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Artists Workshop Plein Air Event Show and Sale

Artists Workshop Plein Air Event Show and Sale

Coming July 1, 2017

On the front lawn at Art Presence Art Center in Jacksonville, Oregon!

Artists Workshop July 1, 2017 Plein Air Event Show and Sale at ARt Presence ARt Center, Jacksonville, Oregon

The Artists Workshop is holding their 2017 Plein Air Event this year from June 28-July 1, 2017. Participating artists will paint on location for three days, then present their work for judging, a show and sale on the front lawn of the Art Presence Art Center in Jacksonville, Oregon on July 1 from 9 am – 3 pm.

There will be an exciting quick-paint competition from 10 am to noon, and the awards ceremony takes place at 2:30 pm. Over 30 artists are participating in this year’s event, which means there will be a wide range of plein air painting styles available to interested collectors. Jurors are Willo Balfrey and Richard McKinley, so you know the awards will be decided by two of the most highly respected artists in the Valley!

The event takes place side by side with the July reception for the new art exhibit at Art Presence Art Center, so be sure to come inside and view the paintings and other art works in the gallery too!

Early Bird Bonus for 2017 Alpine Art Retreat EXTENDED to July 15!!

Early Bird Bonus for 2017 Alpine Art Retreat EXTENDED to July 15!!

We have extended our Early Bird bonus (2 additonal free nights) if you register before July 15th. We have only 2 remaining spaces, so we just need two more amazing women! Call Elaine Frenett at: 541-944-2196 to register

2017 Alpine Art Retreat Objectives and Summary

dscn5363A guided exploration for wonder-filled women.

Following last year’s “full to over-flowing” attendance, we have reshaped our intentions. Jean and I would like to direct our energies to more quiet moments allowing more personal discovery. With that purpose in mind, we have limited retreat participation to just eight (including two instructors), and is all inclusive of lodging, meals and workshops. With this experience, unique in its quiet reflection and playful interaction…you will discover how to combine eyes and mind with heart!

To explore how images and words and spirit stir together within us as creatives and take time to understand and direct those urges.

In this cradle of deep connecting, inquisitive women, nature’s still wonder, and expanded self-awareness, you will explore journaling and how it relates to the art of watercolor.

For a select number of curious women who feel invigorated in the rustic beauty of a mountain setting!

Each year our format is reinvented to inspire both leaders and participants. This intimate venue encourages individual introspection and shared connection while nature’s quiet insists upon acknowledgement and wonder.

  • Held at the Lake Alpine Resort in Bear Valley, California. Map of location: 300wlakesshore2http://www.mapquest.com/maps?city=Lake%20Alpine&state=CA
  • Begins Tuesday evening (August 22, 2017)
  • Ends Sunday afternoon (August 27, 2017)
  • Everyday (six days) includes programs in painting, journaling and writing – all
    processes of discovery.
  • There are two instructors for the full program time (Elaine Frenett and Jean Warren)
  • Location is at the wonderful Lake Alpine Resort.
  • The cabins include full kitchen & bathroom facilities, plus a sunny deck with a sparkling lake view.
  • Our playful gathering is held in two rustic, spacious and fully stocked cabins, lovingly named the “Ponderosa” and “Sequoia.”
  • In keeping with our back-to-camp playfulness (yes, there could be s’mores!), the300wbobbiedemo
    sleeping arrangements are bunkhouse style (e.g., shared rooms where each person has their own bed). We love how this fits in with the spirit of the retreat. Yet at the same time there are two private rooms available too. All share bathroom.
  • Meals are included. We may dine at our cabin or at the Resort dining area or deck. We’ll begin with light breakfast fare accompanied by tea, coffee and juice, and later we partake of a relaxed and refreshing lunch. Evening meals will find us embracing our chef’s creativity – perhaps on our private deck.
  • Participants with special menu needs are welcome to bring along their preferences. We make every effort to accommodate special diets, within resources. With two fully equipped kitchens you can attend to your personal pleasure too.Luscious, Refreshing Lunch
  • Amidst the formal instruction and programs you have ample time for hiking and private reflection.
  • One day we will hike or travel to a new sketching destination. Immersing ourselves in the wonder of the outdoors and fresh territory.
  • This all inclusive retreat is $1,750.00 for shared rooms, which includes lodging, food, activities, and instruction.
  • If you want to upgrade to a private room (shared bath), add $600.00. You can keep
    private as you like.
  • 300wsequoiaprvtroomIn addition to your personal items, bring your favorite paint brushes, paint and
    stretched or mounted water media paper, canvas and/or your journal/sketchbook. If you have questions about materials, please call or write.

The days are summer warmed, while cooling evenings are cozy and thoughts turn to introspection.

Add 2 Free Nights!

300wbobbiechipmunkSign up by June 15, 2017 (as space remains, remember there are only 6 slots) and will be treated to 2 nights added for free.

The Alpine Art Women’s Retreat with lodging, meals and workshops is a wonderful value at $300.00 per day.

Yet, sign up now and with the added bonus of two free nights your retreat is only $219.00 per day.jeansmosquiteprwpainting300

Staying two more days makes a perfect stay. These two free days are a great way to practice what you’ve learned, to get out and explore, and to savor the friendships made. Here is how one of our creatives explored our free day at Mosquito Lake, near Ebbets Pass.

Just imagine, a full five days of workshops and then the treat of two more joyful days of exploration.

If you like the idea of lingering until Tuesday (instead of leaving around noon Sunday), then sign up today to reserve your space by calling Elaine at: 541-944-2196.

Marketing for Creatives FREE Workshop TOMORROW at 10AM!

Medford Arts Commission logoMedford Arts Commission: Connecting people with art.

The City of Medford Arts Commission is the sponsor of a free, two hour presentation: Marketing for Creatives and Artrepreneurs on Friday, June 23rd 10AM – NOON in room 129 of the Higher Education Center at 101 S Bartlett Street in downtown Medford.

Learn tools and techniques of media and promotion to draw larger audiences to your events, increase press coverage of your creations, and reach new audiences for your art.

“This is a community event: all ages and skill levels are welcome.

You aren’t just an artist or maker or a performer, you’re a small business, an Artreprenuer, and you deserve the opportunity to present yourself as such. If you want to learn how to get the word out, this is the workshop for you.” says Presenter Josh Gross

About the Presenter

Josh Gross is an author, music editor for The Rogue Valley Messenger, and creative entrepreneur, Josh Gross, and cover tools and tactics for musicians, performance and visual artists, writers, makers, filmmakers, and more.

About the Medford Arts Commission

The Medford Arts Commission (MAC) is comprised of nine volunteer residents of Medford, a City Council liaison and a Parks and Recreation Commission liaison. Currently, the Medford Parks and Recreation Department provides a staff liaison whose responsibility is to facilitate meetings, support programs/projects and manage budgets.

Medford Arts Commission Mission Statement

The mission of the Medford Arts Commission is to enhance the quality of life in our community by supporting public art, programs, awareness and education to enable all of Medford’s citizens to enjoy

and appreciate the arts.

Upcoming Workshops with Silvia Trujillo

Upcoming Workshops with Silvia Trujillo

I’ve been at the drawing board (literally) working on three large commissions for the new Oregon Retina Center in Medford, getting work ready for my solo exhibit at The Berryman Gallery (located in the Craterian Theater), acted as juror for a member show, finished up the teen mentor project, and  recently taught a ‘Clouds & Skies’ workshop. Besides all this I’ve managed to get a bit of plein air work in and attend some open model sessions. Whew, it’s been a busy Spring, but I’m grateful for all of the opportunities! And of course I’m still showing new work at the Art & Soul Gallery in Ashland.

If you’d like to keep up with my latest works and offerings, please visit my blog (link at bottom) and subscribe …

Upcoming workshops:

Oil painting of a landscape with clouds by Silvia trujillo, Ashland, OregonPlein Aire

Saturday and Sunday, July 8-9, 8:30am-12pm
All painting media and skill levels welcome

Location TBA

The tradition of Plein Aire (open air) painting began with the impressionists. In this class you will develop a deeper understanding of how to create a successful landscape painting. You will learn principles of composition, light/shadows, atmospheric perspective, and color temperature while working on location. Working directly from nature will help you gain a new understanding and confidence in your landscape painting.

Painting of a tree in oil by Silvia Trujillo, Ashland, OregonFix and Finish 

Saturday and Sunday, August 19-20,10am-2pm
All painting media and skill levels welcome

“Fix and/or Finish” a painting by figuring out what will benefit those pieces that are not quite working, or start a new project! The instructor will help with composition, color, and techniques to guide viewers’ eyes through your painting. Silvia has a wide range of experience with different styles and media, and will help you in mastering yours.

Hope you can make it to one or both of these!

Registration:

Summer Classes and Workshops at Rogue Gallery & Art Center

UPCOMING SUMMER CAMPS AND CLASSES

FOR YOUTH
Tie Dye Camp 
For ages 7-11, Tuesday-Friday, June 27-30 from 1-4pm
Artists will dive into vibrant colors and learn many fun designs and techniques producing bright and colorful tie dye creations.
Register Here >>

Space, Time and the Universe Painting Camp
For ages 7-11 Tuesday-Friday, July 11-14 from 9am-12pm
Students will use their imaginations to create strange new life forms including animals, plants, humans and aliens using traditional drawing techniques with demonstrations, practice, and still life supports.
Register Here >>

Manga Camp with Craig Honeycutt
For ages 11-14 Tuesday-Friday, July 11-14 from 1-4pm
Young illustrators will bring manga characters to life with helpful tips and tricks in creating anatomy, postures, hands, and hair using their favorite characters and other popular images for inspiration.
Register Here >>

See more upcoming summer camps for youth here>>

FOR ADULTS

Plein Aire Painting with Silvia Trujillo
Saturday and Sunday, July 8-9, 8:30am-12pm
Working directly from nature will help you gain a new understanding and confidence in your landscape painting.
Register Here >>

Go Abstract! With George Shively
Saturday, July 22,10am-2pm and Sunday, July 23, 1pm-3pm 
Create a painting in a different way and focus on pure design, as beautiful texture and dynamic light and shadow, as elegant linear patterns.
Register Here >>

See more adult workshops and classes here>>

An Afternoon with Stefan Baumann

Art Du Jour Gallery Presents "An Afternoon with Stefan Baumann", Friday, June 23rd, 2017!  Enjoy an afternoon lecture/demo by renowned artist Stefan Baumann of The Grand View (PBS/SOPTV) at the Medford Library, from 1:30 – 3:30pm. There will be a reception immediately to follow, with a chance to meet Stefan!  Art Du Jour Gallery  213 E. Main Street Medford, OR 97501  Hours: 10-4, Tues.-Sat. and 3rd Friday 5-8.    For information, call (541) 770-3190.

Art Du Jour Gallery and Central Art Supply Present “An Afternoon with Stefan Baumann”

Friday, June 23rd, 2017

Enjoy an afternoon lecture/demo by renowned artist Stefan Baumann of The Grand View (PBS/SOPTV) at the Medford Library, from 1:30 – 3:30pm. There will be a reception immediately to follow, with a chance to meet Stefan!

For information, call (541) 770-3190.

Poets & Painters Workshop with Mindy Carpenter & Anna Elkins

poets and painters workshop with Mindy Carpenter and Anna Elkins 6/24/17 at South Stage Cellars

My talented friend Anna Elkins and I are hosting an upcoming workshop on Saturday, June 24th! It’s called Poets & Painters and will combine our love of writing, painting, words, color and imagery. We will paint an 8″x10″ very simple, loose still life, write freestyle prose poetry around the piece, paint the words into the painting, around or underneath so only you know they are there or a combination of both. Still life objects and “mise en scene” will be provided. The class will be fun, nurturing, a creative jumping off to both your writing and your art.

ALL SUPPLIES PROVIDED, including light snacks. Wine available for purchase as it will be held in the lovely outdoor patio at South Stage Cellars. Class size limited. No experience necessary. This is an expressive fun workshop with no rules, just showing up for yourself.

 

The Wordbody Blog Turns Ten

Sunrise, Sunset:

Today also happens to be summer solstice—
a great reason to watch the sun set!
Ten years ago today, I started the Wordbody blog before flying off to a tiny island in Micronesia. To celebrate, I compiled an entirely random assortment of things I learned between then and now.  

1) Earplugging fear. Might as well start with the main event. Ten years ago, I flew to Saipan to teach public high school because I was afraid of public speaking. I decided it was time to face that ol’ fear. A wise man once said, “The dogs of doom bark at the door of your destiny. But when you step through the door, you usually find a Chihuahua with a megaphone.” Truth. Today, I teach locally and globally. And I do love it. It is part of my destiny. When those dogs start barking, plug your ears and keep walking.

2) Own compassion. We’ve all heard it before: we can only be as compassionate (or honoring, or respectful, etc.) to others as we are to ourselves. But it’s really, really true. We can’t give what we don’t have. Speaking of giving….

3) Give like a river. I read this somewhere, once upon a time. What you put in from where you stand on a river’s shore will likely be carried downstream. And what you receive may come to you from upriver—from an entirely unexpected, unseen source. As I continually learn this, I’m getting better at releasing the illusion of reciprocity (bonus: this is a great antidote to bitterness).

4) Some reflexes & assumptions can kill you: While driving over the Siskyou Pass in sub-zero winter behind mud-spraying semi trucks, don’t reflexively squirt the cleaner fluid on your windshield. (If you do, you have about two inches of visibility beneath the wiper line to see enough to pull over!) Assumption scenarios with fellow humans can be equally dangerous.

5) Happy day. Years ago, while traveling in Asia, I read Eric Weiner’s The Geography of Bliss. By that point, I had lived and worked on several continents, and all but North America knew to take more than two weeks of vacation a year. In Weiner’s search for what makes people happy in Thailand, he found that the Thai people are less likely to take big, long vacations. Instead, they have learned how to build breaks and rest into their everyday lives. I loved that idea. Since reading that, I’m constantly reminding myself to intersperse my freelance work day with hammock time, cups of tea, reading poetry, or just staring out the window. Happier (and more productive) me.

6) Metaphors for the “Big Lessons.As a writer, I love metaphors. As an artist, I also love visual ones. You know the adage about giving people a clean slate? I remind myself of that figurative clean slate by keeping a literal slate (aka a mini chalkboard) above my door. It’s clean—nothin’ on it. A nice reminder.

7) Low fat! Low carb! Paleo! No! While standing in a wedding buffet line in my early thirties, I picked up a piece of bread. One of the women across from me noticed and pointedly said to her friend how great she felt when she avoided bread. That comment felt like a slap on two levels: it felt shaming, and it showed me how my own “didactic diet” had likely annoyed or even hurt others. Sure, if a person has a serious disease or food intolerance, it’s wise to let people know. Otherwise, food trends come and go. Unless someone asks, it’s probably better to figure out what works for ourselves and eat it—not preach it.

8) We are spirit, mind, and body—in that order. I wrote about that in a 2011 post called “Bikini Season for the Spirit.” Reading it again was a good reminder. 

9) The best investment. As a poet/painter, I’m not exactly a Fortune-500-level investor. But a couple of years ago, I decided to give up financial insecurity for Lent. For 2-3 hours a day after work, I read books, watched instructional videos, and navigated websites to figure out how to build a nestegg. When friends asked me what I was up do, I would tell them, and we’d end up sharing our good and bad financial adventures. Over those 40 days, I realized something. The best investments are relationships. My Roth IRA may fluctuate, and the few stocks I bought certainly will, but investing in people—regardless of reciprocity (see #3)—is always savvy.


10) Mistakes are often creativity in disguise. When I first returned home from the island of Saipan, I missed the 180-degree views of sea and sky. I had watched most sunrises and sunsets. One afternoon back in Oregon, I wanted to paint with some leftover red wine. I made myself a cup of coffee but bumped into something as I went to set it down. I splashed just enough over the rim to leave a coffee ring on my paper. At first, I was annoyed. I wanted to use that sheet of watercolor paper to paint! But then, as I looked at the common “mistake” of the ring, I saw the beauty in it. I dipped the cup in wine, and voilà: a tribute to watching sunrise with one beverage and sunset with another. Here’s to seeing coffee rings and other mistakes with new eyes.
 

July Intuitive Painting Class

Reminder for Intuitive Painting Class

Watchful Eyes

Intuitive Painting With Eve

Are you ready to explore the edges of your creativity; Play with and follow the threads of visual expression; laugh with the joy available when you trust your intuition to guide you?

 

Experience and experiment with a variety of non-threatening painting processes. Artists who want to create with renewed enthusiasm as well as inexperienced artists will be delighted.

 

 

Join me for a playful afternoon on Sunday, July 9th from 12pm to 4pm. Classes are small and comfortable. Price is $50 including materials. Contact me at 541-772-6888 for more information and registration. www.evemargowithrow.com

Tangents – What Are They and Why Care?

Off On A Tangent.

Tangents – what are they and so what?

Tangents - just me thinking

Purpose.  My intention in writing this article is to explore and perhaps shed some light on how the word “tangent(s)” is used in drawing, illustrating, painting and photography.  I would like to share with you how this topic came up in conversation.  Then, I’ll talk about the definition of tangent as it applies to artwork.

To illustrate the issue, I will include some examples of tangents in my own work and suggest some possible remedies. Finally, I will list some references and links for further study.

Summary.  Tangents come into play when designing two dimensional artwork such as drawings and paintings.  They are created when two objects, such as a line or shape, touch but do not overlap.  Because they can be visually awkward or ambiguous, tangents tend to draw the viewers attention.  By learning how to identify tangents, the artist can either avoid them altogether, or use them to advantage.

Tangents As A Topic Of Conversation.

Banquet Discussion. The topic of “tangents” came up over dinner while I was attending the Watercolor Society of Oregon’s Spring Convention. I can’t remember who brought up the topic but the gist of the story was that a fellow artist missed out on the top prize of a juried competition because of a tangent in her painting.

What? My little brain cells clicked into alert mode. But, what if the tangent was supposed to be there? And, what is a tangent?

I Know or I Think I Know.  I thought I knew what a tangent was and so did my table mate. However, she described a tangent that wasn’t anything like what I thought a tangent was. Could there be more than one tangent, perhaps two tangents, at least? We discussed the problem for a while and, failing to resolve the issue, went on to discuss other matters.

Gray Matter Spinning.  Well, you might imagine my little brain cells would not let the matter rest. What was the definition and who was right? Did I know what I was talking about?

Ignorance Is Not Bliss.  In a way, no; I did not have a clear idea of what I was talking about when it came to tangents.  Too many vagaries, from not being able to see the painting, to not knowing the definition of tangent as it applies to art.  Time for researching definitions and looking for examples.

Definition.

In geometry, a tangent is a line that touches a curved surface but does not intersect it.

Lets put this another way: tangents are two things, (lines or shapes) that are touching but not overlapping.  They are pretty much the same in artwork as they are in geometry.

Why Do We Care?  When it comes to looking at realistic images, we seem to like a visual order to things.  And, in the case of tangents, we like to know which shape or line is in front and which one is in back.  We like our spatial arrangement to be established and recognizable.

When the spatial arrangement is not clear, we have visual ambiguity; space collapses and the image looks flat.

The Fix?  Creating space by either shifting the line or shape or “pushing back” one of the elements by using aerial perspective (softening edges, muting tone, or moving color toward blue).  I will elaborate about spatial relationships and fixes below.

Examples of Tangents

Note, the bottom two examples are supposed to be of a simplified shape of a person (head, neck shoulders) and a shape of a tree. Just to clarify; thanks!

 

A Bit More Discussion And Elaboration.

Issue For Realism.  As I understand it, where this “touching but not overlapping” becomes a problem is in composing representational two dimensional art pieces.  That is to say, if I want to paint a realistic picture, tangents are something to be aware of and concerned about.   Because, you see, the tangents imply that the two shapes or lines are on the same plane.

Space!  Put another way, its all about spatial relationships. The issue with two dimensional works of art is that we are trying to depict a three dimensional world on the picture plane.  If the two objects are on the same plane in life, then the tangent may not be an issue.  But, what if they’re not on the same plane; what if one apple is deeper in shape than the other?  If they’re touching, but not overlapping, it creates an ambiguity.  The illusion of three dimensional space collapses and the image looks flat (as mentioned earlier).

Phew!

Creative Intent.  So, what if I like to collapse the illusion of three dimensional space?  Well, then, that’s me and part of creative intent.  And, when I create then collapse space, the result is not particularly realistic; its expressive, stylized or stylized.

A Word Of Caution.  I would suggest being clear in your design that your intention is something other than traditional realism.  Why?  We are still concerned with communicating to our viewer and we want to invite the viewer into our world; include them in on the joke, so to speak.  And, back to tangents, they can confuse your viewer.

Back From My Tangent!  Sometimes writing about issues we face while drawing or painting feels like waving in the air; its hard to articulate and communicate what I mean.  Naturally, this is where examples come in handy!

Example One:  Man With Hat.

It didn’t take me long to find some examples.  I just had to look at my “works in progress” and recent painting.  So, lets take a look at some examples from my “Man with the Hat” Series.

Yes, I have some “tangent” issues.  Consider my first example.  I had an idea to add a tree behind my “Man with the Hat”, insert a few leaves and title it “Last Leaves of Autumn”.  Seriously, it was my intention to have one leaf practically touch the face of my gentleman with a hat.

Oh, just to explain, I composed this design BEFORE the WSO convention, the discussion and research on tangents.

Still, I noticed something was awkward.  When I transferred the design to the painting, I added some space between the leaf and the shape.

Tangent, Example 1

Sidebar:  Watch Adding New Things At The End!

Trouble! Which brings me to my next insight.  I get into trouble when I add things to compositions AFTER being finished.  Its an “upsetting the apple cart” type situation.  When something new is added to a picture, its like adding a new subject at the end of the story; its jarring.  Then, you have to start “fixing” the composition.  It might have been better to start a new drawing altogether.

Multiple Tangents!  And, that’s why this next variation on the “Man With The Hat” has at least three tangents that have to be dealt with.  This is a “work in progress”, so I have room yet to adjust before I complete the painting.

Tangent Example Two:  Man With Hat and Dog.

Here goes example two.  First I decided to extend the tree branches behind the man.  Second, I had an idea to add a dog.  I’d seen a man with a dog at a bus stop and was inspired.

Nice ideas, but the composition was already fairly well developed so now I have tangent problems to fix.

More tangents

Isn’t composing fun?  Its all about problem solving!

References.

I found some interesting sites on the web that have more articles on tangents.  Cartoonists who rely on line work have a particular problem with tangents.

Empty Easel: Avoiding Tangents:  9 Visual Blunders Every Artist Should Watch Out For.

Schweizer Comics:  The Schweizer Guide To Spotting Tangents.

Monkey Lunch:  Tangent Slide Show.

Control Paint.com:  Avoid Visual Tangents, (video).

Conclusion.

Remember back near the beginning of this article and the dinner conversation I talked about?  Well, my friend and I were both correct.  Tangents crop up in pictures in many different ways.  However, once you understand what they are, you can identify them and use them to serve your own pictorial purposes.  Isn’t that wonderful?

I hope you have enjoyed this article on tangents as they apply to two dimensional artworks.  My intention was to shed some light on the subject, provide some useful information and share examples.  If you were like me and were not certain about the usage of tangents, now you know a bit more!

Please enjoy the next wonderful piece of art you come by, and, maybe, see if you can find a tangent or not!

Thanks!

 

 

 

 

 

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