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Ishtar Lakhani on BBC 100 Women List

Congratulations to the Center for Artistic Activism’s Ishtar Lakhani is included on the BBC’s 100 inspiring and influential women from around the world for 2020.

Ishtar is an alumni of Center for Artistic Activism programs, and became a collaborator on programs we ran in South Africa like the 2016 AIDS Conference and trainings for artists working on the decriminalization of sex work in South Africa. She currently works on the Free the Vaccine for COVID-19 campaign – a partnership between the Center for Artistic Activism and Universities Allied for Essential Medicines. Recently she was profiled in Maverick Citizen.

Congratulations Ishtar!

Unstoppable Voters Panel – Behind the Scenes

What worked? What were some of the strategies used in the projects? What wasn’t captured in the photos and video? You can watch a recording of this panel below.

Highest voter turn out, ever.

You can’t win elections without turning out voters. While there’s work ahead and complex problems to solve, we’re allowing ourselves a moment to linger on this victory.

On Monday November 23rd we held a panel with some of our Unstoppable Voter project leaders. We talked about what worked, some of the strategies used in the projects, and what wasn’t captured in the photos and video.

Missed it? Here’s a video:

Behind the Scenes of Unstoppable Voters

Here’s who joined:

Thanks again to our Unstoppable Voters projects for helping fight voter suppression, overcome pandemic obstacles, and bring some joy to voting.

Here’s a short video that gives you a taste of what we got done:

And we’ve got post-election projects happening now.

Behind the Scenes of Unstoppable Voters
Monday, November 23, 2020 at 6pm EST

Emergency Circus

Emergency Circus is an Unstoppable Voters Project – a series of Center for Artistic Activism supported works that ensure every vote is counted in the 2020 U.S. election, relieve tension, and build healthy institutions in the aftermath.

Emergency Circus

Bringing circus joy to where it’s needed most. We are taking circus performer clowns across hotly contested Arizona directly to the doors of poll workers and counters to thank them for risking their lives to count the vote. It’s a short socially distanced show for poll workers and their families, often by surprise. Circus-a-grams are completely self-contained, Covid safe, and use humor, skill, and inspiration to lift spirits. Friends, family members, and the poll workers themselves all across Arizona can simply call 1-(NOW)-CIRCUS-1 and have a sweet show filled with magic, music, clowning, and circus tricks delivered to their door free of charge.


Clay Mazing of Emergency Circus

Composed of superhuman circus performers from around the globe, Emergency Circus administers inspirational circus shows and workshops to  the hospitalized, the homeless, the imprisoned, & the under-circused everywhere. 

This non-profit seeks to inspire, entertain, and enliven humanity in peril. Through spectacle, performance and the power of the human spirit, the Emergency Circus are out to achieve the seemingly impossible. To replace fear and grief with laughter and joy, if only for a little while.

Clay Mazing, Emergency Circus Captain: For over 15 years Clay Mazing, the lasso-spinning, comedic vaudevillian, and multi-instrumentalist has performed all over the world from county fairs, to opera houses, to stadiums, to television and film. 

As founder and director of the non-profit humanitarian project called the Emergency Circus, Clay has performed alongside Dr. Patch Adams and with Clowns Without Borders for Syrian refugees in Jordan, occupied Palestinians in the West Bank, hurricane shelters in the US, and hospitalized children all over the world, to name a few. 

Unstoppable voters projects throughout the country relieve tensions and look to the future as every vote is counted

Experts predict that election returns will be slow and chaotic. Artists are preparing by answering critical questions: How can we counter tension, fear and potential violence? How do we inspire resilience and hope to defend the basic tenets of democracy? How do we respond with so many unknown factors?

The Center for Artistic Activism’s Unstoppable Voters Project has gathered a group of artists and culture makers who know how to transform emotions and  support a weary nation through early voting and the transfer of power during a challenging election season. As the nation awaits election results and their aftermath, projects will help folks relieve tension on the streets, at counting sites and in their homes, with Counting Cheerleaders, the creation of Social Emergency Response Centers, of-the-moment songs created and distributed by the Peace Poets, and continued performances by Emergency Circus and dancing mailboxes Delivering Democracy, among other projects.

Packing and Cracking

Packing and Cracking is an Unstoppable Voters Project – a series of Center for Artistic Activism supported works that ensure every vote is counted in the 2020 U.S. election, relieve tension, and build healthy institutions in the aftermath.

Packing and Cracking

Do we choose our politicians, or do our politicians choose us? Packing and Cracking is an interactive mapmaking event about gerrymandering: the pervasive practice of politicians choosing their voters rather than the other way around. Through participatory drawing and map-drawing games, Packing and Cracking uses critical cartography, gerrymandering history, and interviews with politicians and reformers today to show how easy and disenfranchising gerrymandering can be and ask what, if anything, we should do about it.

Streaming on North Carolina’s local TV station The People’s Channel October 27-November 3! Learn more.

Created by Rachel Gita Karp and Joseph Amodei


Joseph Amodei is a new media artist, theater designer, activist, and educator. Joseph conceives of art as a powerful epistemic and emotional tool for examining assumed realities. Their work combines innovative technology, extensive research, and hope for alternate futures to invite audiences into a communal process of debriefing and re-learning. Joseph grew up in North Carolina, where they received a BFA in Studio Art from UNC-Chapel Hill. Joseph received their MFA in Video and Media Design from Carnegie Mellon. Currently, they are a professor of Immersive Media at Chatham University in Pittsburgh. (pronouns: they/them)  www.jamodei.com 

Rachel Gita Karp makes rigorously-researched performances about politics and public policy. She has developed and directed new performances through The Drama League, Irondale, Mabou Mines, Ars Nova, Actors Theatre of Louisville, LaGuardia Performing Arts Center, The Wild Project, The Brick, The Flea, IRT, Dixon Place, Incubator Arts Project, SPACE on Ryder Farm, Barn Arts, Orchard Project, and Columbia University’s graduate and undergraduate schools. Rachel is currently the Beatrice Terry Resident Director at The Drama League and a Directing Fellow at Clubbed Thumb. She recently received her MFA from Carnegie Mellon University, where she held fellowships in theater and public policy. www.rachelgitakarp.com 

Unstoppable Voter Projects Throughout the Country Will Bring Art and Entertainment to Voters and Polling Places; Artists Hope to Inspire Others in Their Own Communities

In this contentious election season, many people are wondering how we can move past division and tension to celebrate democracy and our freedom to vote. Artists, in the business of storytelling and culture-making, are working around the country to turn the focus to honoring and encouraging participation in our democratic process. With this in mind, the Center for Artistic Activism created the Unstoppable Voter Project. We funded 11 of the most ambitious, innovative collaborations between artists and civic organizations seeking to increase voter engagement after receiving more than 100 applications. Artistic events will take place nationwide, with a focus on states where voters are facing barriers to the polls.

Seed Evolution

Seed Evolution is an Unstoppable Voters Project – a series of Center for Artistic Activism supported works that ensure every vote is counted in the 2020 U.S. election, relieve tension, and build healthy institutions in the aftermath.

Seed Evolution

One Bus. Eight Cities. Two Weeks. We will have pop-up screenings and public art activations, from New York to Miami. As we travel throughout a number of cities, we’ll be using our bus as a stage to invite people of all ages and backgrounds to share their stories, hopes, and dreams for the future, while also projecting community pieces onto large cityscapes. We’re bringing attention to global issues, using art as a tool to seed higher consciousness and broadcast unspoken dreams of communities across the US — especially the underrepresented voices. We are offsetting the bus’s carbon footprint by contributing 10% of this campaign to Jaguar Siembra, a non-profit foundation dedicated to preserving Nature & Ancient Wisdom, planting 10,000 trees for Food Forests in the heart of the world, La Sierra Nevada in Colombia. 

Led by Angela del Sol Varelaarski


Seed Evolution is a movement to weave the dreams and visions of humanity.

We seek to transform city streets from a space of passive consumption and transit into a site of creative engagement and community dialogue. 

Angela Del Sol is an activist and creative producer, passionate about the connection between art, culture, and social impact.

Her clients include Frieze Art Fair, The Economist, UN’s Peace Boat US, Summit Series, US Open, Coach, Panorama NYC, VR World, Little Sun Energy, and More.She has fundraised over 100k to deliver solar power and water to communities in need.

Unstoppable voters projects throughout the country relieve tensions and look to the future as every vote is counted

Experts predict that election returns will be slow and chaotic. Artists are preparing by answering critical questions: How can we counter tension, fear and potential violence? How do we inspire resilience and hope to defend the basic tenets of democracy? How do we respond with so many unknown factors?

The Center for Artistic Activism’s Unstoppable Voters Project has gathered a group of artists and culture makers who know how to transform emotions and  support a weary nation through early voting and the transfer of power during a challenging election season. As the nation awaits election results and their aftermath, projects will help folks relieve tension on the streets, at counting sites and in their homes, with Counting Cheerleaders, the creation of Social Emergency Response Centers, of-the-moment songs created and distributed by the Peace Poets, and continued performances by Emergency Circus and dancing mailboxes Delivering Democracy, among other projects.

Reminder: Angels Deadline November 25

2020 Angels Show CALL TO ARTISTS!

2020 Angels show call to artists

Many thanks to 2019 Angel Artist Katherine Bird for permission to use her angel from the show!

It’s that time again! Time to find your angel art or create something new and submit it in response to the Southern Oregon Artists Resource 8th annual 2020 Angels Show call to artists. Here’s the application form with rules and procedures that you can download and complete, then submit with your angel art at the gallery. Please include  titles, dimensions and medium for each piece.

We don’t ask for traditional representations of angels, though they are welcome. What we’re looking for is unique artistic interpretations of angels. We have seen some amazing interpretations over the years and look forward to seeing yours!

This year we’re changing things up a little for the Angels Show. First, due to the COVID-19 pandemic, we do not plan to have a reception. However, the gallery will produce a virtual tour video that we will post widely across our websites and social networks. Second, to keep the works on display to the level that the gallery’s patrons have come to expect, the show is now juried. Finally, due to space limitations and our mutual desire to display every artist’s art without crowding, each artist will have a maximum of two pieces accepted. There is also a size limit of 48″ in any direction for all pieces. And we have to say this…all angels must be your own original artwork – no giclees, please! As always, all angels must remain on display until the show ends.

Here’s how to submit your angels for jurying and a timeline of important phases between now and the show’s opening:

  1. Visit this link to download the form, print and complete.
  2. Include a summary of information about your art with titles, dimensions and medium for each piece.
  3. Bring your angel art to the gallery with your form and summary on November 23, 24 or 25. **Be sure to wear your mask and be prepared to observe social distancing measures while in the gallery. Hand sanitizer is available at the front desk.
  4. Jurying takes place the week following Thanksgiving. Artists are then notified of the status of their work’s acceptance.
  5. Pick up artwork that is not accepted at the gallery on December 4, 5 or 6.
  6. We hang the angels on the back wall of the gallery on December 2.
  7. The show opens Friday, December 4 and continues through Sunday, December 27.
  8. Pick up unsold angels on Monday, December 28.

All angel art must be for sale, and Art Presence realizes 35% of sales. There is no additional fee for submitting your art or participation in the show.

**IMPORTANT! Please note that the gallery observes mandatory masking and social distancing guidelines. When you come to the gallery to drop off and pick up artwork, you must wear a mask and observe physical distancing of at least 6 feet. Artists manning the gallery are keeping everything clean and safe, and hand sanitizer is available at the front counter.

We are so excited to see the angels that this year’s artists submit! In light of the difficulties this year has presented for all of us, angels are just the thing to wrap up the year. We hope you find comfort and inspiration in creating your angels for this year’s show. Let’s make this is best angels show yet! Thank you so much for answering the 2020 Angels Show Call to Artists!

If you have any trouble at all with the pdf file below, please visit the call to artists at Southern Oregon Artists Resource or our Facebook page.

Download (PDF, 171KB)

The post Reminder: Angels Deadline November 25 appeared first on Art Presence Art Center.

Reminder: Angels Deadline November 25

2020 Angels Show CALL TO ARTISTS!

2020 Angels show call to artists

Many thanks to 2019 Angel Artist Katherine Bird for permission to use her angel from the show!

It’s that time again! Time to find your angel art or create something new and submit it in response to the Southern Oregon Artists Resource 8th annual 2020 Angels Show call to artists. Here’s the application form with rules and procedures that you can download and complete, then submit with your angel art at the gallery. Please include  titles, dimensions and medium for each piece.

We don’t ask for traditional representations of angels, though they are welcome. What we’re looking for is unique artistic interpretations of angels. We have seen some amazing interpretations over the years and look forward to seeing yours!

This year we’re changing things up a little for the Angels Show. First, due to the COVID-19 pandemic, we do not plan to have a reception. However, the gallery will produce a virtual tour video that we will post widely across our websites and social networks. Second, to keep the works on display to the level that the gallery’s patrons have come to expect, the show is now juried. Finally, due to space limitations and our mutual desire to display every artist’s art without crowding, each artist will have a maximum of two pieces accepted. There is also a size limit of 48″ in any direction for all pieces. And we have to say this…all angels must be your own original artwork – no giclees, please! As always, all angels must remain on display until the show ends.

Here’s how to submit your angels for jurying and a timeline of important phases between now and the show’s opening:

  1. Visit this link to download the form, print and complete.
  2. Include a summary of information about your art with titles, dimensions and medium for each piece.
  3. Bring your angel art to the gallery with your form and summary on November 23, 24 or 25. **Be sure to wear your mask and be prepared to observe social distancing measures while in the gallery. Hand sanitizer is available at the front desk.
  4. Jurying takes place the week following Thanksgiving. Artists are then notified of the status of their work’s acceptance.
  5. Pick up artwork that is not accepted at the gallery on December 4, 5 or 6.
  6. We hang the angels on the back wall of the gallery on December 2.
  7. The show opens Friday, December 4 and continues through Sunday, December 27.
  8. Pick up unsold angels on Monday, December 28.

All angel art must be for sale, and Art Presence realizes 35% of sales. There is no additional fee for submitting your art or participation in the show.

**IMPORTANT! Please note that the gallery observes mandatory masking and social distancing guidelines. When you come to the gallery to drop off and pick up artwork, you must wear a mask and observe physical distancing of at least 6 feet. Artists manning the gallery are keeping everything clean and safe, and hand sanitizer is available at the front counter.

We are so excited to see the angels that this year’s artists submit! In light of the difficulties this year has presented for all of us, angels are just the thing to wrap up the year. We hope you find comfort and inspiration in creating your angels for this year’s show. Let’s make this is best angels show yet! Thank you so much for answering the 2020 Angels Show Call to Artists!

If you have any trouble at all with the pdf file below, please visit the call to artists at Southern Oregon Artists Resource or our Facebook page.

Download (PDF, 171KB)

The post Reminder: Angels Deadline November 25 appeared first on Art Presence Art Center.

2020 Angels Show CALL TO ARTISTS!

2020 Angels Show Call to Artists. Image of abstract angel painting by Katherine Bird from the 2019 Angels show

Many thanks to artist Katherine Bird of Grants Pass for permission to use this image of her painting from the 2019 Angels show.

2020 Angels Show CALL TO ARTISTS!

It’s that time again, and the deadline is approaching fast!  Time to find your angel art or create something new and submit it in response to the Southern Oregon Artists Resource 8th annual 2020 Angels Show call to artists. Here’s the application form with rules and procedures that you can download and complete, then submit with your angel art at the gallery BY NOVEMBER 25. Please include  titles, dimensions and medium for each piece.

We don’t ask for traditional representations of angels, though they are welcome. What we’re looking for is unique artistic interpretations of angels. We have seen some amazing interpretations over the years and look forward to seeing yours!

We are grateful that once again Art Presence Art Center will host the Angels Show, but this year we’re changing things up a little. First, due to the COVID-19 pandemic, we do not plan to have a reception. However, the gallery will produce a virtual tour video that we will post widely across our websites and social networks. Second, to keep the works on display to the level that the gallery’s patrons have come to expect, the show is now juried. And third, due to space limitations at the gallery and our mutual desire to display every artist’s art without crowding, each artist will have a maximum of two pieces accepted. There is also a size limit of 48″ in any direction. Sorry, but we have to say this: All angels must be your own original artwork. No giclees, please! As always, all angels must remain on display until the show ends.

Here’s how to submit your angels for jurying and a timeline of important phases between now and the show’s opening:

  1. Visit this link to download the form, print and complete.
  2. Include a summary of information about your art with titles, dimensions and medium for each piece.
  3. Bring your angel art to the gallery with your form and summary on November 23, 24 or 25. Be sure to wear your mask and be prepared to observe social distancing measures while in the gallery. Hand sanitizer is available at the front desk.
  4. Jurying takes place the week following Thanksgiving. Artists are then notified of the status of their work’s acceptance.
  5. Pick up artwork that is not accepted at the gallery on December 4, 5 or 6.
  6. We hang the angels on the back wall of the gallery on December 2.
  7. The show opens Friday, December 4 and continues through Sunday, December 27.
  8. Pick up unsold angels on Monday, December 28.

All angel art must be for sale, and Art Presence realizes 35% of sales. There is no additional fee for submitting your art or participation in the show.

**IMPORTANT! Please note that the gallery is observing mandatory masking and social distancing guidelines. When you come to the gallery to drop off and pick up artwork, you must wear a mask and observe physical distancing of at least 6 feet. Artists manning the gallery are keeping everything clean and safe, and hand sanitizer is available at the front counter.

We are so excited to see the angels that this year’s artists submit! In light of the difficulties this year has presented for all of us, angels are just the thing to wrap up the year. We hope you find comfort and inspiration in creating your angels for this year’s show. Let’s make this the best angels show yet! Thank you so much for answering the 2020 Angels Show Call to Artists!

Download (PDF, Unknown)

NY Times Article on Joe Biden’s Support of the Arts



              

Joe Biden and the Arts: No R.B.G. but a Loyal Promoter of Culture

The former vice president has been an intermittent consumer of the arts, but cultural leaders credit him as a key source of government financial support. 

By Graham Bowley

Oct. 30, 2020, 11:21 a.m. ET

Joseph R. Biden Jr. is no aesthete. Not many presidential nominees have been, though some, after a stint in the White House, have decided to take up painting — with varying degrees of success.

But if Mr. Biden’s tastes run to 1967 Corvettes, Grisham novels and “Crocodile Rock,” he is, nonetheless, someone arts leaders say has always embraced the practical usefulness of the arts as an economic engine, political action trigger and community builder.

Mr. Biden’s attitude is “less from a consumer point of view and more about the inspirational value and transformational value of the arts,” said Robert L. Lynch, president and chief executive of Americans for the Arts, a national arts advocacy organization, who has tracked Mr. Biden’s support for the arts for decades. “It’s not, ‘Look, I loved this piece, or this song.’ It’s more about the bigger role of the arts in society.”

America already has a good idea of President Trump’s approach to the arts, which largely regards the world of culture as the habitat of effete liberalism and relies instead on promoting his support from celebrity performers like Ted Nugent, Lil Wayne or Kid Rock.

Mr. Trump’s signature cultural policy directive has been an effort to strip all funding from the National Endowment for the Arts and the National Endowment for the Humanities, two grant-giving agencies that have, nonetheless, survived despite conservative views that their missions are outside the core responsibilities of government.

But Mr. Biden’s perspectives on the arts, and what sort of impact his presidency might have on cultural organizations, has received little attention, particularly in a rancorous campaign dominated by the pandemic, health care and other contention issues.

The leaders of cultural organizations say that as a Democratic Senator from Delaware, and then as vice president, Mr. Biden was a consistent advocate for government funding for the arts. Last month, he won the endorsement of the Actors’ Equity Association, the union for actors and stage managers, only the second time in its history it has made a presidential endorsement. (It backed Hillary Clinton in 2016.)

“Vice President Biden understands that the arts are a critical driver of healthy and strong local economies in cities and towns across the country,” said Kate Shindle, president of Actors’ Equity, in a statement.

Jane Alexander, the actress who was chairman of the National Endowment for the Arts from 1993 to 1997, recalled walking with Mr. Biden from Union Station to Capitol Hill shortly after the Republicans had taken both houses of Congress in the 1994 elections and some were assailing the organization she ran. He was not making fiery speeches, but she said she knew she could count on his support.

“He said, ‘You have a very tough job,’” Ms. Alexander said. “I remember him being very sympathetic with the work that I had to do, and he had been supportive of the N.E.A. all along.”

So even though he never made culture a focus of his legislative legacy, like Edward M. Kennedy, who was one of the founders of the Senate’s arts caucus, Mr. Biden has received high marks for his voting record from arts executives. As a senator, Mr. Biden co-sponsored the bill creating the American Folklife Center at the Library of Congress, supported initiatives for cultural diplomacy, and in 2001, was one of the original co-sponsors of legislation establishing the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture. He attended the opening as vice president in 2016.

“Everything we hoped for, he voted for,” said Mr. Lynch of Americans for the Arts.
In comparison to a public figure like Ruth Bader Ginsburg, whose attendance at the opera was routine, Mr. Biden’s profile as an arts aficionado is modest, his regular trips with his family to see Broadway shows notwithstanding. As vice president for eight years, he attended at least seven events at the Kennedy Center, including a National Symphony Orchestra program, a Washington National Opera gala, a theater master class, a ballet performance and the opening concert for the 2016 Ireland Festival, according to Eileen Andrews, a spokesman. The Bidens also hosted a reception for Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater at the vice president’s residence in Washington.

Cultural officials at the Delaware Theater Company, the Delaware Art Museum and Wilmington’s Grand Opera House describe him as a supportive presence, if an infrequent visitor. In 2012, a museum official recalled, Mr. Biden and his wife, Jill, attended the opening of an exhibition of works by the Delaware artist Mary Page Evans, a friend, whose works they hung in the vice president’s residence in Washington, the official said. And Mr. Biden appeared at the Grand Opera House for political events with Barack Obama, spoke on a tribute video for the theater, and in 2018 spoke onstage during his “American Promise” book tour.

“If you are unable to show up at a museum every week, or every month, we are going to figure it’s because you are out there doing what you do best,” said Tina Betz, director of cultural affairs for the city of Wilmington. “We need him in Washington banging his fist, stamping his feet, making sure the N.E.A. and the N.E.H. stay intact.”

As vice president, Mr. Biden is credited with helping negotiate the 2009 stimulus bill in the wake of the financial crisis that included $50 million for the arts that many institutions viewed as critical.

“We had a lot of resistance from members of Congress, especially on the Senate side to get this money in there,” said Nina Ozlu Tunceli, executive director of the Americans for the Arts Action Fund. “The only way it got in there was an agreement between Nancy Pelosi and the White House, and Joe Biden was the lead negotiator for the White House and Nancy Pelosi was the lead negotiator for the House. It was handwritten into the deal in the last minute.”

The Obama administration was the first to enter office with a presidential arts platform. So far, Mr. Biden’s current campaign has not come forward with a similar program of specific policies for the arts, though the Democratic platform acknowledges the economic worth of the arts and in an interview in August with Lin-Manuel Miranda, Mr. Biden went further.

“The future of who we are lies in the arts,” he said. “It is the expression of our soul.”
The White House of John F. Kennedy, who had Robert Frost read a poem at his inauguration, is often cited as one where the importance of the nation’s cultural life was made manifest with the routine celebration of artists at state dinners and other events. But the John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum suggests in its presentations that J.F.K. was not a cultural sophisticate but rather a person who preferred Broadway show tunes over Beethoven. It quotes Jacqueline Kennedy as quipping that his favorite song was “Hail to the Chief.”

Mr. Biden’s taste in music, based on his playlists, runs toward the Beatles, Springsteen, Coldplay and Rod Stewart. The band he would like to play with, he has said, is the Chieftains, the Irish folk group. (He said he would sing “Shenandoah.”) His favorite film, he has said, ​​​​​is “Chariots of Fire.”

James Joyce is among his favorite writers, an affinity for Irish culture that links up with Mr. Biden’s heritage. His taste in poetry also runs toward the Irish. He quoted from“The Republic of Conscience” by Seamus Heaney, the Irish poet, when President Obama awarded him the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 2017.

Poetry has had a great impact on Mr. Biden’s life. As a boy, he has often recalled, he stuttered badly and was bullied at school. To cope he memorized long passages of works by writers like Emerson and Yeats, reciting them alone to his bedroom mirror so he would learn to relax his face and gain confidence. “Meek young men grow up in libraries,” was a favored Emerson quote.

Today, as a politician now known for his loquacity, he regularly quotes from Heaney’s “The Cure at Troy.” He recited some of it during his acceptance speech in August at the Democratic National Convention.

Politics, of course, is not poetry. Constrained by the realism of budget deficits, the will of Congress and competing claims for other projects, a new president may not be able to put arts at the forefront of his thinking.

But a poem can be a powerful campaign tool, as Mr. Biden made evident again Thursday when a favorite stanza from Heaney’s “Cure at Troy” went out on the candidate’s Twitter feed.

Graham Bowley is an investigative reporter on the Culture Desk. He also reported for The Times from Afghanistan in 2012. He is the author of the book “No Way Down: Life and Death on K2.”

Thanks to Americans for the Arts – Arts Action Fund for bringing this article to our attention.

Online Classes with Bobbi Baldwin

CLICK HERE TO REGISTER
Bobbi Baldwin is an artist living in California. She has taught a few classes at the museum in the past and has been Zooming classes for her own students. We are fortunate in having her teach some special classes just for us. In Bobbi’s words: “As a teacher, I must first see my students as individuals and second as a budding artist. Each person I encounter comes to the easel with a different set of learning skills and life lessons. It is my intent to give wings to my students feather by feather. I once heard that the measure of a good teacher is only through the students who surpass them. I look forward to seeing my students inspire the world with their own work.” This is a series of six classes. You can sign up for one or all. Each class is $25 for members and $30 for non-members AND she will make the class recording available for download for $20 so you can watch it over and over on your own time. The classes are two hours long on certain Fridays in November, December, and January from 10:00am until Noon. The class will consist of a 1.5-hour lecture and demonstration and then discussing your own work. You can use your favorite medium.
We hope to “see” you in class. We know you will enjoy your experience. Take care, Hyla Executive Director
Grants Pass Museum of Art | 229 SW G Street, Grants Pass, OR 97526