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Love for the Win

“Heart Wins,” from the Take Heart series

Once upon a time, I spent the week between Christmas and New Year’s reviewing the previous year, evaluating it, and forecasting/goalcasting the year ahead. You might say I was an overachiever with  resolutions.

Some years, I was bullet-point specific. Like when I determined to go on an archaeological dig, learn salsa dancing, and take up archery: check, check, check. (I discovered that I hated the heat and dirt of the dig, I wasn’t a fan of prescribed dance steps, but I was a decent aim.)

 

Other years, I was more open-ended, listing four to five feelings I wanted to cultivate. Once, I painted a four-point compass with harmony at its center and joy, peace, prosperity, and grace as its north, south, east, and west.

 

At the end of December 2019, while housesitting at a lovely home, high on a hill—as I had for many years—I sat in front of the fire and started my review and projection. 

 

Or I tried to. 

 

I even had a fancy calendar that led you through all the steps with lots of questions to answer and blanks to fill in. (I should note that I am very good about answering all the questions and filling in all the blanks.) And yet, as I flipped through the pages I usually looked forward to filling, I found myself completely uninspired by all the specificity. 


For once, I didn’t want to grip the steering wheel of my life so hard and beeline for the next goal. And believe me: I can beeline! From putting myself through undergraduate and graduate school on scholarships to getting a grant to write poetry in Germany for a year to all manner of less scholastic but equally daunting goals since: I. Get. It. Done. 

 

But those last days before 2020, I didn’t want to get it all done. Because I had a hunch that there were things waiting to happen if I were willing to let go of my limited ideas of what I could achieve and maintain in my own strength. And so, to my surprise, I found myself writing the word “Love” in big, loose cursive across all those usually inviting blanks I was “supposed” to fill in.

 

Fun facts: Just over a month into 2020, I began dating an old friend. Then he proposed. Then we got married. And we have spent the last half year learning the intricacies of love—and I could not have forecast any of them!

 

So, for 2021, I didn’t buy the fancy, fill-in-the-blank calendar. In fact, I’m using one of those free company calendars. I’m keeping it simple. And I’m metaphorically writing love across every month. 

 

And on this Day of Epiphany—a feast day celebrating the manifestation of the One who is Love—I invite the continual manifestation of Love to us all…in all its unpredictable forms, across all the days of this year.  

GPMA News January 2021


January 2021 eNews

Happy New Year. We hope to connect with all of you soon. Keep checking the museum website for any updates regarding exhibits, events, and more.
Enjoy! Hyla Executive Director
Click here to visit our website
Current Exhibition The membership exhibit will remain in the museum through January 22. Currently the museum is closed – but you can view each entry in the exhibit by watching the video (see below). GPMA 2020 Membership Exhibit Video What’s Next? The Exhibition Department has been very busy keeping up with the many changes in schedules. Following is a preview of a preliminary list of exhibits for 2021. This list is totally subject to change due to circumstances that the museum cannot control. Vince Carl Kristen O’Neill Rogue Valley Biennial Ilene Gienger-Stanfield 2021 Membership Exhibit Sakaya Ganz Reclaimed Creations

Save These Dates
Black, White, & the Blues will be virtual this year.
MARCH 25 – stay tuned for more information! We are almost positive that Art in the Garden will be live because it is an outdoor activity and it is not until June 12 & 13. Virtual Classes SIGN UP HERE Happenings If you would like to have a private shopping experience – we are happy to open the gallery just for you. We are offering private shopping for customers limiting going out in public. They may make an appointment by calling, 541 476 3220.

Help keep the museum free for all! The museum does not receive government funding (other than grants from the Josephine County Cultural Coalition and the Oregon Cultural Trust via JCCC). So keeping the doors open depends on grants, donations, memberships, sponsorships, and rent from the street level businesses (Shoefly and Gallery One). You can do one time donations and you can also do monthly donations. It’s easy – and we appreciate you very much! On additional side benefit – the foundations who offer grants are very pleased to see community involvement. Your donations show your support!
You can DONATE by clicking here

Monthly donations are so amazing. They add up quickly. Just $10 a month means a donation to the museum of $120 for the year. That’s fabulous. Please consider this option. The payments safely charged to your credit card.
Be a “Monthly Sustainer” and click here!

You can also call us at 541-479-3290 or send mail to us at Grants Pass Museum of Art, P.O. Box 966, Grants Pass, OR 97528

Do you shop on Amazon? This quarter, we received $24.29. Every little bit helps a lot. Thank you! Did you know that if you go to a special link called Amazon Smile you can choose a nonprofit to benefit from your purchase. Each nonprofit has a unique link. Here’s the portal you can use for the museum. Every little bit helps! CLICK HERE or click the picture to shop and benefit the museum.The best part is that it doesn’t cost you any extra!



THANK YOU! If you get this far….here’s a wonderful hand painted 2021 calendar to enjoy.

Mannerly, Bannerly

This little poem is my wish & my wonder for the New Year:  


Mannerly, Bannerly

 

When all manner of bad 

lands in our laps, 

and the mean things 

land in our news feed,

what if, 

instead of responding 

in kind,

we respond in kindness?

What if 

we invite the other to dinner,

polish our best manners,

and serve goodness?

What if

we lift a banner of love,

lifting each other up,

until there is no other?  



*The illustration above is from Blessings: A Children’s Book for Grown-ups, cowritten with my dear mom, Jan Elkins         

 

Building New Muscles – Figure Drawing Class

For me, learning these days is all about “building new muscles”. Hi!  Let me explain what I mean.  You see, I have been taking a drawing class titled “Elements of Figuring Drawing, Anatomy for Artists” for the past few months.   It is an online class through The Art Students League of New York.  And, …

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The post Building New Muscles – Figure Drawing Class appeared first on Margaret Stermer-Cox.

Above the Fog, Above the Fray

 

On Saturday, I went Christmas-tree-hunting with my new extended family. We drove out of the foggy valley in trucks, careening up old logging roads into the mountains until we hit sunshine—and snow. 

 

The day was a catalog of goodness: Leftover turkey sandwiches by the fire (and roasting of “snow marshmallows”). Gentle, sunny walks for some…sledding (and wiping out) for others. Hot cocoa with whipped cream, optionally spiked with peppermint schnapps (yes, please).

 

It was a very good day to get away. Besides taking a break on Thanksgiving afternoon for our meal, Jared had spent every other daylight minute of the holiday weekend bricking the new house, and I had been staining its cedar shingles. 

 

Tree-hunting and snow-playing were welcome respites. When the sun and fire got low, we all piled back into the trucks and started for home. Through the forest, we kept glimpsing a lake of fog still covering the valley. And then, before descending back down the mountain toward home, we came to a clearing and saw this view.

 

Up on that rise, we felt warmth and had perspective. Back beneath the fog, we felt the cold and had limited visibility. But beyond what we can feel and see in our valleys—geographical or emotional—a higher elevation rises above us.

 

Whole days can feel like they look: heavy and damp and dark.

 

But. 

 

Looking above the fog, I reminded myself that even when we can’t always get to a higher vantage with our physical bodies, we always can with our hearts and minds. 

 

This photo is for all of us on the days when we’re stuck below—in the fog and in the fray. A reminder that, above what seems oppressive and heavy, there stretches a bright, wide scope of possibility. Until the fog lifts, we can choose to enjoy the lights on the tree and the warmth of the wood stove. And maybe a bit of peppermint schnapps in our cocoa. 

 

Gratitude and joy to you,

 

Anna

Online Classes with Bobbi Baldwin

CLICK HERE TO REGISTER
Bobbi Baldwin is an artist living in California. She has taught a few classes at the museum in the past and has been Zooming classes for her own students. We are fortunate in having her teach some special classes just for us. In Bobbi’s words: “As a teacher, I must first see my students as individuals and second as a budding artist. Each person I encounter comes to the easel with a different set of learning skills and life lessons. It is my intent to give wings to my students feather by feather. I once heard that the measure of a good teacher is only through the students who surpass them. I look forward to seeing my students inspire the world with their own work.” This is a series of six classes. You can sign up for one or all. Each class is $25 for members and $30 for non-members AND she will make the class recording available for download for $20 so you can watch it over and over on your own time. The classes are two hours long on certain Fridays in November, December, and January from 10:00am until Noon. The class will consist of a 1.5-hour lecture and demonstration and then discussing your own work. You can use your favorite medium.
We hope to “see” you in class. We know you will enjoy your experience. Take care, Hyla Executive Director
Grants Pass Museum of Art | 229 SW G Street, Grants Pass, OR 97526

California Watercolor Association’s 51st National Exhibition

Painting Selected For Exhibition. Greetings!  I am thrilled to say that my watercolor painting “Three Minute Egg #14 – Blue Espresso Cup” was juried into the California Watercolor Association’s (CWA) 51st National Exhibition. The Juror of Selection was Mr. Frank Webb.  There were 650 entries and the Juror selected 97 paintings for the show. Congrats! …

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The post California Watercolor Association’s 51st National Exhibition appeared first on Margaret Stermer-Cox.

“Moon Goddess” – Halloween & Pollinator Bat

Halloween and Bats Go Together. Greetings!  It is late October and that must mean it is “Moon Goddess” time.   Why October?  Well, bats are a traditional theme for Halloween and she is a bat.  Or rather, a colored pencil drawing inspired by the long nosed and long tongue bats of North America.  They are …

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The post “Moon Goddess” – Halloween & Pollinator Bat appeared first on Margaret Stermer-Cox.

Not What I Expected

Once upon a pre-pandemic time, I heard a famous writer say that when she looked back at her life, nothing had turned out the way she’d thought—and that was good. She said she could summarize what she’d learned about life with this simple statement: Not What I Expected.

I think that would make a great T-shirt. 

 

This year certainly racked up more than its fair share of unexpected things—good and bad. I was scanning the calendar all the way back to the maskless days when I realized that so many big things I’d anticipated got cancelled, and yet even better things—things I could not have fathomed—happened in their stead.

 

Exhibit A: This spring, I was going to help lead a workshop in Paris and then begin my poetry book tour there afterward—continuing the tour in New York and San Francisco. It was kinda career-pinnacling stuff. And then, a matter of weeks before departure, the world shut down. But guess what? The day the workshop would have started, my now-husband proposed to me. And as grand as Paris is, if I never return to the world’s most romantic city, I feel no lack; I have actual romance now! 

 

Exhibit B: I had been invited to give a poetry reading and teach workshops at a college writing conference in Wyoming this fall. One of those all-expenses-paid gigs poets dream of. The event managed to stay on the books all through the summer, but then…it was finally cancelled. The plan had been to drive out there with my husband, teach, and then take our delayed honeymoon road trip from there. We wouldn’t have had as much time to see the national parks and monuments we hoped to visit, but we were going to make the best of it. When the conference was cancelled, we were able to take the entire time together—time that became so precious and relationship-building, I am quite glad we did not have to give up a minute of it. 

 

Exhibit C: Any moment now, I would have been boarding a plane to Sweden and then on to Latvia for a month-long writing residency. I would have spent all of November writing in a little seaside village. You guessed it: cancelled. But you know what? I’d almost forgotten that was going to happen. My life has taken such a different turn that many of the things I once wanted fiercely now seem like brief apparitions—like glimpsed prisms of light that all but fade by the time you focus on them. 

 

I have no idea what November will bring instead of Latvia. (And I’m not talking about elections or anything else one might expect.) I’m actually glad to have no idea what specific goodness is on its way—I just know that something is. It always is; Goodness & Mercy are always at our heels. Maybe we just have to stop now and then, turn around, and acknowledge them. Something tells me those two are all the more thrilled to come closer with their surprising gifts when we’re grateful for them. Even when they deliver stuff we never ordered. 

 

Speaking of ordering, I’m seriously thinking about making that T-shirt. I haven’t figured out what the back would say, but I might borrow a line from another famous Creator:

 

“And it was good.” 

 

Museum News Mid-October 2020

Click here to visit our website
Announcing the Membership Exhibit 2020
The exhibition department has decided to try and have a membership exhibit this year. It will be different from those in the past. We will only be able to display one piece of art per member and there is a limit of 60 pieces for the exhibit. Here’s how it will work: Contact the museum and make a reservation to bring in your artwork. We will be able to have two people in the museum every 15 minutes to finalize paperwork and pay the hanging fee. ($20) Dates for art drop off are: November 5 (Thursday) from noon until 3pm November 6 (Friday) from noon until 3pm November 7 (Saturday) from 10am – 1pm You can call and reserve your time slot now. The end of the reservation period is October 23. This is a first come first served situation so don’t delay. CALL 541-479-3290 Leave a message if we are not at the museum to answer – we will call you back. There are still size restrictions as usual – no art can be larger than 36″ wide x 48″ long (outside frame dimensions).
The proposed exhibit dates are from November 12 through December 18. Art pick up will be December 19 (Saturday) and December 20 (Sunday) from noon until 4pm both days.
If you are an artist and you need financial help
The Oregon Arts Commission, in partnership with Oregon Community Foundation and the James F. and Marion L. Miller Foundation, has just launched a statewide Artist Relief Program. The Artist Relief Program provides relief funding to Oregon artists who have experienced financial hardship during the COVID-19 pandemic due to cancellations of exhibitions, performances, rehearsals (or other activities with a stipend), events, teaching opportunities, book signings, or other professional presentation opportunities. We are making efforts to reach artists across Oregon, and specifically artists from traditionally or currently underserved and under-resourced communities, including communities of color and rural communities. The applications will be reviewed by panels of arts professionals. The application opened October 16 with a deadline of November 10. The grant guidelines and link to the application are on the Arts Commission website. The guidelines include information about the program, the application questions and the criteria that panelists will use to review applications. The program supports professional artists from specific disciplines who have experienced or anticipate experiencing loss of revenue of $1,000 or more between March 1 and December 31, 2020. (Supported disciplines: Literature (creative non-fiction, fiction, play writing and poetry); Dance (including choreography); Music (composition and music performance); Theatre and Performance Art; Folk & Traditional Arts; Visual Arts (crafts, drawing, painting, photography, printmaking, sculpture, mixed media and new media); Design Arts; and Media Arts.)CLICK HERE TO FIND OUT MORE.
Almeda Fire Resources for Artists
We all know about the Almeda fire that ravaged our area, particularly the towns of Talent and Phoenix, just a month ago. What not everyone knows is that there were many artists who lived there since they couldn’t afford to rent in Ashland but needed to remain close to the galleries. And when an artist’s home burns down, they not only lose their abode and all their belongings like everyone else, but their tools of trade AND their entire life’s work of art. Click the image to find out more about who needs help and who can help.
A few words from Kristen O’Neill
It was October of 2015 when I first started volunteering for GPMA, and shortly after became the Administrative Assistant. I love my job and being part of the art community. This is a very special place we have here, and its filled with the best people. During my time at the museum I have become a Gallery One artist, taught several thousand students, developed friendships, helped with exhibitions and events, and so much more. When I first brought my daughters to the museum they were only one and six years old. Now my oldest is in middle school, and my youngest is now the six year old!   For the school year, as things currently are, I will be staying at home with my girls to help them with their remote schooling. It is with mixed emotions that I will only be working Saturdays for the museum. I look forward to spending more time with my daughters, Eirin, wants to learn how to cook more (yes!) and Kaitlyn is loving the super-power of learning how to read. I am also glad to continue as the assistant here at the museum. This place truly is a gem. I am so thankful to work in the arts and for an organization that has always been so thoughtful of my needs and has always made me feel valued. I look forward to both the extra time at home, having more time for my own artistic practice, and to then eventually return to working full-time at the museum again.
A small sampling of Kristen’s art – see more in Gallery One and you can find even more on her website: https://kristenoneillart.com/
Heceta Head Oregon Coast Trail Series Starry Night Over Grants Pass
A few family photos with Kristen, Eirin, and Kaitlyn
Eirin, comparing the size of her head with a dahlia Kaitlyn doing homework
Kristen, Eirin, and Kaitlyn at last year’s membership exhibit Kaitlyn showing Nancy Clark her entry in last year’s membership exhibit
Current Exhibition
Our permanent collection has been gathered over many years. It is extremely diverse and totally interesting. Each year we try and show off some of the art. We always have some pieces from the collection in the halls and stairwell.
If you can not come to the museum in person, here’s a link to see the exhibit in a virtual format. You can move the pictures with your mouse. CLICK HERE
A new fundraising idea for the museum
Over time many people have donated art to the museum. Much of the art has been included in the permanent collection but some of the art is available for purchase. We typically offered the art as part of our silent auctions at Black, White, & the Blues. However, we will not be having BWB in 2021, so this is an alternate idea. We have just opened a new eBay account and are offering two unique items – A Bev Doolittle signed print and a hand signed limited edition serigraph by Leroy Neiman. If you are interested and/or curious, click on the eBay logo and you will be transported to the listings.
Huge thanks for monetary help
We have been very fortunate. We have received emergency funding from the following organizations. With their help and the help of many community members, the museum has been “safe” during the pandemic. We do need to continually receive funds for current needs and future programs. Please help if you can. We appreciate your support!
The Red Backpack Fund is managed by Global Giving.
Happenings
Come in and shop in a safe and clean environment. It’s a fabulous place to buy all sorts of art and great greeting cards. There are more than five dozen artists represented in the gallery.
The owners of Shoefly, Sydney and Alan, have been very busy remodeling the interior of their new store. You will not recognize it! They plan on being open 100% by Halloween. Check out some of the shoes that will be available in their window display. They carry shoes for women and girls. This is very exciting news.
Help keep the museum free for all!
The museum does not receive government funding (other than grants from the Josephine County Cultural Coalition and the Oregon Cultural Trust via JCCC). So keeping the doors open depends on grants, donations, memberships, sponsorships, and rent from the street level businesses (Shoefly and Gallery One). You can do one time donations and you can also do monthly donations. It’s easy – and we appreciate you very much! On additional side benefit – the foundations who offer grants are very pleased to see community involvement. Your donations show your support!
You can DONATE by clicking here
Monthly donations are so amazing. They add up quickly. Just $10 a month means a donation to the museum of $120 for the year. That’s fabulous. Please consider this option. The payments are safely charged to your credit card.
Be a “Monthly Sustainer” and click here!
You can also call us at 541-479-3290 or send mail to us at Grants Pass Museum of Art, P.O. Box 966, Grants Pass, OR 97528
Do you shop on Amazon?
This quarter, we received $12.81. Every little bit helps a lot. Thank you!
Did you know that if you go to a special link called Amazon Smile you can choose a nonprofit to benefit from your purchase. Each nonprofit has a unique link. Here’s the portal you can use for the museum. Every little bit helps! CLICK HERE or click the picture to shop and benefit the museum.The best part is that it doesn’t cost you any extra!
THANK YOU!
If you get this far….
I was wandering around in YouTube, trying to find a perfect video for this newsletter. There were lots of things about art and hope but they were either too old or too long. Then I stumbled on this one. It is from a long time ago – and some of you may have seen it. It’s worth watching again. And somehow, it has great meaning for our time.
The Power of Words