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What will we send out?

When I created the Word-Painting Project, the idea was to do something that could encourage others…and cover my grocery bill while chalet-sitting for friends in Switzerland (I’m a practical poet!). 

Though I thought I was making time for the project, the project made time for me. It gave me time to watch the light on the Alps and the clouds catch on their peaks. It gave me time to listen to the symphony of cowbells on the Holsteins munching wildflowers on the slope of the next-door chalet. And it was a joy to share that time in words and images by creating a word-painting every day for ten days. 

Back home, the prints of those originals already arrived, and I’ve hand-addressed the first of ten batches to go out over the summer. This week, a stack of Word-Painting No. 1 prints began their stamped way through the postal system to their recipients, and I blessed them as I dropped them into the post-office slot.  

This was the last image I created for the Word-Painting Project. It seemed appropriate to end with a question: What will we send out into the bright world beyond us? Some days, the world is bright, as in sunny and good—like this summer solstice day. And some days, the world is bright, as in the harsh glare of a world in need. Regardless of the natural or emotional weather, I choose to send out something encouraging. And with it, a big dose of gratitude. 

So, in each of Switzerland’s three, official languages, thank you for being part of the Word-Painting journey: danke, merci, grazie.

The sorrows and joys of taffy

Here I am with a taffy painting I started in February, but have been deterred from finishing because of multiple family obligations. Nevertheless, slow but steady.

I embarked on a series of enlarged images of salt-water taffy last year, unable to reach cruising speed for the work because of a slow flood of continuous family obligations. Over the past year, I’ve had to keep halting my painting (and writing) every two or three weeks for multiple reasons, including several trips to Florida to prepare my parents’ condo for rental or sale, since they’re no longer able to get down there—as well as flights to L.A. to spend a welcome week with my kids and grandkids, after long absences. Having just gotten back from one of those weeks in L.A., my mother fell and broke her hip and then amazed the Highland Hospital staff with her rapid ability to get moving again after a partial hip replacement at the age of 94. So, with my time devoted to helping both parents adapt to all of this at home, my work has been on hold for yet another week as of today. 

Caring for aged parents has provided an energizing counterpoint to work at the easel, especially because I’ve been focused on such what seems at first such a trivial subject, dollops of salt-water taffy veiled behind twists of waxed paper, in contrast to the somber, chastening experience of advanced age. Lauren Purje, after she saw my paintings of candy jars seven or eight years ago, remarked, “There’s sadness in them.” It was undoubtedly what charmed her about the paintings, though at the time I was nonplussed by the comment, unconscious of everything about those paintings other than my formal intentions. Sad candy seemed like an oxymoron. They offered me a way to bring more color to a still life—giving me a softened geometric image, a grid, and the format let me choose the colors I could put down. It also offered a balance between flatness and representational depth. The emotional pull of the image wasn’t even on my radar—I was too aware of my formal goals to be alert to what the act of painting had smuggled into the image on its own, while my attention was diverted to the paint itself. In other words, the candy jars were a reminder of how I think art actually operates, embodying a world of feeling and imagination despite an artist’s conscious intentions, conveying more than the artist is, or can ever be, aware of.

I chose taffy for formal reasons as well: the way in which it enabled me to pick and choose different color harmonies and presented loosely abstract properties in the shapes of the paper and the molded nougat-like candy full of supple curves with a few sharp edges. Each bit of wrapped taffy, when the image is enlarged, looks sculptural, muscular, but also ethereal and vulnerable to me—like the contrast between the modeled wax and fabric of Degas’ sculpture of an adolescent dancer. The spirals and tiers and spots of color in the candy itself feel—to me—like wistful, sotto voce references to color field painting, translated into three dimensions. Stacking them and setting them near a window for the shadows cast by a single source of natural light, I’m fascinated by how much drama the images can evoke, like glimpses of rare birds. Their shapes and lines, and the variation in opacity and transparency, give them an almost psychological resonance when I look at the finished work. They seem full of personality. And, simply in their shape and the way they catch the light, a stacked pair of these treats evokes for me a dozen different things: insect wings, tropical fish, rock faces, raptors, carved marble, Elizabethan portraits, skulls, and flesh clothed in sheer fabric. There is a slightly erotic allure in the way these little chunks of sugar present themselves for viewing though the lumpy quality of their form makes this sort of reflection amusing. All of it is amusing. It’s a little funny simply to find oneself painting images of candy and talking at any length about it. Thiebaud kept having to fight the notion that he was crazy to pick his sweet subject matter in the beginning. 

Whether or not anyone else has an inkling about any of this while looking at these paintings, it’s what makes me want to stick with it for quite a while: all of these associations give the act of painting these images a luxuriant feel of being immersed in an encouraging certainty that this is exactly what I should be painting right here and now. That’s a rare feeling, because it’s so easy to get away from the feel of settling into exactly what you most want to do with paintings that answer to what you want to see when you are done. I forget about how slowly the work proceeds and delight in the process itself, in the feel of the paint as I apply it. When you are in that zone, it hardly matters what you are depicting or how, because there’s a sense of perfection in the process that justifies itself anc conveys something essential about painting to a viewer. Again, this is ironic. I’m representing objects riddled with imperfections, wrinkles, crimps, dimples, and cracks, squeezed, smudged, torn here and there, and yet by painting all of that a certain way, they look exactly right and they evoke for me the perfection of any and all imperfections in a subject when they are subsumed into a good painting.  

Lately, too, these paintings feel like an intersection between life and art for me. I’ve been surprised at how the light itself, the way it falls on these punished-looking yet stubbornly cheery servings of empty calories reminds me of the slow, suffering decline my parents are enduring. A sentinel of mortality hovers in my peripheral vision every day now, the sense of impending surrender that skulks around the emotional family campfire, waiting for the flames to gutter.  They aren’t going anywhere. Their health is comparatively good, broken bones notwithstanding. But the erosion of age is relentless. The perky quality of this candy, seemingly eager to be unwrapped and enjoyed, reminds me inevitably of how my parents continue to crack jokes despite the indignities and disorders of advanced age and how they delight in the simplest things, the company of nearly anyone—how they still revel in the color of new leaves in the spring, the beauty of their grandchildren (as hard to make out through the distortions of macular degeneration as it is to see edges of candy behind waxed paper), the weary smile of a son showing up every other day to help. The nurses and techs who came to my mother’s room loved her after three days. She and my father still live independently at home, but it’s a cluttered place now, full of devices to help my father move around, countless pill bottles, machines to magnify whatever my mother needs to read, and lingering smells that wouldn’t have been there ten years ago. They are at the age when they still want to live, and be with the ones they love, though they are ready for whatever might follow the encroaching squalor of a struggle that gets harder from one month to the next.  I could try painting portraits of my parents, but in an oblique way, for me, these taffy paintings are representations of their lives, their struggle, their spirit.

So the sadness of jelly beans may be in the process of being upstaged by the brave tristesse of taffy. Whether the work conveys joy or sadness, life or death, if they turn out the way I want, the images this subject gives me will—I hope—hint at a larger beauty that encompasses all of those polarities. One thing that hasn’t changed and doesn’t fluctuate is love and much of this work is a celebration and direct expression of it. I love my family. I love my work. I may be painting taffy for quite a while, and all those wings that will never fly. I hope I can find time to paint other things as well, though maybe I shouldn’t worry about that just yet. 

Call to Artists for the Oregon State Fair Fine Art Show

2019 CALL To ARTISTS

Oregonstatefair.org
Online Registration Open NOW

oregon state fair logo
Professional Artist Online Entry Deadline:
July 15, 10 pm
Non-Professional Artist, Young Artist and Oregon Award Online Entry Deadline:
August 7, 10 pm


NEW AWARDS FOR 2019 

(in addition to our traditional awards)

Show your Oregon Pride!
To be eligible, entries
need to be Oregon-
centric – highlighting a physical aspect
of Oregon or promoting an export or
commodity. The winner will receive a
special ribbon and cash prize.

And
Governor’s Choice Award
This year we are honored to have Oregon’s Governor, Kate Brown,
selecting a prestigious Governor’s Choice award winner. Sponsored by Dick Blick Art Supplies and Gamblin Paint

Please contact us with any questions. 971-701-6571 or email
[email protected]

David Smith’s material magic

Lakeside-sunglare, oil on birch ply, 8×10 inches, 2019

I recently received my copies of INPA 8, from Manifest Creative Research Gallery, and I’ve been finding much to admire in its pages. I’m going to post some of the work over the next few weeks. It was especially pleasant to see David Smith represented yet again. He’s pitching almost a perfect game since Manifest started publishing INPA: getting his work into, I believe, all but one of the annual compilations of great contemporary painting. He used to have his studio in Hong Kong, which was appropriate, since in most of his work there’s a very Asian sense of unoccupied space, a philosophical void. As in the work of Clifford Still and Sam Francis, that sense of vacancy has as much to do with the effect of his images as whatever emerges from the emptiness. It links his work as well with sumiye painting and Chinese scrolls. It’s a Taoist esthetic that he doesn’t address candidly in his own statements about his work, though what he does say about his process echoes the principles of gutai, which finds new forms of creative expression by exploring the effects and properties of physical materials, again an Asian tradition, but out of Japan, rather than China.

From his website:

These paintings depict natural forms and spaces on solid, wood panels. They use the chemical qualities of oil washes to disrupt, dissolve or decay the image surface. Light, space, time and environmental decay play against natural elements. The images exist in a state of flux; location and time are not always apparent. The light, space and forms are shifting, living and dying, displaying a fragile and temporary nature. Influenced by ink painting, abstraction and photography, they aim for a sense of the mysterious and the elemental.

I recall the earliest work of his I saw in some of the initial INPA publications, work from nine or ten years ago. It showed a helicopter or jet suspended in fog, giving me the sense of being an entomologist discovering an unclassified caddis fly, with human technology seemingly as evanescent as a newly hatched insect. Having moved back to Ireland, he has evolved a process that, more than ever, prompts me to ask a question I emailed to Jason Franz years ago, knowing there would be no answer on the other end: “How in the world does he do that?”

I suspect there may be some originating step using the transfer of a photographic image onto his support, which is then worked by hand, the way R.H. Quaytman begins by silkscreening a Polaroid image onto a surface and then improvising on it with other materials. It’s possible, but the evidence of his brush is often so distinct that he doesn’t seem to be working from a transferred photographic template. Whatever he’s doing, I’ll bet he doesn’t want to talk about it in detail. I wouldn’t. He should consider his techniques proprietary. Like Quaytman, Smith reduces his image to the simplest possible interlocking layers of differing values—usually eliminating almost all color other than dark-to-light grays. The effect is wondrous: it’s as if he creates an astonishingly convincing landscape that recedes into a more and more atomized haze, each tier of earth or trees or water inhabiting its own particular distance from the eye. In some of the most recent work this year, he shows land masses rising from a remote lake, and these forms could be rock or trees or both, it’s hard to tell, and yet without being able to actually identify what you are seeing, the image looks perfectly real, even with the long parallel lines clawed into the paint, as if with a comb, on the shining surface of the lake. The effect is to make you feel a sense of convincing verisimilitude, true to dawn landscapes you’ve seen in the past, while at the same time introducing you to an entirely imaginary world, an almost abstract collage of shapes, where the scraped and squeegeed-looking ridges of paint somehow magically are both an inert substance disrupting a flat surface and yet exactly what the eye needs in order to seize on a perfectly-rendered, natural vista.

Serene solitudes

In Her Mirror II, detail, Shawn Downey, oil on panel, 2018

I visited Arcadia, in Pasadena, after Shawn Downey’s solo show closed nearly half a year ago now, yet some of his work was still hanging in the rear gallery and I was able to get a close look at half a dozen paintings, which was a great treat—including this one hanging above its shipping crate, ready for its trip home to Canada. Downey’s minimalist interiors, with a single contemplative woman, with the occasional tattoo, in stripped-down, geometric spaces, were a marvel. It felt like a contemporary fusion of Vermeer’s light and Hopper’s sympathetic eavesdropping on urban solitude, but with a brighter, more serene glow. I wish I’d been there to see all of the work.

Art du Jour News June 2019

Art du Jour student art show entry. Image provided by Charity Hubbard

June 2019 Third Friday

Art du Jour Gallery, 213 E. Main Street in Medford eagerly anticipates a return of Charity Hubbard’s student art exhibit for our Third Friday reception on June 21st, 5-8 pm.  Despite an earlier announcement that our musical entertainment would be held back for this months’ event, due to popular demand we have scheduled classical guitarist Rod Petrone to perform for the evening.

Featured Guest Artist Charity Hubbard in Salon June and July

Frequently painting from life on location “en plein air” and people from life is important to Charity Hubbard.  She feels that the regular exercise of painting from life enables her to better capture life, light and a truer sense of atmosphere, even when painting from life is not possible.

Still life by Charity Hubbard.

Still life by Charity Hubbard. Image provided by the artist.

“It is a joy to find inspiration in the challenge of capturing life as it happens, attempting to be true to the mood and nature of what is in front of me.” Charity states on her website.  “Each moment is a gift and a place in time that will never happen again, it’s a privilege to persevere in portraying the spirit of a moment in visual expression to the best of my ability.”

With a background in commercial art for Pixel Productions Inc. (a commercial art and design company), she is trained in perspective and drafting, has illustrated by commission for architects and builders and rendered technical yet artistic architectural illustrations in a variety of mediums.  Her enjoyment of architectural elements is reflected in many of her paintings as well.  Current art pursuits gravitate towards fine art oil paintings of people, landscape and architecture and teaching.  She is also a member of Southern Oregon Society of Artists.

For more information on this artist go to her website at: www.charityhubbard.com

Portrait by Charity Hubbard. Image provided by the artist.

Portrait by Charity Hubbard. Image provided by the artist.

Student Art Show Featured Throughout the Gallery

This is Charity Hubbard’s 11th year of offering small classes that take a classical approach to art.  She has taught in conference workshops and currently offers classes to youth ages 10 and up, teens and adults, rotating in subjects of study.  Her classes are small, 6-10 students each, taught with the aid of an intern assistant, allowing for much individual instruction from Charity.  She also offers a more intensive program where student interns can study with her for 16-18 hours a week and earn a certificate with completion of the program.

Last years’ student art show on Third Friday was the largest turnout AdJ has ever seen, with all indications that the reception this year could be just as popular. We invite the community to stop by on June 21st for the event, or throughout the month during regular gallery hours to see what these gifted students are producing.

Calling All Rogue Valley Artists!!!

Art du Jour is still actively seeking new artists living in the Rogue Valley region who would like to join our co-operative and display their work to the Medford community. Membership includes an active role in the Art in Bloom festival in May, as well as our monthly Third Friday event. Media to be juried for membership includes pottery, sculpture, photography and jewelry.  Contact the gallery by email at [email protected], or log into our website (www.artdujourgallery.com) for full membership information.

Art du Jour Gallery
213 E. Main Street
Medford, OR 97501
(541) 770-3190
OPEN Tues – Sat., 10AM – 4PM

Southern Oregon Plein Air Kicks Off 1 Week From Today! Have You Signed Up Yet?

Central
                                                          Art Logo

southern oregon plein air june 2019

JUNE 19 – JUNE 22, 2019

$85 registration fee – Register Now!

 

Southern Oregon Plein Air (SOPA) invites artists of all levels to participate in 4 days of plein air painting!

 

Artists can customize their SOPA experience by participating in a vendor fair, attending FREE plein air presentations, joining guest artists for on-location demonstrations, entering art into a juried show, participating in a “quick draw” event, and taking advantage of social events.

 

Paintings entered into the competition will be juried for over $1000 in cash prizes for 1st, 2nd, 3rd places and four honorable mentions. This year’s juror is Cody Bustamante, Professor of Art at Southern Oregon University in Ashland, OR.

 

Check In and registration will be happening on Wed. 6/19 at Central Art during our Vendor Fair, so mark your calendars!

 

Thank you for your interest in SOPA 2019 – we hope that you enjoy your experience!

 

*You can PRE-REGISTER NOW by calling 541-773-1444, or by stopping in-store at Central Art and signing up. Payment is required at time of registration to secure a spot. For full event details, click below to visit Central Art’s Official Blog!

VISIT CENTRAL ART!

Earth Paint Summer Deals + Eco Artist Interview

summernewsletter

This season’s HOT DEALS!

20off Big

Wait, there’s more!
Stock Up For Summer with FREE SHIPPING!
Coupon Code: shipart19

Expires June 20th

***

Can you say “Let’s Paint!” in Italian? ….”Dipingiamo!”

Week2 Italy Small

***

Josh Tiessen Painting large

Fascinating interview with Natural Artist & Prodigy, Josh Tiessen.
Read more here.

***

Something’s new in our store…

60789138 2409377522416033
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                                                        n

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Have a fantastic start to your summer season!

The Natural Earth Paint family

©2019 Natural Earth Paint | 330 E. Hersey Street, Suite 6, Ashland, Oregon 97520

Show Your Paper Call For Artists- Woman Made Gallery

Show Your Paper
Exhibition Dates: Sept. 20 – Oct. 19, 2019
Entry Due Date: July 11, 2019
Juror: Kathryn Markel

CLICK HERE TO SUBMIT WORK 
https://womanmadegallery.submittable.com/submitExhibition description: Open to artists who use paper as their substrate or primary medium. Works made on or of paper may include (but are not limited to) painting, drawing, printmaking, photography, collage, cut paper, paper constructions. All media on paper will be considered.

The application fee for our juried exhibitions is $30 for up to three images of work, plus one detail image if necessary. A limited number of artists who experience financial hardship may be exempt from paying the entry fee; please send us an email to request a fee waiver:[email protected]. All applicants should submit an artist’s statement about their body of work. Accepted artworks must not exceed 72″ horizontally and must not have been previously shown at WMG.

Juror: Kathryn Markel, Principal, Kathryn Markel Fine Arts
Kathryn Markel Fine Arts, established in 1975, specializes in contemporary works on paper with the addition of paintings by the young avant-garde. The gallery is run by women and women also comprise 81% of the gallery’s represented artists. Located in New York City—Chelsea and Bridgehampton, NY. Visit www.markelfinearts.com for more information.

Image: artwork by Laurie LeBreton

WMG Literary Series Presents: Building Blocks and Elements
Curated by Nina Corwin
Sunday, July 14, 2019 | 2–4 p.m.

Please join us for WMG’s Literary event “Building Blocks and Elements” on Sunday, July 14, 2019, from 2 to 4 p.m. Curated by Nina Corwin, poets will share their work exploring the elements. Literally OR figuratively, the possibilities for exploring or riffing on the elements will yield an exciting body of poetry.

Woman Made Gallery hosts literary events that coincide with each of our juried group exhibitions. The current poetry series is curated by Nina Corwin. Kurt Eric Heintz is WMG’s Audio Recordist, and Jennifer Steele is WMG’s Literary Events Outreach Coordinator. Thank you to WMG’s Literary Team and all participating poets.

All events are free and open to the public. Donations are always welcome and appreciated at: http://womanmade.org/donate

Woman Made Gallery
2150 S. Canalport #4A-3

Chicago, IL 60608
312-738-0400 | 
[email protected] | www.womanmade.org
Enter through Parking Lot at North Entrance on 21st Street  | Dial 271 on Callbox and press “Call”

Gallery hours: Thurs–Fri noon–6 p.m. | Sat–Sun noon–4 p.m. | Admission: Free

Image: Artwork by Carol Hayman

Join Woman Made Gallery

2150 S. Canalport 4th Fl, Chicago, IL 60608
Enter through Parking Lot at North Entrance on 21st Street
312.738.0400 | Email | Website
Gallery Hours: Thur-Fri 12 – 6pm | Sat-Sun 12 – 4pm

ABOUT WOMAN MADE GALLERY
Woman Made Gallery (WMG) is a tax-exempt, not-for-profit organization founded in 1992. Its mission is to support, cultivate, and promote the diverse contributions of women in the arts through exhibitions and other programs that serve, educate, and enrich our community. We rely on membership contributions and individual donations to create the programs that support our mission.

YOUR DONATIONS HELP MAKE WMG’S EXHIBITIONS AND PROGRAMS POSSIBLE!
Woman Made Gallery is supported in part by grants from The Chicago Department of Cultural Affairs and Special Events; The Gaylord and Dorothy Donnelley Foundation; The Illinois Arts Council Agency; a major anonymous donor; and the generosity of its members and contributors.

Exhibits at Rogue Gallery for Third Friday June 21, 2019

Third Friday Downtown Medford Art Walk

Friday, June 21, 5:30 – 8:00 pm

www.roguegallery.org 40 South Bartlett Street Medford Oregon 97501 541-772-8118 

 

 

 

 

 

Community Gallery

Inspired by the East: Annual Art Movement Tribute

June 7 – July 12, 2019

 

Tom                Glassman Mural Detail Tashi Choling

Tom Glassman, Mural Detail of Tashi Choling, Photograph

 Rogue Gallery artists created work with the inspiration of the art of the East. Artists used themes and styles from China, Japan, India, and other countries of the East. The exhibit includes oil, acrylics, watercolor, pen and ink, Chinese brush painting, pastels, fiber art, photography, and mixed media.

Participating artists include Bruce Allen, Lynn Anderson, Susan Austin, Rachel Barrett, Linda Boutacoff, Hortense J. Bullock, John E. Bullock, Dawna Curler, Phyllis Earls, Cynthia Flowers, Tom Glassman, Jay Gordon, John Hawkins, Kim Hearon, Mary Hills, Zelpha Hutton, Jennifer Ivey, Sheryl Leblanc, Charles Lockridge, Susan Murphey, Janice Rosenberg, Barbara Schack, Pam Shay, Darlene Southworth, Daniel Verner, Walter Wirfs, & Charlotte L. Wirfs.

 

Main Gallery

Surface and Structures: Paintings by Cammy Davis and Sculpture by Nadine Gay

May 10 – June 21, 2019

The last day to view this very popular exhibit is June 21.

 

Cammy Davis Give Me One Reason

Cammy Davis, Give Me One Reason, Acrylic

The Surface and Structures exhibit features abstract artist Cammy Davis and sculptor Nadine Gay. Cammy Davis paints bold large abstract acrylic paintings. Nadine Gay is a multi-media artist who creates whimsical and contemplative ceramic figurative sculptures. The exhibit is a juxtaposition of large, textured, color enriched canvases with sculpture that is figurative, spiritual, and at times delicate. Each artists’ work is beautifully complemented by the other.

 

Cammy Davis is a Jacksonville artist who has been featured at fine art galleries between Seattle and Palm Springs. She has developed art tutorial videos and music art videos. Cammy studied fine art at the University of Idaho and has a degree in Interior Design from Bellevue College in Washington. Cammy has been deeply influenced by her childhood experiences of growing up in the woods. She spent her youth making sword fern teepees and treehouses from material of the land. The lifestyle was simple and creative. Her youth instilled in her a resourceful and creative spirit that is present in her abstract paintings. She resides in Jacksonville.

 

Nadine Gay was born and raised in France and came to the United States in the 1970’s. She holds a Bachelors of Fine Art from the Pratt Institute. Nadine has taught art in various programs from kindergarten to college, prisons to psychiatric hospitals, and classes for adults. In 2016, she retired from teaching art and moved to the Rogue Valley to concentrate on her art. She describes her work as a playful conversation between her dreams, images and the materials she uses to create. Her work is often process oriented, as Nadine explains, “Stories emerge, the child in me delights in what comes to life. My work connects me with a fantasy world, a waking dream-space.” She has exhibited in France and throughout the US.

Refreshments from Harry & David will be served at the reception.