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SOSA Meeting on August 28

Watercolor painting of a cat by Marianne Nielsen of Grants Pass. Nielsen speaks about painting in watercolor at the monthly meeting of the Southern Oregon Society of Artists on August 28, 2017.The Southern Oregon Society of Artists (SOSA) will be meeting August 28th  at 7 pm at the Medford Public Library.   The guest speaker will be  Watercolor by  Marianne Nielsen from Grants Pass.  She will be teaching her techniques  for painting pet faces, especially dogs and cats eyes whiskers and noses..   Anyone interested in Art is welcome to attend.

Marianne teaches watercolor classes four times a week in Grants Pass.  She is currently  displaying her art at Gallery One in Grants Pass.
For more  information call BJ Mathis at 541-414-4993 or Judy Grillo at 541-625-3285 ( or,  catch-up with Judy at Exit 24 in front of McDonalds  between 6:30-8:30 A.M. as she is painting and  overseeing the Bee Mural being painted there. Come prepared to add a flower or bee! )

Its That Darn Brand Thing Again! On Defining My Brand

Introduction: My Own Brand, or Modus Operandi

Lately I’ve been thinking about “brand” as it relates to my own artistic style or modus operandi (MO).  Why do I avoid defining my brand?  Choices; there comes a time when we can’t do it all.  I have come to realize that if I don’t focus on a brand or MO, I risk confusion, among other things.

To explain my thinking, I’d like to share a story then explain my situation.  Finally, I’ll invite your feedback on the cohesiveness of my own “brand” as it applies to three of my paintings.

Artist Brand: MsKitty, Toy Pony and Blue Bunny Blues

Musician John Mellencamp, And His Brand

This June, my husband Robert and I attended a John Mellencamp concert. We had a wonderful time; Mr. Mellencamp and his band put on a great show. He had the energy and sound that we like about John Mellencamp.

You see, we were not sure we were going to like the show.

Brand: Voice and Energy

I think a little background is in order here. My husband and I grew to appreciate and enjoy John Mellencamp’s music in the 80s and 90’s. So, when we saw that he was coming to one of our favorite venues, we immediately purchased tickets.   Then, a few weeks later, he released his latest music album. But,  this did not sound like the John Mellencamp we knew! It seemed that his voice was different and the energy was not there. What happened; were we going to like the show?

AHA!  A Thought Pops In My Head!

It was while thinking about this concert that I had an “AHA” type moment!  This is all about “branding”, and it applies to me and my art.  Just as Mr. Mellencamp’s voice and energy are his brand, I need to define my brand and focus!

On Brand: Still Life with Egg Cup and Rabbit Netsuke

The Kewl Payntur Case

Here’s a “for instance” scenario. Let’s call the artist “Kewl Payntur” just for fun.  Kewl Payntur might be me or any artist you might know.  Over time, our buddy Kewl builds an audience of people who like his or her particular art.  There is something about Kewl’s work that speaks to the audience.  Mr/Ms Payntur can surprise, challenge and engage the audience as as he/she evolves, as long as the “certain something” is still there.  The “certain something” instills a type of cohesiveness about the body of Kewl Payntur’s work and that it helps the audience identify and define the artist’s work.

Tormented?

So, what is the lesson being taught or tormented over? Deciding on a “brand” or style.

Two Styles! (Or maybe three?)

I wrestle with what I define ought to define as my “brand”.  Usually, I think of my brand as being a stylized, abstracted, designed approach to the subject.  In other words, I am not trying to paint from life and I purposely want you to know it.  My intention is to stylize, distort and have fun with my images.

Problem Defined.

OK, fine, so what’s the problem?  Well, I like to paint from life too. From time to time, I focus my efforts on creating paintings and drawings that achieves a degree of accuracy and likeness.

To rephrase the problem, what does having two different styles do to my brand as an artist?  Do I confuse my audience?  And, what does this dichotomy have do to achieving a degree of mastery in either approach?

Its About You: Confusing or Cohesive

So, this really is about you, the viewer.  Would you like to help?  I have posted three of my paintings and all of them include a rabbit, just because I like rabbits.

What do you think, is my “brand” identifiable?  Even if you can’t articulate it, do all three look like they were done by the same artist?  Or, do you find the collection confusing?

On Brand: Garden Bunny

Post Script:  John Mellencamp’s Voice Endures

By the way, to me, Mr. Mellencamp’s brand includes his voice and energy.  His voice has matured, but it still has the special something that I recognize as the “John Mellencamp” voice.  So, it was a good concert.

Post Script, Again: Travels

In my last posting, I spoke of traveling adventures.  Robert and I did go on the road to New Mexico and we are back home.  We had a good trip and I have started working on my blog posting.  I hope to have something to share with you soon!  Thanks!

 

 

 

 

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The post Its That Darn Brand Thing Again! On Defining My Brand appeared first on Margaret Stermer-Cox.

How To Paint Portraits Part 2 What Beginner Artist Need to Know

IN this video Stefan Baumann teaches How To Paint Portraits Part 2 What Beginner Artist Need to Know
Inspiring Millions to paint outdoors This video is about Touch Move and Inspire. Get a free Book at his website www.StefanBaumann.com. The paintings of Stefan Baumann reveal the true spirit of nature by transporting the viewer to distant lands that have gone unseen and undisturbed. With the huge success of Baumann’s weekly PBS television series “The Grand View: America’s National Parks through the Eyes of an Artist,” millions of people witness for themselves the magic Stefan portrays on canvas, his passion for nature and the American landscape. By distilling his love of nature into a luminous painting of brilliant, saturated color that transcends conventional landscape and wildlife art, Baumann has captured the hearts and imaginations of a generation. Each painting becomes an experience rather than merely a picture – a vivid manifestation of his special and personal union with nature and the outdoor world. Through his mastery of light, color and artful composition, Baumann invites you to experience nature in its purity. It is no wonder that for many years distinguished American collectors, including former presidents and financial icons, have sought out his work.

The post How To Paint Portraits Part 2 What Beginner Artist Need to Know appeared first on Stefan Baumann – The Grand View: Paintings by Stefan Baumann.

Visiting Stores With Wonderful Paper Creations

When I’m traveling, I’m always on the lookout for stores selling paper and paper creations. Who knows where my next inspiration will come from. On my latest trip, I found a number of shops with wonderful paper creations.

This window display of 3D paper stars drew me into Design Warehouse in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

While walking down the street in Santa Fe, New Mexico, I saw the above window display and just had to check out the store. While it was mostly a design studio, called Design Warehouse, there were a number of paper sculptures that I loved and got permission to take photos of for my blog.

If you look closely, you can see the delightful pop up paper cards.

I found the above paper pop up cards there too. Look closely and see a variety of cards on each shelf.

Paper boxes hanging in a window display at Design Warehouse in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

In addition to the star window display, there was another window with paper boxes hung on strings. There were multiple layers of paper and some were cut to show the paper below it.

Magic paper lamps at Design Warehouse in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

The above “Magic Lamps” have light shining through paper cut outs. The cut outs were spinning. Absolute fun!

Wonderful paper art at Collage Annex. Check out the bird perched on the antlers.

When I visit Portland, Oregon, I try to always visit Collage, an art supply store on Alberta Street. This past visit I found they had opened Collage Annex next door where they have wonderful artful gifts, many of which were made out of paper.

Lots of cards, prints. posters and more at Collage Annex in Portland, Oregon.

Check out the map of Portland in the above photo. It’s one of the best sellers at Collage Annex.

Love the old style teal typewriter.

And for anyone longing for days of old, you can purchase a non-electric writing device. I love this teal typewriter!

Window display at Ped X Shoe Shangri-la.

Just down the street from Collage Annex, I found the above paper garlands in the window of Ped X Shoe Shangri-la, my favorite shoe store in Portland.

Window Display at Illustrated Playing Cards.

I found this delightful store, Illustrated Playing Cards in a little mall off Alberta Street in Portland, Oregon. Unfortunately the shop wasn’t open the day I was there. I’ll be checking it out the next time I’m in Portland. I can see myself spending hours in there. I like to purchase playing cards from places I visit, and I am sure I’ll find a few decks of cards in there that I won’t be able to resist.

Enjoy, Candy

Visiting Prickly Pear Paper

A lot has happened since my last blog post. I traveled from Oregon to California to Arizona to New Mexico to Oklahoma to Kansas to Colorado to Utah to Nevada and back to Oregon. It’s been a bit of a whirlwind of driving and visiting with very little time for art along the nearly 5,000 miles we traveled.

Prickly Pear Paper in Gilbert, Arizona.

I did find time, while in Arizona, to visit a wonderful little paper shop where they both make and sell paper products. It’s called Prickly Pear Paper and it’s a letterpress and design studio in addition to being a retail store. They’re part of Barone, a craftsman community in Gilbert, Arizona.

They have their letterpress in their shop.

Prickly Pear Paper started in 2016 by Lauren Elliott and Mark Johnston. They envisioned a business that combined their love of graphic design with fun, adventurous stationery that makes people smile. I think they accomplished their objective.

This Arizona map is one of the best sellers in their shop.

In addition to what they have in their shop, they also offer custom design and printing services for businesses, events, weddings, announcements and personal stationery.

Prickly Pear Paper in Gilbert, Arizona.

BTW, I purchased the adoption card that is sitting on the letterpress in the second photo. And if you can’t make it to Gilbert, Arizona, you can check out their website: Prickly Pear Paper.

Enjoy, Candy

About An Artist’s Vision Plus New Three Minute Egg Paintings

Artist Vision:  How To See.

Greetings!  I’d like to share with you two of my latests pieces in my “Three Minute Egg Series”.  Furthermore, I’d like to talk about how I come up with my artistic vision for a series, using my current paintings as an example.

The Good Question.

A friend and collector of mine asked me a tough question a couple of months ago.  She had seen my earlier paintings and blog posting about my three minute egg series.  The question was how to see and understand my paintings.  I immediately thought “Oh, I need to do an artist’s statement for this series”.

Artist Vision: Three Minute Egg Project

Time Out!

OOPS!  Please stop!  Before you read any more, I’d like to ask you to please just look at the paintings.  Without analyzing, allow yourself to have a first impression; a first reaction.  It doesn’t matter if you like them or not, just allow yourself to respond in your own personal manner.

Vision: About Relationships.

Now then, back to what the series is about; the artist’s vision.

When I start thinking about an artists statement or vision, I start remembering relationships and stories about the subject.  For example, I did not enjoy eating eggs when I am a child, though three minute eggs were the least offensive.  That being said, I was always intrigued by the egg cups.  The particular eggs cups we had were ones that my parents purchased when they were living in Spain.   To me, they were exotic, interesting and special.

Still Life and Project Set Up.

Now, lets consider the set up of the three minute egg still life.  I knew I was going to be going from realistic to abstract when I started this project.  You might remember that the first seven completed were part of a workshop I attended with artist Gabriel Lipper.  (Paintings 8 and 9 were done after the completion of class).

So, the set up.  I looked on line at still life set ups from some of the Master’s of still life, like Chardin.  Then, I considered what I had laying around in the kitchen.  Time is a theme I had been wanting the explore so the kitchen timer was selected for the still life.  Eggs shells are one of my favorite subjects because I feel the need to study how light falls on the curved shapes, so they were in.  Timer plus eggs suggests three minute egg in my mind.  To complete the set up, I added a spoon and napkin.

Design: Like A Puzzle.

To understand what you see in front of you, it might be good to realize that I like to design my abstractions.  Thinking of a tapestry or a puzzle, I am concerned with how the pieces fit together.  I select and create a scheme to be the backbone structure.  Then, I arrange my shapes, searching for something that captures my imagination.  I play close attention to the light and dark pattern I create because it helps direct the viewer around the painting.

Still Life Objects: Like Family and Friends.

So, what does it mean?  Think about your family and friends.  When you’re taking a group picture, how do you arrange yourselves?  If you’re all getting along and happy, you might stand close to each other and be fairly equal in rank.  But, maybe someone is having a birthday or something extra special.  Perhaps they stand a little bit higher or forward from everyone else.  Then, there is the shy person who tries to hide behind friends.  One must not forget the class clown who does things like stands on their heads or makes a silly face.

Well, organizing a still life is like arranging friends.  And when I work in a series, I arrange and re-arrange my buddies, or subject matter.  I paint them different colors; change sizes; change layouts, and generally experiment.  The more I work, the more ideas come into my mind.  I’m also learning how color, shape, size, line, direction, texture, that is to say the elements of design, work together to create mood.

Artist Vision:  Evolves with the Series.

Lets think back to the beginning: what am I saying?  Right now, I would say that I am exploring a still life motif that is linked to my memories of childhood and the three minute egg breakfast.

In time, the series may start to take on a different meaning to me.

Artist Vision: Three Minute Egg V9

What Do You See?

Back to you.  I asked you early on to just look at the paintings.  Do you remember the first things that came to mind?  Did you immediately see the eggs, timer, spoon and napkin?  Or was it just a jumble?  Now that you’ve read my account of how I developed this painting, look at the painting again.  How do the paintings feel to you now?  Do you see more?  Does the subject speak to you?  How about the paint?

More Later This Summer and Fall.

These are paintings eight and nine in the series. The plan is to create more later this summer and fall.  I would like to invite you to see the earlier paintings in the blog post “Deconstructing a Realistic Painting Toward Abstraction”.

Hopefully, I have given you a way in so you may see and enjoy my paintings.  Please do come back and see how the next paintings develop.

Travels Around The West.

I will be taking a break from studio painting as my husband and I travel around the West.  I hope to share drawings and paintings from our travels over the next few weeks!  In the meantime I do hope you are well.

Warm regards,

Peggy

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The post About An Artist’s Vision Plus New Three Minute Egg Paintings appeared first on Margaret Stermer-Cox.

How To Paint Portraits , What Beginner Artist Need to Know

So you want to know How To Paint Portraits? In this video there is information on what beginner artist need to know how to paint portraits. If you want more information on painting portraits this is a good place for beginner artist to start. For more information go to www.StefanBaumann.com for more information. A Portrait is composed image of a person in a still position. A portrait often shows a person looking directly at the painter or photographer, in order to most successfully engage the subject with the viewer.There get a free book on painting.
With the huge success of Baumann’s weekly PBS television series “The Grand View: America’s National Parks through the Eyes of an Artist,” millions of people witness for themselves the magic Stefan portrays on canvas, his passion for nature and the American landscape. By distilling his love of nature into a luminous painting of brilliant, saturated color that transcends conventional landscape and wildlife art, Baumann has captured the hearts and imaginations of a generation. Each painting becomes an experience rather than merely a picture – a vivid manifestation of his special and personal union with nature and the outdoor world. Through his mastery of light, color and artful composition, Baumann invites you to experience nature in its purity. It is no wonder that for many years distinguished American collectors, including former presidents and financial icons, have sought out his work.

The post How To Paint Portraits , What Beginner Artist Need to Know appeared first on Stefan Baumann – The Grand View: Paintings by Stefan Baumann.

An Afternoon with Stefan Baumann

Art Du Jour Gallery Presents "An Afternoon with Stefan Baumann", Friday, June 23rd, 2017!  Enjoy an afternoon lecture/demo by renowned artist Stefan Baumann of The Grand View (PBS/SOPTV) at the Medford Library, from 1:30 – 3:30pm. There will be a reception immediately to follow, with a chance to meet Stefan!  Art Du Jour Gallery  213 E. Main Street Medford, OR 97501  Hours: 10-4, Tues.-Sat. and 3rd Friday 5-8.    For information, call (541) 770-3190.

Art Du Jour Gallery and Central Art Supply Present “An Afternoon with Stefan Baumann”

Friday, June 23rd, 2017

Enjoy an afternoon lecture/demo by renowned artist Stefan Baumann of The Grand View (PBS/SOPTV) at the Medford Library, from 1:30 – 3:30pm. There will be a reception immediately to follow, with a chance to meet Stefan!

For information, call (541) 770-3190.

Tangents – What Are They and Why Care?

Off On A Tangent.

Tangents – what are they and so what?

Tangents - just me thinking

Purpose.  My intention in writing this article is to explore and perhaps shed some light on how the word “tangent(s)” is used in drawing, illustrating, painting and photography.  I would like to share with you how this topic came up in conversation.  Then, I’ll talk about the definition of tangent as it applies to artwork.

To illustrate the issue, I will include some examples of tangents in my own work and suggest some possible remedies. Finally, I will list some references and links for further study.

Summary.  Tangents come into play when designing two dimensional artwork such as drawings and paintings.  They are created when two objects, such as a line or shape, touch but do not overlap.  Because they can be visually awkward or ambiguous, tangents tend to draw the viewers attention.  By learning how to identify tangents, the artist can either avoid them altogether, or use them to advantage.

Tangents As A Topic Of Conversation.

Banquet Discussion. The topic of “tangents” came up over dinner while I was attending the Watercolor Society of Oregon’s Spring Convention. I can’t remember who brought up the topic but the gist of the story was that a fellow artist missed out on the top prize of a juried competition because of a tangent in her painting.

What? My little brain cells clicked into alert mode. But, what if the tangent was supposed to be there? And, what is a tangent?

I Know or I Think I Know.  I thought I knew what a tangent was and so did my table mate. However, she described a tangent that wasn’t anything like what I thought a tangent was. Could there be more than one tangent, perhaps two tangents, at least? We discussed the problem for a while and, failing to resolve the issue, went on to discuss other matters.

Gray Matter Spinning.  Well, you might imagine my little brain cells would not let the matter rest. What was the definition and who was right? Did I know what I was talking about?

Ignorance Is Not Bliss.  In a way, no; I did not have a clear idea of what I was talking about when it came to tangents.  Too many vagaries, from not being able to see the painting, to not knowing the definition of tangent as it applies to art.  Time for researching definitions and looking for examples.

Definition.

In geometry, a tangent is a line that touches a curved surface but does not intersect it.

Lets put this another way: tangents are two things, (lines or shapes) that are touching but not overlapping.  They are pretty much the same in artwork as they are in geometry.

Why Do We Care?  When it comes to looking at realistic images, we seem to like a visual order to things.  And, in the case of tangents, we like to know which shape or line is in front and which one is in back.  We like our spatial arrangement to be established and recognizable.

When the spatial arrangement is not clear, we have visual ambiguity; space collapses and the image looks flat.

The Fix?  Creating space by either shifting the line or shape or “pushing back” one of the elements by using aerial perspective (softening edges, muting tone, or moving color toward blue).  I will elaborate about spatial relationships and fixes below.

Examples of Tangents
Note, the bottom two examples are supposed to be of a simplified shape of a person (head, neck shoulders) and a shape of a tree. Just to clarify; thanks!

 

A Bit More Discussion And Elaboration.

Issue For Realism.  As I understand it, where this “touching but not overlapping” becomes a problem is in composing representational two dimensional art pieces.  That is to say, if I want to paint a realistic picture, tangents are something to be aware of and concerned about.   Because, you see, the tangents imply that the two shapes or lines are on the same plane.

Space!  Put another way, its all about spatial relationships. The issue with two dimensional works of art is that we are trying to depict a three dimensional world on the picture plane.  If the two objects are on the same plane in life, then the tangent may not be an issue.  But, what if they’re not on the same plane; what if one apple is deeper in shape than the other?  If they’re touching, but not overlapping, it creates an ambiguity.  The illusion of three dimensional space collapses and the image looks flat (as mentioned earlier).

Phew!

Creative Intent.  So, what if I like to collapse the illusion of three dimensional space?  Well, then, that’s me and part of creative intent.  And, when I create then collapse space, the result is not particularly realistic; its expressive, stylized or stylized.

A Word Of Caution.  I would suggest being clear in your design that your intention is something other than traditional realism.  Why?  We are still concerned with communicating to our viewer and we want to invite the viewer into our world; include them in on the joke, so to speak.  And, back to tangents, they can confuse your viewer.

Back From My Tangent!  Sometimes writing about issues we face while drawing or painting feels like waving in the air; its hard to articulate and communicate what I mean.  Naturally, this is where examples come in handy!

Example One:  Man With Hat.

It didn’t take me long to find some examples.  I just had to look at my “works in progress” and recent painting.  So, lets take a look at some examples from my “Man with the Hat” Series.

Yes, I have some “tangent” issues.  Consider my first example.  I had an idea to add a tree behind my “Man with the Hat”, insert a few leaves and title it “Last Leaves of Autumn”.  Seriously, it was my intention to have one leaf practically touch the face of my gentleman with a hat.

Oh, just to explain, I composed this design BEFORE the WSO convention, the discussion and research on tangents.

Still, I noticed something was awkward.  When I transferred the design to the painting, I added some space between the leaf and the shape.

Tangent, Example 1

Sidebar:  Watch Adding New Things At The End!

Trouble! Which brings me to my next insight.  I get into trouble when I add things to compositions AFTER being finished.  Its an “upsetting the apple cart” type situation.  When something new is added to a picture, its like adding a new subject at the end of the story; its jarring.  Then, you have to start “fixing” the composition.  It might have been better to start a new drawing altogether.

Multiple Tangents!  And, that’s why this next variation on the “Man With The Hat” has at least three tangents that have to be dealt with.  This is a “work in progress”, so I have room yet to adjust before I complete the painting.

Tangent Example Two:  Man With Hat and Dog.

Here goes example two.  First I decided to extend the tree branches behind the man.  Second, I had an idea to add a dog.  I’d seen a man with a dog at a bus stop and was inspired.

Nice ideas, but the composition was already fairly well developed so now I have tangent problems to fix.

More tangents

Isn’t composing fun?  Its all about problem solving!

References.

I found some interesting sites on the web that have more articles on tangents.  Cartoonists who rely on line work have a particular problem with tangents.

Empty Easel: Avoiding Tangents:  9 Visual Blunders Every Artist Should Watch Out For.

Schweizer Comics:  The Schweizer Guide To Spotting Tangents.

Monkey Lunch:  Tangent Slide Show.

Control Paint.com:  Avoid Visual Tangents, (video).

Conclusion.

Remember back near the beginning of this article and the dinner conversation I talked about?  Well, my friend and I were both correct.  Tangents crop up in pictures in many different ways.  However, once you understand what they are, you can identify them and use them to serve your own pictorial purposes.  Isn’t that wonderful?

I hope you have enjoyed this article on tangents as they apply to two dimensional artworks.  My intention was to shed some light on the subject, provide some useful information and share examples.  If you were like me and were not certain about the usage of tangents, now you know a bit more!

Please enjoy the next wonderful piece of art you come by, and, maybe, see if you can find a tangent or not!

Thanks!

 

 

 

 

 

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The post Tangents – What Are They and Why Care? appeared first on Margaret Stermer-Cox.

Its About Egg – Broken And Otherwise

Potato Salad Friday – With Egg

Hi and Good Friday To You!

I was making a potato salad this morning, with hard-boiled egg, and was thinking about the paintings I’ve been doing lately with eggs and egg cups. What is so special about eggs? I don’t really like eating just plain old eggs, though I do add them to food, such as potato salad and cake batter (yum!).

Broken Egg

Eggs On The Brain – Just Thinking

Do you have a “thing” about eggs? Or, better yet, have you ever thought about it?

Well, yes, I’ve thought about eggs a bit.

Breakfast With Mom:  Eggs

To explain, when I was growing up, eggs were a regular part of our breakfast. Three or four times a week Mom would serve us eggs and I didn’t like them.   But, I didn’t say a word because when breakfast was ready, it was eaten without complaint. I do come from a family of six kids and Mom didn’t have room for picky eaters.

Mom would poach, scramble, fry or three-minute soft boiled eggs. Three-minute cooking was among my preferred method for eating because then I could dunk my toast in the eggs. Remember soft, white “Wonder” bread? That type of bread was excellent for dunking toast.

Egg Cups

The other thing I particularly liked about three minute eggs was the cup it was served in. Mom and Dad purchased wooden egg cups when they were living in Spain. The cups were simple but they had a nice shape.  And, they were from Spain!

So, every time I draw or paint my egg shells and egg cups, I pay homage, just a little, to Mom and her three-minute eggs.

Oh, this egg cup is not one of my Mom’s Spanish ones.  I purchased it at one of the local grocery stores.  Still, I like it.

About the Painting

“Broken Egg” is an acrylic painting done on heavy weight watercolor paper. Its size is 6”(h) x 6.5”(w). The painting is available for purchase for the price of $175 (unframed) plus shipping and handling. Should you like to collect the painting, please contact me.

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