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Call for Art Watershed Art Group, Ashland, OR

A Call for Art
Watershed  Art Group Requests Proposal for Sculpture Installation

Bandersnatch Trail, Ashland Watershed, Ashland, Oregon

The Watershed Art Group, in cooperation with the City of Ashland Public Arts Commission, with assistance of a grant from the Haines and Friends Fund, is seeking proposals for a three dimensional sculpture to be permanently installed along Bandersnatch Trail in the Ashland Watershed as part of the Watershed Art Project’s “Art Trail.” The concept will be initially displayed in Ashland, and will eventually become the second piece to be situated on the trail. It will follow the well-received “Pacific Fisher” created by Jeremy Criswell of Jacksonville, Oregon. We are including the possibility of sculptures made from natural  materials in the Watershed as well as ephemeral art.

The Watershed Art Group is calling for proposals for sculpture for the  second piece on the Bandersnatch  “Art Trail” Please review the Request For Proposals/Call for Art below and consider submitting a proposal by March 15, 2016. Any questions can be directed to: the Watershed Art Group  [email protected]

or call Pam Marsh 541-282-4516, or Sue Springer 541-601-6406

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The Art Inspector: Saving the Earth by Changing Art

Creative industries have changed standards and best practices to adopt sustainable and environmental techniques in design and production. Architecture has adopted LEED Performance design into standard practice, and Industrial Design begins with thinking about the end of life of a product and how to leave the least amount of impact on the environment. Both of these industries fought for decades, since the 1970s, against changing habits, systems and academic content. Resistors during the transformation proclaimed they would all go out of business; it was impossible to get all stakeholders on board; and they didn’t want to be creatively strangled.

This shared history of transforming creative industry leads us to a problem we are facing within the Art world. Can artists change the way they create work to make a healthier planet? Personally, I believe so, however, with the inclusion of all key players from the art world, including: art institutions, art media, academia, retailer/manufacturers, collectors and artists. Art seeds culture and influences public behavior. If artists can change their standard of practice then the rest of the world will follow.

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Art Inspector assessing quilters studio. Photo by Wendy Crockett.

How is this transformation possible? Incorporating a triangle approach to such transformation isThe Art Inspector, a social practice artwork I founded during my candidacy for a Masters in Fine Arts at San Jose State University, uses aHealthy Art Program (education), Legislative Reform (advocacy) and Third Party Inspections (studio assessments). This project started a few years ago when I noticed fellow studio mates as well as the art school itself seemingly unconsciously teaching and using harmful applications and techniques, disposing of waste, and ineffectively ventilating rooms. I noticed piles of plastic thrown into dumpsters, studio lights left on for what seemed 24 hours at a time, and complete negligence when using harsh chemicals. In my studio, a rusty cabinet labeled “Store Harsh Chemicals Here” written upon faded masking tape hosted a dusty plastic binder labeled MSDS Sheets. Taking a closer look, I realized no one had taught me whatMaterial Safety Data Sheets meant and how they might apply to what I do. I asked around to other artists what they might know about these sheets and what they thought about what they were using and how they were disposing of extra material. Many artists noted that they knew someone, or had experienced themselves, long term health problems from misuse of chemicals in the creation of artwork. Most artists intuitively believed that there was a better way to develop their work and acknowledge the harm of some of the materials, but did not know what to do about it or did not see change as a high priority.

Inspired by artworks using methods of Intervention Art which take on the roles and aesthetics of corporations and disrupt systems in unexpected ways, such as theYes Men andLuther Thie, I decided to become an Art Inspector. Within construction and manufacturing, unaffiliated auditors determine if a building or product can be certified as sustainable. If deemed so, doors open for prospective buyers and subsidies. I wanted to take this method to the Art World.

But how does a third party inspection work? There are at least two inspections to take place. The initial inspection starts with an intake form that asks questions to each artist about their studio environment, materials they are using, and the type of machines or equipment that use power. During this process a series of tests are conducted using similar equipment used for energy audits in residential homes. The Art Inspector tests power outlets, lighting and occupancy, ventilation and Volatile Organic Compounds. Once the inspection process is finished The Art Inspector will write up a report based on the data collected and make suggestions for alternatives and improvements to artists studios and the working process. If the artist makes the recommended modifications, The Art Inspector will return for a re-inspection and award a Healthy Art Certification if the artist passes.

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Paint waste from inspection of painter’s studio. Photo by Wendy Crockett.

Artists who fail inspection or those who are interested in diving deeper into changing their habits can join the Healthy Art Program. Various workshops ranging from green materials, sustainable wood products, energy efficiency, lighting and safety are available to artists at varying partner institutions. If the artists are supplied with resources and knowledge, they will be empowered to change. The final part of The Art Inspector is to advocate for change in policy and curriculum on both an institutional and government level. Working with academic and museum institutions to adopt new values and requirements for artworks to be created sustainably will create a shift in the resources for production of art. If a major contemporary art museum such as the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art sets a standard for new works to be exhibited using a significant amount of low impact materials and works with third party agents such as The Art Inspector, then other practitioners will follow. With this same concept, Public Art Programs can adopt LEED standards into creation of artworks in the public realm.

Even today these concepts of change in the Art World are seen as radical and frightening to some. However, many artists are willing to do what they do best, experiment with new ideas. With the vision of The Art Inspector, we will open up the avenues to sustainable living, healthy living, and simultaneously, changing the way we make art.

 

Follow Danielle Siembieda-Gribben on Twitter: www.twitter.com/Art_Inspector

A Warm Welcome to Mark Hannah of Ink & Oil!

We couldn’t be more pleased to add another innovative artistic endeavor to our directory, and discovering what’s going on in southern Oregon’s creative community is often as much of a surprise to us as it is to anyone else! This time we introduce Mark & Sarah Hannah of Ink & Oil, a design store and gallery based in Grants Pass, OR that offers hard to find design classes and workshops.

Hannah still operates “Thief(it)”  in Pasadena, CA. Why Thief it?” he writes on his Web site, thiefit.com. “It is an answer to a question. Next time somebody asks you what to do with an object that would otherwise be thrown away, tell them to Thief It. Create a unique object or product that is your own and save it from the future, which would probably have been a big hole in the ground and, depending on its composition, a very, very long time decaying.” Read the rest of the article from which Mark is quoted at the PasadenaWeekly website to learn more about where he’s come from.

Fortunately for southern Oregon, where Hannahs have come to is here!

Creative Director MARK HANNAH  has a degree in Transportation Design from Art Center College of Design in Pasadena, California, and teaches Visual Communication at Art Center as well as Product Design and Visual Communication at Gnomon School of Visual Effects in Hollywood, California. In his words, “We design and build unique things.” Ink & Oil will also host Mark’s Oregon workshops in Industrial, Entertainment and Sustainable Design, and offers a small Gallery space for local and emerging artists in Southern Oregon. Classes and workshops are offered in the evenings and weekends and are a great resource for students of all ages interested in product or transportation design as well as entertainment design.   Future workshops and classes will include a wide range of art and design as well as sustainable processes and design. Visit Ink & Oil’s listing at the Southern Oregon Artists Resource for links and contact information, then take a look at their online store for a peek at some unique products and artwork.

Currently Mark is announcing three workshops to take place at Ink & Oil on March 1 & 2:

visual_communications

Visual Communications

Friday, March 1, 6pm-10pm​  $35

This four hour workshop will introduce students to the basics of Visual Communication.

Perspective, lineweights, value and shadows will be covered.

 

 

automotive-design

Automotive Design 

Saturday, March 2, 9am-2 pm​  $50

​This 5 hour workshop in Automotive Design will focus on the basics of how to set up a proper perspective drawing for vehicles as well as sketching and ideation basics.

 

 

 

entertainment_design

Entertainment  Design

Saturday, March 2, 3pm-8pm $50

This 5 hour crash course will introduce the student to the field of Entertainment design and focus on techniques to develop unique and interesting characters and props for the film and gaming industry or just for fun!

 

 

For more information and to register, visit http://www.inkandoil.net/#!workshops–classes/c241f

​or call 541.632.9104

Mark Hannah Ink & Oil Design Workshops, March 2013