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Fine, Call Me Pop

I’m beginning to realize it’s entirely fair to classify some of my work as Pop, and I’m comfortable with the idea. It doesn’t clarify anything—categorizations and schools and movements just obscure what’s actually going on in a painting—but I’ve begun to warm up to what Pop was doing, historically. It made me uncomfortable in the past, because I didn’t arrive at what I do as a way of emulating Pop Art at all. I’m sympathetic with the non-intellectual aims of that movement, the notion that visual art can be accessible and enjoyable to anyone with eyes and that visual art can, maybe should be, entirely a perceptual matter. I’m happy that Arthur Danto considers Andy Warhol’s Brillo boxes to have been a major philosophical meditation calling into question the nature of art and putting an end to the notion of progress in the history of painting—but I don’t think that sort of philosophical investigation was Warhol’s mission. Whether it was or wasn’t, Danto’s insight made me realize, in my thirties, that I could consider myself a contemporary visual artist, rather than just a latecomer. I don’t think Danto would agree with me that people now have permission to do exactly the sort of thing done in the past, without irony, and create work that is absolutely vital and compelling and fresh. But his insights make this conclusion inescapable.

I conclude from Danto’s thesis that for the past seventy years or so artists have been free to do anything at all, including exactly the sort of work that has been done in the past, and what they produce can be considered entirely relevant and contemporary. Everything is permissible because anything can be art. (This doesn’t mean anything is great or even good art: that’s as rare as it ever was.) Ending the tyranny of art history is the last, great liberation for individual painters—and it was Danto’s genius to recognize all of this. The challenge now is to become oneself, in whatever idiosyncratic way works, even if the outcome looks like a painting rooted in traditions from thousands of years ago. Picasso already understood this between the wars when he was borrowing stylistic inspiration from Ingres and the figures on attic vases for the Vollard Suite.

What I’m beginning to realize, though, is that I’m sympathetic with the way in which Pop Art pushed back against art of the previous decade, along with its advocates, primarily Clement Greenberg. Pop tried to prove that art didn’t require the existential pretensions of abstract expressionism—its self-conscious Zen profundity, its rootedness in the subconscious. (Although I happen to love that.) Pop showed that art didn’t need to have any intellectual significance whatsoever, though Danto can write at length about its philosophical weight. I’m more and more convinced that much of Warhol’s work was done in an innocent spirit, without irony and without cynicism: formally, it’s in a neighborhood close to the Matisse cut-outs. But his two-dimensional renderings of Marilyn Monroe’s face or a Campbell’s soup can were also a sort of taunt, at the time, from a planet orbiting far from Matisse. With Warhol’s rendering of a familiar object or face, reducing it to its flattest possible form, he seems to mock Greenberg’s worship of painting’s “flatness” even while pleasing the masses with something Greenberg must have considered kitsch.

I’ve always been put off by what seems self-consciously hip posturing in Warhol’s productions and yet I wonder if he was often too absorbed in the challenge of what he was doing to have any sort of ironic agenda. I had lunch with AP Gorny eight years ago in Buffalo and he recalled an experience Mary Griffin, a friend of Gorny’s, had with Warhol:

I have a friend, Mary Griffin, who was the Director of The Kitchen NYC for ten years. What helped them survive every year was an annual gala. There were ‘heavy hitters’ on their board. One was Warhol of course. When you hear the stories of what he was like to be around, you realize he was always ‘paying attention’ and thinking. What happened? Of course, the Kitchen was artist-initiated with artists running everything. So it’s a sort of improvised, screwed up mess. Mary describes having worn her highest heels for this most important annual fundraising event. She ran with two slide show carousels missing their locked retainer rings. Speeding across the lobby she trips and, literally, the carousels fly out of her hands, and hundreds of slides are on the floor. Who comes out from the restroom? It’s Warhol. The lobby’s empty. Of course he seems not engaged with this crisis, but he kneels down on the floor, and helps her pick them up. But as he picks the slides up, he’s looking at them. Staring at the images he starts saying: ‘This is interesting’. He’s committing the experience to memory! 

I had the impression from this story that Warhol was not only memorizing the experience, but was simply transfixed by what he saw in the slides, receptively aware of anything and everything as a channel for delight. He couldn’t help himself. There was an important slideshow presentation waiting (could there be such a thing in the days before the Powerpoint deck?) but Andy couldn’t tear himself away from these random slides. I can identify with childlike rapture over the commonplace. That kind of delight is partly why I absorb myself for weeks with an image of taffy.

The first time I was aware someone would call my work Pop was around the time of that conversation with Gorny. Before I was represented by Oxford Gallery, I found an article about Art Brokerage, an entirely web-based platform for selling artwork—primarily from people who want to resell work they’ve purchased in the past. I surfed around at the site and noticed that it was seeking paintings by Thiebaud for a particular buyer. I found an email for the company’s owner, Donna Rose, and wrote, “Are you looking specifically for Thiebaud or will any old painting of candy do?” She was amused and said, no, just Thiebaud, but she asked to see my work. She offered to put them up for sale, and she sold some. This was not something she often did—posting new work directly from a painter rather than reselling work already in someone’s collection—and she didn’t want me to advertise the fact. I’m now represented exclusively by Oxford Gallery and it’s been years since I’ve worked with Donna. I wasn’t entirely alone; she sold original, new work by friends of hers: Ed Ruscha and Russell Chatham, for example. She’d also sold work by Lisa Yuskavage early in her career, when Yuskavage was still unrecognized, and, I think, hanging out in Vegas, where Donna’s company is headquartered. When Donna tagged my candy jars as Pop I was startled, because it hadn’t entered my mind. The series of salt water taffy paintings I’m doing now represent a reprise of the same situation: they could easily be considered Pop, with subject matter that would have been deemed unworthy of representation before Pop.

Yet when Donna tagged my candy jar paintings as Pop at artbrokerage.com, it irked me because I hadn’t arrived at them with Pop Art in mind at all. There were only two Pop artists who had found a place in my heart over the years: Jim Dine and Wayne Thiebaud, especially Dine. Though I have been painting candy for years, it wasn’t as a result of my admiration for Thiebaud’s confections. With her painting of four stacked honey jars, arranged to almost entirely fill a square canvas, Janet Fish gave me the idea of filling an ordinary jar with gum balls and enlarging the image dramatically to create a unified field of color across the surface. After gum balls, I moved on to jelly beans. Chiclets. Breath mints. And so on. The motive was to solve a formal challenge: to find a way to paint a straightforwardly realistic still life while making color the primary consideration and giving it as much real estate on the canvas as possible. But the repetitive format had roots, as well, in the way Rothko could paint the same horizon line, the same format for his subtle color, over and over. Monet with his haystacks. And Warhol with his color variations within the armature of the same arrangement of flat patterns to depict the same face. The fact that I was painting in a traditionally realistic way seemed, for me, to put the work somewhere outside the category of Pop. I’ve warmed up to this designation because I’ve become more conscious of the way Pop was a repudiation of a dominant theoretical aesthetic—it was a conclusive rejection of the last real set of rules, a repudiation of theory itself.

There was a mixture of defiance and ironic acquiescence in the way Pop accepted, as a tease, (while it was also rejecting) Greenberg’s influence over the art world at the time. Flatness still demands tribute from painters everywhere, including the perceptual painters, and their results can be wonderful. It’s always on my mind as well, whether I’m doing it justice or not. But I like Pop’s punk eagerness to do what was forbidden. It defied Greenberg by being kitschy, even as it submitted to him, ironically, by being flat—paradoxically short-circuiting his dominance. Try to get flatter than this, Clement! That kind of defiance-cum-acquiescence runs throughout what I do in a slightly different way, especially in the candy paintings, because I’m embracing a lowly, unserious subject for formal reasons—and also out of love for its humble beauty and appeal and almost erotic physicality—while painting these objects with highly realistic methods that ultimately stretch back centuries. The paint itself becomes more and more my focus, in ways that probably wouldn’t be of interest to anyone but me. Oddly enough that aligns me just a bit, alas, with Greenberg but he would wince, thank God, since I’m haunted more by Manet and Velasquez and Welliver than anyone striving for flatness, when it comes to the feel of the paint as I apply it.

Not that there’s anything wrong with any of that now.

Ashland’s First Friday Art Walk, December 6th, 2019 from 5 to 8 pm

Join us for the First Friday Art Walk festivities! 

Ashland Gallery Association Exhibit Openings & Artist Receptions  First Friday Art Walk, December 6th from 5 to 8 pm

Ashland Gallery Association Exhibit Openings & Artist Receptions

First Friday Art Walk, December 6th from 5 to 8 pm

Stroll the galleries and take in the visual delights in downtown Ashland and the Historic Railroad District.  Venture further to explore out-skirting galleries!  Enjoy this free year-round community event, filled with a diverse array of artwork, live music, artist demonstrations, refreshments and lively conversation! 

December Spotlight Exhibits

Ashland Art Center

Art with a Heart

Ashland Art Center, December’s Spotlight Gallery will be featuring Susanne Petermann, Collage Artist, Marcy Greene, Mixed Media Art and Jo Ann Manzone, Fiber Artist.  Musical guest is Jennifer Davis and Darcy Sternenberg with be featured in the photographers co-op.

Ashland Art Center is the number one spot where the community comes together to meet our local artists, shop in our gallery and studio’s, take classes and enjoy wine and music.  This month we are partnering with CASA and will have a giving tree in the center to help families in need.  Stop by and sponsor a child with a donation or purchase of a gift.

We will also have a Holiday Show in the Classroom, so you can buy local artisan made gifts.  Gift-wrapping is available.

Marcy Greene, mixed media

Marcy Greene, mixed media

Shepherd’s Dream

Rogue Valley and Beyond

Pat Moore has been an avid photographer for 35+ years, and brings his keen eye for the processes of nature to his craft.  His approach reflects two essential aspects of his personal history:  early exposure to urban cultures and architecture, together with two decades as an organic farmer.  This appreciation led him to wilderness areas at home and abroad.  These elements are apparent in the works that Pat shares with the world.

Pat Moore, “Deadfall Lake Reflection,” photograph

Pat Moore, “Deadfall Lake Reflection,” photograph

Studio 151

Featuring Kaho Koinuma – Mandala art

First Friday in December at the studio features a joint show of mixed media figures and wall art by Elizabeth York and works by guest artist, Kaho Koinuma. Kaho is a Mandala artist who draws directly from the heart. Her sacred mandalas are expressions of love filled with prayers for each and every being to awaken to the essence of the heart and for all experiences to be pathways home to love. Many have found inner guidance and healing through meditating and contemplating her mandalas.

Prior to 2006, Kaho had no experience in fine art, but with a sudden inspiration from the universe through a Japanese artist, the mandalas started to appear as answers to her heart’s calling.

Before becoming a mandala artist, Kaho was a competitive figure skater and coach for 30 years. This experience prepared her for the focus and discipline it takes to infuse the dots and shapes that appear in each mandala with universal love.

Her work has been the subject of several articles, including a feature article in Hado magazine in which Kaho was interviewed by Dr. Masaru Emoto, author of the best-selling book “The Hidden Messages in Water.”

Since early 2007, Kaho has been exhibiting her mandalas and offering meditations, workshops and retreats in support of all beings to discover peace, love and true happiness, within the core of his/her own heart.

The studio will be open on First Friday, 12/6 from 5-8.

www.mandalasoftheheart.com
Instagram: @kaho_koinuma

Koinuma, “Bliss,” gel pens on paper

Koinuma, “Bliss,” gel pens on paper

Ashland Custom Frame

Oil Paintings by David William Terry

Artist David William Terry has been a professional artist since 1981. He specializes in oil paintings, particularly portraits. He has won awards for his paintings in a number of national and international juried exhibits.

David’s paintings portray his simple desire to share what he considers beautiful.

He is less concerned with originality or style, than with capturing the essential character of his subjects, whether they are people or waterfalls.

Originally from Texas, David and his partner Francesca came to the Rogue Valley in 2015. They currently live in Jacksonville.

 

David’s paintings will be on display through the end of January

David William Terry, “Gabija,” oil on linen

David William Terry, “Gabija,” oil on linen

 

New AGA Member

Trace West

Trace West Announces New Furniture Series “STATERA”

Grand Opening Reception: Thursday, December 5th, 2019   7:00 -10:00 pm
Design Lab Talk: January 18, 2020 11:00 am -1:00 pm

Andrew Golish, a member of the American Craft Council, is the principle designer and founder of TRACE WEST, a new boutique furniture gallery located in Ashland, Oregon. The showroom will be hosting within the gallery scape a revolving series of contemporary craft guest artisans working in a range of various mediums including textiles, lighting, ceramics and other applied media. The grand opening for TRACE WEST will be held on Thursday, December 5th, 2019.

STATERA SERIES

The opening of the TRACE WEST showroom coincides with the debut of the STATERA series. STATERA, which is Latin for “balance,” is a new contemporary furniture design series featuring fine finish solid walnut custom coffee tables, consoles, benches, and end tables for living spaces and the work environment.

Golish states that the search for “perfect balance” motivates him to create cutting-edge, contemporary designs by integrating traditional hand craft techniques with new technological applications. The STATERA signature series offers clean, sleek lines with intersecting geometric shapes. The sculptural dimension of cascading, rich wood textures are central of these exquisite pieces and elevate them to a high level of quality and design. “Complex simplicity” aptly defines the STATERA series, an elegant balance of functional design and contemporary aesthetic.

DESIGN LAB TALKS

Additionally, TRACE WEST will host and present DESIGN LAB TALKS, an educational guest speaker series featuring contemporary design influencers. Future topics will include the impact of new cutting-edge technology has on design, the convergence of contemporary craft, and the role of contemporary art in the creative marketplace. Join us January 18, 2020 as Golish kicks off the first Design Lab Talk event.

ABOUT TRACE WEST

The TRACE WEST name originated when Golish journeyed from the midwest. Golish states that he “was seeking a more creative, open minded environment and community.” Ashland, Oregon, a cultural hub of the Pacific Northwest, represented the perfect location to bring his creative spirit to fruition. TRACE WEST has been well received by the local community, in no small part due to the company’s focus on locally sourced materials and creating environmentally conscience, sustainable furniture and decor.

Golish has taken a unique approach to the marketing challenge. In what is ever becoming a more and more competitive e-commerce retail environment, Golish has elected to open a brick and mortar gallery which will allow him to interact personally with clients on a daily basis. Simultaneously, TRACE WEST maintains and is growing its own online presence, through its website tracewest.com, as well as industry related associations and community organizations.

Please contact us directly to learn more about TRACE WEST and the debut of STATERA, the perfect balance.

For more information about all of our exhibits and to download the December Gallery Tour map, please visit: www.ashlandgalleries.com  

 

Please see attached “Spotlight Exhibits.”

The Ashland Gallery Association is a collection of over thirty galleries and dozens of artists, offering remarkably diverse and high quality works of art.

Ashland has been designated as one of the “Best Small Arts Towns in America.” And while our most famous arts organization is the award winning Oregon Shakespeare Festival, you really haven’t seen Ashland until you’ve seen the Ashland Galleries.

We’re remarkably user-friendly. Most of our galleries are located within just a few blocks of each other, and every gallery welcomes all comers. We’re proud of the work we produce and offer, and we look forward to showing you what we’re all about.

Thank you for your support of the Visual Arts in our communities!

Josephine County Artists Association Christmas Party December 5th

Josephine County Artists Association Christmas Party

December 5th

1:00 pm to 3:00 pm

Fruitdale Grange 1440 Parkdale Dr, Grants Pass, OR 97527

Josephine County Artists Association Christmas Party December 5th 1:00 pm to 3:00 pm Fruitdale Grange 1440 Parkdale Dr, Grants Pass, OR 97527

Come and have fun and support JCAA Bring a friend… or two or three friends!

 

November 2019 Art Deadlines List- Call for Art!

Calls to Artists:

December 30, 2019 – SPLASH 22

Showcase your talent by entering this exciting competition, brought to you by Artists Network. We have dedicated the 22nd edition of Splash to The Creative Spark! Top award winners will be published in a special edition of Watercolor Artist magazine. Entry Fee. Details: http://bitly.com/2wPDCzU

December 02, 2019 – LACDA “SNAP TO GRID” OPEN CALL, EVERY ENTRY SHOWN!

The Los Angeles Center for Digital Art seeks artists for an un-juried international exhibit featuring digital art and photography December 12, 2019-January 4, 2020. All entries will be printed (8.5“x11” on heavyweight paper) and shown in the gallery arranged in a grid. Entrants submit JPEG files of original work. Entry Fee. Details: http://bitly.com/2CI03Kz

November 30, 2019 – SLOWART PRODUCTIONS | EMERGING ARTISTS 2019

Deadline Extended – This is the 28th annual competition for gallery exhibition and “Artists of the Decade Publication Award.” This exhibition is devoted to the discovery, introduction and promotion of “Emerging Artists.” The exhibition will be held March 5 – 28, 2020 at the Limner Gallery and is open to all artists working in any media. Entry Fee. Details: http://bitly.com/2MOkrkc OR [email protected]

November 22, 2019 – CHAOS: AN INTERNATIONAL CALL FOR WORKS OF ART

The Cincinnati based non-profit arts organization and gallery, Manifest, invites visual artists to submit works about chaos, disorder or displacement. Artists are encouraged to take a broadly creative view in interpreting the theme. Submissions can range from the most traditional realism to the most conceptual, abstract, or experimental. $40 for up to FOUR entries. $5 per each additional entry. Entry Fee. Details: 513-861-3638 OR http://www.manifestgallery.org/chaos OR [email protected]

November 25, 2019 – PHOTOGRAPHIC CALL FOR ENTRY “SMALL WORKS”

Photographers of all levels are invited to submit work reflecting the theme “small works” to A Smith Gallery. Any photographic medium including digital, alternative process, mixed media and 3D are acceptable. Any subject matter is acceptable. The only rule….the maximum dimension of finished piece can be no larger than 12” on the longest side. Kevin Tully, A Smith Gallery co-director, is the juror. Entry Fee. Details: 512-422-4080 OR http://asmithgallery.com/main-gallery-call-for-entry OR [email protected]

November 25, 2019 – POSTCARDS FROM THE EDGE 2020

PFTE is one of our most important fundraisers of the year, and its success will allow us to produce important art activism projects in 2020. By participating, artists support our mission, enabling us to produce AIDS-focused contemporary art programs and provide supplies and assistance to artists living with HIV/AIDS, many of whom are unable to continue producing work without such support. No Entry Fee. Details: http://bitly.com/2pGsANy

November 26, 2019 – CALL FOR ART | 9TH ANNUAL NATURE ONLINE ART COMPETITION

Light Space & Time Online Art Gallery announces an art call for the gallery’s 9th Annual “Nature” Online Juried Art Competition. The “Nature” theme is the artist’s depiction of nature art. Nature subjects include geographical subjects, landscapes, natural objects, wildlife and natural environments. Early entry and art student discounts. Winners receive extensive worldwide promotion. Entry Fee. Details: http://bitly.com/31lkvuC OR [email protected]

November 28, 2019 – ANDREU WORLD CONTEST 2019

The contest is organized by Andreu World company. In order to participate in the contest, each participant must design an item of furniture (seat or table). Please read the product briefing. The following material You must submit: – a model (scale 1:5); – a technical report; – CD or USB with drawings, plans, sketches. No Entry Fee. Details: http://bitly.com/2OlnbDS

November 30, 2019 – FISH SHORT STORY PRIZE

Top ten stories will be published in the FISH ANTHOLOGY 2020. 1st: €3,000 plus 5 day Short Story Workshop at the West Cork Literary Festival. 2nd: A week at Anam Cara Writers’ Retreat and €300. 3rd: €300. 7 Honourable Mentions €200 each. Entry Fee. Details: http://bitly.com/2NIljGW

November 30, 2019 – INTERNATIONAL ART EXHIBITION NORDART 2020

The NordArt is an annual international exhibition of visual arts in Büdelsdorf, Germany, organized by Kunstwerk Carlshütte. This is one of the largest juried exhibition of contemporary art in Europe, representing all facets of visual arts (painting, sculpture, installation, photo, etc.). No Entry Fee. Details: http://bitly.com/2kDaJVs

November 30, 2019 – NORTH CHARLESTON CITY GALLERY APPLICATIONS OPEN 2020 2021

Established and emerging professional visual artists creating two-dimensional or wall-hung three-dimensional works are invited to apply individually or with a group to exhibit at the North Charleston City Gallery. Exhibitions are rotated on a monthly basis and may feature two or more artists concurrently. A Review Panel will evaluate and select exhibits in December 2019 for FY July 2020-June 2021. No Entry Fee. Details: 843-740-5854 OR http://bitly.com/2iTaHaP OR [email protected]

November 30, 2019 – 17TH ANNUAL SMITHSONIAN.COM PHOTO CONTEST

The contest is organized by Smithsonian.com magazine. What does an award-winning photograph look like? It can range from an captivating portrait of a family member to a moon-drenched landscape to movement captured at just the right time. Our 17th Annual Photo Contest is now open for submissions, and we’re looking for the best of the best. No Entry Fee. Details: http://bitly.com/2XvkMdb

December 01, 2019 – INTERNATIONAL CALL FOR ONLINE ART COMPETITION, OPEN/NO THEME

No Theme art competition opens November 7, 2019 and closes December 1, 2019. Contemporary Art Gallery Online encourages entries from all 2D and 3D artists regardless of their experience or education in the art field. A group exhibition will be held December 3 through January 2, 2020. Awards will be given along with competition collateral. Winners will be announced on December 17, 2019. Entry Fee. Details: 844-210-7722 OR http://tinyurl.com/2019-Open-Theme OR [email protected]

December 4, 2019 – WASSAIC PROJECT 2020 SUMMER RESIDENCY OPEN CALL

The Wassaic Project accepts 1 – 6 month proposals for our Summer Residency program and Family Residency program (May through October). For emerging and professional artists, writers and other creatives. Housed in historic, landmark buildings, the residency program offers nine artists each month the opportunity to live and work in the heart of a rural community. Details: http://www.wassaicproject.org/artists/summer-residency OR [email protected]

December 07, 2019 – 8TH ANNUAL INFECTED BY ART IMAGINATIVE REALISM COMPETITION

We offer $3,000 in cash prizes and publication in our upcoming Compilation Art Book – Infected by Art Volume 8. Artworks voted on by our jury will be selected for the book. We are looking for the very best in Imaginative Realism artworks, i.e. science fiction, fantasy, horror, etc. Traditional and Digital painting, Drawing and Sculpture are all acceptable mediums. Open to All Artists. Entry Fee. Details: 440-463-7240 OR http://bit.ly/ib8entry OR [email protected]

December 09, 2019 – NOBROW SHORT STORY COMPETITION

Our theme is ‘The Censor’. You can interpret this in any way you wish – it could represent censoring of the past, present and future; the self; the state; or the effects of censorship on everyday life. As a provocation we hope our theme can provide a rich vein of storytelling inspiration for anyone wishing to take part in the competition. No Entry Fee. Details: http://bitly.com/2lc9I79

December 11, 2019 – BGGALLERY | ANIMAL BEHAVIOR (ONLINE EXHIBIT)

An exhibit of artworks depicting clothing and wearable objects. Examples: hats, shoes, dresses, gloves purses, belts watches, ect. Any medium including sculpture is eligible. 50/50 split. No Entry Fee. Details:

December 12, 2019 – WILDLIFE PHOTOGRAPHER OF THE YEAR 2020

The competition is organised by the Natural History Museum in London. Wildlife Photographer of the Year calls on photographers worldwide to put nature in the frame. Whether you’re young, old, professional or amateur, we’d like to see work that raises awareness of the beauty and fragility of the natural world. Entry Fee. Details: http://bitly.com/2P6H9EH

December 16, 2019 – WELLCOME PHOTOGRAPHY PRIZE 2020

The Wellcome Photography Prize is a competition run by the Wellcome Trust. Whether you are a professional, student or amateur photographer, you’re invited to enter the Wellcome Photography Prize 2020, which celebrates compelling imagery that will encourage conversations about the health challenges of our time. No Entry Fee. Details: http://bitly.com/2pIQF65

December 19, 2019 – DC INDEPENDENT FILM FESTIVAL MARCH 4 TO 8, 2020: DEADLINE

Film and screen arts projects incl.: creative spectrum of animation formats; films that appeal to the child in all of us; horror night: documentary (long and short format); art films, interactive films and web series pilots. Dedicated high school film competition. International Women’s Day, March 8th, 2020. Submit at FILMFREEWAY
Entry Fee. Details: 202-338-1198 OR http://filmfreeway.com/DCIndependentFilmFestival OR [email protected]

December 27, 2019 – CALL FOR ART | 9TH ANNUAL ALL WOMEN ONLINE ART COMPETITION

Light Space & Time Online Art Gallery announces an art call for the gallery’s 9th Annual “All Women” Online Juried Art Competition. The gallery invites entries from women artists only, working in any media, regardless of where they reside. There is No Theme for this art competition. Early entry and art student discounts. Winners receive extensive worldwide publicity and promotion. Entry Fee. Details: http://bitly.com/2q1rrAs OR [email protected]

December 31, 2019 – SHINING A LIGHT INTERNATIONAL PHOTOGRAPHY CONTEST

As 2020 is the centennial anniversary of the ratification of the United States’ 19th amendment and the 55th anniversary of the Voting Rights Act, the Muhammad Ali Center is commemorating this occasion with Women’s Fight for the Right, in hopes that it will honor the women around the world who have fought and continue to fight for the right to vote without bias, discrimination, violence, and fear. No Entry Fee. Details: http://bitly.com/2mbXVWw

December 31, 2019 – LAS VEGAS LITTLE THEATRE ANNUAL NEW WORKS COMPETITION

All plays must be full length (90 minutes or more). No musicals, please. Plays must have no more than eight actors. Ideally looking for subject matter that will appeal to an age range of 18 – 30. First prize production of the play in the Fischer Black Box in May plus $150. Second prize $75. Third prize $50. No Entry Fee. Details: http://www.lvlt.org/newworks

January 06, 2020 – INTERNATIONAL PHOTO CONTEST “YOUTH EYES ON THE SILK ROADS”

The Silk Roads are an expansive region composed of a network of maritime and land routes. Originating in East Asia, South Asia, and Southeast Asia the Silk Roads cross the Central Asian sub-continent, the Russian steppe, the Iranian and Anatolian plateaus, and the Arabian Peninsula. They also stretch through North Africa and Northeast Africa, from Tanzania to Morocco. No Entry Fee. Details: http://bitly.com/2W1c0DU

January 6, 2020 – BUILD YOUR LA COLLECTOR LIST: SUPERFINE! ART FAIR | LA 2020

Level up your career. Learn how to build sales and a collector list from our marketing experts. Curate to sell with our friendly guidelines, and meet your next collectors at Superfine! | LA 2020. Location: The Reef, 1933 S. Broadway, Los Angeles, CA 90007 Fair dates: February 6 – 9, 2020 Booths are selling quickly, so we recommend applying before the deadline! Application Fee. Details: http://superfine.world/before-you-apply

January 08, 2020 – SHE: AN EXPRESSION OF WOMANHOOD CALLS FOR ENTRIES

She: an expression of womanhood focuses on the theme of women in art, as creators, innovators, consumers, and subject matter. In an era of multiplying female voices, world-wide political movements, and fluid gender roles and identities, this exhibit invites artists to dive into the vast and often contentious conversation about the meaning of she. Entry Fee. Details: 410-326-4640 OR http://annmariegarden.wufoo.com/forms/she-an-expression-of-womanhood OR [email protected]

January 13, 2020 – LENS 2020 INTERNATIONAL JURIED EXHIBITION

Photographers are invited to submit work for possible inclusion in the exhibition. All subject matter and photographic processes are welcome. Artists are invited to submit up to five photographic images in JPEG form. Images must have been created within the past five years. JUROR: CATHERINE EDELMAN, Owner and Director, Catherine Edelman Gallery, Chicago Entry Fee. Details: 224-200-1155 OR http://bit.ly/2MF5a3U OR [email protected]

January 14, 2020 – SONY WORLD PHOTOGRAPHY AWARDS 2020

The Sony World Photography Awards has four competitions: • Professional competition All entrants must be over 18. • Open competition The competition is open to anyone. • Youth competition Photographers aged 12-19 are set monthly challenges. • Student competition The competition is open to all students of photography. No Entry Fee. Details: http://bitly.com/2gaxoRd

January 15, 2020 – HEKTOEN INTERNATIONAL WRITING CONTEST

Hektoen International, an online journal of medical humanities, has launched an international essay writing competition. This year’s theme is Blood. No Entry Fee. Details: http://bitly.com/2kHiIks

January 15, 2020 – I LIKE YOUR WORK WINTER ONLINE EXHIBITION

Emerging and mid-career artists are invited to submit their work for consideration to our February 2020 Online Exhibition juried by the artist & curator Kirstin Lamb. I Like Your Work is a platform that works to share information, interviews and create opportunities for artists.All submissions will be considered to be featured on social media and podcast interviews. Entry Fee. Details: 740-680-2283 OR http://www.ilikeyourworkpodcast.com/submitwork OR [email protected]

January 17, 2020 – THE BOOK ILLUSTRATION COMPETITION 2020

Entrants are asked to submit three illustrations for Love Poems, selected and edited by Imtiaz Dharker. Love Poems, selected and edited by Imtiaz Dharker, is a brand-new anthology of love poetry ranging through time and across cultures. For this competition, we are asking you to illustrate three poems by Imtiaz Dharker, Emily Dickinson and John Donne. Entry Fee. Details: http://bitly.com/2maFnWP

February 04, 2020 – ZEISS PHOTOGRAPHY AWARD 2020

Epiphanies, inventions and transformations from the known to the unknown, we want to see something new. Submissions exploring the landscape, humans, science, political or economic changes, or even something more conceptual, are all welcome. No Entry Fee. Details: http://bitly.com/2RfsqsA

April 30, 2020 – NIKON SMALL WORLD COMPETITION 2020

The Nikon Small World Competition is open to anyone with an interest in photography through the microscope. There are two competitions: * Nikon Small World Contest * Nikon Small World In Motion Contest Photomicrographs must be taken using a light microscope. All types of light microscopy and specimens are acceptable. The use of Nikon equipment is not required. No Entry Fee. Details: http://fla.st/2MZyFQn
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Green Friday Deals from Natural Earth Paint!

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Green Friday Deals!

As we get close to the upcoming spending frenzy for our loved ones, It’s the perfect time of year to be conscious of where we put our time and money! Whether it’s donations to great causes, supporting local businesses, hand-made gifts from the heart or earth-friendly gifts made in the USA, there are so many wonderful options! We wish you a beautiful Winter season and offer you these fabulous discounts on our natural art supplies – hand-made in small batches with lots of love. -The Natural Earth Paint Family

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Plan Your List Accordingly This Season & Take Note Of Our Holiday Hours!

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Wishing all of you a happy, healthy and artistic holiday season

 

Filled with friends, family and fun!

 

We look forward to serving you!

 

 

– Your Friends at Central Art

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Applications Open For 14th Edition of Arte Laguna Prize

Entries are open for the 14th edition of Arte Laguna Prize

In addition to the exhibition in Venice at the Arsenale, the contest lands in Moscow and the cash prizes increase

Open Call for the 14th Arte Laguna Prize

Applications are open for the fourteenth edition of Arte Laguna Prize, one of the most influential and longest-running competitions for emerging artists and designers. The Prize continues its mission of promoting creative talents through art residencies, exhibitions, festival participations and collaborations with companies and this year Arte Laguna has established an important new partnership with MMOMA – Moscow Museum of Modern Art, bringing to Moscow in 2021 a selection of over one hundred works.

With fourteen years of history the Prize, organized by the Cultural Association MoCA (Modern Contemporary Art), gives artists the opportunity to join a huge network of collaborations worldwide, exhibit in the breathtaking location of the Arsenale of Venice, win cash prizes of a total amount of 40.000 euro and much more.

New this year is Arte Laguna World (https://artelaguna.world/) the contemporary art platform that connects artists to collectors and art professionals.

The new edition of Arte Laguna Prize renews the section dedicated to design, giving it a new interpretation that is more art-oriented and supported by Assarredo/ FederlegnoArredo: “Giving voice to art and its expressions is fundamental”, states Claudio Feltrin, President of Assarredo, “it allows us to maintain a link with our cultural roots, to which art draws, and helps us to build a bridge to the future, thanks to the work of young artists who propose new languages. Through the collaboration with MoCA (Modern Contemporary Art) in Venice, we want to support artistic projects capable of enhancing culture and design”.

The international jury, led by Igor Zanti, curator of the Prize since its first edition and director of IED Florence, will be composed of: Iwona Blazwick – director of the Whitechapel Gallery in London; Karel Boonzaaijer – designer, architect and professor at the German Universities Fachbereich Gestaltung and FH Aachen; Valentino Catricalà – contemporary art curator and art section director of the Maker Faire – The European Edition; Aldo Cibic – fundamental name of made in Italy design in the world; Erin Dziedzic – Chief Curator at the Kemper Museum of Contemporary Art in Kansas City, Missouri; Zhao Li – professor at the Central Academy of Fine Arts in Beijing and curator of the Chinese Pavilion at the 53rd Venice Biennale; Riccardo Passoni – director of GAM – the Modern Art Gallery in Turin; Vasili Tsereteli – Director of the Moscow Museum of Modern Art.

The jury will select the best applications from the ten disciplines in the competition, which will be on display at the Arsenale Nord in Venice from March 21st to April 13th 2020. Among the exhibited works, the jury will identify four absolute winners who will win the cash prizes of 10,000 euro each.

The Prize obtained a medal from the President of the Italian Republic and is organized with the patronage of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, the Ministry of Cultural Heritage, the Veneto Region, the Municipality of Venice, the Ca’ Foscari University of Venice, the European Institute of Design and FederlegnoArredo.

Artists and designers from all over the world can participate in the competition without any limitation, the applications must be submitted by November 27th 2019.

More information and the terms and conditions are available on www.artelagunaprize.com

Artist in Residence Prizes

A program of art residences in Italy and abroad to allow an artistic experience of growth in contact with a new environment or a new culture, to create new works and to participate in new activities in a multicultural environment. The residencies are assigned to six artists and are: Fabrica in Treviso, Gridchinhall in Moscow, Espronceda in Barcellona, Basu Foundation for the Arts in Kolkata, Farm Cultural Park in Favara (Sicily), Maradiva Cultural Residency in Mauritius.

Business for Art Prizes

Collaborations with companies in order to connect artists with entrepreneurs who see creativity as a form of communication and productive momentum. This year an artist Under25 from the painting section will win a € 2,500 prize and a collaboration with the Venetian company Majer; three artists will win a € 1000 prize each and spend a month at the Outofblue tourist facility in La Palma – Canary Islands, where they will have the task of enhancing the spaces with site-specific interventions.

Artist in Gallery Prizes

Organization of 2 exhibitions in international Art Galleries, including setting up, vernissage and catalogue. The venues are: Galerie Isabelle Lesmeister in Regensburg, Germany and Jonathan Ferrara Gallery in New Orleans, United States.

Partecipation in Festivals and Group exhibitions

Selection of eleven artists for participation in collective events in Slovenia at Art Stays Festival and in Beijing with the events organized by Art Nova 100.

Sustainability and Art Prize dedicated to alluminium

The special prize with the CIAL consortium and Ca’ Foscari that rewards with 3,000 euros the best Reuse, Reduce, Recycle proposal for aluminum packaging recycling.

www.artelagunaprize.com #artelagunaprize #premioartelaguna Press Office

Alessandra Lazzarin

+39 347 2790099 [email protected]

Elena Pardini

+39 348 3399463 [email protected]

Big Gratitude for All the Little Things

Happy Gratitude!

Little things can bring such big delight. Like receiving photos of my new book, Living Large on Little, trotting the globe from New Zealand to Kansas (with a few furry bibliophiles, too!) 

Thank you, thank you to all the readers! Another delight: reading reviews. Here are teasers from a few that have come in so far:

“At the end of this little book I was happier and more hopeful…Finished the book feeling inspired and amazed…As I closed it I felt richer!”

“What a delight! I read this short but powerful collection of anecdotes in a single evening! So much heart and depth tucked in these pages. I will read it more than once, surely. Love!”

“I finished this book feeling hopeful, appreciative, optimistic and grateful. It’s full of insightful personal stories about wealth, the actual money kind, or the “feeling wealthy”, the internal abundance kind that comes from within (which is no small thing! it’s actually THE THING!!!)…”

Of course, I’d also be immensely grateful if you want to add to the reviews! You can find the book here. It brims with gratitude and grace—good for every season, but especially this one. 

Thank you for reading & blessings of delight, 

Anna

Big Gratitude for All the Little Things

Happy Gratitude!

Little things can bring such big delight. Like receiving photos of my new book, Living Large on Little, trotting the globe from New Zealand to Kansas (with a few furry bibliophiles, too!) 

Thank you, thank you to all the readers! Another delight: reading reviews. Here are teasers from a few that have come in so far:

“At the end of this little book I was happier and more hopeful…Finished the book feeling inspired and amazed…As I closed it I felt richer!”

“What a delight! I read this short but powerful collection of anecdotes in a single evening! So much heart and depth tucked in these pages. I will read it more than once, surely. Love!”

“I finished this book feeling hopeful, appreciative, optimistic and grateful. It’s full of insightful personal stories about wealth, the actual money kind, or the “feeling wealthy”, the internal abundance kind that comes from within (which is no small thing! it’s actually THE THING!!!)…”

Of course, I’d also be immensely grateful if you want to add to the reviews! You can find the book here. It brims with gratitude and grace—good for every season, but especially this one. 

Thank you for reading & blessings of delight, 

Anna

Making marks

The Light in The Room, detail, oil on linen.

My most recently finished still life makes me uneasy. If I look at it in a dim light, before going to bed, I’m gratified that I did almost exactly what I set out to do—capture a glowingly illuminated kitchen in the middle of a bright, summer day. But during the daylight hours, if the surface of this painting is well-lit, I want to crawl into a corner and close my eyes. 

I had this same feeling a year ago last month when I went to see my prominently displayed paintings—I could see them through the front windows of the museum while parking my car on the street—at the Wausau Museum of Contemporary Art exhibition in Wisconsin, jurored by Frank Bernarducci. Once I got up close, by virtue of the unsparing gallery lighting, the brushwork made my skin crawl. I felt exposed. The execution didn’t appear to have bothered anyone else, considering the placement of the two paintings. But ever since that opening, I’ve been concentrating on the thickness of the paint—endeavoring to get a Goldilocks feel, not too thick, not too thin—and the way I need to handle it, wet on wet. I’ve been conscious of the desire to user thicker paint for years, but this determination to paint wet into wet began when I returned from Wisconsin last year. (I make exceptions when this isn’t possible, when I see something in the already dried coat that makes my stomach tighten with disappointment, as it did yesterday with the taffy painting I’m doing now. But I make my amendments by putting down uniform areas of wet color and then going back to push detail into them immediately.)

I don’t want what I’m rendering to look hyper-realistic. The paint should look like paint, not the surface of a photograph. But it needs to flow gradually from one spot to the next. No rough edges where edges don’t form clear lines and borders in the source. So now, today, the formerly irksome part of the painting doesn’t make me want to hide when I look at it. It’s all about the nature of the brushwork, the energy and visibility of the mark (or just the way the paint flows from one tone into another) as catalyst for how the eye flows across the image and reads it. I don’t expect my brushwork to be what it is in Van Gogh, or Sargent, or Manet, or Hals, or Thiebaud, or Jenny Saville. But the brushwork now doesn’t get in the way of what pleasure I get from looking at what I’ve done. It isn’t at odds with the image. But when I see areas where the paint is applied skillfully in terms of value and hue, but it just looks awkwardly scumbled, dragged across already-dry paint, and the edges of each spot of color make it look scuffed and chaotic, then I want to slip the painting away into storage. I don’t, because it’s a decent enough painting. Yet his knowledge doesn’t help, which I take as a good thing. Excellence requires striving.

It’s all about whether or not the eye bumps into a spot of paint or glides over it, riding the energy of the paint itself, the life it imparts to the act of looking. I am probably right in reacting this way to the work I’ve done. But maybe not. When it comes to painting, it’s best not to be certain of anything except in those rare cases when I know the painting is really finished and as good as I can make it. (I’m certain about the prefection of most of Vermeer, and quite a bit of Piero, but that’s a pretty safe certainty and though I know I’m looking at a painting when they’re the ones making it, the marks they make aren’t all that visible.) The less refined execution might end up being what people value most in some of these paintings I want to avoid seeing—the way in which the surface is at odds with the image it induces you to see. In fact, I’m constantly trying to do smaller, more improvisational paintings that are all about the visibility of the paint and where the areas of paint look abstract and unrecognizable up close—in other words, simplified and much more painterly work. But this isn’t what I’m after in the sort of paintings I’ve been exhibiting over the past decade—with the exception of one small interior with figures, quickly executed with easy brushwork, I showed at a pop-up in London years ago. 

The humorous element here is that with either kind of brushwork, my current painting looks roughly the same from a few feet away—and the magic of Chardin resides in how, up close, it is just a chaotic mess, while a little farther away, it’s amazing. But it’s a good chaotic mess up close. His paint was thicker, more sensuously applied, more like Thiebaud than Vermeer, so that the paint itself was a pleasure to see. As opposed to what I’m dealing with. But I’m working on it.