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Southern Oregon Plein Air Event 2017 Last day for Early Registration Monday, May 15

Southern Oregon Plein Air Event 2017

Last day for Early Registration is Monday, May 15th!

Event Takes Place 06/28 – 07/01/17

Quick Paint Competitions!
Art Supply Representatives!
Over $1500 in Cash Awards & Prizes!

Visit www.soartistsworkshop.com or call 541-324-7624 for full details and schedule!

Southern Oregon Plein Air Event 2017, produced by the Artistsworkshop and sponsored by Central Art Supply

Ashland Gallery Association's May 2017 Spotlight Exhibits

Bruce Bayard: Video Projections

Bruce Bayard continues his exploration into time-based imagery with video collages created for installations and performances. The video compositing process he uses is similar to that of the Photoshop process used in all his still images, interjecting stressed surfaces and multiple layers of interacting images. The resulting video clips are further combined in a program that randomly selects and runs portions of the clips in constantly changing sequence.

This batch of work contrasts trains, airplanes, forests and calm water surfaces. No soundtrack exists for the videos, but are created improvisationally in the moment using a Buchla Music Easel, and additional modular electronic sound sources.

During the First Friday Artwalk the projections will run continuously, with a combination of pre-recorded and improvisational soundscapes.

Bruce Bayard Boatman
Image caption: “Airplane,” video still by Bruce Bayard

Ashland Art Works

Michael Gibson’s Paintings 

This month Ashland Art Works features new work by Michael Gibson: Surrealistic “Winescapes” with homage to Dali and Chirico. “I had fun with this series,” says Gibson. “I got into their heads, appreciating the originality of their compositions, use of color and love of life.

Michael’s style is unique and at the same time inspired by works of post-impressionist artists. He received his BFA from Houston Museum of Fine Arts and has worked as a designer, art director, and taught life drawing, illustration, painting, graphic design and photography at Art Institute of Houston and the Art Institute of Seattle.

5 GALLERIES AND THE SCULPTURE GARDEN:

As always, you will be more than pleased by our selection of Fine Art and Crafts.

  • AAW is home to these outstanding local artists…
  • Elin Babcock’s assemblage, jewelry, & paintings
  • Marydee Bombick’s functional and garden pottery
  • Suzanne Etienne’s joyful paintings
  • Michael Gibson’s painting in post impressionists’ style
  • Cheryl Kempner’s jewelry, garden art & Crazy Clay Birds
  • Claudia Law’s textile creations
  • Daniel Loch’s photography
  • Bonnie Morgan’s decorative and functional pottery
  • George Popa’s dimensional wire sculptures
  • Lorene Senesac’s raku sculpture & wall reliefs
  • Connie Simonsen’s handpainted silk scarves
  • Angelique Stewarts functional and stylish weavings
  • John Weston’s fine woodwork & cutting boards

Surrealistic Winescapes

Image caption: “Surrealistic Winescapes” by Michael Gibson

American Trails

Alebrije or Animalistas

In May, American Trails Gallery we will be featuring the woodcarving folk art out of Oaxaca, Mexico. Fanciful carvings called alebrije or were first done by artist Pedro Linares Lopez in Mexico City in the 1930’s. He made elaborate piñata’s, carnival masks and religious figures out of paper mache and cardboard. This caught the attention of prominent gallery owners who began to market the pieces. Diego Rivera and Frida Khalo began commissioning the fanciful alebrijes, which means monsters. Linares returned to Arrazola in Oaxaca and began sharing his designs with fellow artisans. Manuel Jimenez Ramirez was the first to carve the colorful creatures out of copal wood in the 1970’s. The art form exploded in the 1980’s with folk art galleries in the US becoming more and more interested. Today, there are three main villages that the carvers reside; Arrazola, the pueblo of Manuel, San Martin Tilcajete, and La Union Tejalapam. We are proud to have over 80 families represented in our gallery.

American Trails Gallery proudly features the art and crafts of the indigenous peoples of the America’s. Weavings from the Navajo’s and Zapotec’s, carvings from the Hopi, Zuni, Haida, Kwakiutl, Inuit and Oaxaca, ceramics from many of the pueblos in the Southwest, Acoma, San Ildefonso, Zuni, Cochiti and the Mata Ortiz of Mexico, handmade historic and contemporary jewelry from the Pueblos, Zuni, Santo Domingo, Navajos as well as from Taxco. The largest selection of Historic Basketry in the Pacific Northwest including Pomo, Maidu, Hoopa, Karok, Wintun, Shasta, Modoc and many more. We also feature Regional artists depicting the Wildlife and Landscapes of the area. When you purchase a gift from American Trails you are helping to support hundreds of families who are working hard to keep the traditional Arts and Crafts of their communities alive and well.

The American Trails Gallery which for 23 years was located at 250 East Main Street on the Plaza in Ashland is being reopened at a new location 250 East Main street.

Open 10 am to 6 pm everyday excluding holidays

“Animalistas” woodcarving folk art

Image caption: “Animalistas” woodcarving folk art

Hanson Howard Gallery

Wataru Sugiyama & Lewis Anderson, ceramic sculptures & digital photography

The influence of the aesthetics and imagery of Asian art will be strong in our May exhibition.  Wataru Sugiyama slyly infuses a contemporary charm and, at times, humor into what we recognize as traditional Japanese motifs in his ceramic sculptures.  Lewis Anderson digitally blends photographs of the Pacific Northwest into landscapes that exist in a world of his own invention but have distinctive undercurrents of traditional woodblock landscapes.  Large in scale, at times up to 80” wide, these landscapes have the ability to draw you in and hold you. Show runs May 4th-30th.  Join us for an artist reception on First Friday, May 5th, 5-8 p.m.

Wataru Sugiyama has cultivated an appreciative audience for the Haniwa type imagery in his sculpture. Elements of Japanese history and mythology are almost the exclusive focus of Wataru’s creations.  He interprets imaginary and existing objects and gives them a modern twist by bringing his personal vision to these subjects.  His sculptures are truly inspirational, have a powerful presence, sense of humor, and make a strong impression on his viewers.  Besides historical elements, extremely fine detail and exquisite facial expressions are featured on his sculptures.

Lewis Anderson accurately describes his art as being somewhere between photography and painting, somewhere between East and West, somewhere between contemporary and ancient. The images invite the viewer to explore quiet moments in diverse landscapes full of light and shadow and symbology.  An ancient river winds through tall foreign mountains, full of soft golden light and blue fog. A single silhouetted figure in a small boat appears to be slowly rowing into the unknown in one of the three scroll-like panels of Boatman. This timeless image, like the others in Lewis Anderson’s Dynasty collection, emanates a strong sense of peace, solitude and mystery.

Boatman by Lewis Anderson

Image caption: “Boatman,” digital print on aluminum by Lewis Anderson

Contemporary Translation of Edward III by Ashland New Plays Festival

Ashland New Plays Festival Edward III playbill cover

Understanding Shakespeare through a Modern Verse Translation:

A contemporary playwright translates Edward III for today’s audiences, to be performed as a dramatic reading March 27 in Ashland, Oregon

By Kara Q Lewis

Afternoon light filters over the laptop of playwright Octavio Solis, who focuses on the screen, puzzling out ways to decipher a difficult verse from William Shakespeare’s play Edward III. After getting sick two weeks earlier, Solis began working from bed. His wife teases him about not using his brand new writing studio. He works intensely and relentlessly: “I get obsessive about it,” he says, “I work on it ‘til 1 or 2 in the morning and then it’s the first thing I do when I wake up.” He continues:

“I’ve enjoyed every second of it. It taps into the part of my brain that likes puzzles. I’m decoding something really intricate and special. The process has revealed Shakespeare’s craft as a writer. I’m getting into Shakespeare’s head, like when I try to think like Will Shortz so I can solve New York Times crosswords.”

Solis is part of Oregon Shakespeare Festival’s project Play on! 36 playwrights translate Shakespeare. The playwrights have been paired with a dramaturg and commissioned to create modern verse translations of plays attributed to Shakespeare. The project aims to “bring fresh voices and perspectives to the rigorous work of translation” while making “39 unique side-by-side companion translations of Shakespeare’s plays that are both performable and extremely useful reference texts for both classrooms and productions.” Solis’ version of Edward III will be presented as a staged reading by Ashland New Plays Festival on March 27.

The Play on! project comes with controversy. For some, Shakespeare’s words should remain unaltered. The belief is that today’s audiences should intuit and grasp one of Shakespeare’s play’s meaning from skilled actors and directors in its original language. Another issue raised is one of funding. As one New York Times op-ed contributor, James Shapiro, writes, “I’d prefer to see [the project] spend its money…enabling those 36 promising American playwrights to devote themselves to writing the next Broadway hit.”

The director of the project, Dr. Lue Douthit, has worked at OSF for over 20 years and says she is frustrated as a theatergoer. She understands the meaning of Shakespeare’s works, having discussed, written about, studied, annotated, and adapted the bard’s plays. And yet, she gets lost in the language. In a HowlRound forum, she writes: “I can hear it at 16 rpms, but not often at the zippy 78 speed that the language is designed to run.”

Solis responds to the controversy: “I understand why this project exists,” he says. “In scholarship, [the language] feeds the scholar’s soul to read and study it. But in performance there are some elements that are over our heads no matter what.”

For instance, he explains that there are many references and metaphors from Shakespeare’s time that have lost their impact, like those related to Ovid’s Metamorphosis and the lives of Roman generals. In one specific case with Edward III, Solis had to research the identity of “the queen of shades,” and upon discovering it, re-wrote the line to provide context that she is “Diana of the moon…”

Sidestepping the discussions and lively debate over the translations, we come face to face with the playwrights and their work. Solis is enthusiastic and passionate about this project: honoring Shakespeare’s poetry and getting to understand the preeminent playwright’s motives in order to clarify and strengthen his play’s power for today’s audiences.

“I’m trying to make myself invisible in this process,” Solis says. “But I’m a poet, too. And I think I bring some poetic clarity to the work. I’ve also been an actor, so I’m trying to make it more actable, to make lines more personal, rather than lofty and disengaged. I’m not inventing characters or story; I’m working from what is already there. Within that, there’s immense creative freedom. It pushes me to be the poet I know I can be, and I am comforted. We know more words than Shakespeare did, and I can access them so quickly.”

One of the most challenging aspects of Solis’ line-by-line translation has been Shakespeare’s use of chiasmus – a reversal of subject and predicate, usually with two parallel statements, as in this line from Act II Scene I, by Shakespeare: “Her beauty hath no match but my affection. / Hers more than most, mine most and more than more / hers more to praise than tell the sea by drops /”

Solis continues: “It’s a device that disengages – to not use ‘my, me, or I’.” One example of Solis making a scene more personal by using more direct language is in this intense speech given by Edward III in response to his son’s challenge to uphold a promise the prince made that contradicts his father:

Thou and thy word lie both in my command

what canst thou promise that I cannot break?

which of these twain is greater infamy

to disobey thy father or thyself?

Thy word nor no man’s may exceed his power

nor that same man doth never break his word

that keeps it to the utmost of his power.

Solis unpacked this verse multiple times and finally rested on this translation:

Your word and you fall under my command.

What can you promise that I cannot break?

Which of these two bring you the most disgrace,

To disobey your father or yourself?

Your word, nor any man’s, should not exceed

My power to break it, nor should you ever

Infringe upon your utmost word to me.

One of Solis’ most treasured discoveries during this project has been what he’s learned from dissecting Shakespeare’s writing process: his word choices, shortcuts, and creativity. “I am in awe of his particular genius, to fit so much into one line, and then make it rhyme,” Solis says. “With my tries, they’ll be one and a half lines – or two or three lines. I’ll agonize sometimes forever on iambic pentameter, and then I’ll go back to the original and find out – Shakespeare cheated! Some lines have one less or a couple more syllables than scan.” (Scansion is the process of scanning a line of verse to determine its rhythm, which is iambic pentameter in Shakespeare’s case.)

Separate from the controversy of translating Shakespeare, Edward III has its own unique discourse and disagreement among scholars as to whether the play was actually written by Shakespeare. It was officially added to Shakespeare’s canon in the late 1990s. Part of the evidence used to credit Shakespeare as the author came from computer software meant to find plagiarism in college papers.

Solis describes what convinced him Edward III must have been written by Shakespeare: “In two of the most powerful speeches, with messengers describing graphic sea battles and French refugees fleeing their villages – there is such a command of language and tone. They’re so vivid, with the poetry subverted to describe something that is truly horrifying.”

The story of Edward III follows the personal and political struggles of pivotal characters at the start of the Hundred Years’ War between England and France in the 14th century. The five-act play features the English king’s love for a married countess, brutal battles for power in France, and personal struggles of honoring oneself versus honoring a king or country.

Solis found that promises resonate in the play: “Promises, swearing oaths, these are big: when is it okay to break a promise, what is the value of your word, from both a personal level to a cosmic level to everything in between – a country to the army and towns? It’s interesting to see how they play out.”

Also of interest for Solis were the impactful correlations between parts of the play and present-day political events, including Brexit, Syrian refugees, as well as the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Solis says, “I’m drawn to the way the war, the political situation then, echoes to the present day. Edward III – England – chose to invade France and then they wondered why the French didn’t embrace them. They wanted to win hearts and minds, as they were going through burning villages and killing people.”

When Edward III was written in the 1590s it was a propaganda play, showing the royalty and their praiseworthy wars. “But,” Solis says, “It doesn’t put a gloss on it. Yes, it was patriotic and enormously popular, but there are some dark things that Shakespeare is mindful of exploring, like how to be a good ruler, a good conqueror.”

In a pivotal scene at the town of Calais, it is the king’s wife who helps change her husband’s mind not to kill French men who surrendered voluntarily to save their town. However, the king wants to raze the village and kill the men to show his power. Queen Philippa then says, “Those who fall under the sword and turn to ash by fire, offer you no homage. Only living can pay you homage.”

Another strong female character is the Countess of Salisbury, whom the married Edward falls in love with and propositions, expecting her to fall under his command. He is then humbled by her response. “She had to stand up by herself and make a solution all by herself,” Solis says. “She’s more honorable than I could imagine. She forces [the king] to come to his senses. It’s resonant on so many levels.”

As Solis labored over individual words and phrases, working line by line through the five-act, 103-page, 19,000-word play, “tweaking confusing parts to make it better for contemporary audiences,” he was also translating the characters, giving audiences a stronger connection to the lives and lessons played out in the story.

In addition, the play needs to work as poetry. Solis asked himself constantly, “If Shakespeare were alive today what would he do?” For Solis the poetry was as demanding as the story. “Shakespeare’s poetry is just gorgeous, and I’m a purist.” He quotes the Play on! playwrights’ first rule, “to do no harm.”

When choosing Edward III from the list of available plays to work on for Play on!, Solis was excited. “I found it at the bottom of the list,” he says, “I didn’t know the play, so I was going at it with virgin eyes, and it will be the same for the audience.” When he gave his selection to Douthit, the project’s director, Solis says she was pleased.

“Why?” he asked.

She replied, “Because, you’re a poet.”

The special, one-night-only dramatic reading of Solis’ translated version of Shakespeare’s “new” play is being produced by Ashland New Plays Festival, a nonprofit organization that assists playwrights in the development of new works through public readings and offers educational forums to the community through discussions and workshops.

Solis looks forward to the performance. “This is a fresh script, newly done, and I am working in a mode that is entirely new to me.” He also hasn’t heard the play out loud yet. “It’s imperative that I hear this with the most qualified Shakepearean actors,” he says, “in order to know whether I am going in the right direction. ANPF is giving me first shot at this. The importance of that cannot be minimized.”

The performance is Monday, March 27, at 7:30 p.m. at Southern Oregon University’s Music Recital Hall.

Tickets are $20 and $25, reserved seating, available online or at the door, subject to availability.

Visit www.ashlandnewplays.org/ticket s-e3/ to learn more.

It is directed by Dawn Monique Williams and features a cast of 12, including: Armando Duran, Devin White, Sam Osheroff, Tamra Mathias, Jamie Peck, Jon Cates, Jordan Barbour, Kyle Haden, Robin Goodrin Nordli, Nancy Rodriguez, Stephen Michael Spencer, and Vilma Silva.

Edward III actors

More about Octavio Solis:

Author of over 20 plays, Octavio Solis is considered by many to be one of the most prominent Latino playwrights in America. With works that both draw on and transcend the Mexican-American experience, he is a writer and director whose style defies formula, examining the darkness, magic and humor of humanity with brutal honesty and characteristic intensity. His imaginative and ever-evolving work continues to cross cultural and aesthetic boundaries, solidifying him as one of the great playwrights of our time. Learn more at www.octaviosolis.net.

octavio solis

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MCAF Announces Call to Artists, Art Class for Youth, More

MCAF Announces Call to Artists, Art Class for Youth

MCAF Announces Call to Artists, Art Class for Youth, Father’s Day Print Sale, and Plans for Magna Deo Church and Cultural Center.

Masterpiece Christian Fine Arts Foundation Call for Entries “Words in Red”

MCAF announces call to artists, art class for youth : Words in Red Exhibition

A Seven City West Coast/Southwest Tour

For an artist there is no higher aspiration or honor than to use your gift to the glory of God. (I Corinthians 10:31). Others do not have your gift nor your voice. You have been endowed with a way of “seeing” and a calling to infuse your generation with grace and truth and beauty. In the midst of the collapsing cultural pillars, as many feel uncertainty and despair I invite you, we ask you to boldly create and answer the Call for Entries for this new traveling exhibit, “Words In Red – the Direct, Uncensored and Provocative Words of Jesus.”   His words have life-giving power and you can give them visual embodiment.   Deadline for juried entries is Sept. 1st, 2016.   For prospectus, entry form and other details see more.

Masterpiece Christian Fine Arts Summer Art Academy Art Class for Youth

MCAF Announces Call to Artists, Art Class for Youth

Drawing with Realism in Pencil with Kim Ragsdale Phillips

By the age of 8 many professional artists we know today knew they wanted to be an artist—forever!  Masterpiece is passionate about training young artists with excellence in technical skills with a view to using their gifts to the glory of God. If you’re in the Ashland, Medford, Oregon area, then this class is for the young artist in your life. Give them a jump start and true confidence with this fun and foundational drawing class this summer in Ashland with award winning graphite/pencil artist Kim Ragsdale Phillips. www.kimragsdale.com
Cost:   $90 for 6 weeks (just $15 per 2 hour session)
Class size: 10 minimum, 18 maximum
At the beautiful and newly renovated “Upper Room”, 50 W. Hersey Street, Ashland, Oregon at Ashland Christian Fellowship
Register by June 21st  online  at www.mcfineartsfoundation.org
Or by calling 541.621.6015 for registration or questions.

Father’s Day Special

Father's Heritage by Michael Dudash framed printSpiritual Warfare & A Father’s Heritage Prints

by Ron DiCianni and Michael Dudash

18 x 24 print
The whole of Scriptures tells the true stories of fathers and sons and daughters. It is one of the most important life relationships but among the toughest yet most impacting jobs in the world.   These two framed prints can be an encouragement to a father in your life.  These two prints are available now for Father’s Day and through the month of June and if you place an order today or tomorrow they can be shipped to arrive by Father’s Day (some exclusions apply).
Regular price $475
Special Father’s Day Sale NOW through June just : $299 . Free regular ground shipping.
Order now to encourage the young father in your life
MCAF Announces Call to Artists, Art Class for Youth, More : Magna Deo, Biblical fine art Cultural Center

MAGNA DEO

There’s a buzz in Southern Oregon.
(And we aren’t talking about the one created by the green leafed law recently passed by Oregon voters )
 
Masterpiece Christian Fine Arts Foundation has had extraordinary experiences and connected with over 40,000 thousand guests as we have traveled with our fine arts exhibits and art conferences.
Fine art provides a wide open door to conversation and interaction with individuals from all walks of life, languages, backgrounds and cultures…an opportunity to infuse a Biblical worldview into the cultural dialogue and experience.
Magna Deo is a vision to establish a church and cultural center dedicated to the reawakening of the truth, grace, beauty and nobility of Christianity through the vehicle of the fine arts, music, film-making, culinary arts, drama and education.
We’ve been eagerly awaiting a hearing with our local county commissioners in 4 – 6 weeks to give potential zoning approval to a large scale plan and vision.  Click For More about the Magna Deo project.
MCAF Announces Call to Artists, Art Class for Youth, More

Masterpiece Christian Fine Arts Foundation, 17575 Hwy. 66, Ashland, OR 97520

 

Arts Alliance of Southern Oregon UPDATE

Arts Alliance of Southern Oregon 
January 12, 2015, 2:30-4 PM, Rogue Gallery & Art Center Studio
Community Meeting Notes
 
Over 18 community members attended including artists, arts advocates, and representatives from art organizations including Rogue Gallery & Art Center, Art Presence, Edgy Art Events, Southern Oregon Guild, Grants Pass Commission for Public Art, Medford Arts Commission, Art Works, and more. Participants from throughout Southern Oregon  represented both Jackson and Josephine County as we came together to forge and strengthen the Arts Alliance of Southern Oregon. 
 
We shared the history of the Arts Alliance:
In Spring 2013, leaders from various arts organizations gathered with a vision to strengthen partnership and improve communication for the benefit of the larger arts community. Since then, we regularly held panel discussions, public, and steering committee meetings to gather input as to what the Arts Alliance should be and came up with mission and vision statements.  Meeting locations varied throughout Southern Oregon in Medford, Ashland, Grants Pass, Jacksonville, and Kerby in order to be accessible, inclusive, and to encourage participation by the regional arts community. 
 
MISSION: Arts Alliance of Southern Oregon is an organization of artists, arts organizations, arts advocates, and the public, dedicated to building a strong, creative and sustainable Southern Oregon arts community.
 
With ongoing input from our arts community, we decided to create an active and robust Arts Alliance to help our arts community thrive. Our vision for the Arts Alliance is to accomplish this mission through:
  • Developing a strong, supportive system of sharing information and services among individuals and groups having art as a common interest.
  • Strengthening the economies of Southern Oregon communities by increasing the demand for art and increasing arts advocacy.
  • Supporting activities that raise awareness of the importance of the arts and create opportunities for all to participate in and experience the arts.
2015 is the pilot year for the Arts Alliance of Southern Oregon!
Presently, the Arts Alliance of Southern Oregon is planning to launch: we are building a website, creating a map and calendar, designing and creating marketing materials, continuing to streamline communication, build membership, and we received a grant for this launch (thank you, OCF!). 
 
Together, we will be:
Inclusive, Positive, Communicative, Creative, Informative, Collaborative, a Resource
 
During the meeting we brainstormed slogans, or a tag line, for the arts marketing campaign. There were many great ideas but we narrowed down the many choices to these top hits (with number of votes):
Its SO Art (7)
A Brush With Art (6) 
SO heart Art (6)
See Art Be Art SO Art (3)
Keep Calm It’s Art (3)
Art For All (3)
One for All and All for Art (3)
 
The steering committee will meet next month to coordinate details for the arts marketing campaign including a logo design, regional coordination, fundraising, and to continue outreach to our blossoming arts community. We look forward to the Arts Alliance Launch in Spring 2015!
 
Thank you for participating and please encourage more artists and arts advocates to get involved in Arts Alliance of Southern Oregon. For now, our facebook page is a great resource for alls to artists, art events and opening receptions, inspiration and more: https://www.facebook.com/ArtsAllianceSO
 
Next Arts Alliance of Southern Oregon community meeting- Tues., April 14th from 2:30-3:30PM, Shield Room, The Bear Hotel, Grants Pass- SAVE THE DATE!
 
Arts Alliance of Southern Oregon
PO Box 24, Jacksonville, OR 97530
(Donations welcome as we prepare to launch!)

January 2014 News from the Southern Oregon Society of Artists

Click to view larger version of the Southern Oregon Society of Artists February 2014 Newsletter