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Art Supplies

The love affair with art supplies began at a young age. My two most concrete memories of this was obsessing over the 64 pack of Crayola crayons (sharpener included) until they magically appeared for a birthday or special occasion and second, was a Christmas where my uncle gave me a pack of artist grade magic markers from England or Sweden or somewhere not Canada and they were the Rolls Royce of markers. All the colors, the packaging, the quality. I hauled that pack of markers around for years. Seriously, YEARS. They never ran out!!! I wish I could remember the brand.

Art supplies still give me that rush of excitement. The packaging, the possibility, the time spent walking the aisles just absorbing the products. This is my candy store. (Well, I like candy stores too but that’s another blog post.)

My most recent purchases are good brushes from Princeton, all the Gamblin mediums and spirits (shown) and some fun new Gamblin oil colors. (They are the childhood magic markers to me…amazing quality and make me feel good just looking at them on my art table.)

Wherever you are, whatever stage of this (endless?) lockdown you’re in, I know it helps me to stay creative. Painting, cooking, sending fun snail mail….happy creative weekend, friends. xo

“Art Supplies” 12×12″ oil on 1.5″ canvas

Sacred Offerings from Roxanne Evans Stout

third   Hello you beautiful artists and friends! I hope this newsletter finds you well! These are not easy times, but I am finding ways to create joy, and I hope you are too. I am thrilled to tell you about a special project I have been preparing for quite some time. It is finally ready to share with you! 1 poster
My next online class for you is… Sacred Offerings! Create beautiful backgrounds for stenciled “Offerings.”

How will you use them? In books, as wall hangings, as gifts or stand-alone works of art… Join me March 11 at 1 pm PST on Facebook Live! The class will last 1.5-2 hours.

After you register, you will receive an invite to a closed Facebook group, where the class will be. You will be able to re-watch the class and share with the group forever after. So even if you can’t make the live recording, it will always be available to you in our Facebook group! And it is only $30! Register here now! Register now to join Sacred Offerings!

Nurture your creativity with Sacred Offerings. Nourish your artistic spirit with an afternoon making art together… In Sacred Offerings!

If you want to explore printmaking on a Gelli plate, this will be a wonderful class for you!

We will add texture and color to papers and delve into new and meaningful ways to use my stencil designs!

We are going to nurture our creativity together, and create all kinds of magic!

Register now to join us in Sacred Offerings!

Explore Gelli plates and stencils in new and meaningful ways with us in Sacred Offerings!
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May you have a magical, beautiful day! Thank you so much to each of you who has already signed up for Sacred Offerings!  

©2021 River Garden Studio | P.O. Box 645 Keno OR 97627

I’ve been in the “l’atelier”

I was thinking today, it’s been a bit since I’ve posted on my blog. Proof that the covid time vortex exists because “a bit” was LAST YEAR. Ok, it was December 31, 2020 but still…what I thought was maybe a few weeks was nearly two months.

Hello. Fast forward. It was January. Cold, wet, a 2020 hangover for sure. Then it was February. Still cold, a little snow, Valentine’s Day, lots of pink art and here I am today, February 17th and a good handful of my early new year projects are done! (Commissions, a new catalogue, a couple of new products…hint hint…coming soon.)

And that is a one of the silver linings of this pandemic. There is time and a schedule to complete these small business tasks that used to get wedged in or not done at all. I’m not used to that feeling and I like it. I love making new products! Or getting new card designs out! Updating my website or, a couple of weeks ago, buying a new easel! In this long home stretch of staying put and waiting this out, these are the fun accomplishments that I’m holding tight. I’m painting more, creating more, obviously not blogging more (ha!) and keeping deadline commitments to myself. Structure helps in this period of blurry time.

I painted “L’Atelier” last month which means “the studio”, usually for an artist or designer and that’s where I’ll pretend I’ve been for the last two months. In the “atelier”, darling. Under a chandelier on the chaise lounge.

To find any of these new goodies, new greeting cards are here. Lots of new paintings (including “L’Atelier”) are at elizabethW in Carmel Postcards and stickers live here and voila new designs of Fancy Envelopes.

As always, free shipping on everything. (Within the United States.) As always, thank you for reading and being here and I promise (really) because I wrote it in ink like my others tasks I actually completed, dates that I would blog. So no more echo chamber helllllllloooooooooooo out there. See you soon. xo

P.S. Sorry no link for the new paintings at elizabethW. Kelly has info on everything: [email protected]

P.P.S You see…vortex again. I had something to add and now blank. Bye!

The Gasket of Grace

To celebrate this month that celebrates relationships, I decided to write about gaskets. 

I don’t think I really knew what a gasket was until we had three needing to be replaced. First to go was my husband’s kayak drysuit neck gasket (which I really didn’t know about). Second was our woodstove door gasket (which I learned how to replace). And third was my little stove-top coffee maker gasket (which apparently gives up if I accidentally leave the contraption on the burner too long).

 

Once things happen in threes, I start to pay attention. And I start to research meaning. Turns out, the official definition of a gasket is a seal that fills the space between two or more mating surfaces.

 

Well, if that isn’t a relationship metaphor! 

 

A favorite of the hundred or so books I’ve read on marriage (I exaggerate that number, but only slightly) is Rob Bell’s Zimzum of Love. In it, he explores the ancient Hebrew word zimzum, which essentially means “the space between.” I’m kind of obsessed with this idea. In fact, my first poetry collection many years ago was a little chapbook titled, The Space Between. I look for connections everywhere—for what brings things and people together and what keeps them together. 

 

The best part of the gasket definition? It allows for less-than-perfect mating surfaces between two, irregular parts. Which could be said of the space between two, irregular people.

 

“So,” I asked myself, “What is the gasket of marriage?”

 

First, I should explain that my husband and I are very different. We are learning to laugh about this. 

 

He’s Mr. Spontaneity. On a Friday after a long work week, he can grab a jar of peanut butter and head out camping on a whim. I am Mrs. Planner. If we are going camping, I like to A) know about it at least a day in advance and B) pack a cooler brimming with pesto, sliced aged cheddar, pre-chopped onions soaking in olive oil for morning eggs, driving snacks of sea-salt dark chocolate, at least one good bottle of wine, etc. etc. 

 

He’s Mr. DIY. Whether changing the car oil, installing a new dishwasher, or cutting his hair, he’s a do-it-yourself kinda guy. I’m Mrs. Outsource-My-Weaknesses. I like to take the car in for its checkup to my trusty mechanic, hire a handyman to install anything that comes with a lengthy instruction manual and connects to electricity or water, and when I did briefly cut my own hair for a season, it just confirmed that I should leave some things to the professionals.

 

He’s Mr. Down-to-Earth and says it like it is. I’m Mrs. Pie-in-the-Sky and tend to quote literature aloud. When we watched Starsky & Hutch one night, I recognized the start of a favorite Shakespeare line, quoted by Snoop Dog, “To err is human…” and I spoke in time with the rest of it: “…to forgive, divine.” At dinner parties now, my husband likes to say I quote Snoop Dog, at which point, I start distinguishing between primary and secondary sources. 

 

Whether expressed by a 17th-century bard or a 21st-century bard, forgiveness is something my husband and I both agree on. It’s the gasket of grace. Especially in marriage. And especially when two different people approach life in different ways—which is bound to lead to misunderstandings.  

 

I have a hunch that you don’t need a lot of grace to love someone who’s a lot like yourself. That’s pretty easy. Learning to love difference is a gift in that it does require a lot of grace. Maybe the more difference between two people, the more grace you can have—if you also choose to give it. 

 

I looked up zimzum to make sure I didn’t miss anything. Part of HarperCollins’s definition states: “In marriage, zimzum is the dynamic energy field between two partners.” 


We are learning to celebrate the dynamics. 

 

So whether I lean toward my poetic-academic love of Big Words and call it zimzum, or whether I lean toward the practical gasket, I know that whatever seals the space between us will be made of grace. 



Boulders and Aspens in Hope Valley

The post Boulders and Aspens in Hope Valley appeared first on Stefan Baumann – The Grand View: Paintings by Stefan Baumann.

Yosemite National Park: View from Glacier Point

Yosemite National Park View from Glacier Point, oil on canvas.

Painting by Stefan Baumann.

Painted on location en plein air, alla prima, from Glacier Point.

This painting is looking toward the south Yosemite Valley.

The post Yosemite National Park: View from Glacier Point appeared first on Stefan Baumann – The Grand View: Paintings by Stefan Baumann.

Yosemite National Park: View from Glacier Point

Yosemite National Park View from Glacier Point, oil on canvas.

Painting by Stefan Baumann.

Painted on location en plein air, alla prima, from Glacier Point.

This painting is looking toward the south Yosemite Valley.

The post Yosemite National Park: View from Glacier Point appeared first on Stefan Baumann – The Grand View: Paintings by Stefan Baumann.

Shoshone Falls

Shoshone Falls, Plein Air Painting of Shoshone Falls by Stefan Baumann.

Shoshone Falls is a waterfall on the Snake River in southern Idaho, United States, approximately 3 miles northeast of the city of Twin Falls. Sometimes called the “Niagara of the West,” Shoshone Falls is 212 feet high—45 feet higher than Niagara Falls—and flows over a rim nearly 1,000 feet wide. Wikipedia

The post Shoshone Falls appeared first on Stefan Baumann – The Grand View: Paintings by Stefan Baumann.

Shoshone Falls

Shoshone Falls, Plein Air Painting of Shoshone Falls by Stefan Baumann.

Shoshone Falls is a waterfall on the Snake River in southern Idaho, United States, approximately 3 miles northeast of the city of Twin Falls. Sometimes called the “Niagara of the West,” Shoshone Falls is 212 feet high—45 feet higher than Niagara Falls—and flows over a rim nearly 1,000 feet wide. Wikipedia

The post Shoshone Falls appeared first on Stefan Baumann – The Grand View: Paintings by Stefan Baumann.

Bridal Veil Falls, Yosemite National Park

Bridal Veil Falls, Yosemite National Park.

12″ X 18″ Oil on canvas.

This painting of Bridal Veil Falls was created en plein air on location in Yosemite Valley in summer at Bridal Veil Vista Point. Yosemite is a grand location for outdoor painters to go and be with nature.

The post Bridal Veil Falls, Yosemite National Park appeared first on Stefan Baumann – The Grand View: Paintings by Stefan Baumann.