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The tip of the iceberg

Skye, Chris Baker, gouache, detail.

About 200 hundred pages into the Kilmartin translation of Swann’s Way—I came back to this passage after finding a similar observation in the second book—Proust talks about how his fiction is non-intellectual, and that his lack of ideas originally persuaded him that he couldn’t be a writer.  A La Recherche du Temps Perdu shows how his pursuit of love and friendship and social status kept him from discovering his vocation, though ironically the story of his immersion in the illusions of society becomes the actual content of the novel he was unable to write because he was living the events of the book. He had to get lost to find himself.

Here is the passage that says so much, for me, about visual art and the lack of intellectual content or meaning in the paintings I love most (it’s appropriate that visual art was one of the primary inspirations for Proust’s novel and for his style of writing):

Then, quite independently of these literary preoccupations and in no way connected with them, suddenly a roof, a gleam of sunlight on a stone, the smell of a path would make me stop still, to enjoy the pleasure that each of them gave me, and also because they appeared to be concealing, beyond what my eyes could see, something which they invited me to come and take but which despite all my efforts I never managed to discover. Since I felt that this something was to be found in them, I would stand there motionless, looking, breathing, endeavoring to penetrate with my mind beyond the thing seen or smelt . . . It was certainly not impressions of this kind that could restore the hope I had lost of succeeding one day in becoming an author and poet, for each of them was associated with some material object devoid of intellectual value and suggested no abstract truth.

He ignores these intimations for years because they offer him no ideas. He spends years believing he had no talent, no creative virtues, as a result of this lack of intellectual originality. By the end of the novel, the elimination of ideas in favor of the raw phenomena of life, the matrix of felt experience, becomes his sextant, enabling him to bring to life a complex and beautifully superficial world, saturated with a reality to which its inhabitants remain deaf and blind, except in brief, revelatory moments—and those simple moments are what his art is dedicated to triggering, the opening up of a world, intensely familiar but also fresh, surprising, and new. In other words, alive. And through all of it runs the Platonic suggestion that these glimpses are also glimpses of something incorruptible and timeless, hints that the material world is merely the tip of an iceberg invisible to conscious thought.

Draw or Sketch? What is the Difference?

Sketch Or Drawing: Just A Cup

To Draw, To Sketch, Drawing, Sketching, A Drawing, A Sketch.

I’ve been thinking about the difference between the act of drawing and sketching.  And, I’ve been considering the finished products: a sketch and a drawing.

Defining the Difference Between Sketch & Draw.

Truthfully, I find it a struggle to come up with an easy way to describe the difference between the two that fits all cases.  Or even most cases.  Even still, a definition that might give me a “litmus” type test for what is a drawing and what is a sketch.

Drawing Or Sketch Broken Seashell with Knotted Napkin

Shades of Gray.

You see, I tend to find myself thinking of exceptions.  That is, I think the terms shades of gray.  This is not a particularly helpful approach, however, when one wants to define something.

Drawing Or Sketch: A Page From My Sketchbook

 

An Analogy.

But, I did think of analogy that may shed some light.  Perhaps sketching is like writing short notes.  Taking the analogy further, perhaps a finished drawing is more like a novel or a biography.  It was the notes that you did during the research process that enabled you to write the novel or biography.  Therefore, the act of drawing is like more in-depth drafts and finished writings of poetry, novels, biographies and so forth.  Whereas, sketches are a type of research for that in-depth study or finished piece of art.

Time.

Another difference one might consider is time needed to produce the work.  Sketches may be thought of as faster types of drawings.  One works in haste to capture the essentials of the subject in a few minutes.  On the other hand,  a drawing might be a slower, more deliberate type of drawing.  It might take hours, days or weeks to complete.

To Draw – Umbrella Term?

To my mind, I see the verb “to draw” as the umbrella term because it means to pull a mark across the surface.  The result then is a drawing.  To sketch, and the resultant sketch, would be  a subset or specific type of drawing.  Again, a faster, less developed type of a drawing.   So, when a person draws to create a detailed, more finished work, then it would not be a sketch; instead a drawing.

Vague and Convoluted.

Do you see how easy it is to get vague and convoluted when considering the differences?   

I think there is certainly a difference between the types of drawings.  But, perhaps, types of drawings can be considered on a sketching/drawing continuum, with quick sketch at one end and finished drawing on the other end.

Clarity of Meaning.

So, why all this struggle to define?  Clarity in communication might be one desired result.  When I say “I draw out my design before I paint it“, I do mean a more deliberate preparatory drawing.  A fair amount of thought and consideration has gone into the composition before I paint it.

Drawing Or Sketch? Concept Drawing Tea For Two With Milk

On the other hand, sometimes I sketch rather than draw before paintings.  That is, I note on the surface the boundaries or critical lines of the subject in a more simple manner.  I leave the painting part of the process to develop the composition and design.

Ask The Artists or Draftsperson.

I do have one more thought.  In some ways, it seems to me more appropriate for the artist to determine if their own work is a sketch or a drawing.  Because the amount and type of work would be relative to the artist’s needs.  That is, can you tell by a finished sketch or drawing the amount of work done beforehand?  Maybe the answer is we think so, but may easily be deceived!

Sketch or Drawing Blind Contour Drawing: Santa Cat

Still Thinking.

Incidentally,  I still haven’t solved my own problem of writing about sketches or drawings.   If I use only the words “sketch” or “draw” based on the work, then the writing becomes too stilted.  That is to say, the same word gets used too often.  So, how to solve this problem?  I am not sure yet.

In the meantime, perhaps I’ll go work on a sketch or drawing.

Articles That Shed Light On The Subject.

Here is a list of four articles about the difference between drawing and sketching.  You might find them helpful.

http://www.differencebetween.net/miscellaneous/the-difference-between-sketch-and-drawing/

http://www.differencebetween.info/difference-between-drawing-and-sketching. Note, this particular link has a nice table that highlights the difference between the words draw and sketch.

https://www.quora.com/What-is-the-difference-between-a-sketch-and-drawing

 

The post Draw or Sketch? What is the Difference? appeared first on Margaret Stermer-Cox.

Shift to the Left

Shift to the Left

My creative life has taken a much needed turn to the left. For the last 15 years I have had the delight of playing a major role in grand-mothering. That girl is now in high school and although we are still very close, she is busy finding her way exploring her new life.

All of this time I have had my Artwork in Art & Soul Gallery in Ashland Or. and for 7years was one of the owners with 3 other women. It was fun to be a part of it all on that level but kept me busy enough that I struggled with getting and staying in my creative groove and following the threads which is the reason to do it. It kept me in my right brain which is not my home. A little more than a year ago, we sold the gallery. I still show there and it’s a lot less stress.

Now, I am finally focusing again on my teaching and creating. The shift has opened up new directions in my expressions. I’ve always been a texture freak but right now I am using physical instead of just visual. It creates an entirely new puzzle to solve and I’m having a blast following the new threads.

My biggest challenge now is with the technical expertise it takes to get the images and information out there. I’ve always referred to it as my “button impairment” but I think it is mostly being two generations too old and being dominantly left brained. So with focused attention and the grace of friends, I’ll function more comfortably soon.

I’ve recently joined forces with a wonderful Artist friend Pam Haunschild to teach workshops in other locations. Our theme is “Using textures to create Expressive Water-media paintings”. We will be teaching at the Emerald Art Center in Springfield OR (Eugene) May 9th and 10th.
Contact them at EmeraldArtCenter.org
We will be at the Mendocino Art Center in Mendocino, CA June 20th and 21st. Follow this link for full information: http://www.mendocinoartcenter.org/Summer20/Haunschild-Withrow
The information is also on my website and posted on our Facebook pages at, Eve Margo Withrow and Pamela Haunschild .I’ll also be teaching more often here in my home studio so stay tuned.

Rogue Valley Messenger Artist Highlight – Dana Feagin

My painting of Cookies, a former blood donor cow, was featured on the cover of the Rogue Valley Messenger in December. That issue also includes an interview about me and my art, which you can find here.

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Mendocino Art Center Workshop in June!

Mendocino Art Center Workshop

EXPRESSIVE WATERMEDIA TEXTURES

Full Moon Sky mixed media painting by Eve Margo Withrow

Full Moon Sky by Eve Margo Withrow
Mixed water media on paper

Instructors: Pam Haunschild and Eve Margo Withrow
June 20–21, 2020 (Saturday–Sunday, 9:30am–4:30pm)
All levels

Register Online Now
Or call the Mendocino Art Center Registrar:
707 937-5818, ext. 10 or toll-free 800 653-3328, ext. 10

CLASS DESCRIPTION

In this fun and exciting workshop, we will create textured, complex watermedia (acrylic/watercolor) backgrounds and then work on turning them into harmonious, successfully finished paintings. You have your choice of working in acrylics and/or watercolors along with a gesso mixture (provided).

Texture makes your painting feel more dynamic, creates a sense of depth, and helps viewers emotionally connect with a painting. Texture is sometimes visual (on the surface) and sometimes dimensional (raised above the surface). We will work with both types of texture in this workshop.

Mossed in the Forest, painting by eve margo withrow

Mossed in the Forest
Eve Margo Withrow

Eve specializes in the visual (surface) textures by layering and manipulating watermedia. Interesting patterns and images emerge from her process. She uses tissue paper, plastic wrap, salts, bleach, and other materials to create layers; following threads and surprises and imaginative pathways to create her uniquely powerful images. She then uses windowing and design techniques and sometimes collage to turn textural starts into finished paintings.

Pam specializes in creating dimensional texture through the use of gesso with various texturing materials. Using a gesso underlayer allows a great deal of flexibility in subsequent layers, which can be either watercolor or acrylic. Pam will provide you with a pre-gessoed paper and demonstrate not only the various ways gesso texture can be applied, but how to finish these painting using value contrast and negative painting techniques.

These texturing processes will produce uniquely interesting and creative paintings. Bring a sense of adventure and spontaneity and you will be amazed at what can result. The class is appropriate for anyone – beginners will have no trouble with the methods used and more advanced painters will be able to add complex texturing processes to their repertoire. You will leave with at least twelve painting starts, and one or two completed paintings.

ABOUT THE INSTRUCTORS

PAM HAUNSCHILD is a watermedia artist who devotes her time to capturing the beauty of nature in the American West. She is a retired college professor who now lives in Ashland, Oregon, and paints full time. She has been and artist-in-residence at three national parks and continues to be inspired by her time there. Her work is in galleries in Ashland, Seaside, and Bandon, Oregon, and is held by many individual and corporate collectors, including the National Park Service. She has done many commissions, most recently designing and painting a poster and playbill cover for the Britt Festival in Jacksonville, Oregon, and a large native plant mural at Southern Oregon University.

Pam has taught many watermedia workshops in Oregon and Northern California, including at Sitka Center for Art and Ecology and Coos Art Museum and enjoys helping all students discover new methods of painting while using (or developing) their own unique artistic style.

Read more about Pam
Rogue Valley Messenger, Blurring the Lines with Color: Southern Oregon Artist Pam Haunschild

Watchful eyes, painting by Eve Margo Withrow

Watchful Eyes
Painting by Eve Margo Withrow

EVE MARGO WITHROW is an international award-winning professional artist. She uses mixed watermedia (acrylics and watercolor) and frequently layers and collages her materials. Her paintings are magical impressions that reflect feelings of a particular experience or place. She is always curious to explore what lies outside the box. “I play and adventure with my textures, layers and colors, following threads here and there, thus entering the flow of my creative process.”

Eve has a master’s degree in art education from the University of Wyoming. With over 40 years experience in teaching art classes and workshops, Eve masterfully guides and encourages participants to awaken to their innate creativity by experiencing the joy of self-expression. Eve is a previous owner of Art & Soul gallery in Ashland, Oregon, and is currently showing her work there, along with Rogue Gallery in Medford. She has taught many workshops across the western United States.

TUITION & FEES

Current MAC Members: $216
Non-members: $240 plus a $45 non-member registration fee

There is a registration fee of $45 for each class for non-members. Current Mendocino Art Center members do not pay a registration fee and may take 10% off each class registration. The discount is reflected in the prices above. Not a member yet? You may sign up below.
View our membership benefits

REFUNDS & CANCELLATIONS

Cancellations must be made in writing, either by mail or email. If you notify us at least 21 days prior to the first class meeting, you will receive a refund of tuition less a $45 cancellation fee. No refunds will be made after that date for any reason due to our contractual obligations and material acquisitions. If the Art Center is compelled to cancel a class you will receive a full tuition refund. Memberships are non-refundable as they are considered a donation to the Art Center.

Instructor materials fee: $10. We will be providing gesso mixture, containers, an assortment of texturing materials, one pre-gessoed piece of paper, and an extra squeeze or two of paint so you don’t have to buy a whole tube of something you want to try.

Materials List

Register Online Now
Or call the Mendocino Art Center Registrar:
707 937-5818, ext. 10 or toll-free 800 653-3328, ext. 10

Emerald Art Center Workshop in May

Emerald Art Center Workshop

Using Texture to Create Expressive Watermedia Paintings.

I am teaching a workshop with Pam Haunschild at Emerald Art Center on Saturday and Sunday, May 9-10. The topic is Using Texture to Create Expressive Watermedia Paintings.

Full Moon Sky mixed media painting by Eve Margo Withrow

Full Moon Sky by Eve Margo Withrow
Mixed water media on paper

Instructors: Pam Haunschild and Eve Margo Withrow
May 9–10, 2020 (Saturday–Sunday, 9:30am–4:30pm)
All levels

CLASS DESCRIPTION

In this fun and exciting workshop, we will create textured, complex watermedia (acrylic/watercolor) backgrounds and then work on turning them into harmonious, successfully finished paintings. You have your choice of working in acrylics and/or watercolors along with a gesso mixture (provided).

Texture makes your painting feel more dynamic, creates a sense of depth, and helps viewers emotionally connect with a painting. Texture is sometimes visual (on the surface) and sometimes dimensional (raised above the surface). We will work with both types of texture in this workshop.

Mossed in the Forest, painting by eve margo withrow

Mossed in the Forest
Eve Margo Withrow

Eve specializes in the visual (surface) textures by layering and manipulating watermedia. Interesting patterns and images emerge from her process. She uses tissue paper, plastic wrap, salts, bleach, and other materials to create layers; following threads and surprises and imaginative pathways to create her uniquely powerful images. She then uses windowing and design techniques and sometimes collage to turn textural starts into finished paintings.

Pam specializes in creating dimensional texture through the use of gesso with various texturing materials. Using a gesso underlayer allows a great deal of flexibility in subsequent layers, which can be either watercolor or acrylic. Pam will provide you with a pre-gessoed paper and demonstrate not only the various ways gesso texture can be applied, but how to finish these painting using value contrast and negative painting techniques.

These texturing processes will produce uniquely interesting and creative paintings. Bring a sense of adventure and spontaneity and you will be amazed at what can result. The class is appropriate for anyone – beginners will have no trouble with the methods used and more advanced painters will be able to add complex texturing processes to their repertoire. You will leave with at least twelve painting starts, and one or two completed paintings.

ABOUT THE INSTRUCTORS

PAM HAUNSCHILD is a watermedia artist who devotes her time to capturing the beauty of nature in the American West. She is a retired college professor who now lives in Ashland, Oregon, and paints full time. She has been and artist-in-residence at three national parks and continues to be inspired by her time there. Her work is in galleries in Ashland, Seaside, and Bandon, Oregon, and is held by many individual and corporate collectors, including the National Park Service. She has done many commissions, most recently designing and painting a poster and playbill cover for the Britt Festival in Jacksonville, Oregon, and a large native plant mural at Southern Oregon University.

Pam has taught many watermedia workshops in Oregon and Northern California, including at Sitka Center for Art and Ecology and Coos Art Museum and enjoys helping all students discover new methods of painting while using (or developing) their own unique artistic style.

Read more about Pam
Rogue Valley Messenger, Blurring the Lines with Color: Southern Oregon Artist Pam Haunschild

Watchful eyes, painting by Eve Margo Withrow

Watchful Eyes
Painting by Eve Margo Withrow

EVE MARGO WITHROW is an international award-winning professional artist. She uses mixed watermedia (acrylics and watercolor) and frequently layers and collages her materials. Her paintings are magical impressions that reflect feelings of a particular experience or place. She is always curious to explore what lies outside the box. “I play and adventure with my textures, layers and colors, following threads here and there, thus entering the flow of my creative process.”

Eve has a master’s degree in art education from the University of Wyoming. With over 40 years experience in teaching art classes and workshops, Eve masterfully guides and encourages participants to awaken to their innate creativity by experiencing the joy of self-expression. Eve is a previous owner of Art & Soul gallery in Ashland, Oregon, and is currently showing her work there, along with Rogue Gallery in Medford. She has taught many workshops across the western United States.

TUITION & FEES

$175 for both days + $15 for materials. We will provide gesso mixture, containers, an assortment of texturing materials, one pre-gessoed piece of paper, and an extra squeeze or two of paint so you don’t have to buy a whole tube of something you want to try.

Register online at EmeraldArtCenter.org or call 541-726-8595.

Emerald Art Center is located at:
500 Main Street
Springfield, OR 97477

Emerald Art Center Workshop in May

Emerald Art Center Workshop

Using Texture to Create Expressive Watermedia Paintings

Full Moon Sky mixed media painting by Eve Margo Withrow

Full Moon Sky by Eve Margo Withrow
Mixed water media on paper

Instructors: Pam Haunschild and Eve Margo Withrow
May 9–10, 2020
All levels

Register Online Now
Or call the Emerald Art Center:
541-726-8595

CLASS DESCRIPTION

In this fun and exciting workshop, we will create textured, complex watermedia (acrylic/watercolor) backgrounds and then work on turning them into harmonious, successfully finished paintings. You have your choice of working in acrylics and/or watercolors along with a gesso mixture (provided).

Texture makes your painting feel more dynamic, creates a sense of depth, and helps viewers emotionally connect with a painting. Texture is sometimes visual (on the surface) and sometimes dimensional (raised above the surface). We will work with both types of texture in this workshop.

The class is appropriate for anyone – beginners will have no trouble with the methods used and more advanced painters will be able to add complex texturing processes to their repertoire. You will leave with at least 12 painting starts, and one or two completed paintings. Although the instructors work with nature subjects, you can work on the imagery of your choice as a final product.

In this post are examples of paintings Eve created using the techniques she and Pam teach in this class. See exampleso fPam’s work on her website: www.PamHaunschild.com

Mossed in the Forest, painting by eve margo withrow

Mossed in the Forest
Eve Margo Withrow

Eve specializes in the visual (surface) textures by layering and manipulating watermedia. Interesting patterns and images emerge from her process. She uses tissue paper, plastic wrap, salts, bleach, and other materials to create layers; following threads and surprises and imaginative pathways to create her uniquely powerful images. She then uses windowing and design techniques and sometimes collage to turn textural starts into finished paintings.

Pam specializes in creating dimensional texture through the use of gesso with various texturing materials. Using a gesso underlayer allows a great deal of flexibility in subsequent layers, which can be either watercolor or acrylic. Pam will provide you with a pre-gessoed paper and demonstrate not only the various ways gesso texture can be applied, but how to finish these painting using value contrast and negative painting techniques.

These texturing processes will produce uniquely interesting and creative paintings. Bring a sense of adventure and spontaneity and you will be amazed at what can result. The class is appropriate for anyone – beginners will have no trouble with the methods used and more advanced painters will be able to add complex texturing processes to their repertoire. You will leave with at least twelve painting starts, and one or two completed paintings.

ABOUT THE INSTRUCTORS

Watchful eyes, painting by Eve Margo Withrow

Watchful Eyes
Painting by Eve Margo Withrow

EVE MARGO WITHROW is an international award-winning professional artist. She uses mixed watermedia (acrylics and watercolor) and frequently layers and collages her materials. Her paintings are magical impressions that reflect feelings of a particular experience or place. She is always curious to explore what lies outside the box. “I play and adventure with my textures, layers and colors, following threads here and there, thus entering the flow of my creative process.”

Eve has a master’s degree in art education from the University of Wyoming. With over 40 years experience in teaching art classes and workshops, Eve masterfully guides and encourages participants to awaken to their innate creativity by experiencing the joy of self-expression. Eve is a previous owner of Art & Soul gallery in Ashland, Oregon, and is currently showing her work there, along with Rogue Gallery in Medford. She has taught many workshops across the western United States.

PAM HAUNSCHILD is a watermedia artist who devotes her time to capturing the beauty of nature in the American West. She is a retired college professor who now lives in Ashland, Oregon, and paints full time. She has been and artist-in-residence at three national parks and continues to be inspired by her time there. Her work is in galleries in Ashland, Seaside, and Bandon, Oregon, and is held by many individual and corporate collectors, including the National Park Service. She has done many commissions, most recently designing and painting a poster and playbill cover for the Britt Festival in Jacksonville, Oregon, and a large native plant mural at Southern Oregon University.

Pam has taught many watermedia workshops in Oregon and Northern California, including at Sitka Center for Art and Ecology and Coos Art Museum and enjoys helping all students discover new methods of painting while using (or developing) their own unique artistic style.

Read more about Pam
Rogue Valley Messenger, Blurring the Lines with Color: Southern Oregon Artist Pam Haunschild

Eve and Pam are the perfect compliment to each other in presenting and facilitating this creative journey, and they both have extensive teaching experience and coordinate well together so that participants will come out of the workshop with a variety of techniques and tools to start or expand their repertoire of texturing techniques.

materials List

  • Artist grade acrylics in your choice of colors. Bring colors you like to work with. Just be sure you have a warm and cool yellow, red, and blue as a minimum. If you don’t have acrylics, we will provide them for a $15 materials fee.
  • Artist grade watercolors in your choice of colors as above. If you don’t have watercolors, we will provide them for a $15 materials fee.
  • Brushes you like to use.
  • Three large (22 x 30) pieces of hot press watercolor paper. 140# is fine, unless you prefer working on heavier paper.
  • Water containers, paper towels, palette, scissors, spray bottle for water.
  • Texturing materials: we will a lot of these materials for you. But we also encourage you to bring anything you think you may like to work with. Examples include stamps, stencils, scratchers, sponges, textured fabric or paper, shells, etc.
  • Two or three old watercolor or acrylic paintings that you don’t mind reworking

We will provide the gesso mixture, gesso brushes and sponges, other containers and applicators and an assortment of texturing materials, stencils, and reference images.

TUITION & FEES

$175.00 for both days + $15 for materials

Register Online Now
Or call the Emerald Art Center:
541-726-8595

Click the link below to download or print the flyer for your reference. Please share this workshop with anyone you think might want to participate!

Download (PDF, 5.5MB)

Grab your bestie! Two spaces left for Paris!!! xo

Bonjour! If there is any part of you that is not so secretly craving a week in Paris, exploring, people watching, museum going, boat riding, painting and more….there are TWO SPACES left in this unique and wonderful art & travel workshop. There is time!

Your hosts are Deep Travel Workshops. Your guest art instructor is moi! The dates are April 4-10, 2020 and in that week it is a fabulous creative combination of time to explore on your own, art instruction après we’ve captured our favorite Paris shots on our iphones, world famous art museums and galleries, Paris walking tours, boat ride on the Seine…and so much more. (I haven’t even started on the restaurants, cafés or patisseries…)

We will cover the iconic landmarks and because we are a small group, it will be easy to get around together–especially with our world travellers, Anna & Christina. This is truly a once in a lifetime opportunity to give yourself the gift of creative time in Paris.

Please see this Paris Guide for more details. I can taste the croissants already….

Any travel/workshop questions: email: i[email protected]

Any questions about art supplies, painting or what to expect… email me!

Join us! Veins avec nous!

xo

On Being The Artist’s Model

Being An Artist's Model: John Stermer drawing Peggy At Five detail

Recent Self Portrait.

I rarely draw or paint my self portrait.  Perhaps this is because I’m not that great of a model!  That is, I wiggle too much.

During this past month’s “Strada Easel Challenge”*, I did a self portrait as part of my daily “drawing from life”.  Given my infrequent work at portraits and difficulty holding a pose, I was fairly pleased with the results.

On Being An Artist's Model: Self Portrait

Me As Five Year Old Artist Model.

Which reminds me of the time when I was about five years old and my Dad, artist John Stermer, drew my portrait.  At the time, Dad was doing portraits of his children; sort of a mini project.  Being the fourth in line, I’d seen my brother and two older sisters get their portrait drawn.  I was so excited when it was my turn.

And, this was when I received my first lesson on being a model.  First of all, I wanted to use the pose my Dad had used for my previous older sister.  I wanted to be like her.  So, I tucked my hands under my chin and persuaded my Dad that this was a good idea.  And, second of all, I thought that I could kept still.  But, not surprising, I didn’t.  I remember Dad asking me to be still, be quiet and to resume my pose.  Dad was infinitely patient and understanding. I am sure the session was under an hour.  And we took breaks. But the entire session seemed to take forever.

Oh, yes, Dad drew this series of portraits using everyday crayons.  I was so enchanted and amazed; my drawings with crayons never looked like that!  (Yes, there is a hint of me taking a photo of Dad’s drawing).

On Being An Artist's Model: Peggy At Five

Understanding The Model’s Situation.

Fast forward to recent times.  I have participated in live drawing classes and sessions as the artist, not the model.  It is critical that I, as the artist, understand what it takes for the model to assume a pose and keep it.   I have come to realize, that I inadvertently expect the model to hold the pose perfectly.  It’s not possible and it is the artist’s responsibility to adjust to the model; not vice versa.  And, as one who can not hold a pose, it’s my job to be understanding.

Self Portrait: Exercise In Learning About Drawing With A Model.

So, on the rare occasions that I do draw a self portrait, I spend some of the time re-learning how to be the model.  And, how to draw from a model.  Who knows, I always have intentions to do more; maybe one day I will.

In the meantime, I hope you enjoy my self portrait and the John Stermer portrait of me as a five year old child!

*PS.  I hope to discuss the “Strada Easel Challenge” in a future post.  In the meantime, I invite you to take a look at their website.

I participated two years ago and you can see the results on this lesson’s learned page.

 

The post On Being The Artist’s Model appeared first on Margaret Stermer-Cox.

Decade In Review: Final Four 2016 to 2019

Decade In Review: Considering Kandinsky, Detail

Happy New Year and New Decade!

I’d like to finish out my micro mini “decade in review” by showing you four watercolor paintings.  The paintings represent years 2016 to 2019.

2016.

Decade In Review: 2016 Irish Breakfast Tea

This painting was an experiment in adding Celtic symbols to help tell the visual story.  You might notice the shamrock, Celtic knot and modified triskele.  The triskele is on the tea bag’s tab.  I used a green dominant color scheme to further support the meaning of “Irish”.   As is my frequent practice, I played with different aspects of the cup, hence the enlarged cup handle.

This painting was shown in Rogue Gallery and Art Center’s “Celtic Celebration Art Show” (Medford, OR) and earned two awards: People’s Choice and  Staff’s pick.  I felt so honored!

2017.

Decade In Review: 2017 Considering Kandinsky

“Considering Kandinsky” was another experiment.  Truthfully, most if not all of my work is an experiment.  At the time, I was preparing to participate in a watercolor demonstration featuring the figure for the Watercolor Society of Oregon.  There were three of us artists and we had agreed on a particular reference photo of a man on a bench.  So, as is my usual practice, I played around with some ideas.  One thing led to another, and pretty soon I was thinking of the artist Wassily Kandinsky.   This was a fun painting for me.

2018.

Decade In Review: 2018 Three Minute Egg #11

I started the “Three Minute Egg” series when I was taking a class with artist Gabriel Lipper.  I’d like to say that it was a wonderful class on “deconstruction”, working in a series, and going from life to abstraction.  So, the first seven paintings I did in his class.  However, starting with number eight and onward, I did in my studio.  This particular painting earned a Fourth Place award in the Watercolor Society of Oregon’s Spring 2018 Experimental Exhibition.

2019.

Decade In Review 2019. Three Minute Egg #14

And, here we are continuing on with the theme of an egg cup and timer.  However, this time I added an espresso cup because I like espresso.

Previous Decade In Review Posts.

2010-2011

2012-2013

2014-2015

In closing, I hope you that you have enjoyed this mini decade in review.  And, I hope you have a great 2020!

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