Trending Articles

Friends of SOAR

For great posts about the business of art, check out The Artsy Shark HERE!
ArtistsBillofRights.org reviews competitions and appeals seeking creative content, listing those that respect your copyrights and highlighting those that don't. Art Matters! publishes calls to artists, and not all of them may be compliant with ABoR's standards. Visit their site to learn more.
We support the Embedded Metadata Manifesto.  Metadata is information such as copyright notice and contact info you can embed in your images to protect your intellectual property, save time when uploading to social sites and promote your art. Click to visit the site and learn more.

Applications Open For 14th Edition of Arte Laguna Prize

Entries are open for the 14th edition of Arte Laguna Prize

In addition to the exhibition in Venice at the Arsenale, the contest lands in Moscow and the cash prizes increase

Open Call for the 14th Arte Laguna Prize

Applications are open for the fourteenth edition of Arte Laguna Prize, one of the most influential and longest-running competitions for emerging artists and designers. The Prize continues its mission of promoting creative talents through art residencies, exhibitions, festival participations and collaborations with companies and this year Arte Laguna has established an important new partnership with MMOMA – Moscow Museum of Modern Art, bringing to Moscow in 2021 a selection of over one hundred works.

With fourteen years of history the Prize, organized by the Cultural Association MoCA (Modern Contemporary Art), gives artists the opportunity to join a huge network of collaborations worldwide, exhibit in the breathtaking location of the Arsenale of Venice, win cash prizes of a total amount of 40.000 euro and much more.

New this year is Arte Laguna World (https://artelaguna.world/) the contemporary art platform that connects artists to collectors and art professionals.

The new edition of Arte Laguna Prize renews the section dedicated to design, giving it a new interpretation that is more art-oriented and supported by Assarredo/ FederlegnoArredo: “Giving voice to art and its expressions is fundamental”, states Claudio Feltrin, President of Assarredo, “it allows us to maintain a link with our cultural roots, to which art draws, and helps us to build a bridge to the future, thanks to the work of young artists who propose new languages. Through the collaboration with MoCA (Modern Contemporary Art) in Venice, we want to support artistic projects capable of enhancing culture and design”.

The international jury, led by Igor Zanti, curator of the Prize since its first edition and director of IED Florence, will be composed of: Iwona Blazwick – director of the Whitechapel Gallery in London; Karel Boonzaaijer – designer, architect and professor at the German Universities Fachbereich Gestaltung and FH Aachen; Valentino Catricalà – contemporary art curator and art section director of the Maker Faire – The European Edition; Aldo Cibic – fundamental name of made in Italy design in the world; Erin Dziedzic – Chief Curator at the Kemper Museum of Contemporary Art in Kansas City, Missouri; Zhao Li – professor at the Central Academy of Fine Arts in Beijing and curator of the Chinese Pavilion at the 53rd Venice Biennale; Riccardo Passoni – director of GAM – the Modern Art Gallery in Turin; Vasili Tsereteli – Director of the Moscow Museum of Modern Art.

The jury will select the best applications from the ten disciplines in the competition, which will be on display at the Arsenale Nord in Venice from March 21st to April 13th 2020. Among the exhibited works, the jury will identify four absolute winners who will win the cash prizes of 10,000 euro each.

The Prize obtained a medal from the President of the Italian Republic and is organized with the patronage of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, the Ministry of Cultural Heritage, the Veneto Region, the Municipality of Venice, the Ca’ Foscari University of Venice, the European Institute of Design and FederlegnoArredo.

Artists and designers from all over the world can participate in the competition without any limitation, the applications must be submitted by November 27th 2019.

More information and the terms and conditions are available on www.artelagunaprize.com

Artist in Residence Prizes

A program of art residences in Italy and abroad to allow an artistic experience of growth in contact with a new environment or a new culture, to create new works and to participate in new activities in a multicultural environment. The residencies are assigned to six artists and are: Fabrica in Treviso, Gridchinhall in Moscow, Espronceda in Barcellona, Basu Foundation for the Arts in Kolkata, Farm Cultural Park in Favara (Sicily), Maradiva Cultural Residency in Mauritius.

Business for Art Prizes

Collaborations with companies in order to connect artists with entrepreneurs who see creativity as a form of communication and productive momentum. This year an artist Under25 from the painting section will win a € 2,500 prize and a collaboration with the Venetian company Majer; three artists will win a € 1000 prize each and spend a month at the Outofblue tourist facility in La Palma – Canary Islands, where they will have the task of enhancing the spaces with site-specific interventions.

Artist in Gallery Prizes

Organization of 2 exhibitions in international Art Galleries, including setting up, vernissage and catalogue. The venues are: Galerie Isabelle Lesmeister in Regensburg, Germany and Jonathan Ferrara Gallery in New Orleans, United States.

Partecipation in Festivals and Group exhibitions

Selection of eleven artists for participation in collective events in Slovenia at Art Stays Festival and in Beijing with the events organized by Art Nova 100.

Sustainability and Art Prize dedicated to alluminium

The special prize with the CIAL consortium and Ca’ Foscari that rewards with 3,000 euros the best Reuse, Reduce, Recycle proposal for aluminum packaging recycling.

www.artelagunaprize.com #artelagunaprize #premioartelaguna Press Office

Alessandra Lazzarin

+39 347 2790099 [email protected]

Elena Pardini

+39 348 3399463 [email protected]

Big Gratitude for All the Little Things

Happy Gratitude!

Little things can bring such big delight. Like receiving photos of my new book, Living Large on Little, trotting the globe from New Zealand to Kansas (with a few furry bibliophiles, too!) 

Thank you, thank you to all the readers! Another delight: reading reviews. Here are teasers from a few that have come in so far:

“At the end of this little book I was happier and more hopeful…Finished the book feeling inspired and amazed…As I closed it I felt richer!”

“What a delight! I read this short but powerful collection of anecdotes in a single evening! So much heart and depth tucked in these pages. I will read it more than once, surely. Love!”

“I finished this book feeling hopeful, appreciative, optimistic and grateful. It’s full of insightful personal stories about wealth, the actual money kind, or the “feeling wealthy”, the internal abundance kind that comes from within (which is no small thing! it’s actually THE THING!!!)…”

Of course, I’d also be immensely grateful if you want to add to the reviews! You can find the book here. It brims with gratitude and grace—good for every season, but especially this one. 

Thank you for reading & blessings of delight, 

Anna

Big Gratitude for All the Little Things

Happy Gratitude!

Little things can bring such big delight. Like receiving photos of my new book, Living Large on Little, trotting the globe from New Zealand to Kansas (with a few furry bibliophiles, too!) 

Thank you, thank you to all the readers! Another delight: reading reviews. Here are teasers from a few that have come in so far:

“At the end of this little book I was happier and more hopeful…Finished the book feeling inspired and amazed…As I closed it I felt richer!”

“What a delight! I read this short but powerful collection of anecdotes in a single evening! So much heart and depth tucked in these pages. I will read it more than once, surely. Love!”

“I finished this book feeling hopeful, appreciative, optimistic and grateful. It’s full of insightful personal stories about wealth, the actual money kind, or the “feeling wealthy”, the internal abundance kind that comes from within (which is no small thing! it’s actually THE THING!!!)…”

Of course, I’d also be immensely grateful if you want to add to the reviews! You can find the book here. It brims with gratitude and grace—good for every season, but especially this one. 

Thank you for reading & blessings of delight, 

Anna

Making marks

The Light in The Room, detail, oil on linen.

My most recently finished still life makes me uneasy. If I look at it in a dim light, before going to bed, I’m gratified that I did almost exactly what I set out to do—capture a glowingly illuminated kitchen in the middle of a bright, summer day. But during the daylight hours, if the surface of this painting is well-lit, I want to crawl into a corner and close my eyes. 

I had this same feeling a year ago last month when I went to see my prominently displayed paintings—I could see them through the front windows of the museum while parking my car on the street—at the Wausau Museum of Contemporary Art exhibition in Wisconsin, jurored by Frank Bernarducci. Once I got up close, by virtue of the unsparing gallery lighting, the brushwork made my skin crawl. I felt exposed. The execution didn’t appear to have bothered anyone else, considering the placement of the two paintings. But ever since that opening, I’ve been concentrating on the thickness of the paint—endeavoring to get a Goldilocks feel, not too thick, not too thin—and the way I need to handle it, wet on wet. I’ve been conscious of the desire to user thicker paint for years, but this determination to paint wet into wet began when I returned from Wisconsin last year. (I make exceptions when this isn’t possible, when I see something in the already dried coat that makes my stomach tighten with disappointment, as it did yesterday with the taffy painting I’m doing now. But I make my amendments by putting down uniform areas of wet color and then going back to push detail into them immediately.)

I don’t want what I’m rendering to look hyper-realistic. The paint should look like paint, not the surface of a photograph. But it needs to flow gradually from one spot to the next. No rough edges where edges don’t form clear lines and borders in the source. So now, today, the formerly irksome part of the painting doesn’t make me want to hide when I look at it. It’s all about the nature of the brushwork, the energy and visibility of the mark (or just the way the paint flows from one tone into another) as catalyst for how the eye flows across the image and reads it. I don’t expect my brushwork to be what it is in Van Gogh, or Sargent, or Manet, or Hals, or Thiebaud, or Jenny Saville. But the brushwork now doesn’t get in the way of what pleasure I get from looking at what I’ve done. It isn’t at odds with the image. But when I see areas where the paint is applied skillfully in terms of value and hue, but it just looks awkwardly scumbled, dragged across already-dry paint, and the edges of each spot of color make it look scuffed and chaotic, then I want to slip the painting away into storage. I don’t, because it’s a decent enough painting. Yet his knowledge doesn’t help, which I take as a good thing. Excellence requires striving.

It’s all about whether or not the eye bumps into a spot of paint or glides over it, riding the energy of the paint itself, the life it imparts to the act of looking. I am probably right in reacting this way to the work I’ve done. But maybe not. When it comes to painting, it’s best not to be certain of anything except in those rare cases when I know the painting is really finished and as good as I can make it. (I’m certain about the prefection of most of Vermeer, and quite a bit of Piero, but that’s a pretty safe certainty and though I know I’m looking at a painting when they’re the ones making it, the marks they make aren’t all that visible.) The less refined execution might end up being what people value most in some of these paintings I want to avoid seeing—the way in which the surface is at odds with the image it induces you to see. In fact, I’m constantly trying to do smaller, more improvisational paintings that are all about the visibility of the paint and where the areas of paint look abstract and unrecognizable up close—in other words, simplified and much more painterly work. But this isn’t what I’m after in the sort of paintings I’ve been exhibiting over the past decade—with the exception of one small interior with figures, quickly executed with easy brushwork, I showed at a pop-up in London years ago. 

The humorous element here is that with either kind of brushwork, my current painting looks roughly the same from a few feet away—and the magic of Chardin resides in how, up close, it is just a chaotic mess, while a little farther away, it’s amazing. But it’s a good chaotic mess up close. His paint was thicker, more sensuously applied, more like Thiebaud than Vermeer, so that the paint itself was a pleasure to see. As opposed to what I’m dealing with. But I’m working on it. 

Window to the future

The Window, Matisse, oil on canvas, 57″ x 46″

One of the treasures from my visit to the Detroit Institute for Arts Museum, and displayed near two equally excellent paintings. Historically speaking, it’s only a short walk from this painting (hanging with two equally beautiful pieces by Matisse) to the work of Richard Diebenkorn.  Yet this was painted half a century before Diebenkorn’s Ocean Park series. What’s baffling is how so much lyrical feeling can be invested in such a restrained and limited range of colors.

H.K. Freeman’s husbandry of her medium

Moment #34, H.K. Freeman, oil on panel, 18″ diameter

I collect spoors, molds and fugus.

Egon Spengler

In the fungus among us, H.K. Freeman sees a world suffused with seemingly chaotic but purposeful mystery. That alone marks her as someone worthy of attention. Fascination with things almost everyone else ignores or shuns, for me, is a springboard for originality in visual art. She is yet another interesting artist I discovered in Manifest’s recent Painted exhibit. Freeman’s current obsession reminds me of Emmett Gowin’s full immersion in the South American rain forest, devoting himself to capturing moths, not with a net but with his photographic lens.  Yet moths are already beautiful. Anyone who has come across a cecropia moth, as I once did in our back yard many years ago when we lived in Utica, will not be able to look away, the wings are so Blakean in their eerie glamour. With fungus, not so much. Noting the mold on my basement cinder blocks after a rainy month, I reach for the bleach. 

But Freeman is a spiritual cosmologist. She sees wonder and mystery in what others recognize only as decay. She marvels at a devouring life form that is neither animal nor vegetable, but something that eats the world’s leftovers as an after-after-party clean-up crew. In all fairness, anyone who has enjoyed a portobello or truffle knows that fungus can taste pretty good, as well. Freeman shows us something more rarefied in her sometimes tiny spherical paintings of fungus that look like miniature worlds viewed through a microscope, or the surface of planets light years away. 

She’s at her best when she finds a symbiotic strength in her medium’s proclivities, offering a little guidance here and there—like a color field painter pouring and steering a flow of paint. It’s both a practical and a symbolic relationship with materials. Anyone who has worked in the natural world, say, growing a garden, recognizes the partnership. The garden does most of the work. Anyone who has tried to steer himself or herself through the world recognizes how free will represents a tiny marginal allowance you earn through prior discipline, simply for the chance  to choose against the daily inertia of one’s character. You are there to nudge things—including yourself—this way and that, toward the desired end. When she finds the effects she wants by letting the paint do what it does on its own, but intervening where needed, the work is enchanting.

What’s marvelous is that, in this fascination with one of the lowliest of life forms, she sees God. She doesn’t preach, just passes along her awe at how much order and beauty and shines forth from the world of decomposition. She’s working a field Richard Wilbur tilled in his great poem about the vulture, and how that carrion bird’s meals serve the same purpose as an ark, delivering life from death.

From Freeman’s website:

The intricate worlds of lichens, fungi, and mosses serve as a starting point for my paintings. These sublime organisms help ensure and maintain life on earth. I draw upon the history of landscape painting and abstraction, together with eco-theology, to communicate spiritual ideas in relation to creation. Using the finite to think about the infinite, the paintings evoke the mysterious, wondrous, interconnected process of existence.

I alternately manipulate the paint and playfully relinquish control to create these worlds. The imagery simultaneously fuses and dissolves, oscillating between certainty and uncertainty with the promise of resolving into something familiar. The luminosity of the colors and the use of abstraction convey the euphoric, transcendental sensation of my initial encounter with the subject matter. The abstraction and the colors stimulate not only the visual senses, but also act on the psyche to contemplate the painted microcosms. I hope the references to creation will invite viewers in, while the abstraction will challenge viewers to perceive in a way that goes beyond the surface of the painting, so they can explore their own thoughts and beliefs.

Free Art Presentation to Benefit Climate Action

Babel and Blood Moons, 2015 Painting from the Digging out from the Dirty Decade collection, by Catie Faryl

Babel and Blood Moons, 2015 Painting from the Digging Out from the Dirty Decades collection, by Catie Faryl

Digging Out From the Dirty Decades

1999–2019

Art Presentation to Benefit Climate Action

Featuring an inspiring art slide show with humorous observations by West Coast Artist Catie Faryl.

Sunday November 17th
two free shows – 3 pm & 5 pm
(30 minutes each)
Bellview Grange 1050 Tolman Creek Road in Ashland, Oregon

Artwork will be for sale at discount prices to benefit Southern Oregon Pachamama Alliance & Project Drawdown Climate Actions

On Sunday November 17th, West Coast Artist Catie Faryl will be sharing her recent art collection, “Digging Out from the Dirty Decades,” at Bellview Grange, 1050 Tolman Creek Road in Ashland, Oregon.  There will be two half-hour art slide presentations, one at 3 pm and one at 5 pm, during which Catie will discuss her art and commentary on events beginning with Y2K in 1999 through the past 20 years, ending with our current situations in 2019.
Faryl is launching her Digging out from the Dirty Decades Card Deck, which is 72 art cards in chronological order along with ironic political satire and revealing environmental commentary.
Sales of Catie’s greeting cards, her popular Balance Deck Art Cards, matted prints, framed and matted originals will benefit climate crisis actions and education programs of Southern Oregon Pachamama Alliance. Also Catie will offer a sneak preview of her next project called “2020 – The Year of Living Frugally”.
For more information please contact Catie Faryl at 541 535-1854 or by email.
Catie’s greeting cards and Art Card Decks are for sale locally at Bloomsbury Books.  If you can’t attend, donations can be mailed to Bellview Grange, P.O. Box 3372, Ashland Oregon 97520    www.catiefaryl.net
For more information contact Catie Faryl at 541 535-1854 or by email at [email protected], and please visit The Gentle Rebellion – a plan to reduce energy use and waste on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/The-Gentle-Rebellion-a-plan-to-reduce-energy-use-and-waste-2456972324539793/

 

The Revellers, New Years 1999 painting from the Digging out from the Dirty Decades collection by Catie Faryl

The Revellers, New Years 1999 painting from the Digging out from the Dirty Decades collection by Catie Faryl

Ed Clark, 1926-Oct. 18, 2019

Ed Clark, Maple Red, Oil and mixed media on canvas, 73″ x 76″

I discovered this magnificent painting at the Detroit Institute of Arts Museum on a visit late last month to Detroit. I recognized the artist when I saw it from a distance only because I’d recently discovered him after news of his death. I felt like Art Brut singing about their ignorance about The Replacements: “How have I only just found out about Ed Clark?”

Arts Action Alert! Please take two minutes to send your message to your U.S. Senators

Hello Arts Advocate,

While fiscal year (FY) 2020 began on Oct. 1, the U.S. Congress must still pass the 12 appropriation bills to fund the government through Sept. 30, 2020 (the government is currently operating under a continuing resolution [CR] through Nov. 21). At least one of your U.S. Senators sits on the powerful Appropriations Committee. They need to hear from you now about your support for robust federal arts funding and how it supports your community and state.

Last week, the U.S. Senate passed their version of the Interior Appropriations bill by an overwhelmingly bipartisan vote of 84 – 9, that included $2 million in increased funding for the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) and the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH)! You may recall that the U.S. House bill, approved earlier this summer, provided a $12.5 million increase in funding to those agencies.

These positive results are the outcomes of grassroots advocacy—from Hill visits during the National Arts Action Summit, to the emails (like this one) advocates have been sending to their congressional delegation throughout the year.

As negotiations are ongoing to finish up FY 2020 funding, it is vital to call on U.S. Senate appropriators to include these remaining pro-arts funding levels in the final legislation.

This includes:

Bipartisan Senate passage of FY 2020 spending package that included the Interior Appropriations bill.
  • Education bill—includes arts education grant funds and a provision calling for maintaining a federal “report card” in arts education
  • Defense Department bill—includes language supporting creative arts therapies for service members
  • Veterans Department bill—includes language supporting creative arts therapies and $5 million for veterans
  • Justice Department bill—includes a provision supporting inclusion of arts-specific intervention strategies for juvenile justice programs

Please take two minutes to send your message to your U.S. Senators. Thank you for taking action to support these end-of-year funding priorities.


1000 Vermont Avenue NW
6th Floor
Washington DC . 20005
T 202.371.2830
F 202.371.0424
One East 53rd Street . 2nd Floor
New York NY . 10022
T 212.223.2787
F 212.980.4857
[email protected]
www.AmericansForTheArts.org
www.ArtsActionFund.org
Powered
                                by VoterVoice

Dana Saulnier

 

Untitled Study, 2014, oil on canvas, 42″ x 56″

I can say that my drive to make art is a desperate issue for me. If I was motivated narrowly by my desire to place myself in some kind of professional situation, where I was primarily concerned with the work’s status within a narrow set of theoretical discourses, then I am not sure that I could proceed with the faith and doubt necessary to the work. I want the work to make sense to people whether they are educated in art theory or not. Like good music I hope good art takes you in. It is hard work to make art and I want to think that it matters to people. That it enlarges our capacity for living.

                                                                                                                         —Dana Saulnier

In an interview a bit harder to penetrate than this lucid remark in the middle of it, Dana Saulnier offers a couple of tangentially related thoughts. I spotted his work in the recent exhibit at Manifest Gallery, so I delved deeper into the paintings already familiar to me from his show at First Street. In this brief observation, Saulnier resists the professionalization of art.  It sounds as if he’s saying that he refuses to find his place in whatever happens to be going on theoretically or, as I would put it, conceptually, in the art world. He doesn’t need to belong. I like this, because he’s asserting his individuality, but also because theory comes second here. Starting from conceptual premises works against painting’s ability to convey an awareness more oceanic than conscious thought–so it’s ass backwards to make a painting to illustrate an idea or a theory of art. To look for significance in visual art can obscure what it’s actually doing. An industry of critical thought depends on the need to extract significance from creative work. As Tom Wolfe pointed out in The Painted Word, to make work that depends on criticism for elucidation or justification upends the relationship between creativity and critique: the critic rules the creator. Postmodernism depends on this. Painting begins to obey the need to be significant in such a way that it will attract critical approval. What gets put aside is attention to what a painting can do, in contrast to what, say, a novel does. Work that arises out of a theory of art, or any conscious purpose, reduces a painting to the role of “signifier” which has, at least, the virtue of keeping critics busy. It sounds as if maybe Saulnier wants to sidestep all of that and allow his work a more elusive impact—though his own critical thought about his work throughout the rest of the interview would seem to argue otherwise.

In this short reflective comment, though, he also says he wants his work to be available and effective, in some way, for people who know little or nothing about art in general—again suggesting that a painting’s work is unmediated, requiring neither commentary nor training. Looking is required; thinking optional and not advised. (Tolstoy’s theories of art toward the end of his life took a similar stance, repudiating much of the Western canon that most educated people would have considered sacrosanct—and quite a bit I would hate to lose, personally. But his intent was to remain true to the wisdom he earned after narrowly avoiding the impulse to kill himself over his inability to understand life intellectually, all of which he dramatized in Anna Karenina.) Granted, some of the most thrilling and powerful visual art has significance in the sense that it conveys much that can be clarified by criticism and commentary and training. It represents ideas, it has significance, the way language does. Yet, for me, the greatest painting has no significance whatsoever, but is instead a perceptual catalyst, a representation only in the sense that an aroma represents a meal. A scent doesn’t signify anything but its provenance—it’s an element of its life-sustaining origin and it brings you toward that origin in the way a painting by Braque could be said to embody the world it invites the viewer to inhabit. How it does this is utterly mysterious, and that isn’t a reality that offers much mileage to critical conversations about it.