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Kindred Spirits 2019 Winter Art Classes and Workshops

     2019 Winter Art Classes and Workshops

Happy New Year to all of you creative souls!  We have moved some things around at Kindred Spirits and I have taken over part of the space as my studio/workshop where it will be much more convenient to teach art classes and celebrate your creations through art walks and events. What I want to accomplish, through my classes is not so much that you look at your creation to reach your ideal of perfection, but through the creative process, find your soul, see what amazing gift you have been blessed with and through that, share with the rest of the world. (Who knows what changes we can make). I’m offering but a catalyst and a space to move forward with this in mind.
Below is a list of some of the classes and workshops we will be having as well as a series of Sumi-e classes on Wednesday evenings and some mornings. Also Thursday evenings are, “Random Acts of Art,”-open studio style.
I’m adding another e-mail if you have questions or are interested in joining a class.  [email protected].
You can also register for a class on-line by going to www.Kindredspiritsartalewine.com website, go to “Class Registration,” and sign up there. 

Sumi-e
Translated, ‘Black Ink-Painting,” is where art and art of living come together.  In these classes, you will explore the simplicity and spontaneity of the essence of nature.  In this painting-method, as in Zen practice, reality is expressed by reducing it to its pure bare form.  You will find this practice extremely therapeutic and heart calming.
All materials provided.
Tuesday Mornings with Tea:
Jan. 22, 10:00
Feb.12 and 26,  10:00
Mar. 12 and 26, 10:00
Wednesday Evenings- “Sake and Sumi-e,” starting:
Jan. 23 at 7:00 P.M.
Cost: $25 per class
“Random Acts of Art”
THURSDAY EVENINGS
Open Studio Drop In and different projects every week.
This photo ( milagros), is just one example.
Cost: $10
“More Random Acts of Art”
THURSDAY EVENINGS
Open Studio Drop In and different projects every week.
Another example: Matchbox reliquaries.
Cost: $10
The Heart Reliquary
For all of you that requested this class again.
This three dimensional wall hanging is just in time for Valentines Day.  Made with doors that open to a niche, these charming little creations can house a special memento or a cool trinket.  The size is approx. 7″x 8″, give or take an inch.  All materials are provided, including paints, papers and really fun embellishments.
Saturday workshop
January 19th, 1:00-4:00
Cost: $45
Circular Wall Hanging
Okay, you wanted another round vessel class, here it is!
This mixed media creation is so fun I am addicted to making these myself.  The piece you will be making is made with clay, wire, natural and decorative papers (mache style), acrylic paint and other embellishments that suit your fancy. I added tassels and beads to this one.
All materials provided.
Saturday, February 16, 1:00-4:00
Cost $55
Ceremonial Tribal Rattle
It’s an instrument and an art piece!
The Native American style rattle holds deep symbolism and represents, through it’s formation and sound, “The three kingdoms or nations,” the animal kingdom, the plant kingdom and the mineral kingdom (earth).  All materials are provided in this mixed media piece including beautiful natural elements.
Saturday,  February 2nd, 1:00-4:00 and Tuesday, February19th, 1:00-4:00
Cost $45
Ethnic Tribal Dolls
Let yourself go!! Wild, eccentric and fun!!  Textiles, beads, paint, clay, fibers, shells and all kinds of unique materials make up this primitive style creation that can hang on the wall.
All materials provided. I will make this a longer workshop just because I know you won’t want to stop working on it.
Saturday, February 9, 11:oo-4:00
Cost: $50

2019 Britt Festival Orchestra Program Call for Entries

Teddy Abrams and the Britt Festival Orchestra

CALLING ALL POETS, WRITERS & VISUAL ARTISTS

Britt Music & Arts Festival wants to put your creativity on display in our 2019 Britt Festival Orchestra Souvenir Program. Our 2019 season is built around the theme ‘The Sound of Nature’. We are looking for original poetry, short stories, or visual art that relates to music & nature for our publication. How does music reflect nature? Where do we find music? How does nature inspire the creative process with regards to music? How did smoke from various fires last summer impact the making of music? Explore these topics through your written or visual artistic expressions.

BFO
Connect with Britt

2019 Britt Festival Orchestra Program Call for Entries

Calling All Poets, Writers & Visual Artists

Britt Music & Arts Festival wants to put your creativity on display in our 2019 Britt Festival Orchestra Souvenir Program. Submit your original work via email by April 1st, 2019 to be considered.

Our 2019 season is built around the theme ‘The Sound of Nature’. We are looking for original poetry, short stories, or visual art that relates to music & nature for our publication, which will go to press in June 2019.  How does music reflect nature? Where do we find music? How does nature inspire the creative process with regards to music? How did smoke from various fires this summer impact the making of music? Explore these topics through your written or visual artistic expressions.

What to consider:

For visual artists: The physical page size will be  6.625”w x 10.125”t and will be printed using CMYK. Please submit a high-res JPG or PDF file for us to consider. All mediums accepted. (Paintings, Illustrations, Comic Art, Photography, Decoupage, etc.) For artists from the Rogue Valley: We will make a high-res scan of the chosen work and return the original to you or you can donate it to be auctioned off to support the BFO. For artists from out of the area (outside the Rogue Valley, Oregon) please be able to supply a high-res print-ready scan or photo of your piece for publication. Any donated work will be auctioned off to support the Britt Festival Orchestra.

Graphic Novel Pages: Using the format of a comic book or graphic novel, express your artistic impressions to be shared with our audience. The focus can be on anything related to orchestral/classical music & nature. From the fire season and how that impacted the making of music to how nature inspires music, to a fictionalized account of our superhero maestro, Teddy Abrams or one of our featured composers. The sky’s the limit!

Poetry: Poems should be a maximum of 250 words (to appear on a half-page of the program)

Prose: Articles or stories should be a maximum of 500 words (to take up a single page of the program)

If your work is selected: you grant Britt the approval to reproduce the artwork in physical and digital format in perpetuity. We will include a byline of your choice and a link to your bio on our website. We will also include featured bios and/or interviews with the winning artists to share on social media. Your work may be published in any the following formats: Physical Program Book, Physically (via ads or souvenir items produced for Britt), Digitally (on our website, our social media channels and through video which will be shared on our social media/Youtube channels & possibly television). Written pieces may be recorded by a narrator and shared via the above digital channels.

Check our website on January 24th for the complete program lineup to pick a composer or work to further your inspiration!

Where to submit your entry AND DEADLINE:

Submit all work to [email protected] in PDF (for written work) or JPG (for visual art) format by April 1st, 2019 to be considered. Selected artists will be notified by email.

Call For Art- Don’t Fence Me In, Rogue Gallery Annual Members Exhibit

www.roguegallery.org 40 South Bartlett Street Medford Oregon 97501 541-772-8118
The Annual Members’ exhibit in the Main Gallery is a favorite for many. You are invited to bring in one piece for this year’s theme “Don’t Fence Me In”. For this year, break through whatever boundaries you like as the title “Don’t Fence Me In” implies. (Though within our constraints of being a current member, and framing and dimensions requirements listed HERE>>) This is one of the few exhibits you can submit a piece that is not for sale.

Annual Members Exhibit – Don’t Fence Me In

Drop-off one piece on the theme “Don’t Fence Me In” on Friday, November 2,10am-5pm and Saturday, November 3, 11:00-3:00 pm. The exhibit runs November 9-December 21, 2018. The reception is Friday, November 16, 2018, 5-8pm. Pick-up is Saturday, December 22, 2018 11am-3pm and Wednesday, January 2, 2019, 10am-5pm.

ELIGIBILITY
•Artists must be current members of the Rogue Gallery & Art Center. They may become a member at the time of drop-off.
• Work is your original art (no reproductions) created within the last two years.
• Photographs and hand-pulled prints are signed.
• Work is in excellent condition (clean mats and frames).
• Work is properly framed and wired for hanging. For safety of artwork, we do not allow saw tooth hangers.
• Watercolors and works on paper must be covered by glass or Plexiglas with no exposed edges (closed frames only). Wrapped canvas is ok.
• Outer dimensions (including frame) are 40” x 40”.
• Please do not submit work that has previously been display in any of our galleries.
• Artist receives 60% of sale price: Rogue Gallery receives a 40% commission of retail sale.

Forms: Inventory & Artist Agreement and Art Labels

www.roguegallery.org

Create Art & Celebrate Diversity- Community Art Contest

Central Art Logo

 

 

As part of our celebration of the fair’s 25th anniversary Sept. 29, 2018, Central Art and the fair are hosting a community art contest.

Consider submitting artwork with the theme “diversity” for the chance to display your artwork at the fair and win prizes!

Contest rules
Artwork will be judged on creativity, style and how well the artwork reflects the contest theme.
Artist may use any medium/format desired (black and white, color, pencil sketch, painting, ink, photograph, etc.).
Artwork must be an original creation, no prints.
Artwork must be created within the past year.
Artwork must be family friendly for viewing by people of all ages, gender, culture and race. Our intent is to emphasize equity, diversity and inclusion.
Artwork must be flat and not exceed 11” x 14” in size.
There is no entry fee. Limit 1 entry per person.
Artwork must be submitted with completed entry form by 4 pm, Friday, August 31, 2018 to Central Art, 101 North Central Ave, Medford.

The selection committee will announce winners at the Greater Medford Multicultural Fair on Saturday, September 29, 2018 at noon.

Immediately after the fair, all artwork will be at Central Art, 101 North Central Ave., for pick up. Artists must pick up their art at Central Art by 4 pm, Tuesday, October 16. It may be disposed of after that date.

Entry forms are available on the Greater Medford Multicultural Fair Facebook page

Prizes: First place winners and honorable mention winners will be selected from age groups: 8 and under, 9-13, 14-17, and 18 and up. Judges will select a winner and honorable mention for each category. The decisions of the judges are final.
1st Prize – $30 Gift Card to Central Art of Medford
Honorable Mention – $15 Gift Card to Central Art of Medford

Thank you for supporting the fair by participating in our art contest!
Download full rules and the application form here:
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Crow’s Shadow Institute of the Arts Seeks New Executive Director

Crow's Shadow Institute for the Arts logo

Position Announcement

Title: Executive Director, Crow’s Shadow Institute of the Arts

48004 St. Andrew’s Road, Pendleton, Oregon 97801

CSIA is searching for an ED who can embrace and fulfill the mission and vision of CSIA, and who can bring energy, experience and intellect to the task of moving CSIA into its next decade of growth.

Crow’s Shadow’s mission is to provide a creative conduit for educational, social, and economic opportunities for Native Americans through artistic development. CSIA’s programs focus on the fine art of printmaking and traditional Native arts education.

CSIA envisions being a creative center for contemporary Native and non-Native artists locally, nationally and internationally through the medium of fine-art printmaking.

Experience with fine-art printmaking and its marketing, knowledge of the contemporary art world, skill in grant writing and building a donor base, and the ability to imagine future programming for CSIA are all desired qualities.

CSIA will give preference to those who have experience working in cross-cultural settings, who have knowledge and interest in contemporary indigenous art, who have knowledge of tribal culture, and who have had capital campaign experience.

The Executive Director is responsible for the overall management of CSIA in accordance with the operating policies as approved by the Board of Directors. In addition to general administration, the Executive Director is responsible for the day-to–day management of the facilities, coordinating with staff in program planning and fundraising for CSIA.

Reports to: Board of Directors

Salary: $60,000 – 65,000 annual salary, DOE

Status: Full-time, Exempt

Benefits: Annually: 12 days paid vacation leave; 8 days paid sick leave; 11 paid holidays

Minimum Qualifications:

  • Associate’s or Bachelor’s degree, any field
  • Three years increasingly responsible non-profit work experience
  • Excellent speaking, interpersonal and written communication skills
  • Excellent computer skills with proficiency in Microsoft applications, QuickBooks
  • Demonstrated ability to work effectively as part of a team

Position open until filled; first review August 28, 2013.

For the complete job description, please refer to the Crow’s Shadow website. To apply, please submit cover letter, resume, and 3 references to: CSIA, 48004 St. Andrew’s Road, Pendleton, OR 97801

For further information, contact James Lavadour, Board President at [email protected] Or phone (541) 276-3954

Art or life?

hopi mask

Hopi mask at auction in Paris

Can I please be the Hopi shaman who got to wear this helmet? Ah. OK. I didn’t think so.

On April 12 the Néret-Minet auction house in Paris will auction many sacred Hopi artifacts, over the objections of the tribe. Above, a helmet representing the Crow Mother, made from leather recycled from a Mexican saddle and feathers, is among the artifacts up for auction. Others are shown in this NYTimes slide show.

“The Hopis, who number about 18,000 in northeast Arizona, believe the objects in the Paris sale, which they call Katsinam, or ‘friends,’ are imbued with divine spirits. The brightly colored visages and headdresses, often adorned with horsehair, sheepskin, feathers and maize, are thought to embody the spirits of warriors, animals, messengers, fire, rain and clouds, among other things.”

Embodying the spirits of fire, rain, and clouds sounds like my idea of art, actually. Sacred or not, most of these look as if they were created right now. Paul Klee would have loved them. And Picasso.

 

Chinook Power Board Showing Frog and Moon to be Unveiled at CCC

Frog and Moon, Chinook Power Board by Greg Robinson, Chinook Tribal Member

Frog and Moon, Chinook Power Board by Greg Robinson, Chinook Tribal Member ©2012-2013 Greg Robinson

“Shwiqhiq Pi mun” (Frog and Moon) will at last find its place at Clatsop Community College.  It will be unveiled just before the College Board meeting, Tuesday, April 9, at 5:30pm, in the upper entry to Columbia Hall, 1651 Lexington Avenue, Astoria.

Last fall this unique piece of artwork was presented to the Clatsop Community College Board of Directors at one of their monthly meetings.   “Chinook Power Board Showing Frog and Moon” first came to Clatsop Community College as part of the Pacific Rim Art ExhibitEmergence from Place–Neo-Traditional Indigenous Art held a year ago at the College’s Art Center Gallery.

The Chinook Power Board is a panel hand carved from red and yellow cedar.  The artist is Greg Robinson, a Chinook Tribal Member.  It is modeled after traditional panels that leaned against longhouses as a gesture of welcoming, an expression of family identity and spiritual protection.  If one looks closely at the piece one will see two frogs on top carefully holding another anthropomorphic figure in their mouth. 

Several community members who saw the art a year ago felt the piece belonged at Clatsop Community College and helped raise enough money to purchase Robinson’s work as a way for the College to honor the Chinook Nation that included the Clatsop Tribe. They were some of the earliest inhabitants of the Lower Columbia Basin and still maintain a tribal presence here with a local tribal office in Bay Center, Washington.  Frog and Moon will hang in Columbia Hall where it will look to the river as a symbolic gesture toward the original inhabitants of the mouth of the Columbia.

The college and community members, who contributed funds to purchase this work and its accompanying plaque, feel confident that “Chinook Power Board Showing Frog and Moon” will be welcoming, show reverence and reciprocity, and remind us to honor our ancestors.

Please direct inquiries to:  Richard Rowland, 503-338-2449; [email protected].

Attached image:

“Chinook Power Board Showing Frog and Moon” was part of the College’s Pacific Rim Art ExhibitEmergence from Place–Neo-Traditional Indigenous Art held a year ago at the Art Center Gallery.

 

 

Non-Discrimination: It is the policy of Clatsop Community College that there will be no discrimination or harassment on the grounds of race, color, gender, marital status, religion, national origin, age, sexual orientation, or disability in any educational programs, activities, or employment. Questions or complaints should be directed to Leslie Lipe, Affirmative Action/Gender Equity (Title IX) Officer in the CCC Library, Suite 108B, 503-338-2450; TDD 503-338-2468. The Title II/Section 504 Coordinator, Christine Riehl, is located in the Student Services Center, 503-338-2474.

Declaración de no-discriminación: Es la política de Clatsop Community College que no habrá ningún tipo de discriminación o acoso por razón de raza, color, género, estado civil, religión, origen nacional, edad, orientación sexual, o discapacidad en los programas educativos, actividades o en la contratación. Preguntas o quejas deben ser dirigidas al Leslie Lipe, Oficial de Acción Afirmativa / Título IX localizado en la Biblioteca oficina número 108, número de teléfono 503-338-2450, TDD (discapacidad auditiva) 503-338-2468. El Coordinador de la Titulo II/Sección 504, Christine Riehl, se encuentra en el Centro de Servicios Estudiantiles, número de teléfono 503-338-2474. Para ADA y otras peticiones de servicios llame al 503-338-2474 o para TDD (discapacidad auditiva) 503-338-2468.

Accommodations: Persons having questions about or a request for special needs and accommodation should contact JoAnn Zahn, Vice President of Finance and Operations, at Clatsop Community College, 1651 Lexington Avenue, Astoria, Oregon 97103, Phone 503-338-2421 or TDD 503-338-2468. Email special needs and accommodation request to [email protected]  Contact should be made at least two business days in advance of the event.

Book Review: A History of How People Cooperate - And Why

Editor’s Note: We found this review by Frank Bures in the February 2013 issue of The Rotarian magazine. Since it resonates with a previously published interview with anthropologist Ellen Dissanayake and helps to explain how and why the arts are so ingrained in our collective psyche, we thought readers with the same fascination might also be interested.

 

The debate over what culture is, and the role it plays in human history, has gone on almost since Edward Burnett Tylor wrote about it in his 1871 book, Primitive Culture. Tylor and others at the same time viewed culture as something that Europe had, and that the rest of the world didn’t.

Since then, views have changed, and in Wired for Culture: Origins of the Human Social Mind (W.W. Norton, 2012), Mark Pagel offers a wide-ranging exploration of how culture and biology have intertwined to create modern human beings. Pagel is an evolutionary biologist, so he starts at the beginning. About 60,000 years ago a small group of humans set off in to the world. Those people were more like us than others who came before them: They had abstract art, jewelry, tattoos, tools, traps, and nets. Our separation from other upright species such as Neanderthals had begun to accelerate. But why?

To find the answer, Pagel looks further back, to the period from 160,000 to 200,000 years ago, when humans became genetically recognizable as us. They began to be capable of having culture – systems of beliefs, ideas, skills, and technologies – and had a new ability to use “knowledge, belief and practices acquired from watching, imitating, and learning from others.”

This expansion of our ability to cooperate helped us work in bigger groups and was humanity’s real survival advantage. However, it has left a complicated legacy; Shared ways of thinking and learning resulted in a sense of kinship among those who are part of our own culture – and created a sense of otherness toward those who are not.

Pagel concludes on a hopeful note. Our received culture is more like software than hardware, he writes. Whereas other animals, from apes to ants, are hard-wired to hate outsiders, he says, we are not. “What our history has demonstrated is that we humans will get along with anyone who wishes to play the cooperative game with us.”

– Frank Bures

Archaeologist Finds Oldest Rock Art In Australia

Archaeologist Finds Oldest Rock Art In Australia. (Found at HuffPostArts today)

 

Archaeologist Finds Oldest Rock Art In Australia

 

Rock Art

 

ROD McGUIRK   06/18/12 09:22 AM ET  AP

 

CANBERRA, Australia — An archaeologist says he found the oldest piece of rock art in Australia and one of the oldest in the world: an Aboriginal work created 28,000 years ago in an Outback cave.

 

The dating of one of the thousands of images in the Northern Territory rock shelter known as Nawarla Gabarnmang will be published in the next edition of the Journal of Archaeological Science.

 

University of Southern Queensland archaeologist Bryce Barker said Monday that he found the rock in June last year but only recently had it dated at New Zealand’s University of Waikato radiocarbon laboratory.

 

He said the rock art was made with charcoal, so radiocarbon dating could be used to determine its age. Most rock art is made with mineral paint, so its age cannot be accurately measured.

 

“It’s the oldest unequivocally dated rock art in Australia” and among the oldest in the world, Barker said.

 

The oldest known rock art is in Spain, where hand stencils and red disks made by blowing paint on to the wall in El Castillo cave are at least 40,800 years old, according to scientists using a technique known as uranium-thorium dating.

 

Australian National University archaeologist Sally May, who is not involved with Barker’s research, described his find as “incredibly significant.”

 

“I don’t think it will surprise anyone that rock art is that old in Australia because we know people have been here a lot longer than that and there’s no reason to believe they weren’t producing art,” she added.

 

Barker said he found evidence that the cave where he found the rock art had been occupied for 45,000 years.