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What will we send out?

When I created the Word-Painting Project, the idea was to do something that could encourage others…and cover my grocery bill while chalet-sitting for friends in Switzerland (I’m a practical poet!). 

Though I thought I was making time for the project, the project made time for me. It gave me time to watch the light on the Alps and the clouds catch on their peaks. It gave me time to listen to the symphony of cowbells on the Holsteins munching wildflowers on the slope of the next-door chalet. And it was a joy to share that time in words and images by creating a word-painting every day for ten days. 

Back home, the prints of those originals already arrived, and I’ve hand-addressed the first of ten batches to go out over the summer. This week, a stack of Word-Painting No. 1 prints began their stamped way through the postal system to their recipients, and I blessed them as I dropped them into the post-office slot.  

This was the last image I created for the Word-Painting Project. It seemed appropriate to end with a question: What will we send out into the bright world beyond us? Some days, the world is bright, as in sunny and good—like this summer solstice day. And some days, the world is bright, as in the harsh glare of a world in need. Regardless of the natural or emotional weather, I choose to send out something encouraging. And with it, a big dose of gratitude. 

So, in each of Switzerland’s three, official languages, thank you for being part of the Word-Painting journey: danke, merci, grazie.

Sorry for the Confusion!

Thanks for trying to sign up for the newsletter! The sign up box format didn’t work correctly over email – EEK!

If you have commented, I made sure you have been added manually. If you were confused and would still like to sign up, follow this link to the webpage where the format is working correctly.

Thank you for your patience!!

Lyda Rose
June 2014
Oil on Panel
7.5″ x 10″

Ch-ch-ch-changes

I’m terrible at blogging, so I’m changing with the times and removing the blog and creating a newsletter. Sign up to stay in the loop for shows, events and anything exciting that happens.

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Hands and Feet
2019
Oil on Linen
18″ x 24″

Earth Paint Summer Deals + Eco Artist Interview

summernewsletter

This season’s HOT DEALS!

20off Big

Wait, there’s more!
Stock Up For Summer with FREE SHIPPING!
Coupon Code: shipart19

Expires June 20th

***

Can you say “Let’s Paint!” in Italian? ….”Dipingiamo!”

Week2 Italy Small

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Josh Tiessen Painting large

Fascinating interview with Natural Artist & Prodigy, Josh Tiessen.
Read more here.

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Something’s new in our store…

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Have a fantastic start to your summer season!

The Natural Earth Paint family

©2019 Natural Earth Paint | 330 E. Hersey Street, Suite 6, Ashland, Oregon 97520

Making Small Pictures of Seashells

Making Small Pictures: Espresso Cup With Broken Seashells

Making pictures, as in to form, shape, bring about or create a picture. 

Small Studies.

It’s the season of “smalls” – that is drawing small studies on a regular basis.

MakingSmall Studies: Broken Seashell With Napkin

Though, truthfully, I am working on a medium size watercolor painting in my “Three Minute Egg” series.  However it is taking a while.  And, when it is drying between layers, I work on other things.

Back to the small studies.  I can get so much enjoyment out of doing the small studies.  Plus, although it may not look it, I do feel as though I’m getting somewhere.  Put a different way, I am making progress on my drawing skills and how I like to compose and think about my art.

Making Small Pictures: Broken Seashells in Ink

And, you might notice, I am using different media: ink on paper; colored pencil on toned paper; and Procreate App with my iPadPro.

The Beauty Of Making Something.

I was recently reminded that when you ask four year olds see things differently.  To explain, when you ask them what they’re doing when they are drawing or painting, more than likely they’ll say they are making something.

And, a child making a picture will probably not be worrying about whether or not their painting will get into a juried show, or sell, or be in a museum, or the myriad of other things grown up artists worry about.

Making Small Studies: Two Broken Seashells and a Box

Making Or Creating.

I think the distinction between “making something” and “creating art” is interesting and revealing.  Think about it.  Sometimes it is just nice to make a picture rather than worry about painting a piece of art.  “Art”, at least to me, is loaded with expectations of creativity, skill and meaning.  Oddly enough, it can be an onerous challenge.

Just making a picture of a broken seashell is more liberating.  I can investigate, play and stop when I want to.  It can come out good or terrible; who cares?  The time spent making the picture is a worthwhile and enjoyable endeavor.

Making Small Studies of broken seashells with ink

Patience And Practice.

Recently, I also remembered that getting good at making something takes practice and patience.  So, these small studies are my way of learning and practicing my craft.

In any case, I hope you enjoy my broken seashells.

Making Small Pictures: Espresso Cup with Broken Seashells

The post Making Small Pictures of Seashells appeared first on Margaret Stermer-Cox.

Discoveries and Sharing From Karin O’Brien’s Studio

Upcoming workshops and news from the studio.

You can still register for my ONLINE class Fin Folk which begins June 6!

I am so excited to be participating with Artful Gathering again this year and offering my second online class. June 6-July 17, 2019. I poured my heart and soul into this class. I wanted to share with you my painting process from idea to finished piece and that is a tough job, as my mind is a complex web of inspiration! I will be available for live support throughout the class dates. If you click on this link: Artful Gathering. It will take you to all the information on registration, the class description and a short video, I hope you will consider joining me!

Teaching on the Road

I will be teaching in San Diego at
Way Art Yonder Studio,
August 3-4, 2019

This is a wonderful venue in Jamul. You will truly feel like you are going away to a retreat. A wonderful class room on a hill, with views of the surrounding area – all the way to the ocean.

I will be teaching my new class “Soul Narratives,” sharing my painting process.  I will take you on a journey with visualization, story and playful painting techniques

Soul Narratives
Way Art Yonder Studio

August 3-4, 2019
Here is the link to register and get more info: Way Art Yonder Studio

Leaving you with Ellie. I have started to pull out my teddy bear and doll making supplies, so more to come on them in the near future!

BE CURIOUS
and see where it takes you!

Blessings,
Karen
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Haines & Friends Fund & “Where’s William?”

Hello friends and art appreciators,
 This Friday in Downtown Ashland is bound to be a happening event!  Not only is it 1st Friday Art Walk, but the Haines & Friends Fund show at the Ashland Springs Hotel will be a unique and insightful exhibit. You will get to see the results of the funds in physical form. So many great artists who were awarded for their artistic visions !
Here is the brochure:
***That’s my painting on the lower left… ‘Suddenly Blue” (40″x30″ oil, with lots of impasto work)
After you view the Haines & Friends Fund show, head over across the street to the Art & Soul Gallery and play ‘Where’s William” for a chance to win art gifts and more!
details here:

ART & SOUL GALLERY CELEBRATES THE OPENING OF OSF’S OUTDOOR SEASON WITH “WHERE’S WILLIAM?” AN ART DISCOVERY GAME!

 

All of the 27 artists at the Art & Soul Gallery have titled one or two of their paintings to relate to William Shakespeare. Throughout the month of June visitors to the gallery who are able to find the paintings will win prizes.

“There is something for everyone,” says the gallery’s new managing director/owner, Peter Stone. “Where’s William” is designed to be a fun way to discover art while looking for Shakespeare themes in the paintings and their titles.” 

Prizes:

~Kids aged twelve and under who find ten or more titles get to choose a super hero or Star Wars lapel pin.

~Seekers who find twenty or more titles get to choose one notecard from an Art & Soul Gallery artist and receive a free pass to Chanting and Chai.

~More ambitious “art snoops” who find 25 or more titles and answer three or more bonus questions will receive a CD, a free pass to Chanting and Chai, get to choose a notecard from an Art & Soul Gallery Artist, a 25% off coupon for custom picture framing from Art & Soul Framing and will be entered into a weekly drawing to win their choice of a painting lesson, a music lesson or an matted/unframed print.

~And anyone who finds thirty or more titles and answers five or more bonus questions will receive the above prizes and be entered into a drawing (at 4 pm on June 30) to win a Judy Richardson original oil painting.

Prizes are available for participants every day at all times when the gallery is open and there will be “art snoops” drawings every Friday in June at 5 pm. (7:30 on First Friday)

You do not need to be present to win at any of the drawings.

For more information about Art & Soul Gallery and “Where’s William” call (541) 488-9006, visit artandsoulgallery.com email: [email protected].

I look forward to seeing you at either of these exhibits! It will be a fun night ….
cheers,
silvia

Class Offerings for 2019

It has been a very busy year and I have had to step back from this blog. I wanted to step back in and let  you know about my upcoming classes. 
I am so excited to be participating with Artful Gathering again this year and offering my second online class. June 6-July 17, 2019. I poured my heart and soul into this class. I wanted to share with you my painting process from idea to finished piece and that is a tough job, as my mind is a complex web of inspiration! I will be available for live support throughout the class dates. 
August 3-4, 2019 I will be traveling to the San Diego area for my class at Way Art Yonder. This is a wonderful venue in Jamul. You will truly feel like you are going away to a retreat. A wonderful class room on a hill, with views of the surrounding area – all the way to the ocean. 
This will be the first time teaching my new class “Soul Narratives” where I will be sharing my painting process. We will be using a 20″x 20″ surface to give us space to explore color shape and texture. I will take you on a journey with visualization, story and playful painting techniques. 
For more information and to register, click on the Pages to the right for each class. 
I really hope you will join me!

My First Book of Poetry

In this life I’ve not travelled much outside North America. Go deep, an inner voice instructed, and so I let that happen first on the boundary waters of Minnesota and Ontario, and then in a convent beside the Red River of the North. In the middle of life I uprooted myself and came to be transplanted on the Pacific Coast. Later I would make a few short trips to England and Ireland. I never travelled far from the waters of earth, and water became a mirror from which soul might reflect.
“Our years are seventy, and eighty if we are strong,” the Hebrew Scriptures say. And I was in my seventh decade before I traveled with my new husband, author John R. Sack, to Italy to celebrate our marriage with a pilgrimage to the holy places of St. Francis and St. Clare. He had written an historical novel set in the era just after the death of Francis, a book which had brought the two of us together in what he calls our wisdom years. And in 2011 we wanted to walk the paths that Francis walked and to visit the convent of San Damiano in Assisi where Clare had lived.
Although I had connections with women in Minnesota who followed the Rule of St. Clare and lived lives of enclosure, I hadn’t entered a Franciscan convent myself. I had, however, considered it as early as my twelfth birthday. I received a book from the Franciscans of Little Falls, Minnesota, explaining the Franciscan way of life, but the Sisters in the town where I lived were not Franciscan, and they were the Sisters I knew, loved, and joined. Consequently, I was not prepared for what happened to me in Assisi.
In Assisi I met Chiara—Clare’s name engraved in Italian on the statue honoring her in the cathedral there. I truly have no way to describe how this happened. I can describe the places John and I visited, the stories we were told, the landscapes, caves, and churches—the worn stones on which these people once walked. Something of them, Francis and (in her Italian language) Chiara, remains alive there, and it shook me to my core. It burned in my heart. I entered a cave, touched a stone, knelt in a small chapel, stood on the stone stairs in San Damiano and something so powerful took hold of me, over and over it took hold, making even simple breath a whirlwind. “What am I going to do?” I fell into John’s arms and wept. This thirteenth century woman had grasped my soul with an intensity too great for me, but she wouldn’t let me go.
Back in Oregon we dedicated our home to her.
And now, these poems.
Sometimes I watch her; sometimes she speaks in her own voice to me. The poems came through me in both third and first person, but all of them are reflections of Chiara as I bent back towards her, as I gazed. Her spiritual teacher from childhood was a man from her own town of Assisi, Francis Bernardone whose imprint on his town, his country, his church, and the entire world’s history remains. Francis and Chiara of Assisi have been relevant in every era up to our own. And back in the thirteenth century the young woman named Chiara left her home to join Francis and his dream of living exactly as Jesus of Nazareth had lived—an authentic Christianity. And Chiara loved him, loved both of them—Jesus the Christ and the poor man, Francis of her own home town.
Both Francis and Chiara lived extraordinary lives. Both were mystics burning with divine love. This love united them and it was in this love that they recognized each other. Despite stories and movies to the contrary, I don’t believe they ever had a sexual relationship nor desired one. All love of that sort was burned in a divine and universal fire and transformed into the very love of God, so profoundly that their love for one another became identical with their love in and for God.
In my journal I wrote: Here’s what I know about Clare’s yearning. In the museum below Santa Chiara Cathedral in Assisi is an alb made of lace which she made for Francis. I can’t remember how many years she worked on it. It’s like spider webs, fine, almost falling apart now even behind the glass. Something about that lace holds a fierce yearning, one she believed she shared with Francis. Was the union in the simple understanding that someone in this world experienced a yearning as intensely as did she? Such yearning cannot be mingled, I think. It is solitary. But just knowing that someone else experiences such infinity of longing causes love. As though the lace were a language of the soul to say, “I want to veil the profound darkness in you with these webs of white lace, something of light, so that you do not succumb to your desperate aloneness, so that you do not give way to a belief that darkness is all there is, but that having finally touched the deepest fields of night, even there you will realize that there is yet More, there is a fullness opening to you, an endlessness that not only fills you completely, but is what you are. And it is Light. It is Love.”
Maria Popova writes, “Even the farthest seers can’t bend their gaze beyond their era’s horizon of possibility, but the horizon shifts with each incremental revolution as the human mind peers outward to take in nature, then turns inward to question its own givens. We sieve the world through the mesh of these certitudes, tautened by nature and culture, but every once in a while—whether by accident or conscious effort—the wire loosens and the kernel of a revolution slips through.”
From time to time I wonder if these mystics, Chiara and Francis, found their way through the mesh of certitude to glimpse truths beyond their era’s horizon, truths that science only recently would discover, or that a psychology of self-integration would realize.  Chiara, herself proclaimed a saint by the church she both loved and challenged during her life, was a woman who claimed her womanhood and the freedom it accorded her. She was the first woman to establish a religious community of women living according to a structure and rule she herself designed. Up to then nuns lived according to rules written by men such as St. Benedict and St. Augustine. The Poor Ladies of San Damiano lived according to the Rule of Chiara. She petitioned Rome again and again to approve her plan. And she didn’t die until the Pope finally agreed. Already, though, groups of “Poor Clares” had come together across Europe. In Bohemia the woman, Agnes of Prague, a royal woman betrothed to the Emperor Frederick II, chose instead to follow Chiara and establish a group of Poor Clares in her own country. The letters between Chiara and Agnes along with the unique Rule and Testament have formed the basis of study, spiritual enlightenment and women’s rights even to this present day.
We humans rarely if ever know what we set in motion simply by living our lives and making what choices we can.
These poems are the product of prayer and contemplation. They are historical only in the broadest sense. I hope, however, they remain true to the spirit of Chiara even while their details are mostly images derived from my own imagination. (from the Introduction)

You can purchase this book by ordering it from your local bookstore or by going directly to Chiara Reflections

The Poet & the Bloodstone

Detail of Bloodstone Pillars, Catedral de Ávila, Spain
I am happy that this poem will be  published in the forthcoming Deep Travel anthology.  A bit of backstory:
Saint Teresa of Ávila and Charles-Axel Guillaumot never met. She was a Spanish nun who lived from 1515-1582; he was a French architect who lived from 1730-1807. Each of them built and left a largely invisible legacy. Hers was a vision of the interior castle of the spirit within us. His was to save Paris from collapsing back into the quarries beneath it by building a support city belowground. Today, you can read what Teresa built with her words, and you can visit a fraction of Paris’ abandoned quarries open to the public. In the poetry collection, Hope of Stones, you are invited to enter a cross-century conversation among The Nun, The Architect, & The Poet. This poem is from that collection, which was a finalist for the Tupelo Press 2019 Dorset Prize.

     The Poet & The Bloodstone 
     Ávila, Spain

Today is research day. First, The Nun’s museum. 
It brims with depictions of heaven speaking 
to the saint. In paintings, doves & rays of light 
descend & suspend above her upturned face. 
Speech ribbons unfurl toward her from angels. 
The saint was known to levitate, so I half expect
the painted words to lift from their composition 
& twirl about. They stay put. 
                                                   Next, the Catedral 
de Ávila. Here, I see the grandeur The Nun left 
behind. This church was built with bloodstone—
granite shot through with iron. It looks like 
history has bled across the walls. The stone came
from a nearby quarry, & I think of The Architect. 
What we pull from the earth & what we do with it. 
I sit a long while on a hard pew, but my most 
profound thought is how best to get to the train 
station tomorrow. 
                                 Time to search for gazpacho 
Rioja—things that don’t last for centuries. I keep 
forgetting that in this country, I’m an outsider 
trying to dine before nine. 
                                               The Nun founded 
her simple convent outside the city walls. 
Paris thought The Architect an outsider 
for not being born in France. I am always looking
for what lies outside—even dining hours. 
                                                                         I find
an open café & order wine the color of bloodstone.