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Words in Red Art Exhibition

Masterpiece Christina Fine Arts Foundation logo and header image

Never were or will there be again
words like  His…

Words in Red logo for the art exhibition presented by Masterpiece christian Fine Arts Foundation in 2017
The Direct, Uncensored, Provocative Words of Jesus

45+ Paintings and sculptures
19 artists  :   7 Cities

Experience a gallery of inspirational,  soul-enriching fine art in Portland.  Works by 19 contemporary artists from across the country including Ron DiCianni, Tim Botts, Chris Hopkins, Michael Dudash, Frank Ordaz, Glenn Harrington, Mick McGinty, Dan Chen, Melanie Cardinal and more

March 23 – 26th
Lakewood Center for the Arts – Lake Oswego, Oregon
Thurs.,  March 23rd
Opening gala event at  7 pm
$10  Advanced gala tickets online/ $12 at the door
Friday,  Sat. & Sunday admission  is free
Fri., Sat  10- 8 pm,  Sun. 12 – 4

And at
Concordia University Library
April 3rd – 30th.
April 9th – Reception 2 – 4:00 p.m. (free)
Guided Tours available for groups call 503-493-6370
Admission is free
For more information see www.mcfineartsfoundation.org or call 541-601-7496

 

Coming soon to:
Eugene May 5 – 27th at Pacific Rim Gallery
Ashland July 1 – 23rd – Rogue Coworks

And experience the Music!
Listen now to the cinematic-esque original music score for the Words in Red exhibit by international composer Willem Van Wyk

Sanctus takes you on an imaginative journey with a blend of fusion and ethnic world/folk music, rich with haunting vocals (Clara Sorace, Celica Soldream and Victor Sordo) and orchestral grandeur that speaks to the heart. Inspired by the Words of Christ, these musical tracks accompany the Words In Red. Listen now!   And use coupon code: wordsinred and proceeds from the CD sales will help the travels of the Words in Red exhibit on its tour

Nature Sketching & Journaling - Table Rock Hike Saturday, May 6

Introduction To Scratchboard class at Central Art in Medford

Introduction To Scratchboard

Instructor: Lara Strazdas

Tigers scratchboard art by Lara Strazdas

When: March 25th & 26th, 2017

Where: Central Art Classroom

Times: 10:00am – 4:00pm

 Fee: $95 (covers 2 sessions)

*supplies provided

Central Art’s own Lara Strazdas invites you to get acquainted with one of the most beautiful and enigmatic art forms – scratchboard! Using easy-to-follow methods, Lara will show you how to get the most out of this versatile medium, from rethinking your approach to light and shadows to creating realistic textures, even incorporating color!

Great for those seeking a new medium to play with this spring!

Seating is limited! Sign up by contacting or visiting Central Art (payment required to reserve spot):

541-773-1444 / 101 N. Central Medford, OR 97501

Tax Season for Poets

Seven meditations on money from a poet who wishes she had thought of the book title The Financial Lives of Poets (she didn’t)
1) “Money often costs too much.”Ralph Waldo Emerson
The poet filed her taxes for the previous year—a year she dedicated to her art. She realized that she technically lives at her country’s poverty level. To her continued wonderment, she finds ways to see many other countries without debt. (She would like to add that she has no trust fund, offshore accounts, or supporting spouse—though she has nothing against any of those!)
She starts to wonder: do the little digits on pieces of paper or computer screens really mean anything?
2) “Money is like a sixth sense—and you can’t make use of the other five without it.” —William Somerset Maugham
And then she sees a pair of boots she’d REALLY love. That aren’t on sale. That would chip away at her dedication pay her annual IRA contribution. And she realizes that yes: those little numbers mean something.
But not everything.
3) “Money will buy you a fine dog, but only love can make it wag its tail” —Richard Friedman
Like a good egalitarian, the poet has dated both rich and poor men over the years. Their financial status had little to do with the end of those relationships—but she did notice that the ones who respected their finances respected themselves—and her.
The day the poet realized she loved herself, she realized she was a wealthy woman.
4) “Budget: a mathematical confirmation of your suspicions.” —A.A. Latimer
The poet used to have a little budget sheet. Back in high school. But since she has spent most of her adult life either self-employed or with erratic income, she long ago moved from budgets to savoir-faire. This works. Except when it almost doesn’t (see #2).
5) “All I ask is the chance to prove that money can’t make me happy.” —Spike Milligan.
Go ahead and try her!
6) “Money is the opposite of the weather. Nobody talks about it, but everybody does something about it.” —Rebecca Johnson
The poet, who once gave up financial insecurity for Lent, observes:
She has been the girl with the salaried job and the vacations to far-flung lands.
She has been the girl living in an unplumbed cabin after the economic downturn, learning how to fill a bag of groceries for just $20.
She discovered something in those contrasts: she wrote more poetry in the cabin than she did with the salary, and she remembers those poems with far more fondness than direct deposit paychecks. (Though she’d truly be game for the opportunity of #5.)
7). “There is the natural economy, and there is the Spirit economy. Though I have no idea how it works, I know it does work.”—Anna Elkins
The poet has come to believe that the Spirit economy transcends the money-for-time model, numbers with lots of zeros, and all the dog-eared financial planning books on her bookshelf.
She has learned that you can invest in friendships, give extravagantly, travel the world, and buy organic chocolate at Grocery Outlet with very little money and very much delight. (Though she’s game to try life with very much money and very much delight! Again, see #5.)
Maybe most importantly, she has learned to be grateful for a life that inexplicably works—partly because she doesn’t put her faith in her own ability to earn it (though she can and does work hard) but instead is thankful for both the visible reality and the invisible. And she has a hunch that the realm beyond the “possible” has a far stronger currency!
we are saying thank you
we are saying thank you and waving
dark though it is.
—W.S. Merwin
from “Thanks”

Tax Season for Poets

Seven meditations on money from a poet who wishes she had thought of the book title The Financial Lives of Poets (she didn’t)
1) “Money often costs too much.”Ralph Waldo Emerson
The poet filed her taxes for the previous year—a year she dedicated to her art. She realized that she technically lives at her country’s poverty level. To her continued wonderment, she finds ways to see many other countries without debt. (She would like to add that she has no trust fund, offshore accounts, or supporting spouse—though she has nothing against any of those!)
She starts to wonder: do the little digits on pieces of paper or computer screens really mean anything?
2) “Money is like a sixth sense—and you can’t make use of the other five without it.” —William Somerset Maugham
And then she sees a pair of boots she’d REALLY love. That aren’t on sale. That would chip away at her dedication pay her annual IRA contribution. And she realizes that yes: those little numbers mean something.
But not everything.
3) “Money will buy you a fine dog, but only love can make it wag its tail” —Richard Friedman
Like a good egalitarian, the poet has dated both rich and poor men over the years. Their financial status had little to do with the end of those relationships—but she did notice that the ones who respected their finances respected themselves—and her.
The day the poet realized she loved herself, she realized she was a wealthy woman.
4) “Budget: a mathematical confirmation of your suspicions.” —A.A. Latimer
The poet used to have a little budget sheet. Back in high school. But since she has spent most of her adult life either self-employed or with erratic income, she long ago moved from budgets to savoir-faire. This works. Except when it almost doesn’t (see #2).
5) “All I ask is the chance to prove that money can’t make me happy.” —Spike Milligan.
Go ahead and try her!
6) “Money is the opposite of the weather. Nobody talks about it, but everybody does something about it.” —Rebecca Johnson
The poet, who once gave up financial insecurity for Lent, observes:
She has been the girl with the salaried job and the vacations to far-flung lands.
She has been the girl living in an unplumbed cabin after the economic downturn, learning how to fill a bag of groceries for just $20.
She discovered something in those contrasts: she wrote more poetry in the cabin than she did with the salary, and she remembers those poems with far more fondness than direct deposit paychecks. (Though she’d truly be game for the opportunity of #5.)
7). “There is the natural economy, and there is the Spirit economy. Though I have no idea how it works, I know it does work.”—Anna Elkins
The poet has come to believe that the Spirit economy transcends the money-for-time model, numbers with lots of zeros, and all the dog-eared financial planning books on her bookshelf.
She has learned that you can invest in friendships, give extravagantly, travel the world, and buy organic chocolate at Grocery Outlet with very little money and very much delight. (Though she’s game to try life with very much money and very much delight! Again, see #5.)
Maybe most importantly, she has learned to be grateful for a life that inexplicably works—partly because she doesn’t put her faith in her own ability to earn it (though she can and does work hard) but instead is thankful for both the visible reality and the invisible. And she has a hunch that the realm beyond the “possible” has a far stronger currency!
we are saying thank you
we are saying thank you and waving
dark though it is.
—W.S. Merwin
from “Thanks”

Upcoming Workshop!

I am teaching a workshop in Carmel, CA next week!!! Hurray! Hooray! Details above but the important stuff:
Thursday, March 9th
The Rotunda at Il Fornaio Restaurant on Ocean Ave, Carmel, CA
5pm-8:30pm
Snacks & refrehsments
SO MUCH FUN AND NO EXPERIENCE NEEDED!!!

Would love to see you there! xoxo

Upcoming Workshop!

I am teaching a workshop in Carmel, CA next week!!! Hurray! Hooray! Details above but the important stuff:
Thursday, March 9th
The Rotunda at Il Fornaio Restaurant on Ocean Ave, Carmel, CA
5pm-8:30pm
Snacks & refrehsments
SO MUCH FUN AND NO EXPERIENCE NEEDED!!!

Would love to see you there! xoxo

Ashland Gallery Association March 2017 Art Exhibits

Ashland Gallery Association – March Spotlight Exhibits

Ashland Gallery Association November 2016 Art Exhibits : Ashland Gallery Association aga logo

Ashland Art Center

Upstairs Featured Artists: Susanne Petermann & Darlene Southworth Techno-color

With watercolor and collage, Susanne Petermann and Darlene Southworth create landscapes not visible to the unaided eye: parts hidden inside machines and computers, interiors of plants and animals, and outer space.  Thus the images appear abstract though they are actually representational

Featured Photographer: Julie Bonney Delicate Beauty

Julie Bonney is a widely traveled local photographer who will be sharing a selection from her recent work, “Delicate Beauty” during March.  Favorite photography subjects for many are flowers.  They speak the language of the heart touching us in ways that open us to the natural world.  However, the challenge is to showcase them in ways that are less common and create a desire in the viewer to stop and take them in.  Photography workshops can be a source of inspiration when things feel stagnant.  To learn some new techniques, Julie participated in a flower photography workshop last September.  Using tulle, lace, optic choices, shallow depth of field, multiple exposures and more unusual angles of perspective she immersed herself in the joy of rekindling her love of floral photography.

Featured Musician: Iconoplasty

Iconoplasty is a complex stew of electronic beats, surf guitar riffs, ambient noise and appropriated pop choruses, all courtesy of multi-instrumentalist, Josh Gross.

“Hibiscus,” photograph by Julie Bonney

“Hibiscus,” photograph by Julie Bonney

AGA Annual Student Art Show

March First Friday will have a very special added attraction when the Ashland Gallery Association celebrates student art.  Alongside art by well-known local, regional and national artists, galleries and businesses will feature works by budding young student artists from the Art Department of Ashland High School.

During the First Friday Art Walk, and throughout the month of March, visitors to AGA galleries will be inspired by the creativity and uniqueness of the art made by these young artists. There will be paintings, drawings, mixed media, and special jewelry pieces, as well as photography on display.

Participating galleries include: Art & Soul Gallery, Ashland Art Works, Ashland Natural Medicine, Hanson Howard Gallery, Nimbus, Studio AB, Liquid Assets Wine Bar, Summit+Fields, as well as The Web-sters.

These galleries will host the following local high school students: Nicole Sagal, Kyra Smith, Mayla Sumner, Cross Harris, Nicholas Morris, Lillian Ljungkvist, Eamon Morris, Charlie Burr, Sonora Jessup, Felix Knowlton, Eva Berg, Cora Stonewood, JD Miller, Salus True, Lyric Sylvan, Lukail Reece-Sullivan, Mina DeVore, Enya Cochran, Tatiana Cegin-Wagner, Cedar Taulbee, Izzy Duval, Adriana Bohn, Ayla Prusko, Jasmine Risser, Rachel Porter, Merlin Skye, and Calin Grimm.

All are invited and the community is encouraged to support these emerging artists by visiting the galleries. View and download the March Art Walk map at:

www.ashlandgalleries.com

2016 Student Show artist, Sophie Birch-Bridges

2016 Student Show artist, Sophie Birch-Bridges

Schneider Museum of Art

Trolley Fun, Exhibitions, Student Open Studios, and Book Reading this First Friday

This upcoming First Friday, March 3, ride the Allaboard Trolley to visit downtown galleries and the art happenings at Southern Oregon University. Exhibitions can be viewed in the Schneider Museum of Art Museum, the Center for the Visual Arts (CVA) Galleries, and the Fine Art students’ Private Open Studios until 8:00 PM. The Museum is hosting a book reading by local author Michael Neimann at 5:00 PM.

University parking behind the Museum will be made available to the public starting at 4:00 PM. The Allaboard Trolley will shuttle patrons to and from the Museum to the downtown Ashland area between 5:00 PM and 10:00 PM – a generous amount of time to visit the Museum, the student studios and Center for the Visual Arts (CVA) Galleries, and then visit your favorite Ashland galleries, studios, restaurants and more. There will be three stops on the Trolley route, the Schneider Museum of Art, A Street between 5th and 6th Streets, and the Plaza by the Fountains. Wine will be generously poured within the Museum and the hours will be extended until 8:00 PM.

 

At 5:00 PM, local author Michael Niemann will read from his latest thriller, Illicit Trade. Neimann grew up in a small town in Germany, seven miles from the Dutch border. Crossing that border often at a young age sparked in him a curiosity about the larger world. He studied political science at the Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms Universität and international studies at the University of Denver. During his academic career, he focused on Southern Africa and frequently spent time in the region. After taking fiction writing courses from his colleagues at Trinity College, he embarked on a different way to write about the world. He currently teaches in the International Studies Program at SOU.

On view at the Schneider Museum of Art is Shapes of Curiosity, the SOU Creative Arts Faculty Exhibition curated by Kelly Worman to complement the Southern Oregon University Center for the Humanities 2016-2017 Campus Theme. Featured Southern Oregon University Creative Arts faculty artists include: David Bithell, Cody Bustamante, Garrick Imatani, Miles Inada, Kyle Peets, Max Reinhardt, Margaret L. Sjogren, Robin Strangfeld, and Summer Ventis.

Roll With Us! Allaboard Trolley

Allaboard Trolley

Coming April 29th & 30th!

A Taste of Ashland 

Celebrating its twenty-eighth year, the Ashland Gallery Association’s signature fund-raising event, A Taste of Ashland is on Saturday and Sunday, April 29th and 30th, from noon to 4p.m. Foodies and wine connoisseurs from all along the west coast follow a map to 17 galleries, to discover Ashland’s best restaurants and the region’s best wines while enjoying the local visual arts.

AllAboard Trolley will offer rides to all galleries, but most are within walking distance.  Tickets are limited to ensure the event is not over crowded.

For tickets and more information about A Taste of Ashland 2017 visit: atasteofashland.com or call 541-488-0178

Poem is Coconut

A poem inspired by reading Octavio Paz beneath the palm trees in Mexico
Yelapa: En Edible Poem
poem is coconut
poem is sea salt
poem is margarita salt
poem is sunscreen
poem is dinner two hours from the now
            of sun and blue & bird
            & ocean licking beach
            in a tidal hunger
poem is hunger
poem has nothing to do with the tongue
poem has everything to do with the tongue
(poem tastes like luz y luna)
poem climbs a palm three
            cuts the green fruit
            throws them to the ground
            lets gravity & distance break them open
            releasing milk & meat
            & both are sweet
poem eats itself and is also called “poem”
poem is coconut

Poem is Coconut

A poem inspired by reading Octavio Paz beneath the palm trees in Mexico
Yelapa: En Edible Poem
poem is coconut
poem is sea salt
poem is margarita salt
poem is sunscreen
poem is dinner two hours from the now
            of sun and blue & bird
            & ocean licking beach
            in a tidal hunger
poem is hunger
poem has nothing to do with the tongue
poem has everything to do with the tongue
(poem tastes like luz y luna)
poem climbs a palm three
            cuts the green fruit
            throws them to the ground
            lets gravity & distance break them open
            releasing milk & meat
            & both are sweet
poem eats itself and is also called “poem”
poem is coconut