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Northwest Mystics 2019: Women of the PNW

Northwest Mystics 2019: Women of the PNW ​presents over 20 women artists for a representation of power found in the feminine mystique and, ultimately, communicates an inspired message that will leave viewers uplifted, hopeful, and with a little joy in their heart.

Center on Contemporary Art Northwest Mystics 2019

From December 5 through 21, Center on Contemporary Art (CoCA) presents, “Northwest Mystics 2019: Women of the PNW.” CoCA will wrap up their 2019 year of amplifying the voices of women and femme-identified artists with an exhibition, not only of women, but also works from select CoCA members. A 2019 Mayor’s Arts Award recipient, CoCA has been an artistic staple in Seattle since 1981 and continues to challenge the status quo while exploring cultural assumptions and highlighting the essential role of art in a global conversation.

“Northwest Mystics 2019: Women of the PNW” will include a wide variety of artists from different backgrounds to include a musical performance, sculpture, painting, and video, as well as lighted animatronic motion-sensitive “flowers” by Sena Clara Creston that engage directly with visitors. Additional artists in the show include Amina Maya, Anya Gudimova, Aramis Hamer, Babs Fulton, Cathy Sarkowsky, Christy Bailey, Eliaichi Kimaro, Jenny Jun Smith, ​Jocelyn Beausire, ​Kree Arvanitas, KT Hancock, Michelle Friars, Minhi Wimplempeck, Ouija Boob, Polly Purvis, Sandi Bransford, Sonya Stockton, Shima Star, ST Rivera, Vian Nguyen, and Victoria Raymond.

This show is inspired in part by the life and work of gallery owner and catalyst for the Northwest School, Zoë Dusanne as she celebrated the ingenuity and unflappable spirit of the Pacific Northwest. Her life, work and dedication to creating and holding space for contemporary art is one that CoCA deeply identifies with. Dusanne was also a trailblazer of her time as the first African-American woman to open her own gallery, a working single mother and, along with her parents, a founding member of the Seattle chapter of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP). In 1947, Dusanne built a home in Seattle specifically designed to double as an art space, which she opened to the public in November 1950. Dusanne’s persistence and dedication to presenting artists, who would later be known as the “mystical” painters from Northwest School, resulted in a feature in ​Life ​magazine in 1953 and propelled the Northwest School to national prominence. Unfortunately in 1958, her home and gallery were demolished in order to accommodate the construction of I-5—something Seattleites can still relate to today.

CoCA’s nod to the Northwest School’s history is visible in landscapes such as one with a twist by Jenny Jun Smith or nature-inspired abstracts with a dark misty palette by Cathy Sarkowsky. In contrast to the Northwest School artists, this show displays a visceral sensuality and playfulness of the feminine mystique. Some works speak directly to the current social climate, such as ST Rivera’s ink on paper piece titled “Machismo;” Vian Nguyen’s oil painting, “Torn;” and Victoria Raymond’s 3D mixed media collage, “Grit.” “Northwest Mystics 2019: Women of the PNW” is a visual representation of the beautiful struggle of the feminine and, ultimately, communicates an inspired message that will leave viewers uplifted, hopeful, and with a little joy in their heart.

 

Exhibition Runs December 5 – 21, 2019.
Opening Reception, on December 5, 2019, 6-9pm, part of Pioneer Square Art Walk and includes a musical performance by Ouija Boob at 7:30pm.
All events at CoCA in Pioneer Square: 114 Third Avenue South, Seattle, 98104
More info: ​cocaseattle.org/exhibitions/northwest-mystics-2019

The Copenhagen Experiment: The Report

The past decade has witnessed a surge in “artistic activism,” both in practice and its study. Whether it actually works, however, is still a matter of faith more than fact. What has not been done is an evidence-based, empirical comparative study of the variable impact of creative versus more conventional forms of activism on a public audience in terms of ideas, ideals and actions. Until now.

Over the course of three days in May of 2018, Stephen Duncombe, Silas Harrebye and their research team mounted activist interventions on a popular and well-traveled bridge in the middle of Copenhagen, Denmark. Each day we paired a conventional activist intervention — public speaking, petitioning, flyering — with a creative way of accomplishing the same task, in a classic A/B experimental model.

After a year of analysis of 108 interviews, 30 observation sheets, petition and pamphlet tallies, hours of film footage of the events, and 25 follow-up survey responses, we are pleased to present our findings. You can read and download the full report, or a short 2 page summary below.

Download pdf Summary: The Copenhagen Experiment (Summary)

Download pdf Full Version: The Copenhagen Experiment

Contact the authors of this report: [email protected]

The Copenhagen Experiment

 

the C4AA Streaming Soiree

If you donate to the C4AA this month, you’ll get a ticket to the big, live, online meetup we’re calling “The Streaming Soiree”.

C4AA Streaming Soiree

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We’ve been thinking about all of you – our far-flung compatriots, and we want to hang out. We want to gather round a campfire and talk about all of our big adventures, and our weird side projects we never talk about. We want to hear what you have been seeing in your corner of the world. We want to ruminate together and brainstorm to solve the pressing problems – How do we rally people? How do we do something amazing with no budget? How do we make sure the next elections go our way? Who should our main audience be if we want to change things? What crazy intervention will actually get people to stop and think? We want to talk about the things you’re wondering about.

As a ticket holder you can:

-Submit questions in advance we will actually research and give our smartest answers to!

-Ask sensitive questions like “where does your funding come from?” or “have you ever had a workshop that ended in disaster?” or “what’s the story with that rash?” and we will do our best to answer them. And honestly!

-Meet other C4AA supporters and learn about their work

-Make suggestions for future Pop Culture Salvage Expeditions outings!

-Get a sneak preview of our upcoming book, “How to Win: A Practical Guide to Artistic Activism!”

-Weigh in on future program ideas we’re developing at the C4AA!

 

You’ll also be the first to learn about the next C4AA Soiree – if there ever is one. This may be the only one – don’t miss it!

Why are we doing this?

We want to spend time this year getting cozier with good people. It keeps all of us inspired. So these hangouts are a way to make sure we’re all connected and feel like we’re in a community.

And we are raising funds to support C4AA’s work. Our passionate focus right now is helping new leaders – we’re passing along our experience, skills and contacts to people new to this work, people who don’t have access to training and networks. We care about creating a global community of people who are doing artistic activism really well, and are making significant strides in social and environmental justice.

Your donations are critical because while most of our funding comes from foundations, it is rare to find funders who support the fundamental costs of running an organization. We need your help to keep the servers roaring, pay staff/interns/residents to do the necessary admin tasks, keep communications flowing to broadcast what we do and find partners, and block out time for our directors and board to think about what’s next.  Very few large funders allow us to use their grants in this way.

This is why we need individual donors and small foundations to support us in the invisible work of running the C4AA.

More reasons to support us.

Why support C4AA? Douglas Rushkoff says we don’t suck. And some of our other alumni seem to agree. Check out these short videos they sent.

Why C4AA?

The Center for Artistic Activism has been helping make more creative activists and more effective artists since 2009. For the past few years we’ve helped some of the most vulnerable people under some of the most repressive regimes around the world. Now we turn our attention back home, and use what we’ve seen work elsewhere to help build a vibrant alternative. More about what your support does to help artistic activism.

2019 marks ten years since the C4AA’s first program. Since then we’ve worked with thousands of artistic activists in 14 countries, on 4 continents. We’re excited about what’s ahead and need your support to get there.

Support Artistic Activists Around the World

Your donations allow us to serve communities who normally wouldn’t be able to afford our programs and help us focus on the most important work we can do. Check out some of our alumni stories to see the people we help.

We Believe in Artistic Activism

Negative predictions come easily and the world has enough bitterness. Right now the world needs your vision, your optimism, and your empathy. It needs your drive and motivation. It needs your most compelling stories, your creativity, and it needs your humor. We need new ideas of how the world can work, and new ways to get there.

The Center trains people to use these ideas in effective campaigns through proven methodologies. With your help, the Center for Artistic Activism supports groups and individuals who are looking for creative and effective ways to counteract bigotry, hate, misinformation and fear.

Your donation is tax deductible

Center for Artistic Activism is a not-for-profit, certified 501(c)(3) tax exempt charitable and educational organization.Under IRS 501(c)(3) tax exempt charitable and educational organization code, the full amount of your donation is tax deductible against your income. To fully benefit from this great tax benefit that helps you reduce your taxes, please inform and consult your expert tax specialist in regards to each donation you make.

Make a donation through your employer

You can ask your company to add us to their Matching Gifts Campaign. Supportive employees at Google and Netflix have already done this.

You can also check if your employer is registered through Benevity.

OAC Update on grant awards, Art in Public Places Roster now open and the first-ever tour of our State Capitol’s art collection!

August 2019

News & Updates

Update on grant awards, Art in Public Places Roster now open and the first-ever tour of our State Capitol’s art collection!

Grant award timeline update

OSG, ALG awards to be announced in September

Due to the new biennium budget process, the announcement of grant awards for the Operating Support and Arts Learning programs is delayed until September.
The Arts Commission is awaiting a final approved budget from the Legislative Fiscal Office and the Business Oregon fiscal office, as well as action by the Arts Commission board, so that grant awards can be finalized and distributed.
Final approval of grant awards is expected at the Arts Commission board meeting in early September. Official notification of application status and funding awards will happen after the Arts Commission board meets.
In recognition of the challenge presented by awards being announced after activity starts, the staff is developing a new timeline for the next funding cycle and may move the activity start period to Oct. 1.

Eric Asakawa plays the role made famous by Kevin Bacon in Broadway Rose Theatre Company’s current production of“Footloose” running through Sept. 1. Broadway Rose received a FY2019 Operating Supporting Grant award. Photo by Craig Mitchelldy.

Call to artists

Oregon Art in Public Places Roster now accepting applications

Regional, national and international artists are invited to submit qualifications for the Oregon Art in Public Places Roster for 2020-2022. Applications will be accepted until 11:59 p.m., MDT (Mountain Daylight Time), on Tuesday, Sept. 10. All materials must be submitted through CaFE™.
The Oregon Arts Commission manages the Percent for Art program for the State of Oregon. The Oregon Art in Public Places Roster serves as a resource for Percent for Art selection panels to identify artists most suitable for specific project needs.
The Roster is completely refreshed every three years. Artist who were selected for a previous Oregon Art in Public Places Roster must reapply to be considered for the 2020-2022 Roster.

George Johanson, “Day and Night,” 2012. Acrylic and oil on canvas. Oregon Department of Transportation.

Corvallis artist Greg Pfarr exhibits in Governor’s Office

Corvallis artist Greg Pfarr will exhibit “A Sense of Place: Time, Memory and Imagination in the Pacific Northwest” in the Governor’s Office of the Capitol Building in Salem through Sept. 26. A “meet the artist” reception is scheduled from 2 to 5 p.m. on Thursday, Sept. 5.
Place has always been a central focus of Greg’s art. He grew up roaming the woods and creeks of southern Ohio, where he found his first inspiration. Early backpacking experiences in the Smokey and Rocky Mountains convinced him that he had to live near wilderness. A move to Oregon in 1980 made it possible.
An exhibit in the Governor’s office is a “once in a lifetime” honor for selected Oregon artists.

Greg Pfarr, “Three Glaciers, Prince William Sound, Alaska,” 2014. Etching and woodcut. 24 x 36 inches (image). Courtesy the artist.

American Artist Appreciation Month

First-ever tours of State Capitol art offered in August

Explore the vast art collection inside the Oregon State Capitol during American Artist Appreciation Month in August. For the first time, State Capitol visitor services will provide guided tours of the Art of the Time Collection, publicly displayed throughout the building.
Tours will depart from the state seal in the rotunda at noon Monday through Friday,
Aug. 19-30. The collection includes more than 175 American (and many regional) artists, featured on the Percent for Art Collection website.
For a schedule of upcoming events and exhibits at the Capitol, visit www.oregoncapitol.com.

Sally Haley, “Camellias,” before 1979. Acrylic on canvas. Photo: Frank Miller.

At Liberty honors Royal Nebeker

Former Arts Commissioner and beloved Oregon artist Royal Nebeker (1945-2014) is being celebrated in a retrospective of his work on exhibit at At Liberty in Bend through September.
A prominent teacher, Nebeker left a tremendous legacy of work. A broad representation of his life’s work assembled for the tribute show.
Royal once said, “This process of painting resembles looking through a night window. I peer out, observing and at the same time see the reflection of the interior conditions of my own reality. It is my intent that as the viewer peers into my painting, he will not only see a visual record of meaning in my life, but will discover the reflection of meaning in their own, as in a night window.”

Pictured at the Royal Nebeker exhibit opening: (left to right) Kaari Vaughn, a founding partner of At Liberty; Sarah Nebeker, Royal’s widow and a Clatsop County Commissioner; Hannah Nebeker, Royal’s daughter; Rene Mitchell, a founding partner of At Liberty; Jenny Green, a founding partner of At Liberty; and Brian Wagner, Arts Commission community development coordinator. .

Florence public mural celebrates local culture

“Stitching Time, Weaving Cultures,” a public mural celebrating local culture and heritage, was recently dedicated in Florence. Commissioned by The City of Florence and the City’s Public Arts Committee, the mural was created by Portland artist-team Marino-Heidel Studios.
Almost three years in the making, the mural showcases folk arts and speaks to cultural interchange. It also “stitches” together ideas that represent the Florence area. The design incorporates the iconic Siuslaw Bridge and native flora and fauna of our region and pays homage to the Siuslaw people.
The project was a partnership between enthusiastic citizens, members of the PUD, Tribal leaders and City of Florence staff.

(Left to right) Harlan Springer of the Florence Public Arts Committee, Catherine Rickbone of the Oregon Coast Council for the Arts and Michal Dalton, Oregon Arts Commissioner.

Upcoming grant deadlines

Oregon Arts Commission | Phone 503-986-0082 | www.oregonartscommission.org

STAY CONNECTED

Politics of Humor in an Age of Fools

Notes from Stephen Duncombe’s presentation Politics of Humor in an Age of Fools

HEMI Encuentro at UNAM, Mexico City, 10 June 2019

I’ve been thinking a lot about the politics of humor in these very dire and serious times.

So what do I think?

A great deal of humor points out the absurdity of the normal, the taken for granted, the everyday  — this is true for political humor as it is for a political humor.

But what if the everyday is absurd? How does humor work then? Or should I say now.

Take Satire, for instance. It is a politically potent form of humor.  An example we are probably all familiar with is  Jonathan Swift’s “Modest Proposal, in which he proposed that the problem of the Irish rural poor might be solved by selling their babies to the rich for food.

Swift’s satire “works” politically because:

Extends the logic of the British Empire’s policies regarding their colonies.

The solution is so absurd — “eat the poor” — that it casts the normal as absurd as well.

Assumes that the audience will see the absurdity, and with their “awareness raised” will resist these absurd policies of Empire.

But can satire work the same way today? When the absurdity of the policies of the National-Fascists, and the leaders who propose them, is so obvious?

What is there to satirize? They satirize themselves.

Take another form of humor: that of the fool, the jester, the clown…the Heyoka. The politics of their humor often lies in their ability to use their foolishness to make a fool of those in power.

But again: what if our leaders — and I speak as a US Citizen here — are openly fools? Does the clown have the same power?

I don’t think so.

My analyses so far could lead to despair. Lo ciento. But I want to end with hope.

For what I have described above is not all that humor does: it doesn’t just function as critique, it can also provide vision.

The clown doesn’t just show the leader up to be a fool, they perform a vision of a world that operates according to radically different norms and hierarchies and values of the “normal’ one we inhabit today.  That is to say: they “turn the world upside down.”

And there is another face to satire as well.  The model of satire we are most used to is  one of negation — critiquing power as it is, that is: critical satire. But there is another form, which we might call prophetic satire, which challenges the logic of power by envisioning power as it should be.

For example, when our friends here at the Encuentro, the Yes Men, appeared on the BBC as spokespeople for  Dow chemical to take full financial and moral responsibility for the Bhopal disaster, they were at one and the same time critiquing the “normal” behavior of corporations and imagining a world turned upside down where corporations care for people and take responsibility for their actions.

This is not to say that “critical satire” doesn’t have an implied positive ideal. It wouldn’t work as satire if it didn’t. But that implied positive is dependent upon a knowing audience that can imagine, or has a memory of, an alternative to the present. And I’m not sure we possess this any longer.  So we may need to make the implicit explicit.

So, I want to end my comments here with a challenge:

To move from a humor that merely critiques, or ridicules or “raises awareness” of the problems of today.

To forms of humor that inspire us to imagine the worlds we want to build for tomorrow.

Muchos gracias.

Light Garden Glass Art Classes and Workshops Summer 2019

1086 Washburn                                June 2019
Medford, OR                                   Tues-Fri 10-5pm
www.lightgarden.net                     Sat  10-1p
(541) 779-0272                                 Closed:  Sun & Mon.
Yes, it’s true….only 6 months left until Christmas!
 
I am already looking forward to our annual
Holiday Open Studio  
event this year!
 
If you would like to be part of our show drop me an email and let me know what you would like to bring to sell.
 
We have limited space available.
 
 
    
 
I wouldn’t be doing my job unless I start reminding you
that it would be a great time to come in and make a
FLOWERS of HOPE
panel
for this year!
Summer is a great time to come in a make a panel!
So much inspiration!
 
 
 
 
 
These projects can be done during our regularly scheduled workshops on Wednesday and Saturday mornings from 10 – 12n.  Please call or email ahead to reserve your space.
 
 
     
Mosaic Design Class
 
This has been the best year for mosaics!  We have lots of different projects going on in different stages.  I can’t wait to see them finished!  It’s not too late to get in on this project.

We’ll help you design your own mosaic by putting together various templates or based on your own drawing, show you ways to lay out your tiles to give your piece more movement, choosing your board or project base, adhesives, using found items and more. 

Continue working on your project during any open workshop or on your own at home.  
NEW*** I will now be including a section on Glass on Glass mosaics.  Let the light shine through!
 
$30 includes class and materials charge.  
  
July 13th 
1-3:00pm
 
Alcohol Inks: Summer Vineyard

This is a great project if you are just starting out in alcohol inks.  Some objects are accomplished by pouring from the bottle, others by using a brush and still others by use of a stamping tool. Good practice in several application methods.   All inks are included.
$25


July 27th
1-3pm

   

 Morning Workshops:

 

Come join our morning workshops on Wednesday and Saturday mornings from 10a – Noon.  Use our tools and workshop space.  $10 for 2 hours!  Call to reserve your space.  You can do a Flowers of Hope panel during any of our workshops…or a “Try Fusing” panel to get you started in fusing.  You can also schedule bigger projects.  Contact us for more information.

LightGarden Glass Art, 1086 Washburn Lane, Medford, OR 97501-2000

BUZZ! New Bee City USA Mosaic Unveiled in Talent

Have you seen the new mosaic

that was just unveiled in Talent?

Within the 32-foot-long mosaic simply titled “Talent: Bee City, USA” are tens of thousands of pieces and the efforts of more than 100 volunteers who worked for the past year and a half, according to Talent artist Karen Rycheck, who wore a purple “beehive” wig Saturday morning at the Talent Commons near City Hall, joining city officials in celebrating the completion of the 18-month project.  “It’s very much the community’s work,” Rycheck said. “I facilitated it, but I didn’t make it.” Photo by Andy Atkinson

Photo by Andy Atkinson/ Mail Tribune

 

Within the 32-foot-long mosaic simply titled “Talent: Bee City, USA” are tens of thousands of pieces and the efforts of more than 100 volunteers who worked for the past year and a half, according to Talent artist Karen Rycheck, who wore a purple “beehive” wig Saturday morning at the Talent Commons near City Hall, joining city officials in celebrating the completion of the 18-month project.

“It’s very much the community’s work,” Rycheck said. “I facilitated it, but I didn’t make it.”

Talent Bee City USA Mural  photo by Andy Atkinson, Mail Tribune

Detail, Talent Bee City USA Mural photo by Andy Atkinson, Mail Tribune

Bee City USA
Check out these links for more information:

12: The Chevrolet Suburban

“It’s a brand new car!” The gang hit the road in a 2018 Chevrolet Suburban SUV. Rugged, automation, comfort, and luxury – how can we use these lessons in our activism?

Sound Note: This show was recorded in a moving car. Thanks to Jimmy Bigbee Garver who recorded, edited, and mixed this episode.

The Chevy Suburban

Why the Suburban? It’s the longest continuous use automobile nameplate in production, starting in 1935, and has traditionally been one of General Motors’ most profitable vehicles.

Chevrolet Suburban – Wikipedia

We were driving the 11th Generation of the Suburban. Truck front, station wagon back: it’s the reverse mullet of the Chevy truck line.

If you’re not familiar with the Suburban…

Chevrolet Suburban Interior

Chevrolet Suburban history

What do we make of fake engine noises?

 

Thank you

We want to thank our sponsor who made this episode of the Pop Culture Salvage Expeditions possible, The Chevrol– just kidding! That’s never gonna happen. This show is paid for by donations to the Center for Artistic Activism, a 501.3c non-profit organization.

If you like the show – donate! (It’s a tax-deductible and a little bit goes a long way)

DONATE!

Ashland New Plays Festival presents THE GUN SHOW by E.M. Lewis

Taking Aim at the Gun Debate: Can we have a conversation about this?

What: Ashland New Plays Festival presents THE GUN SHOW by E.M. Lewis  When: Friday and Saturday, June 14 and 15, 2019, at 7:30 pm  Where: Bellview Grange, 1050 Tolman Creek Road, Ashland  Tickets: $25, available onlineor at the door, subject to availability

A defaced road sign from rural Minnesota.

Ashland New Plays Festival will present a special two-night full production of The Gun Show by award-winning playwright E.M. Lewis at 7:30 pm on June 14 and 15 at the Bellview Grange in Ashland, featuring Andrew William Smith and directed by Lisa Velten Smith. Tickets are $25, available online or at the door, subject to availability. A conversation with the audience about personal experiences with guns will follow the performance.

“I am here to tell a public story and a private story. A story about guns in America and a story about my own experiences with guns in America.”

And so begins the riveting one-hour play. Lewis tells her story with raw honesty and gives audiences important insight into the nuances of America’s gun debate. Since the play’s 2014 Jefferson Award-nominee world premiere in Chicago, it has gone on to receive critical acclaim and sold-out performances across the country and an international premiere in 2017 at Edinburgh Fringe Festival.

In The Gun Show, Lewis takes aim at her own relationship with firearms, from her experiences in a farming community in rural Oregon to the big cities of Los Angeles and New York. Lewis’s stories are brought to life by Smith, who recently completed a month-long production of The Gun Show at Pittsburgh’s Quantum Theatre.

E.M. Lewis is a former ANPF winning playwright and served as host playwright for eight ANPF Fall Festival seasons. Among her many accolades as a playwright and librettist, she was awarded the 2016 Oregon Literary Fellowship in Drama, a Hodder Fellowship from Princeton University, and a playwriting fellowship from the New Jersey State Arts Commission.

She is currently featured in an episode of Play4Keeps Podcast, an ANPF production, where she discusses her play in conversation with ANPF’s Associate Artistic Director and SOU Theatre professor Jackie Apodaca. The Play4Keeps Podcast is available free on podcast apps.

What: Ashland New Plays Festival presents THE GUN SHOW by E.M. Lewis

When: Friday and Saturday, June 14 and 15, 2019, at 7:30 pm

Where: Bellview Grange, 1050 Tolman Creek Road, Ashland

Tickets: $25, available onlineor at the door, subject to availability

For more information, visit www.ashlandnewplays.org.

WMG 22nd International Open Call For Art

22nd International Open
Exhibition Dates: August 9 – 31, 2019
Entry Due Date: May 28, 2019
Juror: Dolores Mercado

CLICK HERE TO SUBMIT WORK 
https://womanmadegallery.submittable.com/submit

Exhibition Description: Invitation to all female identified artists worldwide to submit artwork for this open exhibition. All themes, styles, and media will be considered. Artwork that explores or challenges conceptual and material boundaries is encouraged.

Prizes Awarded:  Best of Show $500 / 2nd Place $250 / 3rd Place $100

The application fee for juried exhibitions is $30 for up to three images of work, plus one detail image each if necessary. A limited number of artists who experience financial hardship may be exempt from paying the entry fee; please send us an email to request a fee waiver: [email protected].

We encourage entries of recent works, but there is no restriction in the creation date. All applicants should submit an artist’s statement about their body of work (up to 250 words.) Accepted artworks must not exceed 72″ horizontally and must not have been previously shown at WMG.

Juror: Dolores Mercado

Dolores Mercado is the Associate Curator at the National Museum of Mexican Art (NMMA) in Chicago, Illinois, and former Associate Director of Education and Senior Arts Educator. She studied at the National School of Painting, Sculpture and Printing La Esmeralda in Mexico City, The Academy of San Carlos from the UNAM in Mexico City, The School of Video of the University of Guadalajara, and at the School of Visual Arts of the University of Guadalajara.

Mercado was the Curator of Women Artists of Modern Mexico: Frida’s Contemporaries; La vida sobre papel: Judithe Hernández; Contemplations: Dan Ramirez, Works from the Permanent Collection; Deportable Aliens: New Work by Rodrigo Lara Zendejas; La Muerte Niña: Day of the Dead; Carmen Parra: Suave Patria; Rito y Recuerdo: Day of the Dead; Quilt Me A Story: Nuestros relatos (Immigration Stories); Maquila Blues: Oscar Moya; Fragmentos: Pilar Acevedo; and Abyss: Rocío Caballero among many others. Mercado has also Co-curated Memoria Presente: An Artistic Journey; !No se olvida! Remembering the Tlatelolco Massacre and Rastros y Crónicas: Women of Juarez, and others.

Mercado has hosted Camino Tierra Adentro radio program at WRTE 90.5 FM (1999 to 2004, MFACM), and Alquimia radio program at WRTE 90.5 FM. (2004-2006) NMMA. She was coordinator and collaborator for the Women Artists of Modern Mexico: Frida’s Contemporaries catalog and Coordinator for Nahui Olin: A Woman Beyond Time catalog, NMMA. Mercado has been in charge of several Symposiums, Conferences and Events and has participated as a panelist in Art in Response to Violence, Northeastern University; Ni Una Más: Remembering the Missing Women of Juarez, DePaul University; and Translating Tragedy into Art, a conversation with Filmmaker Carlos Carrera. Dolores Mercado has exhibited in the US, Mexico, Spain, Canada and Nicaragua.

Image: Artwork by Anoush Bargamian

Join Woman Made Gallery
2150 S. Canalport 4th Fl, Chicago, IL 60608
Enter through Parking Lot at North Entrance on 21st Street
312.738.0400 | Email | Website
Gallery Hours: Thur-Fri 12 – 6pm & Sat-Sun 12 – 4pm
ABOUT WOMAN MADE GALLERY
Woman Made Gallery (WMG) is a tax-exempt, not-for-profit organization founded in 1992. Its mission is to support, cultivate, and promote the diverse contributions of women in the arts through exhibitions and other programs that serve, educate, and enrich our community. We rely on membership contributions and individual donations to create the programs that support our mission.

YOUR DONATIONS HELP MAKE WMG’S EXHIBITIONS AND PROGRAMS POSSIBLE!
Woman Made Gallery is supported in part by grants from The Arts Work Fund; The Chicago Department of Cultural Affairs and Special Events; The Gaylord and Dorothy Donnelley Foundation;  The Efroymson Family Fund, a CICF Fund; The Illinois Arts Council Agency;  The MacArthur Funds for Arts and Culture at The Richard H. Driehaus Foundation; The Joyce Foundation; and the generosity of its members and contributors. We thank our Art Angel, an anonymous donor who contributes generously and repeatedly through BMO Harris Bank.