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Early Bird Bonus for 2017 Alpine Art Retreat EXTENDED to July 15!!

Early Bird Bonus for 2017 Alpine Art Retreat EXTENDED to July 15!!

We have extended our Early Bird bonus (2 additonal free nights) if you register before July 15th. We have only 2 remaining spaces, so we just need two more amazing women! Call Elaine Frenett at: 541-944-2196 to register

2017 Alpine Art Retreat Objectives and Summary

dscn5363A guided exploration for wonder-filled women.

Following last year’s “full to over-flowing” attendance, we have reshaped our intentions. Jean and I would like to direct our energies to more quiet moments allowing more personal discovery. With that purpose in mind, we have limited retreat participation to just eight (including two instructors), and is all inclusive of lodging, meals and workshops. With this experience, unique in its quiet reflection and playful interaction…you will discover how to combine eyes and mind with heart!

To explore how images and words and spirit stir together within us as creatives and take time to understand and direct those urges.

In this cradle of deep connecting, inquisitive women, nature’s still wonder, and expanded self-awareness, you will explore journaling and how it relates to the art of watercolor.

For a select number of curious women who feel invigorated in the rustic beauty of a mountain setting!

Each year our format is reinvented to inspire both leaders and participants. This intimate venue encourages individual introspection and shared connection while nature’s quiet insists upon acknowledgement and wonder.

  • Held at the Lake Alpine Resort in Bear Valley, California. Map of location: 300wlakesshore2http://www.mapquest.com/maps?city=Lake%20Alpine&state=CA
  • Begins Tuesday evening (August 22, 2017)
  • Ends Sunday afternoon (August 27, 2017)
  • Everyday (six days) includes programs in painting, journaling and writing – all
    processes of discovery.
  • There are two instructors for the full program time (Elaine Frenett and Jean Warren)
  • Location is at the wonderful Lake Alpine Resort.
  • The cabins include full kitchen & bathroom facilities, plus a sunny deck with a sparkling lake view.
  • Our playful gathering is held in two rustic, spacious and fully stocked cabins, lovingly named the “Ponderosa” and “Sequoia.”
  • In keeping with our back-to-camp playfulness (yes, there could be s’mores!), the300wbobbiedemo
    sleeping arrangements are bunkhouse style (e.g., shared rooms where each person has their own bed). We love how this fits in with the spirit of the retreat. Yet at the same time there are two private rooms available too. All share bathroom.
  • Meals are included. We may dine at our cabin or at the Resort dining area or deck. We’ll begin with light breakfast fare accompanied by tea, coffee and juice, and later we partake of a relaxed and refreshing lunch. Evening meals will find us embracing our chef’s creativity – perhaps on our private deck.
  • Participants with special menu needs are welcome to bring along their preferences. We make every effort to accommodate special diets, within resources. With two fully equipped kitchens you can attend to your personal pleasure too.Luscious, Refreshing Lunch
  • Amidst the formal instruction and programs you have ample time for hiking and private reflection.
  • One day we will hike or travel to a new sketching destination. Immersing ourselves in the wonder of the outdoors and fresh territory.
  • This all inclusive retreat is $1,750.00 for shared rooms, which includes lodging, food, activities, and instruction.
  • If you want to upgrade to a private room (shared bath), add $600.00. You can keep
    private as you like.
  • 300wsequoiaprvtroomIn addition to your personal items, bring your favorite paint brushes, paint and
    stretched or mounted water media paper, canvas and/or your journal/sketchbook. If you have questions about materials, please call or write.

The days are summer warmed, while cooling evenings are cozy and thoughts turn to introspection.

Add 2 Free Nights!

300wbobbiechipmunkSign up by June 15, 2017 (as space remains, remember there are only 6 slots) and will be treated to 2 nights added for free.

The Alpine Art Women’s Retreat with lodging, meals and workshops is a wonderful value at $300.00 per day.

Yet, sign up now and with the added bonus of two free nights your retreat is only $219.00 per day.jeansmosquiteprwpainting300

Staying two more days makes a perfect stay. These two free days are a great way to practice what you’ve learned, to get out and explore, and to savor the friendships made. Here is how one of our creatives explored our free day at Mosquito Lake, near Ebbets Pass.

Just imagine, a full five days of workshops and then the treat of two more joyful days of exploration.

If you like the idea of lingering until Tuesday (instead of leaving around noon Sunday), then sign up today to reserve your space by calling Elaine at: 541-944-2196.

Wild Imaginings : Experimental Watercolors

WILD IMAGININGSWild Imaginings : Exhibit of Experimental Watercolor Paintings by Elaine Frenett, Darlene Southworth, and Janette Erwin Brown at Ashland Art Center, Ashland, Oregon during October 2016. Reception October 7 from 5–8pm in conjunction with the Ashland First Friday ArtWalk

October First Friday at the Ashland Art Center 2nd Floor Lounge Gallery

FREE Community Art Event

October 7 @ 5:00 pm  8:00 pm

Featured Studio Artists: Elaine Frenett, Janette Ervin-Brown & Darlene Southworth

Long ago, three future friends who would later share their wild imaginings together started their lives. Janette, in California, followed her artist leanings into education, eventually stewarding high school students to reveal their creative talents.  Colorado-born Elaine knew that in her heart resided an artist, yet she was a late bloomer, finally letting go of crafts and completing a graphic design program.  Darlene had the heart of a scientist and filled her mind and observations with biology while shaping many a college mind along the way.

They took on a different life.  

Darlene jumped the “botany” ship and found herself shaping her mind’s eye with fungi.  Janette, an avid lover of the outdoors, took her creative pursuits deep into the arms of nature.  Elaine, well she left the restrained illustration world for the freedom of the watercolor world.  But their paths were growing closer, tempting fate to see what happened when their paths finally crossed.

The maps of their lives grew closer.  

Elaine moved to the Rogue Valley, Darlene was already savoring the lush Southern Oregon surroundings and then…Janette traveled north to Ashland.  At Ashland Art Center the star-studded artist’s paths began weaving together.  Between classes, retreats and conversations over something warm, these three came to share Studio #13 as well as creative challenge.  With this camaraderie they have plunged into experimental water media, the only unifying aspect being the format of watercolor paper upon stretcher bars.  

Wild Imaginings

Ashland Art Center Featured Artists for October 2016, in this special art exhibit you can sample the wild imaginings of these three artists:  throwing, swirling, stapling, stitching, cutting, tearing mostly watercolor media upon paper.  From what appeared in the artist’s mind came these expressions of experiment. Come to Ashland Art Center’s Second Floor Lounge Gallery on Ashland’s First Friday ArtWalk on October 7 from 5–8pm to see the show and meet the artists.

 

2016 Planning & Percolating

TrioPhotoingIn the midst of winter’s gray chill, Jean and I get to fly off to memories of previous Lake Alpine retreats, and in our mind’s eye, begin to concoct the makings of the upcoming 2016 “Alpine Art Retreat: Celebrating Women’s Painting & Journaling”. Or it may have the subtitle “Women Celebrating Painting & Journaling” … you see, it’s still in the planning!

This year we nudged the gathering to mid-August, 14th – 19th to be exact (or you could stay through Sunday, the 21st if you sign up early)! Besides adding the flair PinkWildFlowersof more energy, with campgrounds still open and summer music sometimes permeating the weekend air, there will bemore wildflowers” (to quote one of our potential participants)!!! We also hope this date change will open the retreat to those who can only attend during the summer – like you teachers or campus career women or all you students on vacation (don’t miss our “Emerging Artist” Scholarship possibility)!!!

ExpPtgDarleneCRP1Shaking up the makings of the agenda will subtract some processes and add lots more potential. We want creatives to feel they may come focusing on water media painting skills only – or – come loving only to journal. And the other option is: COME DO THEM BOTH!!! Jean will lean more towards exploring abstraction and feeling nature’s design while Elaine will encourage experimentation and dive deeper into intuition. But we are not set in stone . . . and imaginings still swirl.

So stay tuned for more exact visions of the “sugar plums dancing at our retreat” in the coming updated menu items, “Itinerary” and “Objectives”. All we are certain of, is that it’s going to be fun, expanding and refreshing! Won’t you join us?

 

Filed under: 2016 Retreat, Retreat Scholarships Awarded, Uncategorized Tagged: abstraction, alpine lakes, art scholarships, experimentation, journaling, journaling retreats, Plein air painting, students, teachers, watercolor, watercolor retreats, wildflowers, women’s gatherings, Women’s Retreats

Call to Artists: Return of Orphan Works Extended Comment Period

Editor’s Note: This article is reposted from the American Society of Illustrators Partnership after we received an email forwarded from the former president of the San Francisco Society of Illustrators by Elaine Frenett. Thanks Elaine!

As of the time we’re posting, the comment form at the US Library of Congress website is not working due to a bad link. We hope you will take a few minutes of your time to write your comment and that you will find the submission form working when you’re ready to send your comments to them. Check it here to see if it’s back up: http://copyright.gov/policy/visualworks/comment-form/. You can find the LoC’s notice of the extension here: http://copyright.gov/policy/visualworks/. And here are the instructions for comment submissions:

The Copyright Office is extending the period to submit public reply comments regarding its April 24, 2015 Notice of Inquiry requesting comments on how certain visual works, particularly photographs, graphic artworks, and illustrations, are monetized, enforced, and registered under the Copyright Act.

DATE: Reply comments are due October 1, 2015.
ADDRESSES: All comments should be submitted electronically using the comment submission page on the Office Web site at http://copyright.gov/policy/ visualworks/. To meet accessibility standards, submitters must upload comments in a single file not to exceed six (6) megabytes (MB) in one of the following formats: The Adobe Portable Document File (PDF) format that contains searchable, accessible text (not an image); Microsoft Word; WordPerfect; Rich Text Format (RTF); or ASCII text file format (not a scanned document). The form and face of the comments must include the submitter’s name and organization (if any). The Office will post all comments publicly on the Office’s Web site exactly as they are received, along with names and organizations. If electronic submission of comments is not feasible, please contact the Office at 202–707–8350 for special instructions.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT:

Catherine Rowland, Senior Advisor to the Register of Copyrights, by email at [email protected] or by telephone at 202–707–8350.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: On April 24, 2015, the Copyright Office published a Notice of Inquiry inviting public comments on certain visual works. The initial comments were due on July 23, 2015 and reply comments currently are due on August 24, 2015. It appears, however, that some stakeholders may need additional time to file reply comments. To facilitate full and adequate public comment, the Office hereby extends the time for filing reply comments from August 24, 2015 to October 1, 2015.

Dated: July 21, 2015.

Catherine Rowland,

Senior Advisor to the Register of Copyrights.

THE RETURN OF ORPHAN WORKS

The U.S. Copyright Office Seeks Artists’ Comments

For more than a year Congress has been holding hearings for the drafting of a brand new U.S. Copyright Act.

There is no bill yet. But the Copyright Office has issued recommendations to Congress for a law that would replace current copyright law.

These recommendations include a resurrection of the failed Orphan Works Act of 2008.

That bill called for a return to copyright registration for every picture an artist wished to retain the rights to. Registration would not actually protect your work — an infringer could still infringe you. But by registering it, you would preserve your right to sue in federal court.

Unregistered pictures would still be yours and in theory, clients would still have to get your permission to use them. But if they were to conclude that they had made a “reasonably diligent” but unsuccessful effort to find you, then they could infringe the work as “orphaned.”

The Copyright Office says that several other artists’ issues are “ripe” for legislation: copyright small claims, resale royalties, and other forms of secondary licensing which most artists have never heard of.

The Copyright Office has issued a special call for letters from visual artists asking what challenges we face in licensing and protecting our copyrights. Many of you have already written. We hope many more will do the same.

DEADLINE: THURSDAY, JULY 23, 2015, 5:00PM EDT

New deadline is October 1, 2015.

American artists can submit letters online here.

Non-U.S. artists can email their letters to the attention of:

Read the Copyright Office Notice of Inquiry.

Read the 2015 Orphan Works and Mass Digitization Report.

 

PLEASE WRITE THE COPYRIGHT OFFICE

Because of our past opposition to orphan works legislation, the Copyright Office has issued a special Notice of Inquiry on Visual Works. In it, they acknowledge that visual artists face special problems in the marketplace and they’ve asked artists to respond to five questions:

“The Office invites comments that address the subjects listed below. When submitting a comment, please identify the nature of your interest in this subject (e.g., whether you are a creator, licensee, etc.):

“1. What are the most significant challenges related to monetizing and/or licensing photographs, graphic artworks, and/or illustrations?

“2. What are the most significant enforcement challenges for photographers, graphic artists, and/or illustrators?

“3. What are the most significant registration challenges for photographers, graphic artists, and/or illustrators?

“4. What are the most significant challenges or frustrations for those who wish to make legal use of photographs, graphic art works, and/or illustrations?

“5. What other issues or challenges should the Office be aware of regarding photographs, graphic artworks, and/or illustrations under the Copyright Act?”

[Emphases added for clarity]

And we might suggest a 6th question of our own:

6. What are the most significant challenges artists would face if these new copyright proposals become law?

 

SAMPLE LETTERS

Since most artists have never written to lawmakers before, many of you have asked us for sample letters. It is important that the Copyright Office receive unique letters.

Eight artists have provided their letters to inspire you to write. The letters are poignant examples written respectfully by artists telling their own unique story about their experience and concerns:

  • LETTER 1: “I’m writing to stress that for me, and for artists like me, copyright law is not an abstract legal issue. Our copyrights are our assets. Licensing them is how we make our livings.” Read more.

 

  • LETTER 2: “As a freelance illustrator, I need to maintain revenue streams in order to make a living for my family. The resale of my past images is part of my day to day way of doing business.” Read more.

 

  • LETTER 3: “My art is reasonably well known since it has served the advertising, editorial, public relations and historical documentation needs of the aerospace industry, publications, the military services and air and space museums for 68 years.” Read more.

 

  • LETTER 4: “I am writing to you as an award winning professional illustrator of over 40 years whose work has appeared in many major publications, books and advertisements, both nationally and internationally.” Read more.

 

  • LETTER 5: “I have been a professional medical illustrator since 1975, and self-employed since 1981. During the course of my career, I have created thousands of illustrations…” Read more.

 

  • LETTER 6: “Copyright is the basis of my income and ability to support my business. It is the only way I have to protect the accuracy and integrity of my work, and to negotiate an appropriate fee for re-licensing.” Read more.

 

  • LETTER 7: “My specialty area is fetal development and women’s health illustration… The protection of these images is of utmost importance to my livelihood, and I have struggled to fight the rampant piracy of them, especially by political groups.” Read more.

 

  • LETTER 8: “I am writing to ask that you create policy to protect visual authors and their exclusive rights, and support a sustainable environment for professional authorship.” Read more.

 

Remember, no one is asking you to write a legal brief. Copyright law is a business law, and the lawyers writing these laws know little or nothing about our business.

Let’s explain to them how the laws they’re writing will affect us.


BELOW: Podcast by Children’s Book Illustrator Will Terry, “Everything You Know About Copyright Is About To Change”:

The Return of Orphan Works - Action Needed!

The Return of Orphan Works
The Next Great Copyright Act

We would like to thank artist Elaine Frenett for bringing this issue to our attention via her connection with the Illustrator’s Partnership of America and other related groups. It is crucial that artists retain the rights to and control over their creative works, and it appears that the US Copyright Office and the US Congress are threatening to take those rights and control from us with a new version of the US Copyright Act. This is not the first time this has been proposed, and twice before the national arts community has managed to fend off this attack on our intellectual/creative property, yet this latest proposal appears to be worse than previous versions. Grass roots activism has gained influence in Washington, DC, and though many of you may not be accustomed to such actions, this is one we hope will motivate  you to join with the rest of the creative arts community by writing  a letter to the US Copyright Office…and hopefully your state representatives in Congress, too. The information below will fill you in on what they propose and some ideas to help you write your letter. The deadline for submitting your letter is July 23, so there’s plenty of time to craft a well-written letter, yet no time to waste, so let’s take a few minutes to put down our brushes and pick up our pens to preserve our control over our creations. There is a link to the Copyright Office website where your letter can be submitted under the When and Where heading below. Please read the entire article carefully. We hope the suggestions for your letter will help you get your own words flowing so the letters received in Washington are effective and powerful. Go to http://artists-bill-of-rights.org/ to learn more about copyright and the challenges artists face when it comes to the control of the use of their works.

 

Click here for a timeline of the history of copyright legislation in the United States from the association of Research Libraries.

The EU published a US Copyright Office report on this topic, which can be found via a link at the bottom of this article: http://project-forward.eu/2015/06/24/u-s-copyright-office-report-on-orphan-works-and-mass-digitization/

Though they do not seem to have published anything about this recently, Fractured Atlas, an Americans for the Arts partner organization, is a source of helpful information, and may have other services you find helpful in other areas of your art career.

Artists Alert: From the Illustrators Partnership

The Return of Orphan Works

Part 1: “The Next Great Copyright Act”

JULY 1, 2015

For more than a year Congress has been holding hearings for the drafting of a brand new US Copyright Act. At its heart is the return of Orphan Works.

Twice, Orphan Works Acts have failed to pass Congress because of strong opposition from visual artists, spearheaded by the Illustrators Partnership.

Because of this, the Copyright Office has now issued a special call for letters regarding the role of visual art in the coming legislation.

Therefore we’re asking all artists concerned with retaining the rights to their work to join us in writing.

When and Where

Deadline: July 23, 2015

You can submit letters online to the Copyright Office here.

Read the Copyright Office Notice of Inquiry.

Here are the Basic Facts

“The Next Great Copyright Act” would replace all existing copyright law.

It would void our Constitutional right to the exclusive control of our work.

It would “privilege” the public’s right to use our work.

It would “pressure” you to register your work with commercial registries.

It would “orphan” unregistered work.

It would make orphaned work available for commercial infringement by “good faith” infringers.

It would allow others to alter your work and copyright these “derivative works” in their own names.

It would affect all visual art: drawings, paintings, sketches, photos, etc.; past, present and future; published and unpublished; domestic and foreign.

Background

The demand for copyright “reform” has come from large Internet firms and the legal scholars allied with them. Their business models involve supplying the public with access to other people’s copyrighted work. Their problem has been how to do this legally and without paying artists.

The “reforms” they’ve proposed would allow them to stock their databases with our pictures. This would happen either by forcing us to hand over our images to them as registered works, or by harvesting unregistered works as orphans and copyrighting them in their own names as “derivative works.”

The Copyright Office acknowledges that this will cause special problems for visual artists but concludes that we should still be subject to orphan works law.

The “Next Great Copyright Act” would go further than previous Orphan Works Acts. The proposals under consideration include:

1.) The Mass Digitization of our intellectual property by corporate interests.
2.) Extended Collective Licensing, a form of socialized licensing that would replace voluntary business agreements between artists and their clients.
3.) A Copyright Small Claims Court to handle the flood of lawsuits expected to result from orphan works infringements.

In your letter to the Copyright Office:

It’s important that lawmakers be told that our copyrights are our source of income because lobbyists and corporation lawyers have “testified” that once our work has been published it has virtually no further commercial value and should therefore be available for use by the public.

 

So when writing, please remember:

* It’s important that you make your letter personal and truthful.
* Keep it professional and respectful.
* Explain that you’re an artist and have been one for x number of years.
* Briefly list your educational background, publications, awards, etc.
* Indicate the field(s) you work in.
* Explain clearly and forcefully that for you, copyright law is not an
abstract
legal issue, but the basis on which your business rests.
* Our copyrights are the products we license.
* This means that infringing our work is like stealing our money.
* It’s important to our businesses that we remain able to determine
voluntarily how and by whom our work is used.
* Stress that your work does NOT lose its value upon publication.
* Instead everything you create becomes part of your business inventory.

* In the digital era, inventory is more valuable to artists than ever before.

If you are NOT a professional artist:

* Define your specific interest in copyright, and give a few relevant
details.

* You might want to stress that it’s important to you that you determine
how and by whom your work is used.
* You might wish to state that even if you’re a hobbyist, you would not
welcome someone else monetizing your work for their own profit
without your knowledge or consent.


Because this is a complicated issue, we’ll follow up next week with some expanded thoughts of our own.
 
– Brad Holland and Cynthia Turner
for the Board of the Illustrators Partnership
The Illustrators Partnership has filed multiple papers with the
Copyright Office regarding this issue.

You can download them from the Copyright Office website:

Remedies for Small Copyright Claims

January 17, 2012

Orphan Works and Mass Digitization

Initial Comments, February 3, 2013

Orphan Works and Mass Digitization

Reply Comments, March 6, 2013

Orphan Works and Mass Digitization

Additional Comments, May 21, 2014

Please post or forward this artists alert to any interested party.

Journaling Retreat ~ Day 1 Afternoon

The aftermath of a frivolous, abundant lunch (where we get to make our own sandwiches and eat as much as we choose) found us pondering our afternoon assignment: Desire Mapping. With a wild collection of collage materials, giant atlases for us to dissect and paintbrushes as well, we each turned inside to depict the elements of what our perfect life and surroundings would look like.

First I had to determine what my priorities were. Like: mountains, rivers, wild, wide vistas, elements of the western United States, being an artist, continued learning and nature and women. Oh – and fearlessness!!! So I cut up a bunch of paper and danced it around my spread out journal pages. I never found an adequate image of an evergreened river’s edge so I watercolored it in first. I decided since I love warm colors, to have that red-orange as a uniting element and then, when I didn’t have those colors where I wanted them, I masked off with artist’s tape the area. Then painted it. Here’s my crazy, delicious Desire Map. I still feel very at “home” just looking at it. You might want to try it!!! T’will make you smile. Promise!!

Journaling Retreat ~ Day 1 Afternoon

The aftermath of a frivolous, abundant lunch (where we get to make our own sandwiches and eat as much as we choose) found us pondering our afternoon assignment: Desire Mapping. With a wild collection of collage materials, giant atlases for us to dissect and paintbrushes as well, we each turned inside to depict the elements of what our perfect life and surroundings would look like.

First I had to determine what my priorities were. Like: mountains, rivers, wild, wide vistas, elements of the western United States, being an artist, continued learning and nature and women. Oh – and fearlessness!!! So I cut up a bunch of paper and danced it around my spread out journal pages. I never found an adequate image of an evergreened river’s edge so I watercolored it in first. I decided since I love warm colors, to have that red-orange as a uniting element and then, when I didn’t have those colors where I wanted them, I masked off with artist’s tape the area. Then painted it. Here’s my crazy, delicious Desire Map. I still feel very at “home” just looking at it. You might want to try it!!! T’will make you smile. Promise!!

Dueling Paintbrushes at Journaling Retreat ~ Day One

Today breaks clear, brilliant blue and sunny warm at our first full day of the Women’s Journaling Alpine Retreat. After we’ve welcomed the day with yoga on the sparkling lake’s edge, we breakfast and then, settle out between the two closest cabins with a view peering into the shadowed, cool forest.

We’ve designed this “Dueling Brushes” demonstration to show how differently both Jean and I approach a journal page and how differently we paint. Jean takes her thirty-five minute time frame first. With this result! And then I take mine. As I’ve mentioned I’m struggling with this new journal size (it’s smaller) and the quality of paper (some of the pages are just writing paper). So my attempt to solve the paper challenge is to glue a small piece of watercolor paper into the page where I want to

watercolor. I like the results . . . and I’m pleased with the traveling off the watercolor paper in small overlappings onto the writing paper.

I’m actually pretty pleased with the full spread visual. I like how the colors happen to balance themselves out between the pigments I chose for the landscape and the delicate hues of the pods in this
handmade black paper. Still I feel astonished that those holes I’ve had to cut for the paper clay insert add harmony to this unpredicted page so much further back from when the holes originated.

It’s that magical serendipity of the journal that continues to surprise and please and enamor me. I’m still in love with this process. Ever new . . .

Dueling Paintbrushes at Journaling Retreat ~ Day One

Today breaks clear, brilliant blue and sunny warm at our first full day of the Women’s Journaling Alpine Retreat. After we’ve welcomed the day with yoga on the sparkling lake’s edge, we breakfast and then, settle out between the two closest cabins with a view peering into the shadowed, cool forest.

We’ve designed this “Dueling Brushes” demonstration to show how differently both Jean and I approach a journal page and how differently we paint. Jean takes her thirty-five minute time frame first. With this result! And then I take mine. As I’ve mentioned I’m struggling with this new journal size (it’s smaller) and the quality of paper (some of the pages are just writing paper). So my attempt to solve the paper challenge is to glue a small piece of watercolor paper into the page where I want to

watercolor. I like the results . . . and I’m pleased with the traveling off the watercolor paper in small overlappings onto the writing paper.

I’m actually pretty pleased with the full spread visual. I like how the colors happen to balance themselves out between the pigments I chose for the landscape and the delicate hues of the pods in this
handmade black paper. Still I feel astonished that those holes I’ve had to cut for the paper clay insert add harmony to this unpredicted page so much further back from when the holes originated.

It’s that magical serendipity of the journal that continues to surprise and please and enamor me. I’m still in love with this process. Ever new . . .

Women’s “Art Discoveries” Retreat

Women’s “Art Discoveries” Retreat

Women's "Art Discoveries" Retreat with Elaine Frenett announcement
TITLE: Women’s “Art Discoveries” Retreat
DATE: September 13-18, 2015
TIME: Six day, ALL-inclusive (meals, lodging and instruction) retreat
PRICE: Two prices available, depending upon chosen lodging (see website)
LOCATION: Lake Alpine Resort, California Sierras (between Ebbets Pass and Bear Valley)

Dreaming of an artist’s escape? Envision the air autumn-crisp, with golden leaves reflected in the sparkling lake, pine scent weaving through the trees and thoughts turning to introspection. Such is the setting for the sixth annual Women’s “Art Discoveries” Retreat, September 13-18 at Lake Alpine Resort near Bear Valley California. These experienced professionals, Jean Warren and Elaine Frenett, have reshaped this year’s format to weave paints, mixed media and words together to expand our creativity using collaboration, abstraction and exploration. This all-inclusive (meals, lodging and workshop) retreat is for the spirited woman who loves painting, journaling and the energy of other women (2 scholarships available). For more information: https://visualartjournaling.wordpress.com/objectives-and-summary-2015-retreat/ feel free to contact Elaine Frenett your retreat leader at 541-944-2196.