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8/20/17 Fireside Chat with Stefan Baumann

8/20/17 Fireside Chat with Stefan Baumann

Developing a Style of Painting

While talking about my upcoming workshop in October with a group of students around the campfire after a day of Plein Air painting at The Grand View Ranch, one of the students asked, “How do you find your own style of painting?”  Developing a style of painting is not something that you set out to do. It is something that develops over time. Usually, an “artist’s style” begins with you being interested in other artists’ style, brushstrokes and color harmony. Or it may be the subject matter or mood that influences the development of your artistic style,
Location has a lot to do with a style. Many artists join groups who share similar interests and they develop a style based on the environment. For example, there is a style of painting that can be found in Pasadena that focuses on warm Southern California scenes, and other groups in Maine who focus on the rocky shores of the Atlantic. Even Northern California where are The Grand View is located has a style. The natural scenes that are available to paint influence the works of the artists painting there. The truth is style partly is autobiographical and has a lot to do with where you live, what your parents were like, the school you went to, and the people you hang with.

The Art Market

Often artists paint a location for a gallery because they want clients and want to make sales. They take workshops from artists who are popular to learn how to paint in their style.  Often, artists who teach can only teach the way they paint, and students end up surrendering their own style and genius.
Sex has a lot to do with a style. Men often chose a different way of painting than woman. Men paint subjects like flowers and little girls seem unique to the historic iconic way men painted in the past. When we think of men painting we think of cowboys or bold imagery that make up the male stereotype. Although there are many women that dominate and thrive as masculine artists, most are pigeonholed in painting feminine paintings. These stereotypes also often have artists choosing a style as opposed to developing there own unique way of painting.
Choosing a style is limiting, When a talk with artists they say they want to paint like Monet or Picasso. Why would you want to paint like them? Their style was developed not chosen, so painting like them is impossible, and why would you? You are unique and the way you paint should be too.

Style

To successfully develop your own style, it’s essential to paint from life. Painting from life allows you to experience your reactions to a subject in the moment.  The value of setting up a still life or choosing a location to paint is that you are painting purely what inspires you in the moment including subject matter, composition, color and value. You are arranging, choosing, and molding an idea, arranging the format and the media along with the colors. You choose your brushstrokes and paint colors as you react to what is in front of you.  And then you paint something and you say, “WOW, I like that” and discover something that you may repeat in future paintings. All you need is about 10,000 more moments like this and you will have developed your own style
I have coached many students over the years. My goal as a coach is to help students discover their own style by instructing with a method that allows them to grow as they are. If you want increase your knowledge and skill to bring your art to the next level, I invite you to watch my YouTube videos, consider phone coaching with me, or attend a workshop in Mt. Shasta where we discuss art, passion and life with other artists around the campfire. All the information is on my website, www.stefanbaumann.com.

Call me for information on workshops or coaching 415-606-9074

SOSA Meeting on August 28

Watercolor painting of a cat by Marianne Nielsen of Grants Pass. Nielsen speaks about painting in watercolor at the monthly meeting of the Southern Oregon Society of Artists on August 28, 2017.The Southern Oregon Society of Artists (SOSA) will be meeting August 28th  at 7 pm at the Medford Public Library.   The guest speaker will be  Watercolor by  Marianne Nielsen from Grants Pass.  She will be teaching her techniques  for painting pet faces, especially dogs and cats eyes whiskers and noses..   Anyone interested in Art is welcome to attend.

Marianne teaches watercolor classes four times a week in Grants Pass.  She is currently  displaying her art at Gallery One in Grants Pass.
For more  information call BJ Mathis at 541-414-4993 or Judy Grillo at 541-625-3285 ( or,  catch-up with Judy at Exit 24 in front of McDonalds  between 6:30-8:30 A.M. as she is painting and  overseeing the Bee Mural being painted there. Come prepared to add a flower or bee! )

Fireside Chat with Stefan Baumann – Fear of Judgment

 Fireside Chat with Stefan Baumann - title image of Baumann talking with a group of artists around a campfire

The Artist’s Greatest Fear 

Fireside Chat with Stefan Baumann - image of painting of a rocky mountain goat by Stefan BaumannThis week we were sitting around the campfire after a day of Plein Air painting and the question came up “What is the greatest fear that all artists have?” I thought for a moment and said “The Fear of judgment.” “Judgment from others, from peers, and from themselves.  And, for a good reason, because all artists are impostors.”

Artists prefer showing what worked and only what they want you to see. They will seldom show you the stack of paintings that did not turn out well and they have hidden under the bed.

Children have a natural attraction to drawing. They’re fearless when they use crayons and paper. In fact, when asked to draw anything, they will spontaneously burst into joyful creative activity. There is no end to the multitude of colors and creative compositions that flow effortlessly from their imaginations. But sadly, this all comes to an end for most people.   Why? At an early age around 3 or 4 when this burst of creative genus begins, it is so natural to make a mark on paper or even on walls.  Just like the drawings that the first cavemen drew in caves art has always been a way to communicate. This free expression has lead to some of most fantastic art ever created thousands of years ago.

Children create freely and endlessly the moment they see paper and any device that can make a mark.    When I ask students In high school “Why don’t you create art?” they most often say, “I’m not taking an art class.” Students in College say, “Its not my major.” Later in life the excuse is “I have to focus on a real career.” Then later, working people say, “I don’t have the time” and then finally, retired people say, “I don’t have talent.”

What happened to the Child, the free-thinking, creative spirit that inspired thousands of drawings and pictures? Art is one of the first things that children can do freely that they own.  In a world of “NO! Be Quiet! Sit-down!” art is something they can do that has no rules.  You can make a purple cow and a sun that looks like a star as long as it is yellow, until some day, Mom shows up and says “Billy, There is no such thing as a purple cow. And, by the way, that cow looks more like a dog. Let me show you how.” This critique is given as a learning opportunity by the parent, but the child experiences that he or she has done something is wrong. The free flowing creative moment is gone, replaced by rules and expectations.

I have coached many people over the years who long to be creative and learn how to paint. And very often, overcoming the fear of failing again as they felt at the age of 3 is as important as painting itself.

If you are interested in exploring your creative child or if you want to take your art to he next level, I invite you to go to my YouTube channel, consider phone coaching with me, and attend a workshop here in Mt. Shasta where we discuss life, art, and creative passion with other artists around the campfire.

Please visit my website at www.StefanBaumann.com for more information.

Call me for information on workshops or coaching 415-606-9074

Its That Darn Brand Thing Again! On Defining My Brand

Introduction: My Own Brand, or Modus Operandi

Lately I’ve been thinking about “brand” as it relates to my own artistic style or modus operandi (MO).  Why do I avoid defining my brand?  Choices; there comes a time when we can’t do it all.  I have come to realize that if I don’t focus on a brand or MO, I risk confusion, among other things.

To explain my thinking, I’d like to share a story then explain my situation.  Finally, I’ll invite your feedback on the cohesiveness of my own “brand” as it applies to three of my paintings.

Artist Brand: MsKitty, Toy Pony and Blue Bunny Blues

Musician John Mellencamp, And His Brand

This June, my husband Robert and I attended a John Mellencamp concert. We had a wonderful time; Mr. Mellencamp and his band put on a great show. He had the energy and sound that we like about John Mellencamp.

You see, we were not sure we were going to like the show.

Brand: Voice and Energy

I think a little background is in order here. My husband and I grew to appreciate and enjoy John Mellencamp’s music in the 80s and 90’s. So, when we saw that he was coming to one of our favorite venues, we immediately purchased tickets.   Then, a few weeks later, he released his latest music album. But,  this did not sound like the John Mellencamp we knew! It seemed that his voice was different and the energy was not there. What happened; were we going to like the show?

AHA!  A Thought Pops In My Head!

It was while thinking about this concert that I had an “AHA” type moment!  This is all about “branding”, and it applies to me and my art.  Just as Mr. Mellencamp’s voice and energy are his brand, I need to define my brand and focus!

On Brand: Still Life with Egg Cup and Rabbit Netsuke

The Kewl Payntur Case

Here’s a “for instance” scenario. Let’s call the artist “Kewl Payntur” just for fun.  Kewl Payntur might be me or any artist you might know.  Over time, our buddy Kewl builds an audience of people who like his or her particular art.  There is something about Kewl’s work that speaks to the audience.  Mr/Ms Payntur can surprise, challenge and engage the audience as as he/she evolves, as long as the “certain something” is still there.  The “certain something” instills a type of cohesiveness about the body of Kewl Payntur’s work and that it helps the audience identify and define the artist’s work.

Tormented?

So, what is the lesson being taught or tormented over? Deciding on a “brand” or style.

Two Styles! (Or maybe three?)

I wrestle with what I define ought to define as my “brand”.  Usually, I think of my brand as being a stylized, abstracted, designed approach to the subject.  In other words, I am not trying to paint from life and I purposely want you to know it.  My intention is to stylize, distort and have fun with my images.

Problem Defined.

OK, fine, so what’s the problem?  Well, I like to paint from life too. From time to time, I focus my efforts on creating paintings and drawings that achieves a degree of accuracy and likeness.

To rephrase the problem, what does having two different styles do to my brand as an artist?  Do I confuse my audience?  And, what does this dichotomy have do to achieving a degree of mastery in either approach?

Its About You: Confusing or Cohesive

So, this really is about you, the viewer.  Would you like to help?  I have posted three of my paintings and all of them include a rabbit, just because I like rabbits.

What do you think, is my “brand” identifiable?  Even if you can’t articulate it, do all three look like they were done by the same artist?  Or, do you find the collection confusing?

On Brand: Garden Bunny

Post Script:  John Mellencamp’s Voice Endures

By the way, to me, Mr. Mellencamp’s brand includes his voice and energy.  His voice has matured, but it still has the special something that I recognize as the “John Mellencamp” voice.  So, it was a good concert.

Post Script, Again: Travels

In my last posting, I spoke of traveling adventures.  Robert and I did go on the road to New Mexico and we are back home.  We had a good trip and I have started working on my blog posting.  I hope to have something to share with you soon!  Thanks!

 

 

 

 

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The post Its That Darn Brand Thing Again! On Defining My Brand appeared first on Margaret Stermer-Cox.

How To Paint Portraits Part 2 What Beginner Artist Need to Know

IN this video Stefan Baumann teaches How To Paint Portraits Part 2 What Beginner Artist Need to Know
Inspiring Millions to paint outdoors This video is about Touch Move and Inspire. Get a free Book at his website www.StefanBaumann.com. The paintings of Stefan Baumann reveal the true spirit of nature by transporting the viewer to distant lands that have gone unseen and undisturbed. With the huge success of Baumann’s weekly PBS television series “The Grand View: America’s National Parks through the Eyes of an Artist,” millions of people witness for themselves the magic Stefan portrays on canvas, his passion for nature and the American landscape. By distilling his love of nature into a luminous painting of brilliant, saturated color that transcends conventional landscape and wildlife art, Baumann has captured the hearts and imaginations of a generation. Each painting becomes an experience rather than merely a picture – a vivid manifestation of his special and personal union with nature and the outdoor world. Through his mastery of light, color and artful composition, Baumann invites you to experience nature in its purity. It is no wonder that for many years distinguished American collectors, including former presidents and financial icons, have sought out his work.

The post How To Paint Portraits Part 2 What Beginner Artist Need to Know appeared first on Stefan Baumann – The Grand View: Paintings by Stefan Baumann.

August Featured Artist

“ Following the Circuitous Thread”

Mixed Media Paintings by Eve Margo Withrow –

August 2017

Art and Soul Gallery

Ashland, OR 

    “ I’m always curious to explore the edge that lies outside the box. From that perspective, I reflect on the essential feeling ingredients of an experience or place.  Many of my favorite and most exciting works are the result of finding imaginative solutions to things run amok. I play and adventure with my expressions. Following threads here and there, I enter the flow of my creative process; head and heart awake and dancing.”
 
Eve is an international award winning professional Artist and is part owner of Art and Soul Gallery in Ashland , Oregon.

Please join us on Friday August 4 from 5-8 pm for a festive evening of Fine Art, Music by Rick Millward, Conversation and some refreshing nibbles!

Sky Lake Moon, 30 x 22 Mixed water media on paper from the Solstice Skies collection by Eve Margo Withrow. ©2015

Sky Lake Moon
30 x 22 Mixed water media on paper

Valley of the Rogue

Expression of Machinery, 12″x12″, oil on wood,…

Expression of Machinery, 12″x12″, oil on wood, SOLD

Number ten in my series on the nature of numbers represents the culmination of all numbers before it in which a work reaches its true completion and full potential then returns back to the monad, or number one, to start the cycle anew.

FREE Coloring Event at Central Art Supply

Central Art Logo

 

 

When: Friday July 21, 2017 1:30-3:30 p.m.

Where: Central Art Supply  101 N. Central Avenue, Medford

 

 

Chickadee Creative Coloring, a Medford-based adult coloring book publisher, presents a

FREE Coloring Event  for its three publications:

Amazing Animals Coloring Book for Adults, Creatures of the Deep Coloring Book for Adults, and Wild Women Adult Coloring Book.

 

Each of the three 24-page books contains hand-drawn illustrations by talented Southern Oregon student artists.

 

There are a lot of benefits of coloring for adults and teens, which include activating both sides of the brain (logic and creativity) and reducing stress and anxiety, and it can be a perfect therapy for patients battling an illness or disease. Plus, it is just plain fun!

 

Join us for a fun-filled afternoon coloring your worries away! Pages from each book along with colored pencils to use for this event will be supplied by Chickadee Creative Coloring.

 

Event limited to a maximum of 20 attendees.

To pre-register, visit or call Central Art Supply, located at:

101 N. Central Ave. in Downtown Medford

Phone: (541) 773-1444

www.chickadeecreativecoloring.com

Visit Central Art!

About An Artist’s Vision Plus New Three Minute Egg Paintings

Artist Vision:  How To See.

Greetings!  I’d like to share with you two of my latests pieces in my “Three Minute Egg Series”.  Furthermore, I’d like to talk about how I come up with my artistic vision for a series, using my current paintings as an example.

The Good Question.

A friend and collector of mine asked me a tough question a couple of months ago.  She had seen my earlier paintings and blog posting about my three minute egg series.  The question was how to see and understand my paintings.  I immediately thought “Oh, I need to do an artist’s statement for this series”.

Artist Vision: Three Minute Egg Project

Time Out!

OOPS!  Please stop!  Before you read any more, I’d like to ask you to please just look at the paintings.  Without analyzing, allow yourself to have a first impression; a first reaction.  It doesn’t matter if you like them or not, just allow yourself to respond in your own personal manner.

Vision: About Relationships.

Now then, back to what the series is about; the artist’s vision.

When I start thinking about an artists statement or vision, I start remembering relationships and stories about the subject.  For example, I did not enjoy eating eggs when I am a child, though three minute eggs were the least offensive.  That being said, I was always intrigued by the egg cups.  The particular eggs cups we had were ones that my parents purchased when they were living in Spain.   To me, they were exotic, interesting and special.

Still Life and Project Set Up.

Now, lets consider the set up of the three minute egg still life.  I knew I was going to be going from realistic to abstract when I started this project.  You might remember that the first seven completed were part of a workshop I attended with artist Gabriel Lipper.  (Paintings 8 and 9 were done after the completion of class).

So, the set up.  I looked on line at still life set ups from some of the Master’s of still life, like Chardin.  Then, I considered what I had laying around in the kitchen.  Time is a theme I had been wanting the explore so the kitchen timer was selected for the still life.  Eggs shells are one of my favorite subjects because I feel the need to study how light falls on the curved shapes, so they were in.  Timer plus eggs suggests three minute egg in my mind.  To complete the set up, I added a spoon and napkin.

Design: Like A Puzzle.

To understand what you see in front of you, it might be good to realize that I like to design my abstractions.  Thinking of a tapestry or a puzzle, I am concerned with how the pieces fit together.  I select and create a scheme to be the backbone structure.  Then, I arrange my shapes, searching for something that captures my imagination.  I play close attention to the light and dark pattern I create because it helps direct the viewer around the painting.

Still Life Objects: Like Family and Friends.

So, what does it mean?  Think about your family and friends.  When you’re taking a group picture, how do you arrange yourselves?  If you’re all getting along and happy, you might stand close to each other and be fairly equal in rank.  But, maybe someone is having a birthday or something extra special.  Perhaps they stand a little bit higher or forward from everyone else.  Then, there is the shy person who tries to hide behind friends.  One must not forget the class clown who does things like stands on their heads or makes a silly face.

Well, organizing a still life is like arranging friends.  And when I work in a series, I arrange and re-arrange my buddies, or subject matter.  I paint them different colors; change sizes; change layouts, and generally experiment.  The more I work, the more ideas come into my mind.  I’m also learning how color, shape, size, line, direction, texture, that is to say the elements of design, work together to create mood.

Artist Vision:  Evolves with the Series.

Lets think back to the beginning: what am I saying?  Right now, I would say that I am exploring a still life motif that is linked to my memories of childhood and the three minute egg breakfast.

In time, the series may start to take on a different meaning to me.

Artist Vision: Three Minute Egg V9

What Do You See?

Back to you.  I asked you early on to just look at the paintings.  Do you remember the first things that came to mind?  Did you immediately see the eggs, timer, spoon and napkin?  Or was it just a jumble?  Now that you’ve read my account of how I developed this painting, look at the painting again.  How do the paintings feel to you now?  Do you see more?  Does the subject speak to you?  How about the paint?

More Later This Summer and Fall.

These are paintings eight and nine in the series. The plan is to create more later this summer and fall.  I would like to invite you to see the earlier paintings in the blog post “Deconstructing a Realistic Painting Toward Abstraction”.

Hopefully, I have given you a way in so you may see and enjoy my paintings.  Please do come back and see how the next paintings develop.

Travels Around The West.

I will be taking a break from studio painting as my husband and I travel around the West.  I hope to share drawings and paintings from our travels over the next few weeks!  In the meantime I do hope you are well.

Warm regards,

Peggy

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The post About An Artist’s Vision Plus New Three Minute Egg Paintings appeared first on Margaret Stermer-Cox.

How To Paint Portraits , What Beginner Artist Need to Know

So you want to know How To Paint Portraits? In this video there is information on what beginner artist need to know how to paint portraits. If you want more information on painting portraits this is a good place for beginner artist to start. For more information go to www.StefanBaumann.com for more information. A Portrait is composed image of a person in a still position. A portrait often shows a person looking directly at the painter or photographer, in order to most successfully engage the subject with the viewer.There get a free book on painting.
With the huge success of Baumann’s weekly PBS television series “The Grand View: America’s National Parks through the Eyes of an Artist,” millions of people witness for themselves the magic Stefan portrays on canvas, his passion for nature and the American landscape. By distilling his love of nature into a luminous painting of brilliant, saturated color that transcends conventional landscape and wildlife art, Baumann has captured the hearts and imaginations of a generation. Each painting becomes an experience rather than merely a picture – a vivid manifestation of his special and personal union with nature and the outdoor world. Through his mastery of light, color and artful composition, Baumann invites you to experience nature in its purity. It is no wonder that for many years distinguished American collectors, including former presidents and financial icons, have sought out his work.

The post How To Paint Portraits , What Beginner Artist Need to Know appeared first on Stefan Baumann – The Grand View: Paintings by Stefan Baumann.