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Create Art & Celebrate Diversity- Community Art Contest

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As part of our celebration of the fair’s 25th anniversary Sept. 29, 2018, Central Art and the fair are hosting a community art contest.

Consider submitting artwork with the theme “diversity” for the chance to display your artwork at the fair and win prizes!

Contest rules
Artwork will be judged on creativity, style and how well the artwork reflects the contest theme.
Artist may use any medium/format desired (black and white, color, pencil sketch, painting, ink, photograph, etc.).
Artwork must be an original creation, no prints.
Artwork must be created within the past year.
Artwork must be family friendly for viewing by people of all ages, gender, culture and race. Our intent is to emphasize equity, diversity and inclusion.
Artwork must be flat and not exceed 11” x 14” in size.
There is no entry fee. Limit 1 entry per person.
Artwork must be submitted with completed entry form by 4 pm, Friday, August 31, 2018 to Central Art, 101 North Central Ave, Medford.

The selection committee will announce winners at the Greater Medford Multicultural Fair on Saturday, September 29, 2018 at noon.

Immediately after the fair, all artwork will be at Central Art, 101 North Central Ave., for pick up. Artists must pick up their art at Central Art by 4 pm, Tuesday, October 16. It may be disposed of after that date.

Entry forms are available on the Greater Medford Multicultural Fair Facebook page

Prizes: First place winners and honorable mention winners will be selected from age groups: 8 and under, 9-13, 14-17, and 18 and up. Judges will select a winner and honorable mention for each category. The decisions of the judges are final.
1st Prize – $30 Gift Card to Central Art of Medford
Honorable Mention – $15 Gift Card to Central Art of Medford

Thank you for supporting the fair by participating in our art contest!
Download full rules and the application form here:
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March, April 2018 Classes at Grants Pass Museum of Art

Fairy Houses

with Jan Lacy

Saturday, March 17th & 26th

10:30 – 1:30 both days

Join Jan to learn how to make lighthearted and fun fairy houses. The first day is hand-building. She’ll help you with construction and decoration. Then she’ll do the firing, and the second day you get to glaze. Jan provides all the materials. Fairy houses will be ready to take home 1 – 2 weeks after the class (to allow for the glaze firing).
$50. Includes all the materials.

Needlefelting with Armatures

(Sheep theme)

with Corbin Brashear

Saturday, April 7th

12:30 – 4:30 pm

Create your own fun little sheep while learning how to needlefelt with armatures. Beginners welcome.
$45. Includes all materials.

Gelli Printing

with Karen O’Brien

Saturday, April 14th

10:30 am – 1:30 pm

This is a fun exploratory class in printmaking using commercial and homemade gelatin printing plates. We will experiment with color, plant materials, stencils, masks and texturing materials to make complex papers that can be used as collage for mixed media projects or framed as art. I will also cover how to make your own stamps and stencils to use for printing.
$45. Includes all materials.
Recommended by Karen:
Bring along some soft leaves, so they do not dig into the plate surface and any of your favorite stencils and texture materials ex: bubble wrap, lace…
Grants Pass Museum of Art | 229 SW G StGrants Pass, OR 97528

“One Artist Changes His Art & Saves His Life” Interview, Video and Discount Codes!

“One Artist Changes His Art & Saves His Life” Interview, Video and Discount Codes from the Studio of Leah Fanning Mebane and Natural Earth Paints

drip-effects_inger-jorgensen
Artist Inger Jorgenson, uses Eco-Solve to create beautiful drip effects.

ARTIST FOCUS: ROBERTO PARADA

One Artist Changes His Art and Saves His Life

Artist Roberto Parada

Artist Roberto Parada

Note from the Author: Natural Earth Paint sent Roberto a complimentary bottle of Eco-Solve to try after hearing of his health troubles. We look forward to hearing his feedback!!
Roberto Parada is an internationally known oil painter and illustrator, having been published in Time, Newsweek, Rolling Stone, ESPN The Magazine, Entertainment Weekly, Esquire, and Huffington Post. Few people know that his art process came close to ending his life in 2004. I had the honor of interviewing him about his journey in discovering which of his art supplies were literally killing him, how it happened and what he did to change his process while continuing to paint very high quality, archival and professional paintings.
Were you ever taught about the toxicity in art supplies in art school?

I went to a very prestigious art school in the late 80’s and early 90’s and was never taught about any hazards in art supplies by my painting and illustration teachers. I did have one sculpture teacher who adamantly forbade the use of fixatives, solvents and chemicals because he had gotten lymphoma from the use of those chemicals. He never really explained why we shouldn’t use them but just told us not use them in his classroom. My painting teachers all used toxic materials themselves and probably just didn’t know the health risks involved.

What was your painting technique throughout your school years and career?

I have always been an oil painter and I’m guilty of never wearing gloves or having adequate ventilation or even thinking that I should. Noone ever taught me the risks and on the warning labels on paint thinners I only saw warnings about difficulty breathing and respiratory issues. There was nothing about the fact that it can get into your bloodstream and cause death risks. The warnings are very ambiguous and limited considering the fact that I can list 5 different types of cancer that come from paint thinners. For example, 3 kinds of leukemia AML, ALL, CLL,  and Multiple Myeloma and Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma. I also used all of the heavy metal based paints – cadmiums and cobalts – and didn’t think much about it. In the 90’s the “Odorless Mineral Spirits” came onto the market and we all thought that this was a healthier alternative. Now I know that Odorless mineral spirits still have petroleum based distillates and benzene which is exactly what brought about my illness.

READ FULL INTERVIEW ON OUR BLOG:

FEATURED VIDEO TIP:


How to use Eco-Solve to clean oil paint brushes without toxins or solvents!

The Benefits of Eco-Solve:

  • 100% natural and non-toxic
  • Archival, professional artist-quality
  • Subtle, fruity licorice scent
  • Does not irritate the skin
  • Does not emit harmful vapors.
  • Soy-based and vegan. Cruelty-free.
  • Superb for creating washes, under-paintings, glazes, drip effects, etc.
  • Excellent brush cleaner! Can be used to clean all oil painting tools, palettes, brushes, containers, and work surfaces
  • Does not pollute the soil or waterways

Order Now! 20% OFF! Use Coupon Code: ECOSOLV16

20% off Eco-Solve Now through May 26, 2016! The Green School in Bali uses Earth Paints exclusively in their curriculum and painted a collaborative Earth Day mural this year.

The Green School in Bali uses Earth Paints exclusively in their curriculum and painted a collaborative Earth Day mural this year.The Green School in Bali uses Earth Paints exclusively in their curriculum and painted a collaborative Earth Day mural this year.

Natural Earth Paint Wins the Cribsie Awards – 380,000 people voted that Natural Earth Paints have the “Best Non-toxic Art Supplies”!Natural Earth Paints Wins 2016 Cribsie Awards!

Connect with us via social media!

“Discount Thursdays”

Every Thursday on Facebook we post a Coupon Code or FREE Give-Away! “Like” to get access.

Earth Art Show with Leah Mebane May 7

Leah Fanning Mebane’s 

Earth Art Show 
Saturday, May 7th 3-5 pm
 
4pm Artist Talk and Q&A
At Edenvale’s Enoteca on the Plaza (upstairs)
17 N. Main St. Ashland
FREE Wine Tasting & Appetizers
 
Stop by and say Hi, Sip, Munch and enjoy the great view of the mountains and downtown. 
 
This is my first art show in 6 years and I’m so excited to bring my paintings back into the world! They were all made with natural, hand-made oil paints on organic cotton canvas. Hope to see you there!
 
Earth Art Show with Leah Mebane, Saturday May 7, 2016, 3–5pm, ashland, oregon

Leah Fanning Mebane
 
Owner of Natural Earth Paints
541.890.6533

Contemporary Fine Artist

News from Leah Mebane and Natural Earth Paints

Earth Paint - Leah Fanning Mebane

Earth Paint – Leah Fanning Mebane

Dear friends,

I have some super exciting news about my business, Natural Earth Paints! You probably remember 3 years ago when I started this business in my garage with just 2 natural paint kits. We’ve been slowly and steadily growing and have now filled 2 bedrooms, an outdoor workshop and our kitchen and have now created 15 products. We have lots of exciting things happening next year: our first trade shows, new international distributors wanting to take us on and six new eco-friendly art supplies in development! But we’ve reached a kind-of bottle-neck where we don’t have an inch of space left to grow in my home and also not enough income to rent a warehouse or hire employees or develop new products. 
 
It’s so hard to ask for help sometimes but I’m so excited about the upcoming possibilities for Natural Earth Paints that I’ve decided to take the plunge and reach out! I’ve just launched a fundraiser which will last for one month. Check it out and also check out our JUST released new video by Oneal Latimore here….
www.rockethub.com/projects/50141-support-natural-earth-paint-saving-the-earth-one-brush-stroke-at-a-time

GIFTS FOR YOU… For every donation, you can choose from a large variety of gifts in return – everything from original oil paintings, Earth Paints products and private lessons.

If you’re not able to donate, please forward this link on to anyone who you think may want to help support a small, mama-owned, eco-conscious company. Share the love and have a beautiful Fall.
Sending lots of gratitude!
Leah Fanning Mebane
 
Owner of Natural Earth Paints
541.890.6533

Contemporary Fine Artist

Aboriginal Ochre

The Aboriginal Ochre Wars
There was a time when all of Australia was a network of trading posts. And good ochre was one of the most prized items to trade. “Wilga Mia” in Western Australia is one of the most sacred ochre mines on the continent. If

you want to collect any you have to ask permission from the traditional aboriginal owners and also from the sacred beings who live beneath it’s ancient chambers. It was still being mined and traded in the 1980’s, although by the end of the 20th century it was being collected in plastic buckets instead of bark dishes.
In the Flinders Ranges of South Australia, there’s another famous ochre deposit. For thousands of years Aboriginal expeditions (70-80 men) would walk for two months to travel the thousand- mile round trip to collect their red-gold ochre at a place called Parachilna. They would return with 20 kilos of ochre each in possum or kangaroo skin bags, and on their heads they’d carry huge grinding stones from a nearby stone quarry.
Then in 1860, guess what happened, you guessed it, the white guys arrived. Farmers arrived with land and sheep ownership claims and obviously didn’t want the Aboriginals to eat their sheep or walk across their land. But the natives continued to take sheep meat for their journey and walk across their land which soon became punishable by hanging. In 1863 there was an “ochre massacre” when scores of Aboriginals were killed by angry settlers. Then someone from the South Australian administration suggested a solution! They decided to “move the mine to the Aboriginals” so they wouldn’t have to make the journey. But they moved the wrong mine. They removed four tons of ochre from a mine owned by another tribe on the coast and spent weeks hauling it back. It was a completely wasted effort because the Aborigines wanted none of it.
The white settlers missed the point that it was a pilgrimage involving elaborate ceremonies in collecting the ochre and bringing it back. Also, the sacred ochre was essential for trading which happened when one item is seen as equal in value to another. But free ochre had no value. And lastly, the sacred ochre was used for painting ritual designs and this other ochre from the coast was not good enough or sacred enough and didn’t contain the hint of mercury that made it sparkle.
• From “Color” by Victoria Finlay

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eARTh Day News from Leah Mebane!

eARTh day 2013 news from Leah Mebane

The Art Inspector: Saving the Earth by Changing Art

Creative industries have changed standards and best practices to adopt sustainable and environmental techniques in design and production. Architecture has adopted LEED Performance design into standard practice, and Industrial Design begins with thinking about the end of life of a product and how to leave the least amount of impact on the environment. Both of these industries fought for decades, since the 1970s, against changing habits, systems and academic content. Resistors during the transformation proclaimed they would all go out of business; it was impossible to get all stakeholders on board; and they didn’t want to be creatively strangled.

This shared history of transforming creative industry leads us to a problem we are facing within the Art world. Can artists change the way they create work to make a healthier planet? Personally, I believe so, however, with the inclusion of all key players from the art world, including: art institutions, art media, academia, retailer/manufacturers, collectors and artists. Art seeds culture and influences public behavior. If artists can change their standard of practice then the rest of the world will follow.

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Art Inspector assessing quilters studio. Photo by Wendy Crockett.

How is this transformation possible? Incorporating a triangle approach to such transformation isThe Art Inspector, a social practice artwork I founded during my candidacy for a Masters in Fine Arts at San Jose State University, uses aHealthy Art Program (education), Legislative Reform (advocacy) and Third Party Inspections (studio assessments). This project started a few years ago when I noticed fellow studio mates as well as the art school itself seemingly unconsciously teaching and using harmful applications and techniques, disposing of waste, and ineffectively ventilating rooms. I noticed piles of plastic thrown into dumpsters, studio lights left on for what seemed 24 hours at a time, and complete negligence when using harsh chemicals. In my studio, a rusty cabinet labeled “Store Harsh Chemicals Here” written upon faded masking tape hosted a dusty plastic binder labeled MSDS Sheets. Taking a closer look, I realized no one had taught me whatMaterial Safety Data Sheets meant and how they might apply to what I do. I asked around to other artists what they might know about these sheets and what they thought about what they were using and how they were disposing of extra material. Many artists noted that they knew someone, or had experienced themselves, long term health problems from misuse of chemicals in the creation of artwork. Most artists intuitively believed that there was a better way to develop their work and acknowledge the harm of some of the materials, but did not know what to do about it or did not see change as a high priority.

Inspired by artworks using methods of Intervention Art which take on the roles and aesthetics of corporations and disrupt systems in unexpected ways, such as theYes Men andLuther Thie, I decided to become an Art Inspector. Within construction and manufacturing, unaffiliated auditors determine if a building or product can be certified as sustainable. If deemed so, doors open for prospective buyers and subsidies. I wanted to take this method to the Art World.

But how does a third party inspection work? There are at least two inspections to take place. The initial inspection starts with an intake form that asks questions to each artist about their studio environment, materials they are using, and the type of machines or equipment that use power. During this process a series of tests are conducted using similar equipment used for energy audits in residential homes. The Art Inspector tests power outlets, lighting and occupancy, ventilation and Volatile Organic Compounds. Once the inspection process is finished The Art Inspector will write up a report based on the data collected and make suggestions for alternatives and improvements to artists studios and the working process. If the artist makes the recommended modifications, The Art Inspector will return for a re-inspection and award a Healthy Art Certification if the artist passes.

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Paint waste from inspection of painter’s studio. Photo by Wendy Crockett.

Artists who fail inspection or those who are interested in diving deeper into changing their habits can join the Healthy Art Program. Various workshops ranging from green materials, sustainable wood products, energy efficiency, lighting and safety are available to artists at varying partner institutions. If the artists are supplied with resources and knowledge, they will be empowered to change. The final part of The Art Inspector is to advocate for change in policy and curriculum on both an institutional and government level. Working with academic and museum institutions to adopt new values and requirements for artworks to be created sustainably will create a shift in the resources for production of art. If a major contemporary art museum such as the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art sets a standard for new works to be exhibited using a significant amount of low impact materials and works with third party agents such as The Art Inspector, then other practitioners will follow. With this same concept, Public Art Programs can adopt LEED standards into creation of artworks in the public realm.

Even today these concepts of change in the Art World are seen as radical and frightening to some. However, many artists are willing to do what they do best, experiment with new ideas. With the vision of The Art Inspector, we will open up the avenues to sustainable living, healthy living, and simultaneously, changing the way we make art.

 

Follow Danielle Siembieda-Gribben on Twitter: www.twitter.com/Art_Inspector

Spring 2013 Mandala Workshop

                                        
                            Freedom is Letting Go
              Spring 2013 Mandala Drawing Workshop

This one day workshop focuses attention on creating mandalas to facilitate letting go of anxious thoughts, false concepts, wants, and desires in order to experience more peace of mind and happiness.  Participants will have the opportunity to examine

Eco Oil Painting Tutorial Video

I’ve recently recorded an 8 minute video of me explaining how to eliminate all toxins from your oil painting practice. There will be tips and techniques and info on how to use only natural materials (nothing synthetic or petroleum based). Enjoy!

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