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Calls to Artists – Some with Short Deadlines

Calls to Artists

Well, we might all be grounded from any art activities outside our homes and studios, but that doesn’t mean we can’t answer some calls to artists! Here is a list of active calls, some with deadlines as early as Friday, March 27, others with more time to prepare. We have not culled any artist calls for which Oregon artists might not be eligible, so be sure to do your own due diligence! Good luck to you all!

March 30, 2020 – ARTISTS NETWORK | ACRYLICWORKS 8

Deadline Extended : AcrylicWorks 8–with Special Guest Judge Stephen Quiller! Showcases the best of the best of acrylic painting in a variety of styles and subjects. Win prizes and publication! For the AcrylicWorks 8 competition, we are looking for excellence in acrylic painting in a variety of styles and subjects. The dominant medium must be acrylic, but some minor use of other media is acceptable. Entry Fee. Details: http://bitly.com/2QPH5d3

April 22, 2020 – INTERNATIONAL CALL FOR ONLINE ART COMPETITION, 2020 ALL PLANET EARTH

Contemporary Art Gallery Online is proud to announce their 2nd Annual “ALL Planet Earth Theme” Online Art Competition for 2020. Contemporary Art Gallery Online encourages entries from all 2D and 3D artists regardless of their experience,education in the art field or where they may reside. This is an international competition and everyone is encouraged to participate. Entry Fee. Details: 844-210-7722 OR http://bitly.com/39h8IS2 OR [email protected]

April 30, 2020 – SLOWART PRODUCTIONS | GLOBAL MELTDOWN

The subject of this exhibition is every aspect of the MELTDOWN crisis, be it political, global, personal, environmental, financial, psychological, scientific and/or spiritual. Entry is open to all artists working in any media. Entry Fee. Details: http://bitly.com/39dht0h

March 27, 2020 – CALL FOR ENTRIES FOR ETHOS: SPIRIT OF COMMUNITY

Juried all media exhibit in gallery setting. Entry Fee. Details: 540-760-6928 OR http://fccagallery.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/02/2020-05-prospectus.pdf OR [email protected]

March 29, 2020 – 14TH ANNUAL CALIFORNIA CENTERED: PRINTMAKING

The Merced County Arts Council is now accepting entries for its 14th Annual California Centered: Printmaking Exhibition, to be displayed in the Merced Multicultural Arts Center main gallery from April 21st – June 6th, 2020. This juried group show is open to all printmakers residing in California. Best in Show awards given; winners will receive prize money of $150 and a solo exhibition next year. Juror: Matthew Hopson-Walker” the following: Assistant Professor of Printmaking, CSU Fresno. Entry Fee. Details: http://spark.adobe.com/page/WFHPpgbo7AMcV OR [email protected]

March 31, 2020 – – CALL FOR ARTISTS ARTSFEST ’20 FINE ARTS FESTIVAL

Call for artists! Annmarie Sculpture Garden & Arts Center invites artists working in all media to apply to our festival of the arts. It’s our 27th year and we are ready to showcase an exceptional line up of visual artists.You can expect a well run show with great staff and volunteers. Annmarie is a spectacular backdrop for a festival, with convenient load-in and parking. We hope you will apply! Application Fee. Details: 410-326-4640 OR http://annmariegarden.wufoo.com/forms/artsfest-20-artist-application OR [email protected]

March 31, 2020 – THE CATERPILLAR POETRY PRIZE 2020

The contest is organised by The Caterpillar, a magazine of art for grown-ups.The prize is for a single unpublished poem written by an adult for children (aged 7–11). The poem can be on any subject, and there’s no line limit. Entries must be entirely the work of the entrant and must never have been published, self-published, published online or broadcast. Entries must be in English. Entry Fee. Details: http://bitly.com/2RIprXG

March 31, 2020 – MARRIOTT HOTEL POSTER CONTEST FOR WOMEN IN THE ARTS EXPO

Artwork needed to showcase a one day art expo, in June 13th, at the Marriott Courtyard Hotel cosponsored by East County Art Association. Hotel management will select the art for posters/advertisement in all San Diego. Fist price $300.00 and live interview with the hotel management. Entry fee. Entry Fee. Details: http://eastcountyart.org/poster-art-contest OR [email protected]

March 31, 2020 – DEXTER JONES RESIDENCY

The sculptor’s residency will be at Chesterwood, the former studio of Daniel Chester French, located in Stockbridge, MA. The residency will be from June 1 – June 30, 2020. Sculptors born between 1980 – 2001 may apply. Candidates must be citizens of or residents in the United States with a social security number. No Entry Fee. Details: 212-764-5645 OR http://nationalsculpture.org/programs-awards/dexter-jones OR [email protected]

March 31, 2020 – THE COSMOS PRIZE

Cosmos was an ambitious serial novel orchestrated by the staff of Science Fiction Digest (later Fantasy Magazine) beginning in June 1933. The story of Cosmos spanned 17 chapters written by 16 different authors. Raymond A. Palmer drafted the plot outline and coordinated the work of the writers. The young fanzine editor was able to convince many of the prominent professionals of the day to participate. A No Entry Fee. Details: http://bitly.com/2GeRjgV

April 01, 2020 – 2020 WERGLE FLOMP HUMOR POETRY CONTEST

The contest is organized by Winning Writers. You may submit one humor poem, in English. Your poem should not exceed 250 lines in length. You may submit published or unpublished work. No Entry Fee. Details: http://bitly.com/2l8f0zu

April 02, 2020 – 2020 WE ART WATER FILM FESTIVAL

This year’s theme is Climate Crisis. All short films need to address the topics: Climate Crisis, water and sustainability, linking it to the global problem of water and sanitation and its relation to hygiene, pollution, agriculture, diseases, nutrition, education, etc. There are three categories: Micro-documentary, Micro-fiction and Micro-animation. No Entry Fee. Details: http://bitly.com/37fDNW1

April 05, 2020 – 2020 WATERLOO ARTS JURIED EXHIBITION

Deadline: April 5, 2020. Waterloo Arts invites all artists residing in the US or Canada to submit artwork for the 2020 Waterloo Arts Juried Exhibition. This is a unique opportunity for artists to exhibit work in Cleveland, Ohio. Over $2,500 in cash prizes. . Entry Fee. Details: http://bitly.com/39dht0h OR [email protected]

April 05, 2020 – NATIONAL OIL AND ACRYLIC PAINTERS SOCIETY 2020 SPRING ONLINE

$4500.00 in awards $1000.00 for 1st Place The National Oil & Acrylic Painters’ Society (NOAPS) invites oil and acrylic painters from all across North America and International Artists 18 years old and older to apply to our exhibit honoring the Best in oil and acrylic painting. NOAPS has been showcasing the talents of oil and acrylic painters since 1991. Membership to NOAPS not required Entry Fee. Details: http://www.noaps.org/2020-spring-on-line-prospectus

April 15, 2020 – BLOOM & GROW: BRILLIANT BOTANICALS

Bloom & Grow is a lush, colorful, and wide-ranging celebration of floral and botanical art. Bloom & Grow seeks works that continue these traditions, as well as works that explore the environmental and personal connections we have with flowers & plants. All media welcome; small to large-scale works; indoor and outdoor works; cash awards will be presented. Application Fee. Details: 410-326-4640 OR http://annmariegarden.wufoo.com/forms/bloom-grow-brilliant-botanicals OR [email protected]

April 22, 2020 – LEIGH YAWKEY WOODSON ART MUSEUM BIRDS IN ART

Woodson Art Museum, Wausau, WI, invites two- and three-dimensional artists working in all mediums other than crafts and photography to submit original artworks to the annual juried Birds in Art exhibition, Sept 12–Nov 29, 2020. All artworks must interpret birds and related subject matter. Processing fee: $55 for one entry; $65 for two entries. Entry Fee. Details: 715-845-7010 OR http://www.lywam.org/birds-in-art/2020-prospectus OR [email protected]

April 25, 2020 – CONTEMPORARY REALISM JURIED EXHIBITION OF OIL PAINTINGS

Mills Pond Gallery invites artists to submit works for a juried Contemporary Realism Exhibition July 11 – August 8, 2020. Juror: Max Ginsburg. The subject matter is open and can range from portrait, landscapes, still life, etc. Paintings should be representational, ranging from impressionistic in style to highly rendered paintings. Entry Fee $45/3 images Awards: $2400 Entry Fee. Details: 631-862-6575 OR http://www.millspondgallery.org/calls-for-entry#/contemporary-realism OR [email protected]

April 30, 2020 – NIKON SMALL WORLD COMPETITION 2020

The Nikon Small World Competition is open to anyone with an interest in photography through the microscope. There are two competitions: * Nikon Small World Contest * Nikon Small World In Motion Contest Photomicrographs must be taken using a light microscope. All types of light microscopy and specimens are acceptable. The use of Nikon equipment is not required. No Entry Fee. Details: http://fla.st/2MZyFQn
April 30, 2020 – LARGE MURAL GRANT FOR TOWSON MARYLAND LIBRARY !OPEN CALL!
Large mural grant for Towson Maryland public library. Open to all artists internationally. Open to all concepts and styles, that works with the challenging architectural facade on the main side of the building. The building is considered the gateway to this up and coming arts and entertainment area, and the keystone for future projects. This is a huge opportunity for any passionate muralist! Application Fee. Details: 667-206-2125 OR http://www.towsoncreativepartnership.com/bcpl-towson-library OR [email protected]

May 07, 2020 – $550.00 INNOVATE GRANTS FOR ARTISTS + PHOTOGRAPHERS

Innovate Grant is now accepting submissions for the Spring 2020 Cycle. Innovate Grant awards (2) $550.00 grants each quarter, to one Visual Artist and one Photographer. In addition to receiving a grant award, winners will be featured and recognized on our website and join a growing community of vibrant and talented artists. Entry Fee. Details: http://innovateartistgrants.org

May 15, 2020 – DOROTHEA LANGE PAUL TAYLOR PRIZE

The Lange-Taylor Prize is intended to support artists, working alone or in teams, who are engaged in extended, ongoing fieldwork projects that fully exploit the relationship of words and images in the powerful, persuasive representation of a subject. The prize is not awarded for completed projects or to support the production of a book, exhibit, website, or other outcomes. Application Fee. Details: http://documentarystudies.duke.edu/awards/lange-taylor

May 19, 2020 – $1,000 ARTIST GRANTS | ALL MEDIA ELIGIBLE

The Hopper Prize is offering 5 individual artist grants of $1,000. This is an open call, all media eligible. Grant submissions will be juried by leading curators: Amber Esseiva, Associate Curator, Institute for Contemporary Art VCU, and Leila Groth, Associate Curator for Contemporary Art, Baltimore Museum of Art. In addition to grants, 30 artists will be selected for a shortlist. Entry Fee. Details: http://hopperprize.org

Draw or Sketch? What is the Difference?

Sketch Or Drawing: Just A Cup

To Draw, To Sketch, Drawing, Sketching, A Drawing, A Sketch.

I’ve been thinking about the difference between the act of drawing and sketching.  And, I’ve been considering the finished products: a sketch and a drawing.

Defining the Difference Between Sketch & Draw.

Truthfully, I find it a struggle to come up with an easy way to describe the difference between the two that fits all cases.  Or even most cases.  Even still, a definition that might give me a “litmus” type test for what is a drawing and what is a sketch.

Drawing Or Sketch Broken Seashell with Knotted Napkin

Shades of Gray.

You see, I tend to find myself thinking of exceptions.  That is, I think the terms shades of gray.  This is not a particularly helpful approach, however, when one wants to define something.

Drawing Or Sketch: A Page From My Sketchbook

 

An Analogy.

But, I did think of analogy that may shed some light.  Perhaps sketching is like writing short notes.  Taking the analogy further, perhaps a finished drawing is more like a novel or a biography.  It was the notes that you did during the research process that enabled you to write the novel or biography.  Therefore, the act of drawing is like more in-depth drafts and finished writings of poetry, novels, biographies and so forth.  Whereas, sketches are a type of research for that in-depth study or finished piece of art.

Time.

Another difference one might consider is time needed to produce the work.  Sketches may be thought of as faster types of drawings.  One works in haste to capture the essentials of the subject in a few minutes.  On the other hand,  a drawing might be a slower, more deliberate type of drawing.  It might take hours, days or weeks to complete.

To Draw – Umbrella Term?

To my mind, I see the verb “to draw” as the umbrella term because it means to pull a mark across the surface.  The result then is a drawing.  To sketch, and the resultant sketch, would be  a subset or specific type of drawing.  Again, a faster, less developed type of a drawing.   So, when a person draws to create a detailed, more finished work, then it would not be a sketch; instead a drawing.

Vague and Convoluted.

Do you see how easy it is to get vague and convoluted when considering the differences?   

I think there is certainly a difference between the types of drawings.  But, perhaps, types of drawings can be considered on a sketching/drawing continuum, with quick sketch at one end and finished drawing on the other end.

Clarity of Meaning.

So, why all this struggle to define?  Clarity in communication might be one desired result.  When I say “I draw out my design before I paint it“, I do mean a more deliberate preparatory drawing.  A fair amount of thought and consideration has gone into the composition before I paint it.

Drawing Or Sketch? Concept Drawing Tea For Two With Milk

On the other hand, sometimes I sketch rather than draw before paintings.  That is, I note on the surface the boundaries or critical lines of the subject in a more simple manner.  I leave the painting part of the process to develop the composition and design.

Ask The Artists or Draftsperson.

I do have one more thought.  In some ways, it seems to me more appropriate for the artist to determine if their own work is a sketch or a drawing.  Because the amount and type of work would be relative to the artist’s needs.  That is, can you tell by a finished sketch or drawing the amount of work done beforehand?  Maybe the answer is we think so, but may easily be deceived!

Sketch or Drawing Blind Contour Drawing: Santa Cat

Still Thinking.

Incidentally,  I still haven’t solved my own problem of writing about sketches or drawings.   If I use only the words “sketch” or “draw” based on the work, then the writing becomes too stilted.  That is to say, the same word gets used too often.  So, how to solve this problem?  I am not sure yet.

In the meantime, perhaps I’ll go work on a sketch or drawing.

Articles That Shed Light On The Subject.

Here is a list of four articles about the difference between drawing and sketching.  You might find them helpful.

http://www.differencebetween.net/miscellaneous/the-difference-between-sketch-and-drawing/

http://www.differencebetween.info/difference-between-drawing-and-sketching. Note, this particular link has a nice table that highlights the difference between the words draw and sketch.

https://www.quora.com/What-is-the-difference-between-a-sketch-and-drawing

 

The post Draw or Sketch? What is the Difference? appeared first on Margaret Stermer-Cox.

Dutch diversity

Jasper Beckx’s portrait of Don Miguel de Castro, a Congolese ambassador to the Netherlands, from 1643.Credit…Statens Museum for Kunst

From Black in Rembrandt’s Time, at the Rembrandt Museum in Amsterdam (closed at the moment in the European shutdown.) From the museum’s website: “For years I’ve been looking for portraits of black people like me. Surely there had to be more than the stereotypical images of servants, enslaved people or caricatures? I found the alternative in Rembrandt’s time: a gallery of portraits of black people who are depicted with respect and dignity.” – Stephanie Archangel, Guest Curator

 

 

 

The life you save may be Bill’s

The Song of the Lark, Jules Adolphe Breton, Art Institute of Chicago

Bill Murray tells the story of how he stumbled onto this painting and how it saved his life, more or less, at an especially discouraging moment in his early career. Or at least it showed him how he had nothing to be discouraged about. I love how Breton manages to illuminate the figure with the cool, blue light of the dawn in the west rather than the direct and warm light of the sunrise in the east. It somehow conveys the clemency of the young woman’s experience hearing the bird to inaugurate a day of work. And, who knows, maybe we need to say a few words of gratitude to this painting for Ghostbusters, Lost in Translation, and Rushmore, not to mention a couple of the best moments in Tootsie. 

The Kramer

JERRY: I have to go meet Nina. Want to come up to her loft, check out her paintings?

GEORGE: I don’t get art.

JERRY: There’s nothing to get.

GEORGE: Well, it always has to be explained to me, and then I have to have

someone explain the explanation.

JERRY: She does a lot of abstract stuff. In fact she’s painting Kramer right now.

GEORGE: What for?

JERRY: She sees something in him.

GEORGE: So do I, but I wouldn’t hang it on a wall.

In “The Letter,” the 37th episode of Seinfield, Jerry’s girlfriend, played by Catherine Keener, is painting a portrait of Kramer, which inspires this conversation. Did anyone have to explain visual art before 1850 or so? Did explanations become more important than the creative work itself at some point mid-20th century? Jerry is right: there’s plenty happening in a great painting, but there’s nothing to get in the greatest of them, at least in the sense of an explanation.

Shift to the Left

Shift to the Left

My creative life has taken a much needed turn to the left. For the last 15 years I have had the delight of playing a major role in grand-mothering. That girl is now in high school and although we are still very close, she is busy finding her way exploring her new life.

All of this time I have had my Artwork in Art & Soul Gallery in Ashland Or. and for 7years was one of the owners with 3 other women. It was fun to be a part of it all on that level but kept me busy enough that I struggled with getting and staying in my creative groove and following the threads which is the reason to do it. It kept me in my right brain which is not my home. A little more than a year ago, we sold the gallery. I still show there and it’s a lot less stress.

Now, I am finally focusing again on my teaching and creating. The shift has opened up new directions in my expressions. I’ve always been a texture freak but right now I am using physical instead of just visual. It creates an entirely new puzzle to solve and I’m having a blast following the new threads.

My biggest challenge now is with the technical expertise it takes to get the images and information out there. I’ve always referred to it as my “button impairment” but I think it is mostly being two generations too old and being dominantly left brained. So with focused attention and the grace of friends, I’ll function more comfortably soon.

I’ve recently joined forces with a wonderful Artist friend Pam Haunschild to teach workshops in other locations. Our theme is “Using textures to create Expressive Water-media paintings”. We will be teaching at the Emerald Art Center in Springfield OR (Eugene) May 9th and 10th.
Contact them at EmeraldArtCenter.org
We will be at the Mendocino Art Center in Mendocino, CA June 20th and 21st. Follow this link for full information: http://www.mendocinoartcenter.org/Summer20/Haunschild-Withrow
The information is also on my website and posted on our Facebook pages at, Eve Margo Withrow and Pamela Haunschild .I’ll also be teaching more often here in my home studio so stay tuned.

All about the grind

“I write only when inspiration strikes. Fortunately it strikes every day at 9 a.m. sharp.” 

That quote has been attributed mostly to Faulkner but also to a number of other writers. It summarizes pretty much what it requires to be professional at anything: habitual hard work. I like the quote because that’s exactly the time I usually sit down at the easel, and it’s when I have the most energy and am also the most critical of what I’ve already done, partly because the sun rises and shines through a window behind me, often striking the canvas directly. There’s no escape from that intensity of sunlight: God’s flashlight, as Larry Miller put it in a slightly different context, though the feeling is the same. Despair and shame at everything so manifestly wrong that felt so right at the time. So 9:05 is when inspiration really strikes. It’s when you ignore everything going on inside you–the sudden urge to remodel the basement, the desire to shovel snow, the ease with which you can now contemplate the emotional safety of bank robbery compared with the struggle of painting–and you pick up the brush.  Or the old shirt you use to wipe away a few square inches of still-tacky paint that represent five hours of sub-par effort–and you make merely acceptable whatever looked perfect yesterday and then, around 11 a.m, you actually start spreading paint on canvas in places you haven’t yet defiled. Around 3 p.m. you think, “Damn, I’m good.” Until inspiration strikes again at 9 a.m.

Hope of Stones


Paris, New York, San Francisco…and Southern Oregon! A dream lineup for a poetry book tour, and Im so grateful for the friends in each place who helped make this happen.

Hope of Stones is ready to greet the world, and you can pre-order it via my wonderful publisher, Press 53

Im going to let the dear poets who wrote praise for the book speak for me on this blog. Continued gratitude to them for the beautiful words!

+++

Anna Elkins’ Hope of Stones is a magnificent (I do not use the word lightly) collection—a beautiful, moving, and thought-provoking book of poems. The writing is striking in its control of tone and its precision, unfolding layer after layer of resonance and implication. Three characters: the nun, the architect, the poet who triangulates the relationship. Three different times in history, three different significant endeavors: the architect’s Paris below ground that reflects and supports the Paris above; the visionary nun’s passionate immersion in the inner mansions of God’s Castle; the poet’s engagement in the sensuous spirituality of her research. Give this book to everyone you love. No book of poems I’ve read in a long time more deserves serious, joyful attention and a wide readership. 
—Jim Peterson, author of Speech Minus Applause

This gorgeous book of contemplative poems refuses to accept an easy division between work and prayer. Here, hope is not a thing with feathers. Hope is a paradox, a thing with both heft and light. It is weightless with history, ruin, and body. It is heavy with abyss, nothingness, and caves. Bone and stone point beyond themselves towards the absence of building things up and the presence of emptying things out. Language is both meaningful and errant or even wayward: “earth / is an anagram for heart.” A nun prays “none” against “none.” A whole is reminiscent of a hole. This is a poet’s clearing, housed in eventual collapse. The one who works and the one who prays cross paths, eventually, head to head, skull to skull, in the undertaking of the poet, who excavates a kind of fast, and a kind of pilgrimage, as a way of seeking the first lost garden fruit–the castle cathedral, the ever-never-catacombs–unpicked, undisturbed, and undreamed. 
Gina Franco, author of The Accidental

In Hope of Stones, Anna Elkins creates a multi-various and many-voiced world—set both in the present and in two different pasts, and narrated by three different characters—the Nun, the Architect, and the Poet. This fantastic book reminds me of A. Van Jordan’s M-A-C-N-O-L-I-A, another hybrid collection that brings strong individual poems together into a cohesive narrative. Whereas Jordan’s mode is often cinematic, Elkins works as a portrait painter. Through osmosis, the scholar-poet becomesthe architect and the nun, allowing this intertwined history to work also as an extended metaphor on creativity and desire: “One stair at a time / one corridor after another & a final glimpse / up a shaft to see the pinhole light of sky shining / though a manhole cover….”
Sebastian Matthews, author of Beginner’s Guide to a Head-on Collision

Hope of Stones is an elegant collection. Its formally accomplished poems, distinct voices, and visual design invite us to see the page as a temporal-geographical region. The architect, Charles-Axel Guillaumot, speaks from the lower left margin where he focuses on materiality, catacombs and the undergirding of Paris as he tries to save the city from collapse; the nun, Teresa of Avila, speaks from the upper right margin, where she shares her architectural vision of the spirit. And the poet, who is either in Oregon or traveling, occupies the center of the page where she brings her own dailiness—fires in summer, plums ripening—into conversations with these historic figures. The poet descends literally beneath Paris in her quest for the architect and ascends into the ethereal and sometimes levitational world of the nun. Like Dante, Elkins takes us on a journey. Hope of Stones traverses countries, continents, and historical periods until finally time and space collapse into a kaleidoscope of spirit.
Tami Haaland, author of What Does Not Return

GPMA March Adult Classes

GPMA March Adult Classes

Grants Pass Museum of Art

Adult Classes

Click on any picture to reach our website class signup page.
 Museum members receive a $5 discount on all adult art classes.
To become a member or to renew a membership:

Needlefelting Turtles

with Corbin Brashear
Sat. March 7, 1 – 4:30 pm
Needlefelting is a fun way to create small, soft sculptures out of wool. Corbin will teach you how to create the body shape, then add lots of exciting details. They always come out great.
All materials supplied. No experience needed.
$50 /Members
$55/Non-Members

Gelli Printing- Mixed Media

With Karen O’Brien
Saturday, March 14, 1 – 4 pm
THIS CLASS IS FULL – Another great Karen O’Brien class will be held June 6th. More info coming soon!
This is a fun exploratory class in printmaking using commercial gelatin printing plates. We will experiment with color, plant materials, stencils, masks and texturing materials to make complex papers that can be used as collage for mixed media projects or framed as art. I will also cover how to make your own stamps and stencils to use for printing.
If you own a commercial “Gelli Plate” please bring it to class. I will have small commercial plates and plates to share. Optional to bring some acrylic paint in colors you would like to work with and any of your favorite stencils and texture materials ex: bubble wrap, lace…
All other materials will be provided.
$45/Members
$50/Non-members
All class sign ups are considered final and refunds are not given. The Museum will give a full refund in the case of a class being cancelled.
Unsure if your membership is active? Check in with the Museum staff by calling 541-479-3290, or email [email protected]
Thank you for supporting the arts!

Mendocino Art Center Workshop in June!

Mendocino Art Center Workshop

EXPRESSIVE WATERMEDIA TEXTURES

Full Moon Sky mixed media painting by Eve Margo Withrow

Full Moon Sky by Eve Margo Withrow
Mixed water media on paper

Instructors: Pam Haunschild and Eve Margo Withrow
June 20–21, 2020 (Saturday–Sunday, 9:30am–4:30pm)
All levels

Register Online Now
Or call the Mendocino Art Center Registrar:
707 937-5818, ext. 10 or toll-free 800 653-3328, ext. 10

CLASS DESCRIPTION

In this fun and exciting workshop, we will create textured, complex watermedia (acrylic/watercolor) backgrounds and then work on turning them into harmonious, successfully finished paintings. You have your choice of working in acrylics and/or watercolors along with a gesso mixture (provided).

Texture makes your painting feel more dynamic, creates a sense of depth, and helps viewers emotionally connect with a painting. Texture is sometimes visual (on the surface) and sometimes dimensional (raised above the surface). We will work with both types of texture in this workshop.

Mossed in the Forest, painting by eve margo withrow

Mossed in the Forest
Eve Margo Withrow

Eve specializes in the visual (surface) textures by layering and manipulating watermedia. Interesting patterns and images emerge from her process. She uses tissue paper, plastic wrap, salts, bleach, and other materials to create layers; following threads and surprises and imaginative pathways to create her uniquely powerful images. She then uses windowing and design techniques and sometimes collage to turn textural starts into finished paintings.

Pam specializes in creating dimensional texture through the use of gesso with various texturing materials. Using a gesso underlayer allows a great deal of flexibility in subsequent layers, which can be either watercolor or acrylic. Pam will provide you with a pre-gessoed paper and demonstrate not only the various ways gesso texture can be applied, but how to finish these painting using value contrast and negative painting techniques.

These texturing processes will produce uniquely interesting and creative paintings. Bring a sense of adventure and spontaneity and you will be amazed at what can result. The class is appropriate for anyone – beginners will have no trouble with the methods used and more advanced painters will be able to add complex texturing processes to their repertoire. You will leave with at least twelve painting starts, and one or two completed paintings.

ABOUT THE INSTRUCTORS

PAM HAUNSCHILD is a watermedia artist who devotes her time to capturing the beauty of nature in the American West. She is a retired college professor who now lives in Ashland, Oregon, and paints full time. She has been and artist-in-residence at three national parks and continues to be inspired by her time there. Her work is in galleries in Ashland, Seaside, and Bandon, Oregon, and is held by many individual and corporate collectors, including the National Park Service. She has done many commissions, most recently designing and painting a poster and playbill cover for the Britt Festival in Jacksonville, Oregon, and a large native plant mural at Southern Oregon University.

Pam has taught many watermedia workshops in Oregon and Northern California, including at Sitka Center for Art and Ecology and Coos Art Museum and enjoys helping all students discover new methods of painting while using (or developing) their own unique artistic style.

Read more about Pam
Rogue Valley Messenger, Blurring the Lines with Color: Southern Oregon Artist Pam Haunschild

Watchful eyes, painting by Eve Margo Withrow

Watchful Eyes
Painting by Eve Margo Withrow

EVE MARGO WITHROW is an international award-winning professional artist. She uses mixed watermedia (acrylics and watercolor) and frequently layers and collages her materials. Her paintings are magical impressions that reflect feelings of a particular experience or place. She is always curious to explore what lies outside the box. “I play and adventure with my textures, layers and colors, following threads here and there, thus entering the flow of my creative process.”

Eve has a master’s degree in art education from the University of Wyoming. With over 40 years experience in teaching art classes and workshops, Eve masterfully guides and encourages participants to awaken to their innate creativity by experiencing the joy of self-expression. Eve is a previous owner of Art & Soul gallery in Ashland, Oregon, and is currently showing her work there, along with Rogue Gallery in Medford. She has taught many workshops across the western United States.

TUITION & FEES

Current MAC Members: $216
Non-members: $240 plus a $45 non-member registration fee

There is a registration fee of $45 for each class for non-members. Current Mendocino Art Center members do not pay a registration fee and may take 10% off each class registration. The discount is reflected in the prices above. Not a member yet? You may sign up below.
View our membership benefits

REFUNDS & CANCELLATIONS

Cancellations must be made in writing, either by mail or email. If you notify us at least 21 days prior to the first class meeting, you will receive a refund of tuition less a $45 cancellation fee. No refunds will be made after that date for any reason due to our contractual obligations and material acquisitions. If the Art Center is compelled to cancel a class you will receive a full tuition refund. Memberships are non-refundable as they are considered a donation to the Art Center.

Instructor materials fee: $10. We will be providing gesso mixture, containers, an assortment of texturing materials, one pre-gessoed piece of paper, and an extra squeeze or two of paint so you don’t have to buy a whole tube of something you want to try.

Materials List

Register Online Now
Or call the Mendocino Art Center Registrar:
707 937-5818, ext. 10 or toll-free 800 653-3328, ext. 10