Trending Articles

Friends of SOAR

For great posts about the business of art, check out The Artsy Shark HERE!
ArtistsBillofRights.org reviews competitions and appeals seeking creative content, listing those that respect your copyrights and highlighting those that don't. Art Matters! publishes calls to artists, and not all of them may be compliant with ABoR's standards. Visit their site to learn more.
We support the Embedded Metadata Manifesto.  Metadata is information such as copyright notice and contact info you can embed in your images to protect your intellectual property, save time when uploading to social sites and promote your art. Click to visit the site and learn more.

Take Action Now- Take two minutes to contact your Senator

Dear Arts Advocate,

June is a packed month of arts action!

This week, the U.S. Senate is taking its turn following the exciting House action last week in approving a $2 million funding increase each for the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) and the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH).

You are receiving this email because your U.S. Senator serves on this powerful Senate Appropriations Committee and will be considering funding for the two Endowments this week!  Take two minutes to contact your Senator again today, even if you’ve been in touch in the past on the FY 2019 request. Send a customizable message in support of a minimum of $155 million for the NEA and NEH.

This quick action follows some key constituent meetings in Washington, DC, last week, with members serving on this committee. We need your help to continue to press upon your U.S. Senators how important this funding is to your state.

We will keep you posted on the outcomes. On Tuesday, the U.S. Senate Interior Appropriations Subcommittee will be considering funding for the NEA and NEH.  And on Thursday, the full Senate Appropriations Committee will be considering the bill.

Thank you for taking this quick action today!


Want to do more? Help us continue this important work by also becoming an official member of the Arts Action Fund.
If you are not already a member, play your part by joining the Arts Action Fund today – it’s free and easy to join.

1000 Vermont Avenue NW
6th Floor
Washington DC . 20005
T 202.371.2830
F 202.371.0424
One East 53rd Street . 2nd Floor
New York NY . 10022
T 212.223.2787
F 212.980.4857
[email protected]
www.AmericansForTheArts.org
www.ArtsActionFund.org

Woman Made June 2018 Call for Art

21st International Open

Exhibition Dates: August 17 – September 8, 2018

Final Entry Due Date: June 15 , 2018

Juror: Nia Pushkarova

Prizes Awarded:  Best of Show $500 / 2nd Place $250 / 3rd Place $100.

CLICK HERE TO SUBMIT WORK
https://womanmadegallery.submittable.com/submitCall for Art for all female identified artists worldwide to submit artwork for this open exhibition. All themes, styles, and media will be considered. Artwork that explores or challenges conceptual and material boundaries is encouraged. 

The application fee for our juried exhibitions is $30 for up to three images of work, plus one detail image if necessary. A limited number of artists who experience financial hardship may be exempt from paying the entry fee; please send us an email to request a fee waiver:[email protected]. All applicants should submit an artist’s statement about their body of work. Accepted artworks must not exceed 72″ horizontally and must not have been previously shown at WMG.About the Juror: Nia Pushkarova

Nia Pushkarova is a multimedia artist and curator. She graduated with a Fine Art degree from the University of Reading, England in 1995, receiving a Kodak award upon her graduation. She is the founder and director of NGO IME since 2004, responsible for organizing Water Tower Art Fest in Sofia, Bulgaria. Pushkarova is part of Artist Initiative Network since 2014, and cofounder and  member of the Bulgarian Festival Association. She participated internationally, both as an artist and organizer, including in the 2017 Nakanojo Biennale, Japan; at EFFE Festival Academy, Atelier for young festival managers, Chiang in 2016; at Parabiosis 3, ”Communication and Co-Existence,” Chongqing, China; and in Mexico, Coahuila “Raya En El Agua.”

In her work, Pushkarova deals with issues related to feminism, localism, and geopolitics, while connecting conceptual and political oriented practice with moments of the autobiographical and poetic. She lives and works in Sofia, Bulgaria. For more information visit:   http://nia.watertowerartfest.com

Banner Image: Performance by Nia Pushkarova

Language of the Voiceless
Art Inspired by, and in Memoriam to Artist Nancy Hild
Exhibition Dates: September 28 – October 20, 2018
Entry Due Date: July 15 , 2018
Juror: Jeramy Turner

CLICK HERE TO SUBMIT WORK
https://womanmadegallery.submittable.com/submit

Nancy’s world was one of secrets: secret symbolism, hidden drawers, compartments within compartments, an anger and intense strength that was shielded behind floral arrangements, chicken feathers, pug dogs, and a gently scathing humor….but upon closer scrutiny these pleasantries were often plastic.  Blow up toys, easily punctured, and vulnerable in their inertness.

Nancy exposed her anger at a world that trampled upon women and animals with equal nonchalance, and she did so by creating a silent language of detail and quietude, submerging her figures in the silence of black velvet encasement.

In homage to this otherworldly artist, Woman Made Gallery is asking for art that emotes that which cannot be put into words: women’s anger, women’s sadness, women speaking to each other in tongues only they can understand.  And animals, as representations of vulnerability and simultaneous resilience.  This is a call for art of emotion, above all…..a call for the expression of voicelessness

The application fee for our juried exhibitions is $30 for up to three images of work, plus one detail image if necessary. A limited number of artists who experience financial hardship may be exempt from paying the entry fee; please send us an email to request a fee waiver:[email protected]. All applicants should submit an artist’s statement about their body of work. Accepted artworks must not exceed 72″ horizontally and must not have been previously shown at WMG.

About the Juror: Jeramy Turner

Jeramy Turner’s primary concern has been for many years the use of art and film to expand consciousness and foment the questioning everything. She wants art to shatter complacency, to disturb and delight viewers and to send them home with a new way of seeing the world.

Turner is a self-taught artist, whose paintings are most often depictions of capitalists’ vulnerability.  She has also a long history of running alternative cinemas, mostly in Chicago. She established the international radical feminist art collective, “SisterSerpents” in 1989, which Jesse Helmes decried as a “hate group” against unborn children. Turner has taught and lectured on the conjuncture of political involvement in art and feminism at numerous universities and institutions in the US (Chicago, Boulder, Jersey City,Cornell).  Her work has been exhibited in London, Berlin, Vienna, Stockholm, Hamburg, Bergen, Norway, and at many alternative and university galleries throughout the US.  Her work is represented in Vienna with Treadwell Galerie, and in New York with Limner Gallery. View Jeramy Turner’s work here: www.jeramyturner.com.

Image: Artwork by Nancy Hild

Join WMG

2150 S. Canalport 4th Fl, Chicago, IL 60608
Enter through Parking Lot at North Entrance on 21st Street
312.738.0400 | Email | Website
Gallery Hours: Thur-Fri 12 – 6pm & Sat-Sun 12 – 4pm

ABOUT WOMAN MADE GALLERY
Woman Made Gallery (WMG) is a tax-exempt, not-for-profit organization founded in 1992. Its mission is to support, cultivate, and promote the diverse contributions of women in the arts through exhibitions and other programs that serve, educate, and enrich our community. We rely on membership contributions and individual donations to create the programs that support our mission.

Pie in the Sky

The other day, I was hunting for a file deep in the recesses of my Dropbox folders when I found a document from over twenty years ago. It was a self-assessment essay, written for my senior portfolio as an undergraduate.
At some point, I must have transferred it from a floppy disk, and I hadn’t read it since I wrote it. I winced before clicking “open,” wondering what young Anna had “assessed.” I started to scan the double-spaced, Times New Roman font. Two paragraphs in, and it wasn’t as terrible as I’d thought. I read on. In one section, I detailed the then-highlights of my writing education. One was a seventh-grade project on The Odyssey. Calypso’s fire of the future inspired me, and I wrote an essay musing on my grown-up life.  
I was simultaneously back in my college basement apartment writing that memory and back in the grade-school classroom writing the original. Meta-historical-memory, maybe.
Toward the end of my nine-page self-assessment came this paragraph about my post-graduation dreams: “Once I have the diploma in my hands, I could find myself teaching, working on the staff of a literary magazine, publishing, curating…or even traveling as a freelance artist and poet. I cannot predict what will burn in Calypso’s fire this time, and I do not want to. Through serendipity and grace, the right things come. I am willing to wait.”
I blinked. I hadn’t realized my twenty-year-old self had known all the things she wanted to do. And then I realized I had done them all—including the “or even” of being a traveling freelance artist and poet—the least likely element on the list at the time, especially since I had no role model for that in pre-social-media 1997. It was my pie-in-the-sky dream.
Young me just reminded middle-aged me of serendipity and grace: Thank you, Anna.
Let’s remind ourselves of our dreams, live them, and keep hatching new ones. Apparently, it’s time I hatch some new dreams….

And apparently, there’s pie in the sky after all!

Representative Chellie Pingree’s Statement at the Full Committee Markup Meeting

The new co-chair of the Congressional Arts Caucus, Representative Chellie Pingree, gives a heartfelt statement at the full committee markup meeting covering arts funding and expanding grantmaking opportunities for the NEA and NEH.

Serenity and Joy at Butler

Palm Pattern #125, Edith Bergstrom, at Butler Institute of American Art

The Butler Institute of American Art, the nation’s first museum devoted exclusively to American art, is a jewel tucked way in an old, slimmed-down Rust Belt town, which was booming when America’s industrial age was in full swing. Youngstown is probably one of the communities hardest hit by the migration of heavy industry out of the U.S. and has had to rebuild since huge job losses in the 1970s. Once a city of 170,000 people, it shrank to around a third of that in the 70s and 80s. As with most cities once nourished by the Erie Canal (like the one in which I live), it has had to find ways to diversify its economy and attract and grow innovative new technology firms despite the Great Lakes climate. In the past decade, Youngstown began to stir with new economic life and because of its history as an industrial powerhouse, back when it attracted immigrant workers from around the world, it remains one of the most racially and culturally diverse cities in the nation. Flint and Detroit may get all the publicity, but Youngstown has to have been buffeted and betrayed by the global economy about as severely as any town in the world—and yet it has found a path forward to a new sort of identity and pride in itself. The Butler seems to assert a kind of unassailable character, an affirmation that a few quiet human virtues—gratitude, appreciation, taste—won’t just survive but can prevail in our current feverish media culture. It feels a little miraculous to walk into this little oasis of beauty and wisdom hidden in “flyover country,” among the ghosts of steel mills almost exactly halfway between New York City and Chicago, in the foothills of the Appalachian Mountains.

I delivered a painting to the Butler this past week for the Midyear exhibition by driving west through Buffalo and Erie. I was startled, when I turned onto Wick Avenue, where the museum is situated on the Youngstown State University campus. It’s a beautiful structure, a little grander in person than in its photographs, with a columned façade that looks as if it were modeled after one of Piero’s early Renaissance piazzas. After I dropped off my still life in its wooden crate, I decided to linger for a look at my destination. It was such a pleasure, I ended up staying far longer than I’d intended. It was like being introduced to someone with whom you feel a deep affinity—both the permanent collection and the current temporary exhibits were evidence of a guiding, deeply affectionate intelligence about great art. That sense of welcoming affinity is how I feel every time I visit the Phillips Collection, and to a slightly lesser degree, smaller museums like the Morgan and the Frick—as if I’m perfectly at home in the space and with the work itself. Many of the museums in cities that once thrived because of the Erie Canal offer art museums whose character is akin to the Butler’s—The Albright-Knox, the Memorial Art Gallery, The Everson and Munson-Williams Proctor. The emphasis on American Art at Butler makes it somehow feel the most companionable of them all. By contrast, this hospitable sense of belonging is what I don’t feel when I tour many galleries and some museums. The Tate Modern in London, for example, had an atmosphere of severity, an almost impersonal sense that the art on display was meant to be a rude awakening, which is fine. That’s certainly a recurrent quality in modernist and post-modern work, and there’s nothing wrong with the occasional swift kick to the head, but here, everything I saw seemed to be imbued with a sense that art can celebrate life as a welcome gift. It was moving to feel this kind of serenity in a community that has endured enormous tribulations as America’s economy reconfigures itself.

It was a pleasure that a few of the paintings I was seeing for the first time had been familiar to me from reproductions for decades–while others were unfamiliar works by some of my favorite artists. It was a delight to finally see, in person, Edward Hopper’s Pennsylvania Coal Town, James Valerio’s Ruth and Cecil Him, and Music by John Koch along the mezzanine in the museum’s central gallery.  Each is an example of the painter’s mastery at its peak. They were on display along with equally powerful work by Janet Fish, Neil Welliver, Alfred Leslie, Will Barnett, Jules Olitski, Paul Jenkins, Motherwell, Avery, Gorky, Ivan Albright and Pollock. Much of the work is exceptionally good, sometimes in ways that aren’t entirely characteristic of the painter’s best-known style. Alfred Leslie isn’t represented with one of his figures lit from below, but with a large grisaille watercolor landscape, a twilight view of a road in Massachusetts. A large abstract by Jenkins, Phenomena Panning Gold, isn’t anything like the intensely colorful swirls of paint most familiar to his admirers, but an almost monotone study of molten lobes that look like a fossil record of an orchid blossom. The work by Chuck Close was a complete surprise, maybe one of the most charming images he’s ever done, a mid-sized portrait of his daughter, Georgia. It’s another grisaille image, hung on the wall opposite the Leslie watercolor, constructed as a mosaic of thick paper pulp chips squeezed through a metal mesh. As always with his more recent work, it’s a marvel how Close creates an impressionistically accurate and convincing glimpse of the human face—this time cheerful and smiling—through such rough deconstructions of its photographic source. His usual grids are here replaced by chunks of pulp organically arranged, like an assembly of thumbprints. Even seeing Arsen Roje’s work for the first time was eye-opening. In reproductions, his depictions of scenes from classic movies look a little too ironic, sharing the slightly jaundiced irony that seems to be essential to Pop Art, yet the dramatic scene from To Have and Have Not is technically masterful. It goes to interesting places with oil paint that seem unique to Roje. It made me grin to see the perfect likeness of Sheldon Leonard—the bartender from It’s a Wonderful Life, and an actor who went on to produce of the Dick Van Dyke show —finding his nook here in an art museum.

And that was just the central gallery. Other smaller gallery spaces at the museum were devoted to different themes and mediums: print-making, pastels, art about sports, art about the American west. Each one was just as interesting, surprising and beautifully curated. Wolf Kahn’s small drawings of old barns looked exactly right in proximity to Mary Sipp-Green’s twilight scenes as well as an Olitski impressionistic drawing of a dusk landscape. In the print room, a lithograph by Bellows, a quick sketch of one of his daughters, showed amazing draftsmanship, as quick and confident as a Rembrandt or a Matisse line drawing, the shine of her hair effortlessly rendered with a few quick strokes of crayon on stone. And the solo show, Edith Bergstrom: Exotic Palms, was equally impressive. Her work uses the distinctive patterns of palms, their fronds, the thorny armor they leave behind as they wither and fall off the trunk, the spikes, all aspects of a palm’s anatomy are sources for her to use in creating images that straddle representation and abstraction, some palms looming up like titans, others just a web of syncopated light and dark blades and stripes. Most exceptional were Bergstrom’s watercolors that simplify a dense thatch of leaves into backlit plumage, plants that look like winged raptors swooping in for the kill, or angels hovering directly in your path, just off the ground. The confidence, precision and simplicity of these paintings, as well as their sense of color, is breathtaking.

Mount Lassen National Park Painting Plein Air with Stefan Baumann

Travel with Stefan Baumann and watch him painting outdoors in Mt Lassen National Park. Witness as he captures painting trees, lakes and grass. This is part of Baumann’s PBS television show

Inspiring Millions to paint outdoors This video is about Touch Move and Inspire. Get a free Book at his website

www.StefanBaumann.com. The paintings of Stefan Baumann reveal the true spirit of nature by transporting the viewer to distant lands that have gone unseen and undisturbed. With the huge success of Baumann’s weekly PBS television series “The Grand View: America’s National Parks through the Eyes of an Artist,” millions of people witness for themselves the magic Stefan portrays on canvas, his passion for nature and the American landscape. By distilling his love of nature into a luminous painting of brilliant, saturated color that transcends conventional landscape and wildlife art, Baumann has captured the hearts and imaginations of a generation. Each painting becomes an experience rather than merely a picture – a vivid manifestation of his special and personal union with nature and the outdoor world. Through his mastery of light, color, and artful composition, Baumann invites you to experience nature in its purity. It is no wonder that for many years distinguished American collectors, including former presidents and financial icons, have sought out his work.

The post Mount Lassen National Park Painting Plein Air with Stefan Baumann appeared first on Stefan Baumann – The Grand View: Paintings by Stefan Baumann.

Call to Artists 7th Annual Artoberfest

Call to Artists

SouthernOregonGuild.org

for 7th Annual Artoberfest  
A Juried Art & Fine Craft Fair 
in the Beautiful Illinois Valley of Southern Oregon

Saturday & Sunday, October 20 and 21

Sponsored by the Southern Oregon Guild of Artists & Artisans
For Prospectus & Application go to
APPLY ONLINE
<http://www.southernoregonguild.org
Questions: Call 541-659-3858 or 541-592-5019
DEADLINE
SATURDAY, JULY 14, 2018 


 
Guild Gallery & Art Center
Hours: 10-4pm, Tue-Sat
541-592-5019
 
Mailing
P.O. Box 1596, Cave Junction, OR 97523
The prospectus with details about the show, as well as the application, is online at:
SouthernOregonGuild.org

More Americans Able To Benefit From Arts

Americans for the Arts - Arts Action Fund
              

Wednesday, June 6, 2018

Dear Arts Advocate,

Earlier today, the full U.S House Appropriations Committee voted to approve last month’s Interior Subcommittee vote to increase funding by $2 million each to the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) and the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH), bringing them up to $155 million for FY 2019. New Congressional Arts Caucus Co-Chair Chellie Pingree (D-ME) was also successful in adding the following report language to the arts funding bill:

“The Committee acknowledges and appreciates decades of arts and humanities advocacy by the late Rep. Louise M. Slaughter. In her memory, the Committee encourages NEA and NEH to expand grant-making activities in a manner that honors her advocacy, especially in rural and under-served areas, so more Americans are able to benefit from the economic, social, and educational impacts of the arts and humanities.”

Next, the bill will move on to be reviewed and voted on by the U.S. Senate Interior Appropriations Subcommittee. As the bill moves to the Senate, we have invited three grassroots arts leaders to “Fly-In” from Missouri, Montana and West Virginia to meet with their Senators and advocate for this increased funding bill. Senators Roy Blunt (R-MO), Steve Daines (R-MT), Jon Tester (D-MT), and Shelley Moore Capito (R-WV), are all members of the Senate Interior Appropriations Subcommittee. We hope this advocacy strategy will continue to be effective throughout the appropriations process.

Help us keep pressure on the Senate and provide support to pro-arts leaders by contributing to our Campaign to Increase Funding for the Arts in America.

Nina Ozlu Tunceli
Executive Director

P.S. Thank you for your support. Please keep checking back to our blog post for more information. We’ll be posting a detailed table of the FY’19 House and Senate appropriation allocations for each of the federal cultural agencies.

 

Take action now!

Art du Jour June 2018 Featured Artists

During the month of June, Judy Benson LeNier’s work will be featured in the Salon and Mary Jo Heath will be the featured artist on the back wall at Art du Jour Gallery, 213 E. Main in Medford. Music on Third Friday will be provided by Minstrel Stream.

A professional photographer who specializes in photographing Wildlife, Judy Benson LaNier

Guest Artist Judy Benson LaNier

A professional photographer who specializes in photographing Wildlife, Judy Benson LaNier’s love of Africa began in 1961 when her family hosted Ashland, Oregon’s first Rotary-sponsored exchange student who was from South Africa. The bond forged then has continued through the years as the two families visit each other in Africa and the U.S.A. The magnetism of Africa is strong and Judy has returned there eight times. Her range of photography has expanded to include North American and Hawaiian Flora and Fauna as well as landscapes.

Judy Benson LaNier says, ““When I first went to Africa I was amazed that the animals ignored us completely. They went about their business as if nothing extraordinary was happening. Little did they know that something quite extraordinary was happening inside me! I was experiencing a catharsis, a cleansing of my soul. I was being taught what is truly important in life and I was filled with joy by the lessons!

I hope that my photographs bring you a taste of life in the Bush.”

Her photographs capture the essence of the wildlife in amazing detail. For many years Judy led Photographic Safaris to countries in Eastern and Southern Africa, teaching photography and holding workshops for participants. Her Photographic work is currently represented in five art galleries in Oregon. Judy has published seven books of her photography, the latest being FACING LIONS which recounts an adventure she enjoyed in Africa.

Mary Jo Heath presents a body of work themed “Southern Oregon”

Featured Artist Mary Jo Heath

As the featured artist for the month of June, Mary Jo Heath presents a body of work themed “Southern Oregon”. She was born in Coos Bay, Oregon. At the age of five, she moved to the Rogue Valley with her family and attended school at Central Point and graduated from Medford High School

Mary Jo taught art in public schools for more than 30 years.  The majority of her teaching experience is in Central Point Schools. In 1994, she began working with pastels and has won several awards from the Pastel Society of Oregon National and Membership shows.

When asked about her art, she said, “I have gained experience with a variety of art media during my time teaching art in public schools. Of all the media that I have tried, pastel is the most immediate, the most expressive, and the most forgiving. The pastels become an extension of my hand as I try to interpret what I see and how I feel about a subject matter.  It could be the light, the compositions or the challenge of something I have never painted before. Sometimes the subject matter becomes a vehicle for a more abstract expression. Whatever the inspiration, pastel says it for me.”

Please come and enjoy the wonderful art of both Judy Benson LaNier and Mary Jo Heath at the Art du Jour Gallery. Judy’s photos will bring you closer to wildlife in an exciting way.  Mary Jo Heath’s pastels show her passion for pastels.

Southern Oregon Plein Air 2018 Is Coming! Plan Your Life Accordingly.

Central
                                                          Art Logo

Art In The Rough:

A Plein Air Vendor Fair  at Central Art! 

It’s your first plein air “field assignment.” The easel’s packed, brushes are stowed, paints and canvas tucked into the nooks and crannies of your rig – which is now bursting at the seams! “But wait,” you say, “what am I missing? Is there something better I could be using?”

Bring that intrepid spirit to Central Art during our Plein Air Vendor Fair

Wednesday June 20th, 2018,

and expand your artistic horizons with a plethora of the latest and greatest in plein air essentials that will enrich your experience.

Watch live demonstrations and talk with the experts about what’s new and exciting, enjoy great discounts, and enter to win a Grand Prize!

Plus: don’t forget to share your art adventures with us on Instagram! Be sure to tag @centralart1 in your post, and use the hashtag: #rogueartadventures . We look forward to seeing what you create in the places that inspire you!

*For full schedule of events and to Register Online, be sure to visit

www.soartistsworkshop.com

VISIT CENTRAL ART!