go. (I could make a terrible pun here about two each becoming the most annoying parts of the Enneagram’s Reformer One, but I shall not!) 

 

Suffice it to say, that whatever façade we’ve built basically gets shaken off, and whatever’s underneath probably has some black mold and maybe a rat or two, despite however many years we think we’ve done our spirit excavation. 

 

And also, I married an Eight: the Challenger. Challengers can call your bluff pretty darn well. 

 

Part Two: In Which I Vent About Building a House (Though I Love It, Too)

 

This all leads me, most indirectly, to the process of building a house—before we’d been married a year. (In fact, as I write this, we are just about to reach our nine-month anniversary). 

 

But before I get to that, I should also mention that it took me until my forties to see an obvious life pattern. During my college years, I worked as a housecleaner—for residential and professional buildings. And then I worked as an editor in some capacity for longer than most starting editors have been alive. Cleaning and editing. Basically, I trained myself to see the mess and the misspelled and to perfect them all. But such tasks, though they felt good when done, didn’t feel good in the process; they felt exhausting and never-ending. I wouldn’t so much celebrate as check off the completion of each round of “perfecting,” even as I braced myself for the next round of trash and typos. Versus celebrating the process—mud ‘n’ all. 

 

And let’s just say that pointing out all the dirt and dialogue flaws is not a beneficial marriage skill. But the long-entrenched One in me—the Perfectionist-Reformer—was so used to doing this, that it was hard to stop. It took me a while to be grateful for the fact that my husband doesn’t really care if things are clean or if every T is crossed. “But these are my strengths!” a part of me kept shouting. 

 

Meanwhile, behind the scenes, the truer part of myself kept saying she loved going off on muddy river adventures and not needing to analyze the etymology of the kayak term “boof.” 

 

One book on the Enneagram is called The Road Back to You. The One-Me never understood that title. The Four-Me is jumping up and down for childlike joy, saying, “Yes! We’re back!”

 

Marriage has invited me to return to my creative being: my True Self, the Self who loves paint splatters and rough-edged canvas and impromptu word play for pure fun; the Four who knows that all of life is poetry, not just words on a page—or a specific page count. That Self has risen up alongside our house.

 

Yes, finally, I get to the house. It has become my metaphor for building a more authentic self and marriage. 

 

Last summer, I took a photo of the foundations—surrounded by heaps of displaced earth. Where wild grass had grown in beautiful abandon, the hillside looked like a jagged scar. But we wanted to build something, and so we had to tear into what was there. We had to make a mess.

 

Now, a brick home stands on that site, finished, after months of trucks and lumber. But nothing is ever finished, is it? The wake of construction rubble and ruts surrounding the house remind me how ongoing building really is.

 

Our first day in the house

So that Miller quote I opened with; I am still struggling to love the messy process. But now that I’ve been building a life with someone and building a house with someone—I am beginning to get it. 

 

I am also beginning to embrace both the Reformer and the Romantic in myself—and I consciously choose those two labels for the One and the Four. The drive for excellence in the former helped ground the often formless creative sensitivities of the latter. Maybe I’ll call myself a Romantic Reformer—head in the clouds but feet on the ground. Imperfectly trying to bring Heaven to Earth.

 

The two types in me have finally become one.

 

Union starts in our very own hearts. 

 

Part Three: In Which I Don’t Vent About Marriage, But Instead Write A Poem About It

 

O this strange bliss—

brimming with

mess & misspellings 

mud & wonder—

I embrace all 

your stains & stars.

 

Two become 

one house 

uniting 

divided hearts

 

We build

a mystery.


Right after the land became ours last spring


Oregon Fringe Festival 2021

For Further Information Contact:

Paige Gerhard, Director of the Oregon Fringe Festival, [email protected],

oregonfringefestival.org

2021 Oregon Fringe Festival Honorarium Recipients Announced!

WHAT:

2021 Oregon Fringe Festival Honorarium Recipients Announced!

WHEN:

Thursday, April 29 – Saturday, May 1, 2021

WHERE:

This year’s festival will take place online and features outdoor art installations located on the SOU campus.

https://oregonfringefestival.org/2021-off

This is a free, virtual, and in-person event. Submission fees do not apply.

(Ashland, Ore.) Each spring, the Oregon Center for the Arts produces the Oregon Fringe Festival (OFF), a multi-day event bringing together emerging creators and real-world artistic practitioners to share their respective experiences and to engage with each other’s work. The festival’s mission is simple: to provide a boundary-breaking platform for free expression and to celebrate unconventional art and unconventional spaces.

This month, we are excited to announce that the OFF will feature over 50 acts from over 40 different artists. From live virtual performances to artist lectures/workshops, an

extensive virtual gallery, and outdoor art installations, viewers will have the opportunity to interact with a variety of creative work.

Even more exciting, the OFF has selected and awarded honorariums to artists whose work is boundary-breaking, unconventional, excites discussion, and explores different perspectives of a held position, principle, or belief. This year’s selections include work from local artists, national artists, and international artists.

  • Carlos Fernandex and Manisha Sondhi (Theatre), London
  • Neila Miller (Dance/Movement), Chicago, IL
  • Aurelia Grierson (Theatre), Ashland, OR
  • Cody Clark (Magic/Comedy), Louisville, KY
  • Nat Allister (Theatre), Minneapolis, MN
  • Derek Keller (Music), Ashland, OR
  • Ginger and Johnny (Theatre), Los Angeles, CA

Individuals with disabilities are encouraged to attend our events. If you are a person with a disability who requires accommodation(s) in order to participate in this festival, then please contact Disability Resources at [email protected] in advance.

The OFF is committed to providing a boundary-breaking platform for free expression that amplifies the voices of those who are all too unrepresented in the creative arts industry. A lens focusing on equity, diversity, and inclusion will filter our selection process for all projects submitted.

– OCA at SOU –

About the Oregon Center for the Arts: The Oregon Center for the Arts at Southern Oregon University serves as a creative catalyst for the mixture of students, educators, and artists from the state, the nation and the world. The beautiful Southern Oregon mountain setting provides a special place to learn, explore and train in all of the arts disciplines. Visit: ​oca.sou.edu

About Southern Oregon University:

Southern Oregon University is 175 acres of beautifully maintained campus with outstanding facilities, occupied by a committed and well-respected faculty and talented students. SOU’s vision is to be an inclusive, sustainable university for the future. Faculty, staff and leadership collaborate to achieve those ideals, and are united in their dedication to the students who will create lives of purpose and fulfill our region’s promise. SOU enhances the economic, cultural and social well-being of southern Oregon, and helps its students learn the skills to work both independently and collaboratively, be adaptable and embrace creativity. Its diversity gives SOU both texture and strength. Students’ thoughtfully shared points of view are valued and respected.

Visit: ​sou.edu

March 2021 Ashland Gallery Exhibits

March Spotlight Exhibits

Jhenna Quinn Lewis

Jhenna Quinn Lewis is a contemporary realist oil painter with meditative compositions that often feature birds. She is nationally-known and represented by numerous galleries, with paintings also in museums and corporate and private collections. In 2019, Jhenna received a spotlight in Western Art and Architecture and was selected to take part in Birds in Art at Leigh Yawkey Woodson Art Museum for the fourth time. Her inspiration comes from connecting with nature, studying Japanese masters, and observing the tenets of wabi-sabi—the acceptance of transience and imperfection. Originally from Chicago, Jhenna has made Southern Oregon her home for 20 years now.

Hours: Appointment only.

Address and Contact Information: 541-488-2562 [email protected] jhennaquinnlewis.com

Finch and Hiroshige, Oil painting by Jhenna Quinn Lewis
“Finch and Hiroshige,” Oil painting by Jhenna Quinn Lewis

Hanson Howard Gallery Gallery

Novellas :: Narrative Art by Women for Women’s History Month

Across times and cultures women have been known as the story keepers and tellers, bringing to life our wisdoms and dreams, histories, and futures. To celebrate this tradition we are giving the gallery over to a group of artists who use their craft to tell us stories.

Hours:
Thursday – Saturday from 12:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. and by appointment.

Address and Contact Information: 89 Oak Street, Ashland, OR, 97520 541-488-2562 www.hansonhowardgallery.com

Indigo Beast, Mosaic Sculpture by Laurie Gadbois
“Indigo Beast,” Mosaic Sculpture by Laurie Gadbois

Paula Fong

Paula Fong has been fortunate to spend much of her career as an Ecologist exploring nature. Every square inch of our natural world contains something scientifically interesting and artistically beautiful. Paula likes to pick out one aspect of the environment and hold it up for inspection, with all its imperfections and variation. By changing perspective, focus, season and habitat, she has an infinite palette and an unlimited source of inspiration.

Hours: Appointment only.

Address and Contact Information:
8905 Yank Gulch Rd. Talent, OR, 97540 541-535-2579
[email protected]
prfong.com

Joshua Tree Desert in Bloom, Watercolor and Ink by Paula Fong

Grants Pass Museum of Art
Oregon Coast, Paintings by Kristen O’Neill

The Grants Pass Museum of Art has a new exhibition featuring artwork by Kristen O’Neil. Stop by anytime before March 26, 2021 to see.

In her series titled, Oregon Coast, Kristen has painted various locations with accuracy, prioritizing the essence of a place by eliminating unnecessary details. As a result, and with this painterly approach, landscapes have been generated with fidelity and forms that compromise coastal terrains.

Hours:
Thursday – Friday from 12:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m.
Saturday from 10:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. and by appointment.

Address and Contact Information:
229 SW G St Grants Pass, OR, 97526 541-479-3290 http://www.gpmuseum.com/

Geology, Acrylic painting by Kristen O'Neil
Geology, Acrylic painting by Kristen O’Neil

The Ashland Gallery Association is a non-profit organization dedicated to the promotion of the visual arts in our communities.