Trending Articles

Friends of SOAR

For great posts about the business of art, check out The Artsy Shark HERE!
ArtistsBillofRights.org reviews competitions and appeals seeking creative content, listing those that respect your copyrights and highlighting those that don't. Art Matters! publishes calls to artists, and not all of them may be compliant with ABoR's standards. Visit their site to learn more.
We support the Embedded Metadata Manifesto.  Metadata is information such as copyright notice and contact info you can embed in your images to protect your intellectual property, save time when uploading to social sites and promote your art. Click to visit the site and learn more.

Sherie’ Franssen

Hell, rising from a thousand thrones, oil on canvas, 77″ x 77″, Dolby Chadwick

Celebrate Halloween 2017 with Natural Earth Paints

Celebrate this HALLOWEEN season with our Natural Face Paints!

SALE on our Large and Mini Individual Face Paint Jars! VALID UNTIL OCTOBER 31, 2017

halloween

Celebrate this HALLOWEEN season with our Natural Face Paints!

***
Large Face Paint Jars
***

SALE on our Large and Mini Individual Face Paint Jars!

VALID UNTIL OCTOBER 31, 2017

***
face paints small
***
NATURAL EARTH PAINT-Logo
***

We thank you for your continued support and appreciate any feedback or suggestions!

Love,
The Natural Earth Paint Family

©2017 Natural Earth Paint | 330 E. Hersey Street, Suite 6, Ashland, Oregon 97520

Watercolor & Ink Studies – Just For Fun

Introduction.

Hi!  I’d like to simply share a couple of watercolor studies.  

Watercolor Studies: A Pear and its shadow

Why Do Studies.

There are several reasons why I like doing these studies.  Here are a few reasons that come immediately to mind.

  • Focus:  One has to pay attention when working with watercolor.  The paint moves and I like to take advantage of the paint’s nature.  However, it can get away from me if I’m not paying attention!
  • Fun:  Its watercolor, for the same reason you have to focus: it moves.  
  • Muscle memory.  These studies help develop the skills of observation and brush control.  Doing them often enables me to remember what to do when faced with paper, paint and water.
  • Draw & Paint.  I get to work on both drawing and painting skill sets!  What could be better?

About the Subject Matter.

The subject matter was inspired by the October list of prompts by the website “Doodlewash®”.   There is a list for every day in October, just as a prompt in case you are grappling with what to draw.  

For October 20th, the prompt was “pears”; no problem, I have some pears ripening so I drew and painted one.  

But, the prompt for October 21st was “corn”.  My husband and I already ate up the candy corn.  And, we don’t have any ears of corn in the refrigerator.  What to do?

Aha!  I have a bottle of “Corn Huskers Lotion” sitting on my kitchen sink counter!  Sounds like “corn” to me.

So, tomorrow’s prompt is “barn”; I don’t live in a barn or have one.  So, what to do?  My thinking cap is on; I like this sort of thing.

watercolor studies : Corn Huskers Lotion

Adding Ink.

Oh, by the way, this month is also “Inktober™“.  I thought it would be fun to add some ink today, hence the inking around my “Corn Huskers Lotion” bottle.

In any case, I hope you enjoy the watercolor sketches.  Thanks!

#WorldWatercolorGroup #Inktober2017

 

Share

The post Watercolor & Ink Studies – Just For Fun appeared first on Margaret Stermer-Cox.

Owls in the Wilderness by Eva Thiemann at the Berryman Gallery through Nov 2

Eva Thiemann
Owls in the Wilderness

October 3, 2017- November 2, 2017

Thiemann Eva_Woodland Warden

WOODLAND WARDEN, oil painting by Eva Thiemann

Eva Thiemann, who has previously been known mostly for her oil paintings of Alaskan bears, has ventured into portrayals of owls with grace and finesse. Her signature style of abstract backgrounds supporting realistic subjects has carried over into her new works beautifully. A show of her oil paintings of Owls in the Wilderness is on display at the Berryman Gallery in the Craterian Theater. The show can be seen when attending a performance at the Craterian. Performances remaining while Eva’s show is up include The Simon & Garfunkel Story on October 26, 2017 at 7:30 PM, Rogue Valley Harmonizers present Songs of Broadway with VOCAL SPECTRUM October 28, 2017 at 2:00 PM and 7:00 PM, MOMIX – Opus Cactus on November 1, 2017 at 7:30 PM, and The Improvised Shakespeare Company onNovember 2, 2017 at 7:30 PM. If you have tickets for any of these performances, please be sure to arrive early and take time to enjoy Thiemann’s work. If you don’t…grab tickets today and plan on a pleasant evening of a performance and art gallery exhibit in one outing!

The Rogue Gallery & Art Center curates the Berryman Gallery, located within the adjacent Craterian Theater at the Collier Center for the Performing Arts, at 23 S. Central in Medford. You may visit the Berryman before the Craterian’s performances. See their website for performance dates at www.craterian.org/calendar.

Art Reception at the Rogue Gallery on October 20, 2017

Art Reception at the Rogue Gallery on October 20, 2017

Alx Fox Sunrise Through the Mist Abstract Acrylic on Canvas, 36" x 36"

Alx Fox Sunrise Through the Mist

Main Gallery exhibit:

Elements: Earth, Water, Fire, Wind, Eleanor Erskine, Alx Fox, Zelpha Hutton, Keith Johnson, and Dan Tilden

Exhibit date: September 29 – November 10, 2017

 Artists in this exhibit explore the classical idea of the elements: earth, water, fire, and wind. Described as the simplest essential parts of all things, the four elements have fascinated artists throughout history. Printmaker Eleanor Erskine, sculptor Dan Tilden, and abstract painters Alx Fox, Zelpha Hutton, and Keith Johnson uniquely create artwork reflecting this concept of the natural world.

Eleanor H.  Erskine received a BFA in Painting/Printmaking from the Kansas City Art Institute and a MFA in Printmaking with special focus in Sculpture from the Cranbrook Academy of Art.  She has taught at Maine College of Art, Kansas City Art Institute, Chautauqua Institute, Penland School of Crafts, and Portland State University.

Medford artist, Alx Fox is an abstract expressionist painter who is driven by her passion for self-expression through bold blended colors and distinctive textures. She studied photography, art history and design at Barat College, Lake Forest, Ill.

Zelpha Hutton was an art teacher for twenty nine years and owned Paisley Yarn Shop in Ashland for twenty three years. Her paintings are a reflection of her personal experiences, the spirit of a landscape or imaginary narration. She resides in Central Point.

Keith Johnson received a Bachelor’s of Art and a Masters of Art from the California College of Arts and Crafts. He has been an active painter and printmaker for over five decades. His painting process he describes as “letting go and allowing the paint to develop its own life and its own voice”. Keith lives in Jacksonville.

Ashland artist, Dan Tilden has a passion for woodworking. Using the natural features from the tree, he turns hollow vessels, pots, and bowls on a wood lathe to create an elegant shape while keeping the piece in the most natural state possible. Using a natural edge opening, drying wet wood to warp and move, and using a knot or void in the shape adds character to the piece and lets the piece “speak for itself”.

 

Elm Burl by Dan Tilden

Dan Tilden’s Elm Burl

 

Community Gallery Exhibit

In the Community Gallery

A Moment in Time: Paintings by Trisha Stricklin

 October 13 – November 17, 2017

Ashland artist Trisha Stricklin’s still life, landscape and figurative paintings are rendered sensitively and accurately in high contrast, vibrant colors.

Trisha Stricklin was born and raised in the San Joaquin Valley of California. She received a Bachelor of Fine Arts Degree the California College of Arts and Crafts. For twenty five years, she worked in San Francisco as a designer/art director and illustrator with companies such as the Sharper Image, Smith and Hawken, Gumps, and Williams Sonoma. She moved to the Rogue Valley in 2004 and continued her commercial work. She now devotes most of her time to painting. She describes her oil paintings as “impressionistic realism.” She states, “I strive to produce an accurate rendering of my subject, but not every detail needs to be presented.  There is a place for full detail, and there is a place for space and simplicity.”

Refreshments by Harry and David will be served at the reception on October 20, from 5:00 – 8:00 pm.

 Call the Rogue Gallery & Art Center for more info: (541) 772-8118

Check out more fun activities at: www.roguegallery.org
The Rogue Gallery & Art Center is the Rogue Valley’s premier non-profit community art center founded in 1960 to promote and nurture the visual arts in the Rogue Valley. The Art Center showcases emerging and established artists, presents fine crafts by area artisans, and offers a broad range of visual art classes and workshops for all ages.

Rogue Gallery & Art Center is located in downtown Medford at 40 South Bartlett Street. The hours of operation are Tuesday through Friday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Saturday from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. We are open every third Friday until 8:00pm.

For those of you who have been eyeing these particular prints,…

For those of you who have been eyeing these particular prints, here’s a heads up that there are only a few left in my limited edition run. Five of the beetle and three of the Passion flower. I won’t be making more so get em while you can! 💜
www.michelleanderstshop.com

Grand Jury prize finalist

Breakfast With Golden Raspberries, oil on linen, 22″ x 46″

I was humbly surprised to be informed recently that I’m a finalist for the Manifest Grand Jury Prize, with a cash award of $2,500, which will be bestowed on the best single work exhibited in the entire 13th season at Manifest Gallery. This means the organization’s panel picked Breakfast with Golden Raspberries as the best work in its particular exhibit earlier this year. The final award will involve the contribution of as many as 20 jurors and the few dozen works under consideration will have been culled from more than 15,000 entries to all of the Manifest shows throughout the past season.

Here’s a summary of the process from the notification:

I’m writing to notify you that, now that our 13th season has concluded (and we’ve gotten #14 off to a good start) we’re launching the final stage of the Manifest Grand Jury Prize for your exhibition season, and your work is among the finalists to be considered.
Since we announced the MGJP partway through the season you may or may not be aware of all it entails. Rest assured, there is little you will have to do, although we hope you’ll chat about it in your networks, share your success to this stage, and, if you win, shout it from the rooftops. If you would like further information and background, rather than belabor it  here, I’ll ask that you read up on the prize at http://www.manifestgallery.org/about/awards/grand_jury_prize.
In short, your works were scored the highest by our jury (either alone or tied with others) in the exhibition in which you participated. The entire pool of works, out of many hundred we exhibited across 30 exhibits during the season, are those which did likewise. This pool comprises approximately 40 works.
I’m delighted to have gotten this recognition for a painting that won awards in two other shows last year, including a best in show at Marin MOCA.
I recently told Jim Hall, at Oxford Gallery, that I loved this painting. He laughed and said, “If you do say so yourself.” I laughed along with him, because what I really meant is that there is nothing in this painting that bugs me. To say I love it is, in my lexicon, essentially to say it doesn’t trouble me. (It’s a little more than that, but not much.) Normally, in almost every painting I complete, something continues to bother me about it, something I am at a loss for how to fix–or too cowardly to risk messing up the painting by attempting to fix it. In this painting there is nothing that needs fixing, and that’s a very rare quality in one of my paintings. In a painting I’m finishing now, another small still life with a patterned bowl–I keep going back to them–I’m very happy and surprised by much of the canvas, but one particular area of the background continues to bother me. It doesn’t look wrong or bad, but something in it just subliminally nags at me as not quite right. It’s fine, and few other people would see anything amiss, but something about those distant kitchen cabinets keeps asking for adjustment. I went after it this morning but even as I completed the amendment, I was wondering how to neutralize, just slightly, the color of that sector. As Sam Kinison said so immortally, it never ends.
Sometimes it does end, though–as with this award winner. No matter how often I look at it, I know it’s done. And nothing about it bugs me.

Thiebaud, part 2

Two Paint Cans, Wayne Thiebaud

More Thiebaud, on how he isn’t and was never a Pop artist, is self-taught, and doesn’t trust art that’s rooted in ideas, from another book published in the same year as the one in the last post, Realists at Work, John Arthur, Watson-Guptill, New York, 1983:

You’ve described yourself as a self-taught painter. Does that mean you didn’t study painting?

No. I started as a sign painter and did fashion illustration, furniture drawing, lettering, and cartooning without going to school. At twenty-eight or twenty-nine, when I went back to college, I got credit for most art courses by special examination by that time I had exhibits, Army experience, and so on. I have courses on my record showing I studied painting and drawing, but those were generally by challenge; they just gave me grades. I took art history, courses like the psychology of art, lots of art education courses, but no formal training.

I believe I saw your rows of pies in Life magazine in the early sixties. Your work kept getting linked with Pop Art at that time, which I thought was a bit of a distortion. Much of Pop Art relied on the look of mechanical processes and played down the effect of the hand.

If anything, my interest was the opposite, more out of the tradition of Velazquez, Manet, to Eakins, through people like Jasper John and Richard Diebenkorn, for whom the signature gesture is central.

When I painted the first row of pies, I can remember sitting and laughing—sort of a silly relief—“Now I have flipped out!” The one thing that allowed me to do that was having been a cartoonist. I did one and thought, “That’s really crazy, but no one is going to look at these things anyway, so what the heck.”

Some people have talked about the irony in my work and the idea terrifies me. That’s something I’m not interested in on a conscious level, and the reason I’m not is because that kind of explication of an idea vitiates its power. If I were using what intelligence I have to be ironic, I couldn’t be smart enough for myself. I would be disappointed, and I’m generally disappointed in irony for that very reason. It seems self-explanatory and anticipatory in a way that never interests me. The reason I don’t like classical surrealism if there is such a thing, is that it seems already to have arrived before you’ve seen it. Even a good painter like Magritte—his ideas put me off.

You may be opposed to irony, Wayne, but not to wit.

No, I think wit is a very high form of attainment. Any kind of wit is one of the toughest things to do. Also, it’s one of the things that’s missing in so much of the art world. When you lose the capacity for a sense of humor in an art form, you lose a sense of perspective.

I was just talking to Harry Rand, who wrote a book on Gorky, about how, when you get so you can do something, you don’t want to do it anymore, and he said, “Yeah, that’s very hard, but I think one of the things that painters have to learn is that it’s all right once in a while to shoot fish in a barrel.”

 

Yummy Alliteration: Poets & Painters & Pie at Pennington Farms!

We couldn’t resist! Join us for a fun afternoon of playing with words & paints & Pennington’s signature “cutie pies.” You’ll leave with a finished 8″ x 10″ painting, a poem, and a tummy full of goodness. $95 for all supplies & pie & instruction. Email me to register: [email protected]

Another Story from my Upcoming Book

Here is another sample story from my upcoming book, an example of the true (and sometimes pretty harrowing) stories that will be incorporated into my memoirs. I’m so excited about this memoir editing project and hope you will visit my GoFundMe campaign to learn more!

Download (PDF, 11.08MB)

The post Another Story from my Upcoming Book appeared first on Wendy Gell Jewelry and Art.