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Ashland Gallery Association's May 2017 Spotlight Exhibits

Bruce Bayard: Video Projections

Bruce Bayard continues his exploration into time-based imagery with video collages created for installations and performances. The video compositing process he uses is similar to that of the Photoshop process used in all his still images, interjecting stressed surfaces and multiple layers of interacting images. The resulting video clips are further combined in a program that randomly selects and runs portions of the clips in constantly changing sequence.

This batch of work contrasts trains, airplanes, forests and calm water surfaces. No soundtrack exists for the videos, but are created improvisationally in the moment using a Buchla Music Easel, and additional modular electronic sound sources.

During the First Friday Artwalk the projections will run continuously, with a combination of pre-recorded and improvisational soundscapes.

Bruce Bayard Boatman
Image caption: “Airplane,” video still by Bruce Bayard

Ashland Art Works

Michael Gibson’s Paintings 

This month Ashland Art Works features new work by Michael Gibson: Surrealistic “Winescapes” with homage to Dali and Chirico. “I had fun with this series,” says Gibson. “I got into their heads, appreciating the originality of their compositions, use of color and love of life.

Michael’s style is unique and at the same time inspired by works of post-impressionist artists. He received his BFA from Houston Museum of Fine Arts and has worked as a designer, art director, and taught life drawing, illustration, painting, graphic design and photography at Art Institute of Houston and the Art Institute of Seattle.

5 GALLERIES AND THE SCULPTURE GARDEN:

As always, you will be more than pleased by our selection of Fine Art and Crafts.

  • AAW is home to these outstanding local artists…
  • Elin Babcock’s assemblage, jewelry, & paintings
  • Marydee Bombick’s functional and garden pottery
  • Suzanne Etienne’s joyful paintings
  • Michael Gibson’s painting in post impressionists’ style
  • Cheryl Kempner’s jewelry, garden art & Crazy Clay Birds
  • Claudia Law’s textile creations
  • Daniel Loch’s photography
  • Bonnie Morgan’s decorative and functional pottery
  • George Popa’s dimensional wire sculptures
  • Lorene Senesac’s raku sculpture & wall reliefs
  • Connie Simonsen’s handpainted silk scarves
  • Angelique Stewarts functional and stylish weavings
  • John Weston’s fine woodwork & cutting boards

Surrealistic Winescapes

Image caption: “Surrealistic Winescapes” by Michael Gibson

American Trails

Alebrije or Animalistas

In May, American Trails Gallery we will be featuring the woodcarving folk art out of Oaxaca, Mexico. Fanciful carvings called alebrije or were first done by artist Pedro Linares Lopez in Mexico City in the 1930’s. He made elaborate piñata’s, carnival masks and religious figures out of paper mache and cardboard. This caught the attention of prominent gallery owners who began to market the pieces. Diego Rivera and Frida Khalo began commissioning the fanciful alebrijes, which means monsters. Linares returned to Arrazola in Oaxaca and began sharing his designs with fellow artisans. Manuel Jimenez Ramirez was the first to carve the colorful creatures out of copal wood in the 1970’s. The art form exploded in the 1980’s with folk art galleries in the US becoming more and more interested. Today, there are three main villages that the carvers reside; Arrazola, the pueblo of Manuel, San Martin Tilcajete, and La Union Tejalapam. We are proud to have over 80 families represented in our gallery.

American Trails Gallery proudly features the art and crafts of the indigenous peoples of the America’s. Weavings from the Navajo’s and Zapotec’s, carvings from the Hopi, Zuni, Haida, Kwakiutl, Inuit and Oaxaca, ceramics from many of the pueblos in the Southwest, Acoma, San Ildefonso, Zuni, Cochiti and the Mata Ortiz of Mexico, handmade historic and contemporary jewelry from the Pueblos, Zuni, Santo Domingo, Navajos as well as from Taxco. The largest selection of Historic Basketry in the Pacific Northwest including Pomo, Maidu, Hoopa, Karok, Wintun, Shasta, Modoc and many more. We also feature Regional artists depicting the Wildlife and Landscapes of the area. When you purchase a gift from American Trails you are helping to support hundreds of families who are working hard to keep the traditional Arts and Crafts of their communities alive and well.

The American Trails Gallery which for 23 years was located at 250 East Main Street on the Plaza in Ashland is being reopened at a new location 250 East Main street.

Open 10 am to 6 pm everyday excluding holidays

“Animalistas” woodcarving folk art

Image caption: “Animalistas” woodcarving folk art

Hanson Howard Gallery

Wataru Sugiyama & Lewis Anderson, ceramic sculptures & digital photography

The influence of the aesthetics and imagery of Asian art will be strong in our May exhibition.  Wataru Sugiyama slyly infuses a contemporary charm and, at times, humor into what we recognize as traditional Japanese motifs in his ceramic sculptures.  Lewis Anderson digitally blends photographs of the Pacific Northwest into landscapes that exist in a world of his own invention but have distinctive undercurrents of traditional woodblock landscapes.  Large in scale, at times up to 80” wide, these landscapes have the ability to draw you in and hold you. Show runs May 4th-30th.  Join us for an artist reception on First Friday, May 5th, 5-8 p.m.

Wataru Sugiyama has cultivated an appreciative audience for the Haniwa type imagery in his sculpture. Elements of Japanese history and mythology are almost the exclusive focus of Wataru’s creations.  He interprets imaginary and existing objects and gives them a modern twist by bringing his personal vision to these subjects.  His sculptures are truly inspirational, have a powerful presence, sense of humor, and make a strong impression on his viewers.  Besides historical elements, extremely fine detail and exquisite facial expressions are featured on his sculptures.

Lewis Anderson accurately describes his art as being somewhere between photography and painting, somewhere between East and West, somewhere between contemporary and ancient. The images invite the viewer to explore quiet moments in diverse landscapes full of light and shadow and symbology.  An ancient river winds through tall foreign mountains, full of soft golden light and blue fog. A single silhouetted figure in a small boat appears to be slowly rowing into the unknown in one of the three scroll-like panels of Boatman. This timeless image, like the others in Lewis Anderson’s Dynasty collection, emanates a strong sense of peace, solitude and mystery.

Boatman by Lewis Anderson

Image caption: “Boatman,” digital print on aluminum by Lewis Anderson

LACDA Call for Digital Art

LACDA Call for Digital Art

“TOP 40” INTERNATIONAL JURIED COMPETITION

Curating Jurors:
Kathryn Poindexter, California Museum of Photography
Mat Gleason, Coagula Curatorial

 LACDA Call for Digital Art Enter our juried competition for digital art and photography. Entrants submit three JPEG files of original work. All styles of artwork and photography where digital processes of any kind were integral to the creation of the images are acceptable. The competition is international, open to all geographical locations.

The selected winner receives 10 prints up to 44×60 inches on canvas or museum quality paper (approximately a $2,500-$3,000 value) to be shown in a solo exhibition in our main gallery.  The exhibit will be widely promoted and will include a reception for the artist.

Second place prizes: Ten second place winners will receive one print of their work up to 24×36 inches ($150-$200 in value) to be included in the winners’ exhibits and opening.

Deadline for Entries: May 23, 2016
Winners Announced: May 30, 2016
Exhibit Dates: June 9-July 2, 2016

LACDA Artists’ Reception: Saturday, June 11, 6-9pm
Artwalk preview: Thursday, June 9, 7-9pm

Complete information: http://lacda.com/juried/juriedshow.html

Online registration only.
For questions email us at [email protected]
No phone calls please.