Trending Articles

Friends of SOAR

For great posts about the business of art, check out The Artsy Shark HERE!
ArtistsBillofRights.org reviews competitions and appeals seeking creative content, listing those that respect your copyrights and highlighting those that don't. Art Matters! publishes calls to artists, and not all of them may be compliant with ABoR's standards. Visit their site to learn more.
We support the Embedded Metadata Manifesto.  Metadata is information such as copyright notice and contact info you can embed in your images to protect your intellectual property, save time when uploading to social sites and promote your art. Click to visit the site and learn more.

Ashland New Plays Festival Presents CONSTELLATIONS

On May 8 Ashland New Plays Festival Presents a Dramatic Reading of CONSTELLATIONSAshland New Plays FEstival Constellations

A romantic exploration of one relationship in multiple universes by British playwright Nick Payne

 

“In the quantum multiverse, every choice, every decision you’ve ever and never made exists in an unimaginably vast ensemble of parallel universes.” – CONSTELLATIONS

 

>From London, to Broadway, to Ashland! Join us for this special, one-night-only dramatic reading of the “spellbinding, romantic journey” of CONSTELLATIONS. What begins as a simple encounter between a man and a woman then delves into the infinite possibilities of their relationship and asks us to think about the difference between choice and destiny.

 

ANPF’s staged reading is directed by ANPF’s Associate Artistic Director Jackie Apodaca and stars Oregon Shakespeare Festival’s Alejandra Escalante and Daniel José Molina, who also starred together as the title characters in OSF’s 2012 production of ROMEO AND JULIET. This season at OSF you can see them in HENRY IV, PART ONE and TWO.

 

“I feel lucky to be able to explore this text with our wonderful cast in what are sure to be honest and nuanced performances. Not only will they need to live through their characters’ stories, but to live them repeatedly, variably, as the story flitters between universes,” says Apodaca.

 

CONSTELLATIONS is about the mystery of time, the multiplicity of our choices, and the minutiae of life’s many paths. Playwright Nick Payne has gathered those themes into scenes from a single relationship, spread out over numerous tracks in multiple universes. “It’s hard to explain,” Apodaca says, “but easy–I think–to understand.”

 

For Apodaca, the play’s focus on time is something she thought a lot about when her young son became interested in physics and string theory. “We watched a lot of Nova and Brian Greene specials. The irony of learning about time while watching time change my son was not lost on me,” she says. Referring to the parent’s adage, ‘It goes so fast!’ Apodaca continues, “It’s true…except when it drags. Time, like anything worth understanding, is shrouded in mystery.”

 

The dramatic reading will be held on Monday, May 8, at 7:30 p.m. at the Unitarian Center, 87 Fourth Street, in Ashland. Tickets are $20 and are available online and at the door.

 

For more information or to purchase tickets, visit ANPF’s website at www.ashlandnewplays.org.

Download (PDF, Unknown)

Prospect Hotel’s Victorian Christmas High Tea and Craft Faire

Prospect Hotel's Victorian Christmas High Tea and Craft Faire 2016

Better Together: Four Playwrights Share Their New Plays with Ashland

ASHLAND, Ore. — In the basement of Mix Bakeshop, Beth Kander began the first rewrites of her new play, Hazardous Materials. It was fall 2015 and her play The Bottle Tree was one of the four winning plays for Ashland New Plays Festival’s flagship event that year.
ANPF is a non-profit organization celebrating its 25th year of encouraging playwrights in the creation of new works. The organization offers public readings of selected plays and educational forums to the community through discussions and workshops.
ANPF’s Festival Week runs October 19 through 23, with matinee and evening performances each day as well as a playwriting workshop on Saturday, October 22, led by Oregon Literary Fellowship recipient and ANPF Host Playwright EM Lewis.
This year’s winners are Beth Kander for Hazardous Materials, Stephanie Walker for The Madres, Mike Teele for EdanEv, and Michael Erickson for Oberon Springs.
Hundreds of playwrights submit new works to ANPF each year, and the winners are chosen by a cadre of local volunteer readers and ANPF’s Artistic Director, Kyle Haden.
During the festival, the winning plays are presented as dramatic readings, directed and acted by individuals from Oregon Shakespeare Festival and Southern Oregon University.
All the winning playwrights agree that the opportunity to share their work with actors, directors, and audiences strengthens their plays.
“My work can only be stronger when working with directors, set designers, actors. We are better together,” says Kander, her sentiments echoed by Walker, Teele, and Erickson.
“Getting a laugh or a question, it’s invaluable,” says Erickson. “That’s why something like ANPF is so great because you get that feedback that’s so hard to come by.”
Our feature, “Better Together,” introduces you to each of the playwrights and their new plays. Click here to download the pdf file.
Learn more about ANPF and see the complete performance schedule at www.ashlandnewplays.org.
Additional links:

Artoberfest 2016

artoberfest 2016 art fair announcement

2016 Ashland New Plays Festival Announces Winning Playwrights

2016 Ashland New Plays Festival Ashland New Plays Festival Announces Winning Playwrights

They are:

Michael Erickson for Oberon Springs 

Beth Kander for Hazardous Materials

Mike Teele for EdanEv

Stephanie Walker for The Madres

ashland new plays festival anpf logoThese four exceptionally gifted playwrights will travel to Ashland to present their work during our annual Fall Festival, October 19-23, 2016.

A week of receptions, rehearsals, a play writing workshop, and other festivities will culminate with dramatic readings of their plays, which will be performed by some of our finest actors in both matinee and evening performances at the Unitarian Center, 87 4th Street in Ashland. Tickets will go on sale online and at Paddington Station around September 20.

Talk backs with Ashland’s famously sophisticated audiences will follow each performance.

We at ANPF sincerely congratulate our winning playwrights and the other eight finalists, listed below, for their extraordinary work.

ANPF 2016 Finalists

We also congratulate our finalists for ANPF 2016.

They are:

William Kovacsik for Exchanging Minka
Marin Gazzaniga for In Ways Both Frivolous and Deep
Chris Widney for Keepers
Barbara Lebow for Killing Spiders
Natalie Symons for Naming True
Desiree York for The Puppeteer
Sholeh Wolpe for Shame
Norman Simon for Where The Hell Am I?

The festival dates are October 19-23 and take place at the Rogue Valley Unitarian Universalist Fellowship, located at 87 Fourth St. in Ashland.

WEDNESDAY 19, 7:30 PM

THURSDAY 20, 1:30 AND 7:30 PM

FRIDAY 21, 1:30 AND 7:30 PM

SATURDAY 22, 1:30 AND 7:30 PM

SUNDAY 23, 3:00 PM

$FESTIVAL PASSES $60 (4 SHOWS)

$20 AT DOOR

Playwright workshop on Saturday 9-12 at Unitarian Center $10 at door

 Join as a Member and receive one festival pass, priority seating, and invitations to members-only receptions, starting at $100

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Ashland New Plays Festival assists playwrights in the development of new works through public readings and offers an educational forum to the community through discussions and workshops.

ANPF STAFF contact person:  [email protected]

Chinook Arts Festival

chinook-arts-festival-06

The Chinook Arts Festival

September 3rd-5th

A bit closer to Long Beach, Washington, the Chinook Arts Festival will also be taking place on Labor Day weekend. This festival features blown glass, stained glass, photography, jewelry, oil and watercolor paintings, pottery, wood sculptures and more. Come witness the work of the many incredibly talented artists who reside on our beautiful peninsula!

Art & Craft Show at Crescent City Cultural Center

Go to the coast for the holiday and enjoy the Coast Redwoods Art Association’s 2016 Art & Craft Show at Crescent City Cultural Center!

Download (PDF, Unknown)

Local playwright Scott Kaiser talks about his play NOW THIS

anpf scott kaiser now this "Now This" rehearsal, play by Scott Kaiser

“Now This” rehearsal. Photo by Kara Q. Lewis for ANPF

Ashland New Plays Festival (ANPF) Interviews Scott Kaiser

Local playwright, author, teacher and Shakespeare scholar
talks about his play NOW THIS

Ashland, Ore — Scott Kaiser, the multi-talented member of the artistic staff at Oregon Shakespeare Festival (OSF) for the past 26 years and its current Director of Company Development, was interviewed by ANPF’s Mary Silva about his play, NOW THIS, which will be presented as a dramatic reading in Ashland later this month. Kaiser talks about the play, his motivation and his history as a professional playwright, author, actor and teacher.
ANPF will present NOW THIS on Monday, May 23 in the Great Hall at the Unitarian Center, 87 4th Street beginning at 7:30 p.m. Directed by Sara Becker, the play features a cast of 14, including Kaiser, ANPF artistic director Kyle Haden, several noted actors from OSF and a few visiting artists in this compelling look at the destructive influence of consumerism on American society.
These talented actors bring to life the troubled and troubling characters of the fictional town of Purple Mountain, where young Joey Adderall takes us on an unforgettable ride through his final days of a life coming apart at the seams and his fatal response to a place where everything is less than he wants and more than he needs.
$15 tickets are available at Paddington Station and at the door the evening of the performance, subject to availability. For more information: www.ashlandnewplays.org

anpf scott kaiser now this "Now This" rehearsal, play by Scott Kaiser

“Now This” rehearsal. Photo by Kara Q. Lewis for ANPF

The Interview:
MS: First of all, I’d like some background: a bit about where you grew up and where you’ve lived and worked, your educational experience, and what drew you to life in the theater. Anything in your life that you feel contributed significantly to your taking this direction.

SK: Like so many theatre people, I struggled to find a niche for myself in high school, but the theatre kids accepted me with all my awkwardness and quirks when no one else would. So I stuck with it. As a teenager, I did summer stock all over New England. In my twenties, I earned three degrees in theatre, which, to be honest, is a bit ridiculous: a BA from the University of Michigan, an MFA in acting from the University of Washington, and a voice studies degree from the Royal Central School of Speech and Drama in London. In my thirties, I joined the artistic staff at OSF. And now I’m in my fifties, and still at it.

MS: What might you have done for a living if you hadn’t gone into the theater?

SK: When I was a young man, I wanted to be an architect. I’ve always loved looking at buildings and learning about how they were designed and constructed. And to this day, when I see a bit of unfamiliar text—a poem, a speech, a play—I look at it the same way I look at a building, peeling back the facade in my mind to examine the foundation, the framing, the walls, the stairs, the doors.

MS: After directing/acting/overseeing the work of other actors, when and why did you begin writing plays of your own?

SK: My first full-length play was a four-person adaptation of the Huck Finn story narrated by Frederick Douglass called Splittin’ the Raft. That play enjoyed a couple of professional productions—one at the Marin Theatre Company and another at People’s Light and Theatre Company in Pennsylvania. The script was developed
in collaboration with a handful of actors at the Festival in what I proposed and
piloted as “the 12th slot model” back in 1998, which has since become the Black Swan Lab for New Works.

MS: What motivated you to write Now This?

SK: Years ago, the characters in this play starting talking to me in my sleep, so I began writing down what they had to say to me on little scraps of paper. And eventually, I’d collected hundreds of scraps of paper—words, phrases, speeches, and dialogues— written out in complete darkness in the middle of the night. The material on all those scraps, after a great deal of shaping and polishing, with some guidance from the poet Dylan Thomas, became this play.

MS: What is it that you hope people will think about/take away from the play? What one thing would you like people to be thinking about when they leave the performance?

SK: I’d be pleased if people would become more conscious of how American consumer culture effects nearly every aspect of their lives.

MS: Now This seems to draw a strong connection between consumerism and gun violence, an idea that I hadn’t really thought about before. How would you describe this connection?

SK: I won’t pretend to know what goes on in the hearts and minds of individuals who choose to carry a weapon to a public place and slaughter fellow human beings. But thiscountry has a serious problem with guns, and I believe the root cause has something to do with a consumer culture that incessantly promises that love and contentment can be bought.

MS: How do you feel about having Now This chosen to be read by the Ashland New Plays Festival? Even though the play has already been produced, what new or different aspects do you think this reading might bring to the play?

SK: Purple Mountain, the small town depicted in NOW THIS, has a lot in common with the City of Ashland, so I’m very pleased that the play, at long last, will be read here in my home town, and by a fantastically talented group of actors.

MS: You’ve been a long time Ashland resident. What do you like about life here? What drives you crazy? What do you do when you’re not doing theater-related stuff?

SK: I travel a lot for work, which is a privilege because I get to see how other people live in this country. And life is much tougher out there. So it’s always good to come home to Ashland, where life is slower, where we enjoy tall trees, and open space, and clean water, and fresh air—precious things that, sadly, millions of Americans don’t have in their lives. So I do a lot of walking, many miles every day.

MS: I know there are a lot of things I haven’t asked you, but for purposes of this piece, is there anything you’d like to add that I haven’t asked?

SK: If you miss Now This, you can see my newest play, entitled Shakespeare’s Other Women, at Southern Oregon University in the winter of 2017.

 anpf scott kaiser now this "Now This" rehearsal, play by Scott Kaiser

“Now This” rehearsal, play by Scott Kaiser. Photo by Kara Q. Lewis for ANPF

Ashland Gallery Association Exhibits – April 2016

Ashland Gallery Association Exhibits – April  2016

 

Celebrate Ashland’s Visual Arts during the AGA First Friday Art Walk, April 1st, from 5 to 8 pm!

Stroll the galleries and take in all of the visual delights in downtown Ashland and the Historic Railroad District. Enjoy this year-round free community event, filled with spectacular artwork, live music, artist demonstrations, refreshments and conversation with other art enthusiasts!

Pick up a Gallery Tour Map at any member gallery, the Ashland Chamber of Commerce, or download off of our website. For more information about all of the exhibits visit: www.ashlandgalleries.com

See attached April Art Walk Map, Spotlight Exhibits and Special Event!

Download (PDF, Unknown)

Ashland Gallery Association
April Spotlight Exhibits

Studio A. B.
Nude: Group Exhibit

Ashland Gallery Association Exhibits - April 2016 : ROBYN-still_StudioAB

Bruce Bayard FILM STILL, 2015

NUDE is a short film created by artist Greeley Wells in which ten artists and models discuss their relationship with the nude in their artwork. Studio A.B presents work created by those artists in response to and inspired by the film.

Featured artists are: Bruce Bayard, Lisa Byrne, Kevin Christman, Ann DiSalvo, Inger Jorgensen, Irene Kai, Gabriel Lipper, Robyn Reitz, Daniel Verner, and Greeley Wells.

Bruce presents a video loop of experimental image collage. Ann displays a drawing from the series recently supported by a grant from the Haines Foundation. The series pairs humans and animals in a pose of mutual respect. Kevin presents a small figurative study in bronze. Inger and Gabriel present paintings, Daniel, Robyn and Greeley, drawings. Lisa and Irene, photography.

There will be a screening and reception of the film April 14, 6:00–9:00pm at the Enclave Studios, 1661 Siskiyou Blvd., Ashland.

Photographers’ Gallery
If a Tree Could Speak, photography by John Kirk

Ashland Gallery Association Exhibits - April 2016The Tree of Hope_PhotographersGallery

“The Tree of Hope,” photograph by John Kirk

John Kirk’s new photography show, “If A Tree Could Speak…” will be displayed at the Ashland Art Center opening at the First Friday Art Walk, April 1 from 5 to 8 p.m.  

John has shown his photography at numerous juried fine art shows throughout the West taking advantage of his extensive travels to photograph the uncommon beauty of the landscape, water and sky.  His photographs have won many professional awards for their painterly appearance and emotional compositions.

“If A Tree Could Speak…” what would it say?  Surprising statements from the trees themselves highlight this extraordinary photographic journey exploring the life of trees.  You will be astonished by the humorous situations trees get themselves into and what they have to say about coping with the environment, and living in harmony with their neighbors.

Schneider Museum of Art
In Scene: The Schneider Museum of Art Collaborates with Ashland Independent Film Festival

Ashland Gallery Association Exhibits - April 2016 : “Two Ways Down, “ hand drawn animated installation by Laura Heit

“Two Ways Down, “ hand drawn animated installation by Laura Heit

In Scene is a group exhibition of eight artists who work in a variety of mediums such as video, installation, sculpture and photograms in order to explore the state of the natural world in modern times.

The opening reception will be on Wednesday, April 6 from 5:00 – 7:00 PM and the exhibition will resume standard museum hours of 10 AM – 4 PM Monday through Saturday on Thursday, April 7 until Saturday, June 11, 2016.

In Scene participating artist Laura Heit, who is being co-presented by the Schneider Museum of Art and the Ashland Independent Film Festival, will present her installation Two Ways Down, a hand drawn animated installation and film which takes inspiration from the Hieronymus Bosch work Garden of Heavenly Delights.

In Scene will also feature installation, multimedia, and video works from internationally exhibited and recognized artists such as Rashawn Griffin, Adam Bateman, Jessie Sugarmann and MK Guth who is a grant recipient for the Schneider Museum of Art’s Artist Residency program, funded by The Ford Family Foundation, Roseberg, OR.

Eugene based artist, Tannaz Farsi will present an installation outside of the Museum entitled Territory as the last participant in the Southern Oregon SITE Project that presents new art made in response to the “site” of the landscape, history and culture of the Rogue Valley. The collaborative team, Anna Daedalus and Kerry Davis will present Columbia River Water Shadows, a series of large-scale photograms made at ten sites along the Columbia River from the Hanford Reach to its mouth on the Oregon Coast.

In Scene is on view from Thursday, April 7 through Saturday, June 11, 2016.  Regular Museum hours are Monday through Saturday, 10:00 AM to 4:00 PM. The Schneider Museum of Art’s spring exhibition is generously supported by Rogue Frameworks, the Oregon Arts Commission, The Ford Family Foundation, Roseburg, OR, and the National Endowment for the Arts – Artworks program.

SPECIAL EVENT!

Ashland Gallery Association Exhibits - April 2016 : A Taste of Ashland 1 A Taste of Ashland

Celebrating its twenty-seventh year, the Ashland Gallery Association’s signature fund-raising event A Taste of Ashland is on Saturday and Sunday, April 23rd and 24thfrom noon to 4p.m. Foodies and wine connoisseurs from all along the west coast follow a map to 17 galleries, to discover Ashland’s best restaurants and the region’s best wines. For a complete list of pairings go to www.atasteofashland.com

“What makes this wine and food pairing event different for all the others? Each winery and restaurant are painstakingly matched and work together to create unique pairings inside17 colorful galleries all within walking, or trolley ride, distance from one another.” says Jeffery Jones, Event Coordinator for A Taste of Ashland. “This is a rare opportunity to sip seventeen of the region’s best wines, taste food from 23 restaurants, and experience artwork from wonderful galleries that represent hundreds for local, regional and international artists.”

Something different during this year’s A Taste of Ashland is that the Thorndike Gallery at SOU will be hosting Ashland Gallery Association artist members Pop-Up Art Show.  Fifteen artists will show original artwork in a wide range of media, subjects and styles including charcoal figure drawings, abstract geometric acrylic paintings, wearable fiber art, assemblage sculpture, landscape and floral watercolor and more.

Sarah F. Burns, AGA Board President says, “Thank you to the Thorndike Galley at SOU’s Center for the Arts for hosting our pop-up show! The Thorndike is a huge space, light-filled; it will show off the artwork really well.  Ashland has seen some notable gallery owners retire and close their Ashland art galleries recently, so it’s quite welcome to have the opportunity to show off work and meet art lovers and prospective clients.”  There are also several new galleries, wineries and restaurants on the Taste tour this year.

“A Taste of Ashland is the ultimate Ashland experience!” says Jeff Jones, Event Coordinator. “Tasters stroll leisurely through the quaint town of Ashland all afternoon, experiencing the best of Ashland art, food and wine, then have time to relax and attend an Oregon Shakespeare Festival performance in the evening. What could be better!”

Tasters will have the opportunity to vote for their favorite restaurant, winery and gallery using a ballot for the Taster’s Choice award. By doing so, their name will be entered into a drawing for two weekend passes to A Taste of Ashland 2016.

Tickets for A Taste of Ashland are: $65 for both Saturday and Sunday, $55 for Saturday only and $45 for Sunday only.  Tickets to the Taste remain limited to ensure that it is not over-crowded and the event sells out each year, so get your tickets now! A free shuttle by AllAboard Trolley, will offer rides to all 17 galleries, but most are within walking distance.

For tickets and more information about A Taste of Ashland 2016 a complete list of pairings go to: www.atasteofashland.com or call 541-488-0178.
LOCAL TICKET OUTLET: Ashland Art Center 357 East Main St., Ashland. Tickets can also be purchased and wine glasses picked up prior to A Taste weekend at the Ashland Plaza Kiosk from12 noon to 2p.m April 16th through April 22nd. The Kiosk will open at 11a.m. on April 23rd and 24th.

Ashland Gallery Association Exhibits - April 2016 : A Taste of Ashland 2

Parity: A Playwrights Roundtable

ANPF Women’s Invitational Kicks Off with “Parity: A Playwrights Roundtable”

This Wednesday evening, join us as a panel of leading women playwrights discuss why the stories of women and minorities have largely gone untold in American theater, and why we are the poorer for it.

On March 23, at 7:00 p.m. in Meese Auditorium on the SOU campus, join in a thought-provoking discussion as five of the country’s top women playwrights offer perspectives on why this is, what it means and how they are working to change it.

Parity: a Playwrights Roundtable” will feature the three winning playwrights from the upcoming ANPF Women’s Invitational, together with Laura Jacqmin of the Kilroys and EM Lewis, ANPF host playwright. The discussion will be moderated by Dr. Lue Morgan Douthit, Interim Director of Literary Development and Dramaturgy, Oregon Shakespeare Festival (OSF).

All of the women participating in the roundtable have acted in, written and directed plays, or have held major roles in theater around the country,” says Laura Jacqmin, chair of the Women’s Invitational. “They represent an astonishing array of talent, and they are carving out a place in American theater. But there are many other talented people whose work continues to be unheard and unseen.”

Three of the roundtable playwrights – Martyna Majok, Jiehae Park and Lauren Yee – will have directed readings of their plays performed this coming weekend during the Women’s Invitational. Each of their plays has also been chosen to premiere in American theaters in the coming year – one at the OSF.

That places them in the fortunate category of the somewhere-between-20-to-30 percent of women and minority playwrights whose work has been recognized and produced. But there are many more great stories that deserve to be told, says playwright Jiehae Park.

The thing missing, the gap that needs to be closed, is less about the absence of the stories and more about audiences not getting to hear and see all these stories that are already out there, but not being produced.”

Join us for “Parity”: Wednesday, March 23, 7:00 p.m., Meese Auditorium on the SOU Campus. Tickets are $10 and are available at www.ashlandnewplays.org or at the door. Seating is limited.

Parity: A Playwrights Roundtable