Trending Articles

Friends of SOAR

For great posts about the business of art, check out The Artsy Shark HERE!
ArtistsBillofRights.org reviews competitions and appeals seeking creative content, listing those that respect your copyrights and highlighting those that don't. Art Matters! publishes calls to artists, and not all of them may be compliant with ABoR's standards. Visit their site to learn more.
We support the Embedded Metadata Manifesto.  Metadata is information such as copyright notice and contact info you can embed in your images to protect your intellectual property, save time when uploading to social sites and promote your art. Click to visit the site and learn more.

Rogue Gallery April 2017 Exhibits - News

 

Rogue Gallery April 2017 Exhibits and News: April 5 2017 artblast Kathy Morawiec 2    

Above: Detail of  SAWYER TOOK A CHANCE by Kathy Morawiec

Rogue Gallery April 2017 Exhibits – News

Rogue Gallery will be closed Saturday, April 8th for the Pear Blossom Festival.

IN THE MAIN GALLERY

2017 ARTIST TEEN MENTORING PROJECT

April 14– April 28, 2017

Rogue Gallery April 2017 Exhibits and News: 2017 Artist Teen Mentoring Project

Reception: Friday, April 21, 5–8pm

This exhibition is a culmination of Rogue Gallery & Art Center’s annual Artist Teen Mentoring Project that pairs professional artists with Rogue Valley high school students for intensive study and interaction. On display is the creative work of both teens and mentoring artists, which includes painting in acrylic and oil, assemblage, printmaking, pen and ink, charcoal, and sculpture.

 

Through the program, the students learn new techniques to use in their work, how to present their work in an exhibit, and gain insight to the life of a professional artist. Teen artists had the opportunity to work with an established artist to create art in a variety of media. To be accepted into the program, the teens went through an application process that included a portfolio review, a written essay, letters of recommendation, and an interview. The selected students for the program spent ten weeks with their mentors, learning and practicing techniques and preparing their work for display. The time, talent, and dedication are evident in the quality of artwork on display that includes abstract, expressionism, impressionism, and realistic styles.

 

Mentor artists are Jenny Calaba, Sheri Dinardi, David Masters, Nancy Jo Mullen, and Silvia Trujillo. Students are from Cascade, Eagle Point, Logos Charter, South Medford, and St. Mary’s high school, and include Emma Bennion, Maia Bierwirth, Christina Cannon, Alyssa Dunham, Brieann Fitch, Matt Hearon, Alyssa Patterson, and Sophia Von Haden.

Sponsored by:

Rogue Gallery April 2017 Exhibits and News : Sponsored by Rogue Disposal & Recycling

______________________________________

IN THE COMMUNITY GALLERY
Elementary Arts Outreach Student Show

April 7–April 21, 2017Rogue Gallery April 2017 Exhibits and News: Elementary Outreach 2017

Reception: Friday, April 21, 5–8pm

Artwork by local 5th grade students in the Rogue Gallery’s outreach program.

Sponsored by the Lichtenwalner Family

______________________________________

IN THE BERRYMAN GALLERY

In Full Bloom: Kathy Morawiec

March 30 – May 23, 2017

Rogue Gallery April 2017 Exhibits and News - Kathy Morawiec

Klamath Falls artist Kathy Morawiec’s paintings of flowers
showcase her exuberant colors and brushwork.

The Berryman Gallery is located upstairs at the Craterian Theater.
You may visit the gallery before the Craterian’s performances;
see www.craterian.org/calendar for dates.

UPCOMING WORKSHOPS AND CLASSES 

Color Theory for Painters with Craig HoneycuttRogue Gallery April 2017 Exhibits and News: color theory for painters with Craig Honeycutt
This fun and informative workshop is perfect for beginning artists who want to gain an understanding of the natural behavior of color. Students will learn the seven characteristics of color through a series of exciting watercolor paintings.
Saturdays April 15 & 22, 10am-2pm

Register here>>

Announcements from other Organizations

CALL TO ARTISTS for ROGUE VALLEY BIENNIAL 2017 June 1—July 27
As is the tradition of long-standing biennial exhibitions the Rogue Valley Biennial will present the “art of our time.” The Rogue Valley Biennial is a forum for the cultivation, understanding, and appreciation of regional contemporary art.
Awards: Three (3) $200 Jurors’ Choice Awards will be given on June 2.
This year the Biennial will be held at the Grants Pass Museum of Art. For information see their website www.gpmuseum.com

 

Call the Gallery for more info: (541) 772-8118

Check out more fun activities at: www.roguegallery.org

The Rogue Gallery & Art Center is the Rogue Valley’s premier non-profit community art center founded in 1960 to promote and nurture the visual arts in the Rogue Valley. The Art Center showcases emerging and established artists, presents fine crafts by area artisans, and offers a broad range of visual art classes and workshops for all ages.

Rogue Gallery & Art Center is located in downtown Medford at 40 South Bartlett Street. The hours of operation are Tuesday through Friday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Saturday from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. We are open every third Friday until 8:00pm.

June 2016 Announcements from Rogue Gallery

Rogue Gallery and Art Center logo

June 2016 Announcements from Rogue Gallery

3rd Friday Reception This Friday, June 17, 5-8 pm

IN THE MAIN GALLERY
June 2016 Announcements from Rogue Gallery: Blending Poetry and Cloth quilt show

BLENDING POETRY & CLOTH
Studio Art Quilt Associates

June 3 – July 29, 2016

Reception: Friday, June 17, 5–8 pm

This exciting fiber exhibit features thirty-eight juried quilts from the Studio Art Quilt Associates (SAQA) of the Oregon Region. SAQA member artists use color, texture and motion to blend poetic expression into intricate cloth creations. SAQA began in 1989 to represent fiber artists and to further quilting as an art form.

Sponsored by:

June 2016 Announcements from Rogue Gallery : Sierra Fox, woodblock print by Melinda Whipplesmith Plank

Melinda Whipplesmith Plank, Sierra Fox, woodblock print

people's bank of commerce

IN THE COMMUNITY GALLERY

Melinda Whipplesmith Plank:
State of Jefferson Impressions of Glacier

June 4 – June 30, 2016

Reception Date:Friday, June 17, 5–8 pm

Woodblock prints by Northern California artist, Melinda Whipplesmith Plank. This artist captures the natural beauty of the State of Jefferson in woodblocks featuring rich colors and textures together with energetic lines.

More June 2016 Announcements from Rogue Gallery

Make Art this Summer!

June 2016 Announcements from Rogue Gallery : summer art camp for youth

 

 

Printmaking Extravaganza, June 28-July 1

For a list of all the camps with their descriptions
visit
 http://roguegallery.org/art_kids.html

Register here>>

Rogue Studio Life Drawing Sessions start this month!

lifedrawing

 

 

Tuesdays, 6-8:30pm
June 21-July 26

Drop-in rate for one session is $10 or sign up for all six sessions for just $45.

Register here>>

For more adult art classes, visit http://roguegallery.org/adult_classes.html

SAVE THE DATE
June 2016 Announcements from Rogue Gallery : Save the date for Rogue Gallery & Art Center's 2016 Auction

Spend a great night with friends enjoying delicious food and wine while supporting the gallery! Our annual fall benefit auction is our largest and most important fundraiser of the year. Check out photos from last year’s auction HERE

Rogue Gallery & Art Center’s 2016 Auction

Le Moulin Rogue

Saturday, September 24, 2016
RoxyAnn Winery
3285 Hillcrest Road, Medford
5:00 pm

Silent Auction & Cocktail Hour
followed byDinner & Live Auction

Dinner prepared by Jacksonville Inn
Serving RoxyAnn Wine
$65 Per Person

Tickets available HERE

ROGUE GALLERY CALLS TO ARTISTS

Rogue Gallery has extended the submission deadline for our 2017 Community Gallery and Berryman Gallery exhibit series! Priority will be given to those who submitted by June 14, 2016. The new deadline for submissions for both galleries is now July 9, 2016. Click here: http://www.roguegallery.org/calls_to_artists.html  for complete guidelines.

Interested in participating in the members’ exhibit “Celebrating 70 Years of Abstract Expressionism”… Drop-off is June 30, July 1 or 2 during gallery hours. See our calls to artists HERE>> for details.

SUPPORT ROGUE GALLERY WHILE YOU SHOP

Thanks for choosing Rogue Gallery as your NonProfit Organization for your Fred Meyer’s Rewards Card. In June, Fred Meyer sent out email requests to all Community Rewards members to re-link their cards to their favorite nonprofit organization. All you have to do is link your Fred Meyer Rewards Card at www.fredmeyer.com/communityrewards and select Non Profit Organization 88154 (Rogue Gallery & Art Center) as your organization. Then each time you use your Fred Meyer Rewards Card you will be helping us earn a donation from Fred Meyer, at no extra charge to you!

Shop Amazon? Support the Rogue Gallery while you shop on-line at Amazon. Simply shop through smile.amazon.com and  select Rogue Valley Art Association (DBA Rogue Gallery & Art Center) as your organization. Amazon will donate 0.5% of your eligible Amazon purchase to us, at no extra charge to you! Find out more here: smile.amazon.com

Follow Rogue Gallery & Art Center

Facebook Twitter pintrestinstagram Website

Artist Teen Mentoring Project 2016 Exhibit

Rogue Main Gallery: Artist Teen Mentoring Project 2016 Exhibit

Artist Teen Mentoring Project 2016 Exhibit: "Basilica," Mono print by Alyssa Summers

“Basilica,” Mono print by Alyssa Summers

April 1–April 15, 2016, Reception: Friday, April 15, 5-8pm

Sponsored by Rogue Disposal & Recycling, Inc.

Main Gallery: Artist Teen Mentoring Project  

 

The Artist Teen Mentoring Project 2016 Exhibit is a culmination of Rogue Gallery & Art Center’s annual Artist Teen Mentoring Project that pairs professional artists with Rogue Valley high school students for intensive study and interaction. On display is the creative work of both teens and mentoring artists, which includes photography, painting, printmaking, sculpture, and comic art.

 

Through the program, the students learn new techniques to use in their work, how to present their work in an exhibit, and gain insight to the life of a professional artist.

Artist Teen Mentoring Project 2016 Exhibit: "Bloom," Mixed Media by Jenny Calaba

“Bloom,” Mixed Media by Jenny Calaba

Thirteen aspiring teenage artists had the opportunity to work with one of six established artists to create art in a variety of media. Teens went through an application process last fall that included a portfolio review, a written essay, letters of recommendation, and an interview. Teens selected for the program spent over 20 hours with their mentors, learning and practicing techniques and preparing their work for display. Mentor artists include Jenny Calaba, Georganna Happel, Ted Heleard, Mary Wilkins Kelly, David Masters, and Nancy Jo Mullen.

Refreshments by Harry and David will be served at the Artist Teen Mentoring Project 2016 Exhibit artist reception on April 15,  from 5:00 – 8:00 pm.

The Rogue Gallery & Art Center is a non-profit community art center, founded in 1960 to promote and support the arts in the Rogue Valley. The center exhibits a wide range of artistic styles and mediums from local and national artists. Programming includes art educational opportunities for children and adults. Hours of operation are Tuesday through Friday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Saturday from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Call (541)772-8118 for more info or visit www.roguegallery.org.

 

 

Want Your Children to Survive The Future? Send Them to Art Schoo

Want Your Children to Survive The Future?

Send Them to Art School

Can you imagine a world in which most jobs are obsolete?

If not, you are most likely in for a rude awakening in the coming decades of radical shifts in employment. This is particularly true for new parents propelling the next generation of workers into an adulthood that many economists and futurists predict to be the first ever “post-work” society.

Though the idea of a jobless world may seem radical, the prediction is based on the natural trajectory of ‘creative destruction’ — that classic economic principle by which established industries are decimated when made irrelevant by new technologies.

Photo courtesy of Lowe Mill ARTS & Entertainment

When was the last time you picked up the hot new single from your local sheet music store? Many moons ago sheet music was the music industry, with the only available means of hearing pop songs being to have a musician read and perform them. This quickly eroded with the advent of the phonograph, leading to a record industry that dominated the last century and is now itself eroding due to the explosive growth of independent online publishing.

It’s hard to justify using a massive workforce of recording engineers, media manufacturers, distributors, and talent scouts to accomplish a task that a musician can now do by herself in an afternoon with just a laptop. The same goes for the millions of skilled labor and manufacturing jobs that will soon be crumpled by 3D printing technology, the thousands of retailers whose staff and storefronts can readily be supplanted by automated delivery systems, or the dwindling hospitality and transportation industries currently being pecked away by app-based sharing services like Airbnb and Uber.

Never heard of 3D printing, ridesharing, or “post-work” theory? That’s okay; you can just Google them. In fact, thanks to Google we may now add the very concept of knowledge itself to our growing list of no-longer-scarce resources. When anyone can access the world’s greatest library from their cellphone, even the long-revered skill of knowing things loses its marketability.

The Art School Solution

If preparing your kids for a world in which hard-working, knowledgeable people are unemployable frightens you then I have some good news. There is a solution, and it doesn’t involve tired, useless attempts at suppressing technology. Like most good solutions it requires a trait that is distinctly human.

I’m speaking about Creativity.

Send your kids to art school. Heavily invest time and resources into their creative literacy. Do these things and they will stand a chance at finding work and or fulfillment in a future where other human abilities become irrelevant.

Any adult reading this at the time of publication came of age in an era when parents urged children to learn a subject that would funnel straight into a specific career field. Even those parents who encouraged their children’s creative dreams did so with an addendum that we should also consider getting a degree in a practical field that “you can always fall back on if sculpture/philosophy/theater/poetry doesn’t work out”. No doubt this protective instinct was a smart one considering the reality of our youth. An arts education might promise a life of self-discovery, but there has always been reasonably assured financial stability in the high-demand arenas of science, education, skilled trades, governments, etc. Surely that dynamic won’t last much longer as more and more physical and mental human tasks are commandeered by machines and software.

Photo courtesy of Lowe Mill ARTS & Entertainment

I don’t say this to dismiss the importance of any field of study. A world without scientists or doctors or teachers would be just as broken as a world with no artists. Without programmers and engineers the very technologies that make life efficient would quickly disappear. But with the abundance of information and tools freely accessible online to a generation of youngsters equipped with computers from toddlerhood, it’s safe to assume that those who want to maintain current technology have few obstacles in learning how to do so — No degree required. The same goes for any pragmatic skill.

The arts, however, are a polar opposite to pragmatism. Cameras have long exceeded our ability to realistically and efficiently render images, but still our love of painting remains to this day. By now we know that the value of a great painting isn’t in its accuracy at rendering a view but in the artist’s unique capacity to convey a viewpoint. Even those uninterested in “fine” art are driven to make purely aesthetic decisions on practical matters such as clothing, shelter, and transportation. Our willingness to pay extra for beautiful clothes, inviting homes, and sleek cars is motivated not by functionality but by emotionality.

It’s inherently human to want the objects in our lives to communicate feelings and ideas to us and about us. The constant searching for and assignment of meaning dwells in everyone, but the artist is the person who exercises this muscle regularly enough to control it. The person with creative literacy — a basic understanding of the mental, emotional, and sociological tools used for creative thought and communication — is able to find purpose and apply meaning to her world rather than having meaning handed down and purpose assigned to her. The painting student completes his senior thesis exhibit with a head full of many more lessons than just how to paint. He’s now equipped with an ability to see problems, connections, and solutions where others see only a blank surface. I assure you this ability is not limited to the canvas.

Photo Courtesy of Lowe Mill ARTS & Entertainment

I’m not saying anything new here. These qualities of a liberal arts education have been expounded by its proprietors for ages, but with major industries quickly running out of a need for worker bees it’s becoming clearer by the day that our professors were right.

In fact it’s somewhat amazing that this idea was ever in question. Humanity’s highest-paid workers have always been those who as a result of their innovations created opportunity for others to work.

There’s a reason Steve Jobs became a billionaire, and it’s not because he could program computers.

Of course history is also filled with countless stories of equally creative figures lost in the systemic grind of working for the Steve Jobs’s of the world. We’ve all known brilliant people, seemingly not made for our time, whose potential was crushed by dead end jobs after their work was rejected by the film/music/publishing/anything industries. The excuse of being ahead of one’s time can no longer apply though. We live in an age where a person speaking into a webcam can collectively raise hundreds of thousands of dollars just by telling people about a good idea. The gatekeepers are gone and they are not coming back. Our only remaining obstacle can be lack of good ideas.

It’s time for a revolution in education that reflects our new reality and gives students the necessary tools to survive it. Technological advancements will always outpace the offerings of the traditional classroom, making it entirely purposeless to force memorization of knowledge that may become irrelevant before children even graduate. Instead we should hone the skill that best ensures adaptability and resourcefulness during times of constant change.

It’s time for the creative classroom.

But what about STEM?

Does this revolution require us to toss out math or science or history? Does my ideal future classroom wedge would-be physicists into an endless curriculum of figure drawing classes?

Absolutely not!

Let children pursue their own interests and they will find their way to all areas of study as part of the exploratory process. Let the child who is in love with fire trucks continue to obsess over fire trucks. With proper guidance he will soon find himself learning civics, engineering, history, physics, chemistry, sociology, economics, and everything in between — all of his questions fueled by a simple aesthetic attachment to the pretty red fire truck.

No healthy child is born without an innate sense of wonder about their world. However, this childhood compulsion to explore is a bud quickly snipped by adults conditioned to fear the unknown. The tradition of discouraging unusual questions and behavior in children is so pervasive that we have come to view those who survive with their creativity intact as having a “gift”. What is more absurd is our amazement at the correlation of great artists and mental illness, as if the battle for self-expression which artists so tenaciously endure has no causal link to their psychic well-being.

Photo Courtesy of Lowe Mill ARTS & Entertainment

The change that will secure your children’s safe passage through the future comes when we strip creativity of its mysterious, unearthly status. Artists are not magical geniuses. We are simply people who were either privileged enough or stubborn enough to hold onto something that every living person is “gifted” at birth. Assume that your children have limitless creative potential and begin to nurture it. Assume that your children’s ingenuity is the one true safety net available in times of rapid change. Send your kids to art school and they will have exactly what they need to become anything they might need to be.

I speak from experience.


Photo by Eric Schultz, Huntsville Times

Dustin Timbrook is an artist in Huntsville, Alabama who works in many mediums and creative fields. He currently serves as Media Director of America’s largest independent arts facility, Lowe Mill ARTS & Entertainment, and is Creative Director for the marketing company Red Brick Strategies.

He is co-founder of Happenin Records, an Alabama record label that helps finance, produce, and promote dozens of independent musical acts.

He is also founder of the Huntsville Artist Engineer Network, and co-founder of STE(A)M Fest, an annual event that promotes creativity in the STEM subjects to thousands of Huntsville students.

He has a Masters in Education from University of Montevallo, but had to fall back on his painting degree when public education didn’t work out.


Originally published at www.rocketcitymom.com on February 10, 2015.

Premiere of Student Films about Drugs and Bullying in McCloud Feb 19

“Drugs” and “Bullying”

Premiere Showing in McCloud of 2 Video Shorts by Local Students, February 19th

 

Complex personal subject matters were the learning theme for Mccloud High School students during their digital workshops with Christina Schmidlin while creating two short videos on “Drugs” and “Bullying” .  Ms Schmidlin is a videographer and film maker in her professional life and was contracted by the Mccloud Resource Center and the Mccloud ARTS Society to work creatively with our high school students.. For the last two years McCloud students had the privilege to work with her in developing the storyline for the two short videos.  Utilizing their input, talent, and their personal experiences these two short videos represent the efforts for over the two years.   Students were enthusiastic participants in all aspects of the project including learning to act with drama coach Bennett Gale. The acting recreates some of their personal experiences regarding these vital social issues which youth everywhere are addressing on almost a daily basis.

 

In Bullying, “The story focus for this particular project was on the “making of” and “unraveling of” a bully. It is mostly told from the bully’s perspective. Most students in the class experienced bullying both as perpetrators and victims, so we chose this particular, and in my opinion, very effective perspective for the story narrative. There was also one student in the class who experienced a bullying related suicide and ensuing drug use, which lent a powerful story element to the narrative.” said Christina Schmidlin.  She further explained that “all participating students linked the experience of bullying or being bullied to the risk of drug use and teenage suicide. Consequently, all the students wanted to explore this topic in depth in the story sessions.”

 

The Premiere Video Showing of McCloud High Student’s   2 Video Shorts will be Friday, February 19, 2016,  7 – 8:30 pm upstairs in the Mercantile Building. Admission is free in support of the students.  The event is being organized by the McCloud ARTS Society.  Jeff Wescott and some of the high school band members will provide musical entertainment to showcase their talents.  The community is invited to come to the premiere showing and support the students in the first effort to develop a meaningful video short that may later to useful to other students that may or may not be experiencing similar circumstances.

April Exhibits at Rogue Gallery!

Rogue Gallery and Art center logo Medford OregonMain Gallery exhibit: Artist Teen Mentoring Project  

Community and Members’ Gallery: Best of the Best High School Art

April 17 – April 30, 2015, Reception: Friday, April 17, 4-8pm

Main Gallery: Artist Teen Mentoring Project  

This exhibition is a culmination of the Rogue Gallery & Art Center’s annual program the Artist Teen Mentoring Project. On display is the creative work of both teens and mentoring artists. This program pairs professional Rogue Valley artists with local high school students for intensive study and interaction. Through the program, the students learn new techniques to use in their work, how to present their work in an exhibit, and gain insight to the life of a professional artist. On display are a variety of materials and styles including painting, printmaking, photography, comic art, and sculpture.

Seven aspiring teenaged artists had the opportunity to work with one of five established artists to create art in a variety of media. Teens went through an application process last fall that included a portfolio review, a written essay, letters of recommendation, and an interview. Selected teens selected for the program spent over 20 hours with their mentors, learning and practicing techniques and preparing their work for display.

Community and Members’ Gallery: Best of the Best High School Art

On display is over 100 works of art by local high school students. Artwork from 14 local high schools was submitted for in-district screening, and then presented for jurying by professional artists. The artwork includes paintings, drawings, collage, illustrations, sculpture, photography, prints, and ceramics. Best of the Best was started in 1985 by members of the Southern Oregon Research and Development Committee to showcase and encourage artistically gifted high school students throughout the Rogue Valley. This idea has grown and now far exceeds original expectations, as it has become an annual enriching and exciting event each spring for Rogue Valley high school students, parents, and teachers.

Refreshments will be served at the reception on April 17, from 4:00 – 8:00 pm. 

The Rogue Gallery & Art Center is a non-profit community art center, founded in 1960 to promote and support the arts in the Rogue Valley. The center exhibits a wide range of artistic styles and mediums from local and national artists. Programming includes art educational opportunities for children and adults. Hours of operation are Tuesday through Friday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Saturday from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Call (541)772-8118 for more info or visit www.roguegallery.org.

News from Cheryl D Garcia's Great Metal Works

The Great Metal Works
Metal Art by Cheryl D. Garcia   
April 1st, 2015

“Brittilaria” at Britt Festival Grounds

Cheryl has been working on one of the most ambitious and inspired sculptures of her career.  Ten years ago during the first Spring after she moved to Jacksonville from Ashland she was hiking in the hills around town when she first happened across a small clan of the lily family, the Frittilaria.  With a half dozen or so members in Southern Oregon, they each share a brilliant red bell like flower.  None of them stand more than a foot high and one of them only occurs in the Jacksonville Woodlands around the Britt Festival.

When Cheryl returned to her studio instead of picking up her grinder and getting back to the artwork she was working on she pulled out her sketchbook and sketched the blossomed subject with colored pencils.  Years went by and lots of poppies came and went.  Each year when Spring came around and the Frittilaria would bloom, Cheryl would revisit the sketch in her notebook.   It was truly an idea waiting for it’s time and place to come.

While working on one of her larger California Poppy installations, Cheryl’s clients Sean & Sonya asked her what other flowers she had created.  She mentioned the sunflower, thistle, columbine and corn stalk at Walker Elementary School in Ashland, the Bolander’s Lily at Red Lily Vineyards, the Perrier Jouet flower at C St Bistro in Jacksonville and the one flower she had always wanted to create. That frittilaria from her sketchbook.   Without hestitation Sean said “We want the first one if you ever create it!”, and the idea was starting to become reality.

When Sean and Sonya moved to Texas, it seemed like that the idea was destined to remain a dream.  Until one evening last year while Cheryl was attending a concert up at the Britt Festival Grounds and saw the perfect place.  A place where art, music and natural beauty could all meet in combined harmony!

Sean and Sonya loved the idea of giving back something so beautiful to their second home of Jacksonville and asked Cheryl to approach the Britt.  Thanks to the leadership and vision of Donna Briggs and the entire Board of the Britt Festival this dream is about to come true!

You are invited to the dedication of the latest public artwork by Cheryl D. Garcia on Friday, April 10th 2015 from 5:30 – 6:30 PM on the Britt Festival Grounds in Jacksonville, Oregon. Jeff Kloetzel will welcome everyone with music, celebratory miniature cupcakes and cava will be served.  We hope to see you there!

 


“Eternal Spring” Spiral Staircase Sculptural Profile 

Three years ago a couple stopped by the Jacksonville studio of metal artist Cheryl D. Garcia and requested she design a spiral staircase for their home. Cheryl recommended that they purchase and install a kit but they insisted on her being the artist and persisted in their request.  After a long patient wait the sculptural piece “Eternal Spring” was installed in their airy and light filled home in February.

St. Mary’s School
Art Mentorship Program 

As a girl Cheryl always dreamed of assembling the pieces of metal she discovered in the desert canyonlands.  Thanks to the support and encouragement of her family and teachers she was able to develop her inner vision into the metal artist she is today.  Cheryl cares deeply about giving back that support and encouragement through mentorship programs that inspire the next generation of artists.
Of course Cheryl said “yes” when the faculty at St. Mary’s School in Medford asked her to demonstrate her cold steel methods to their art students as part of an “Artist on Campus” Spring student workshop series.  St. Mary’s students will have the opportunity to see Cheryl work and ask her questions about her art.  Faculty, parents and the entire student body will also have the opportunity to interact with Cheryl’s selected sculptural works exhibited in the campus community garden through May.

A Farewell to Louis Colisimo 
The well loved and respected Rogue Valley Glass Artist Louis Colisimo passed away in December.  Many of you will know Louis from his Red Oak Glass in Central Point or will have seen his exquisite work at Kaleidoscope Pizza in Medford. Louis’ students knew him through his infinite enthusiasm, patience and constant encouragement.  Cheryl and Louis were longtime friends and collaborated on the artistic floor lamp below.  The world has lost a passionate and caring artist, he will be missed by our community.

Interview Insight

 Oregon Lifestyles Television’s Terri-Lynn Kalhagen visited the Great Metal Works to interview Cheryl D. Garcia and document her creative process.  Here is the segment they filmed that will be appearing on stations throughout the Pacific Northwest.
 
 
 Cheryl’s MessageThere was a time when I felt compelled to finish an art project the same day.  Today my projects take weeks and sometimes months to complete.  The growth and development I have felt on every project leads me to reflect to the returning Spring.  Since my most recent show at Red Lily in May 2014 I have been creating two amazingly huge projects which have taken all of my time and attention.

“Spring Eternal” was my first ever sculptural spiral staircase.  At a story and a half the assemblage consisted of 46 separately hand made precision fitted pieces.  An enormous effort that combined serious fabrication and artistic vision, the functional artwork astounded even me when I finally saw it fully assembled for the first time.

My second Winter project was “Brittilaria”. This sculptural installation is one of my largest yet and closest to my heart.  The project again challenged me to create, build and explore new tools, methods and techniques.  The completed multi-element work will be installed at the renown music venue at the Britt Festival Grounds here in Jacksonville.  I hope all of you will attend this very special public dedication ceremony on April 10th as we celebrate the natural, cultural and historic treasures of Jacksonville.
  
Of Interest

Britt Festival

St. Mary’s School

Jeff Kloetzel

Kaleidoscope Pizzeria

SO Artists Resource

South Stage Cellars


Audubon Society

 

 
 
 
 

 

 

2015 Annual Art Student Exhibit Opens April 9

The 2015 Clatsop Community College Art Student Exhibit will be on display at the CCC Art Center Gallery, 1799 Lexington Avenue, Astoria, from Thursday, April 9 through Thursday, April 30. An opening reception will be held on Thursday, April 9 beginning at 6:00 p.m.

During the reception, cash prizes and award winners will be announced. This year’s juror, Eleanor H. Erskine, will be present at the reception to give a juror’s talk. Clatsop Community College thanks the Astoria Coffeehouse and Bistro for its generous support for this year’s student awards.

The CCC Art Center Gallery is ADA accessible, free and open to the public. Gallery hours are Monday-Friday, 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., and weekends by appointment.

The Annual Art Student Exhibit is a juried event that showcases the talents and creativity of the college’s art students. Art students are invited to submit up to three pieces of work created in the art classes in which they have been enrolled during the past year. The show will feature a range of disciplines taught at Clatsop Community College, including graphic arts, basic design, drawing, painting, ceramics, photography and printmaking.

Juror Eleanor H. Erskine attended the Chicago Art Institute, received a BFA in Painting/Printmaking from the Kansas City Art Institute in 1981, and earned her MFA in Printmaking, with a special focus in Sculpture from the Cranbrook Academy of Art in 1988. She has taught at the Maine College of Art; the Kansas City Art Institute; The Chautauqua Institution; Penland School of Crafts; and Portland State University. Her works have been exhibited at the Mark Woolley Gallery; Museum of Contemporary Art in Washington D.C; Nelson Atkins Museum; Portland Institute of Contemporary Art (PICA); and the Marylhurst Art Gym. Erskine is recognized locally, nationally and internationally. Her work is held in major private and public collections including the California State University Museum; Portland Art Museum; Spencer Museum of Art; Hallmark Corporation; New York Public Library; Downey Museum of Art; University of Iowa Museum of Art; and in various collections in Canada, Africa, Japan and South Korea.

 

Please direct inquiries to:  Kristin Shauck, 503-338-2472; [email protected].

 

LIFE Art - LIVE. INSPIRE. FREEDOM OF EXPRESSION. at South Stage Cellars

"Mulholland Drive," by Brandy Gibbins

“Mulholland Drive,” Brandy Gibbins

Reception Saturday, February 7 from 6–7:30pm

The art exhibit on display at South Stage Cellars right now is a truly special one. Every year the Cellar’s “Rising Stars” music competition benefits a local nonprofit, and this year they chose LIFE Art, a Medford-based program helping Rogue Valley youth overcome a wide range of difficulties by learning to paint with guidance from artist mentors. I had the opportunity to meet Phil Ortega, founder of LIFE Art, when he and several of the program’s mentors and students were hanging their show. I was deeply moved by the story of LIFE Art and impressed not only by the caring and generous heart of this compassionate man, but the overall quality, ingenuity and expression in the youths’ paintings.

In the spring of 2010, Mr. Ortega was working late at night in the shop where he fixes old cars as a hobby when he heard a sound behind the building. Stepping outside, he discovered a group of teens tagging abandoned rail cars. He asked what they were doing, and they told him they were painting the tag name of a youth who committed suicide in 2009.  Among the taggers were the late youth’s brother and cousin.  Recognizing their genuine need to create a memorial for their deceased relative and friend, as well as some real artistic talent, Mr. Ortega bought the boys blank canvases, brushes and paint that very day to help them channel the memory of their loved one onto something permanent. He then began thinking about how he could develop a program to support kids like these.

Painting by Nicole Paradis

Painting by Nicole Paradis

The LIFE Art program uses visual and creative arts as a means for youth to express their feelings and communicate with others about their experiences. Art projects address the multiplicity of the issues young people are involved in. Factors including difficult family relationships and school experiences, substance use, community risk factors (i.e., gangs, criminality) and cultural pressures are all addressed through guided discussions with caring adults and LIFE Art Mentors.

South Stage Cellars Rising Stars has chosen to donate all the profits from the 2015 music competition to this amazing local nonprofit. We hope you plan to come to Jacksonville on February 7, 2015 to enjoy our Chinese New Year parade and celebration. There will be additional arts and cultural opportunities, including an authentic Origami class at Art Presence Art Center, next to the historic Courthouse. But whatever you do, come to South Stage Cellars at 125 S. Third Street from 6–7:30pm for a reception for the LIFE Art youth artists! Join the teens, mentors and director of LIFE Art, enjoy their work along with live music and complimentary appetizers, and consider helping to empower one of their young artists with a purchase—If there are any left to buy! Paintings were selling as they were placed on the walls. Ortega looks forward to the event, and to highlighting the art and mentorships LIFE Art encourages. “We might even have some poetry or a short story reading by a teen if we can,” he added. The LIFE Art exhibition will continue through the end of March at South Stage Cellars Tasting Room.

YMCA Mural Work, Jose and EMA

YMCA Mural Work, Jose and EMA

SSC Rising Stars, now in its 4th year, was the brainchild of Porscha Schiller, Tasting Room and Marketing Events Manager of South Stage Cellars. The competition has grown every year until it outgrew the tasting room altogether. It will now be held across the street, upstairs in historic Redmen’s Hall. Schiller was quoted in the Jacksonville Review as saying, “Everyone involved in the music competition and LIFE Art is extremely proud of the work these kids are doing and so very grateful to the community for the amazing support this life-changing nonprofit group is getting!”

Tickets for the 4th-annual South Stage Cellars Rising Stars Competition are on sale now at South Stage Cellars in Jacksonville, the Music Coop in Ashland and online at www.southstagecellars.com. For more information, call 541-899-9120.

Mello Saldivar Anaya Working on Mural

Mello Saldivar Anaya Working on Mural

More About LIFE Art

Mr. Ortega wrote us, saying, “We started with the support of the Garrett Lee Smith Suicide Prevention Grant and Jackson County Suicide Prevention Coordinator Michelle Morales. Their guidance was instrumental in creating something unique. We started with a few kids and have grown to serving over 200 local kids every month. We help kids cope with a multitude of stresses. Suicide prevention was our starting focus, but we have grown to include any kid with the idea that group art projects create a certain climate so that the kids are not identified as fragile, but as artists.”

The Garrett Lee Smith (GLS) Memorial grant was awarded to several counties in the state of Oregon from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) in 2010. The grants became available through the Garrett Lee Smith Memorial Act of 2004, the first federal suicide prevention program targeted towards youth. The Act is named after the son of former Oregon senator Gordon H. Smith, who took his own life in 2003.

 

 

Front (l-r): LIFEArt student Adrian Chavez, student Karla Lopez, mentor Aaron Dykstra, student Mello Saldivar-Anaya who painted the murals in the background of our February 2015 cover photo. Back (l-r): LIFEArt founder Phil Ortega, mentor Caroline Wasick, mentor Nicole Paradis, student Luis Rodriguez. Photo by Ezra Marcos.

Front (l-r): LIFE Art student Adrian Chavez, student Karla Lopez, mentor Aaron Dykstra, student Mello Saldivar-Anaya. Back (l-r): LIFE Art founder Phil Ortega, mentor Caroline Wasick, mentor Nicole Paradis, student Luis Rodriguez. Photo by Ezra Marcos.

 

 

 

“I manage LIFE Art so that kids can learn coping skills through art and guided mentorships. I believe that art tells a story, and when kids can demonstrate their voice through art, it relives a sense of hurt for some, joy for most…but when people admire the art they have created, it Validates Their Feelings! That is the LIFE Art mission in a nutshell.” ~Phil Ortega

 

 

 

LIFE Art Today

Thanks to a grant from The Providence Health Plan Community Benefit Fund of the Oregon Community Foundation, LIFE Art in partnership with On Track opened the LIFE Track Youth Center & Art Gallery at 106 S. Grape Street in Medford. This project gives youth a space to express themselves creatively, as well as having a place where they can drop in and find the support of caring mentors. In addition, the center offers FREE art classes every Saturday for youth 10-22 years old. “It’s a cool project, but it is coming to an end this year. LIFE Art is looking for a new place to call home starting this summer. My house served as a place for the kids for a few years, but we are way too big for that anymore!” says Ortega, “Hopefully we will find a place where we can partner with other artists for various art projects and a sharing of experiences and skills can take place. Maybe one of your readers has a space in mind we could lease.”

LIFE Art student Adrian Chavez, mentor Aaron Dykstra and student Luis Rodriguez. Photo by Ezra Marcos.

LIFE Art student Adrian Chavez, mentor Aaron Dykstra and student Luis Rodriguez. Photo by Ezra Marcos.

Ortega tells us that new LIFE Art mural projects are underway, in partnership with the Gang Task Force, which is comprised of many Jackson County agencies working to help connect teens to programs that encourage better lifestyle choices. The murals, painted on large scale canvases, will be displayed around our community starting with Central Art Supply in Medford. They will help us display the art on the exterior of their building as a way to encourage teens to create more ART ON Canvas. The art will also be used as the backstage art to SSC Rising Star Events.

“We believe that when artists (teens) see their art displayed in our community they will feel validated and accepted. More artists will seek programs like LIFE Art to join. It is up to the adults in our community to create a caring environment for our youth to connect with and it starts with setting a positive example. We believe the art will stimulate conversation and empower our youth,” Mr. Ortega says.
The funding for these murals are through the YDC and the KEY ( Keep Encouraging Youth) Project in partnership with LIFE Art, Spartan Boxing, Juvenile Justice and Kids Unlimited.
"Bubbles," by Alondra Flores

“Bubbles,” by Alondra Flores

Funding ends October 15, 2015 for LIFE Art’s other programs:

G.E.M.S.

G.E.M.S. (Girls Expressing Many Strengths) is an after school program geared toward helping young teens learn to cope with life stressors through artistic expression and group support. The program is in partnership with Eagle Point School District and Medford School District.

One–2–One Mentorship Program

One-2-One Mentorship is designed to connect with students who need attention beyond group activities. Many of our participants are dealing with real life issues and struggles around poverty, relationships, family, substance abuse, and education. Connecting with certain students on a regular basis establishes a dependable connection with a caring adult role model.

LIFE Art New Logo

LIFE Art New Logo

Art With A Purpose

The Art with a Purpose sessions are about creating art that is focused on social issues that students face daily. Suicide prevention, self-image, anti-bullying campaigns, gang prevention and promoting civility are all topics that can be better addressed by our model: “Marketing for Kids Created by Kids.”

 

 

 

 

 

Now five years old, the LIFE Art program is in partnership with United Way, Jackson County Health and Human Services, Una Voz, Eastburn Photography LLC, Lenart Art Education Foundation and Oregon Community Foundation (Latino Partnership Project). Mr. Ortega and the LIFE Art staff and mentors thank Jackson County School District 9 Leadership and Staff for making it possible to offer their services within our schools and for the partnerships that support our students.

Come to the reception ~ meet Phil Ortega and the LIFE Art youth artists and mentors in person to learn more! You can help…come to the Rising Stars music competition nights, from which 100% of the profits will benefit LIFE Art!

Classes and Workshop at LightGarden Glass Art

 Flowers of Hope Fusing Workshop

Even if you’ve never done any glass fusing before you can make an 8″ x 8″ fused panel to donate to Flowers of Hope.
$10 buys you a base piece of glass, access to all frits, stringers and noodles, hanging hardware and firing. Come in and try your hand at fusing and find out how easy and fun it can be. You’ll also be doing a wonderful thing for a woman going through a tough time.
OR
TRY FUSING!  Workshop
The same class only you get to keep it!  Learn about using frits, stringers and noodles in this easy workshop!    $15
January  17                 10-12
February 7                   10-12

 Painting with Frit

January 17
10a-12N
Lunch (by Peruvian Point)
1-3pm
 
Learn to use frit, hand pulled stringers and confetti to quickly add dimension and a painterly quality to your fused glass art.

Find out how easy it is to develop your sketches from photos and other inspiration. These panels can be a great reference guide for future projects.
All frit, confetti, stringers, glass and lunch are included.

 

Glass Fusing Basics or equivalent is required.
$125

 Glass Fusing: Basics 

January 24 & 31
1-4pm
Learn one of the fastest growing mediums in glass! In this two week class you’ll complete a 4″ tile and a small fused & slumped plate. Covers firing programs, prepping kiln shelves and ware and much more!All supplies are included.
$85
 

 Fused Glass Switch Plates

February 7
1-4pm
Learn how easy it is to make these very cool fused glass switch plates. All the instructions, materials and firing are included in the $20 fee.  A small amount of 96 glass is required.Basic fusing or equivalent is required.
 

 Fused Glass: Dichroic Jewelry

February 21
1-4pm
Grab attention with beautiful dichroic glass jewelry you make yourself! Cabochons for necklaces or earrings; they all will dazzle your friends!Learn to cut them so they come out perfect every time. Compatible glass and lots of dichroic glass is included.Make several pieces for $55

 
Is there a class listed on our website that you would like to take that isn’t scheduled yet?  Send me an email and let me know.  That’s how I know when to schedule our classes.  If you have 5-6 people we can schedule private parties.click here to check out our classes

 

Need a Kiln?  Rent one of ours! 

Bring in your fused work and we will fire it for you!

 

Projects small enough to fit on a 7″ shelf:              $   5.00

One or more projects on a 13″ round shelf:                8.00

Fuse + Slump on 13″ shelf:                                         12.00

Projects on a 20″ shelf:                                                11.00

Fused + Slump on a 20″ shelf:                                    14.00

Long Bubble Squeeze  add                                            3.00

 

  

 Morning Workshops:

Come join our morning workshops on Wednesday and Saturday mornings from 10a – Noon.  Use our tools and workshop space.  $10 for 2 hours!  Call to reserve your space.  You can do a Flowers of Hope panel during any of our workshops…or a “Try Fusing” panel to get you started in fusing.  You can also schedule bigger projects.  Contact us for more information.

 LightGarden Glass Art is located at:

1086 Washburn                            December 2014
Medford, OR                                   Tues-Fri 10-5pm
www.lightgarden.net                 Sat  10-1p
(541) 779-0272                                 Closed:  Sun & Mon.