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Remember Me – It’s About Blogging & Leaving Talent OR

Remember: Talent Railroad Depot

Yes, do you remember me?

Remember Me? From the blog login page

Remember Me.

As I logged into my website in preparation to write this blog post, I noticed the small remark at the bottom of the page.  It read “Remember Me”.   Though the statement was about my password, it made me wonder, will you remember me?

 

Blog Slow Down.

This past year has not been one of my better blogging years.  As I remember, things were slow to begin with and, then, I  practically stopped writing for the month of August and September.  Not surprising, these two months coincide with our move.  That is to say, my husband and I have left Talent, OR and moved to Ilwaco, WA.

Hard Getting Started Again.

I thought that when we moved into our new place, it would be easy to pick up the keyboard and start blogging again.  Silly me; there is a lot of work to setting up a household.  And, my studio space, for example, is only about a third of the way unpacked.  I do have my drawing table unpacked.  Pencil and paper are always at the ready, so things are looking up.

All that being said, I have wanted to start writing again.  Here we go then and, I do hope that you remember me.

Farewell Talent, Oregon.

So, I’d like to say a fond farewell to Talent, OR.  I thoroughly enjoyed our seven years there.  And, while there, I did some sketches of some of the places around town.  I have included a few just for fun.

Rail Depot.

One of my favorite buildings in town is the old rail depot.  I did a few sketches and here is my favorite watercolor and ink version.  The forward part of the building as space for a cafe.  Currently, it is the home of “Sweet Beet Station”.

Remembering Talent Rail Depot

“Funky Fashions”.

The old building that used to be the home of “Funky Fashions” is also a favorite.  “Funky Fashions” was owned by our neighbor when we moved in to Talent back in 2012.  Since then it has changed businesses a couple of times.  Now, it’s the home of “Biscuits and Vinyl”.

Remember Funky Fashions

“Downtowne Coffee”

One business that did not change while we were there was “Downtowne Coffee”.  It is situated in what was once a gasoline station.  I recommend the espresso at “Downtowne Coffee”; it tastes so good!

Remember Talent OR

Gas Station.

Come to think of it, I did do a sketch of one of the gas stations that is still a gas station.  The employees were nice and this is one of my favorites.

Remember Talent: 76 Gas Station

Fond Memories.

I will remember Talent and the people who live there with fondness.

 

 

 

 

 

 

The post Remember Me – It’s About Blogging & Leaving Talent OR appeared first on Margaret Stermer-Cox.

Living Large on Little: Part 3

And one more installation from my forthcoming mini book: Living Large on Little: How to See the Invitation in Limitation. This vignette is from the section on patience….

When I taught high school on a tiny, Micronesian island, far, far away, I learned to make weekends sacred. I tried to get out and enjoy the ocean, which was my favorite thing to do there. 

One Saturday morning, I stopped at the local outdoor market and bought a coconut to take to Wings Beach. With any luck, I’d have that northern nook of the island to myself. It was an  unprotected beach, as in: no coral reef to create a lagoon and keep the sharks out. I was always a bit afraid of swimming in those waters, and I would force myself to do it.

My car lurched down the pocked, coral road, and I arrived to—delight!—a deserted beach. 

I laid out my sarong on the sand and sipped the coconut juice through the straw sticking from the hole that the man at the market had machete’d open for me. When I finished the juice, I thought: I want to eat the coconut meat inside. But this was the entire coconut—thick, green outer casing and all.

Limitation: I had no machete. 

Invitation: How else can I open it?

I will not admit how long it took me to break that thing open. It involved much hefting and not a few rounds of bashing against rocks. I’m glad there were no witnesses but the coconut crabs, scuttling for cover. 

When I finally heard that shell crack in half, I felt an ancient thrill that no modern equipment of convenience can give. 

I sat on my sarong and scooped out the coconut meat. I ate it with revelry, facing the sea and sky in their many hues of blue. 

When I had scraped out the last of the sweet fruit, I stacked the two shells and ran my hands through the sand—sand that had once been stone or coral and was now soft enough to comfortably sit on. 

So much is worth waiting for. 

Sometimes, that waiting is passive, but many times, it’s a muscle’d waiting, filled with sweat and repetition like the tides. Or the sound of continuous thudding of coconut on stone. 

PS: The official book launch is November 9 at The Miners’ Bazaar in Jacksonville, Oregon, from 5-7 PM.  More info here. 

Living Large on Little: Part 3

And one more installation from my forthcoming mini book: Living Large on Little: How to See the Invitation in Limitation. This vignette is from the section on patience….

When I taught high school on a tiny, Micronesian island, far, far away, I learned to make weekends sacred. I tried to get out and enjoy the ocean, which was my favorite thing to do there. 

One Saturday morning, I stopped at the local outdoor market and bought a coconut to take to Wings Beach. With any luck, I’d have that northern nook of the island to myself. It was an  unprotected beach, as in: no coral reef to create a lagoon and keep the sharks out. I was always a bit afraid of swimming in those waters, and I would force myself to do it.

My car lurched down the pocked, coral road, and I arrived to—delight!—a deserted beach. 

I laid out my sarong on the sand and sipped the coconut juice through the straw sticking from the hole that the man at the market had machete’d open for me. When I finished the juice, I thought: I want to eat the coconut meat inside. But this was the entire coconut—thick, green outer casing and all.

Limitation: I had no machete. 

Invitation: How else can I open it?

I will not admit how long it took me to break that thing open. It involved much hefting and not a few rounds of bashing against rocks. I’m glad there were no witnesses but the coconut crabs, scuttling for cover. 

When I finally heard that shell crack in half, I felt an ancient thrill that no modern equipment of convenience can give. 

I sat on my sarong and scooped out the coconut meat. I ate it with revelry, facing the sea and sky in their many hues of blue. 

When I had scraped out the last of the sweet fruit, I stacked the two shells and ran my hands through the sand—sand that had once been stone or coral and was now soft enough to comfortably sit on. 

So much is worth waiting for. 

Sometimes, that waiting is passive, but many times, it’s a muscle’d waiting, filled with sweat and repetition like the tides. Or the sound of continuous thudding of coconut on stone. 

PS: The official book launch is November 9 at The Miners’ Bazaar in Jacksonville, Oregon, from 5-7 PM.  More info here. 

The Exciting Night is Nearing – RSVP by Oct. 21st

A Delicious and Revealing Event
| A NEW DOOR |  |LET’S OPEN IT! |

RSVP BY OCT. 21ST

2019 Masterpiece Benefit Event Saturday, Nov. 2nd
@Ashland Hills Hotel

Enjoy a stellar evening of exhibits, delicious buffet, new Biblically themed art, silent auction, music and most recent updates.  Hear about ways we are reaching culture for Christ through Masterpiece Christian Fine Arts Foundation.

Including our exciting Capital Campaign for our Magna Deo project in Ashland.
Come Open this New Door with us!

Saturday, Nov. 2nd6:00 Social and silent auction, inspiring art
( Bid on an epic helicopter adventure over Crater Lake and so much more!)

6:30 Dinner & program
with speaker

Head Pastor @ The Story Ashland

Tickets $35 per person

or introduce others to the work we do to connect culture
to Christ through fine art and

Sponsor a table for 10
$350 

Please reserve your place by Oct. 21st.

Buy my tickets now

For more information email [email protected]
or call 541-601-7496.

I cannot attend but would like to support the work Masterpiece does to bring truth, grace, beauty and nobility to culture through fine art

Donate now
Dan Chen Lucite etching
Dan will be with us Nov. 2nd and  introducing his newest sculpture “Ascension”
Copyright © 2019 Masterpiece Christian Fine Arts Foundation, All rights reserved.

Our mailing address is:
Masterpiece Christian Fine Arts Foundation
17575 Highway 66
Ashland, OR 97520-9406

October Third Friday at Art du Jour

Art du Jour’s featured wall for October 2019 is a collaboration of participating member’s work focused on the theme “Celebrating Fall Colors”. -Roy Musitelli photo 10/2/19

October Third Friday:

Art du Jour Gallery, 213 E. Main Street in Medford is featuring Jeanne LaRea-Lagano in our salon for September through November.  Our monthly exhibit on the featured wall we will be offering a mix of work in recognition of the glorious colors of fall. For Third Friday (October 18th, 5pm-8pm) classical guitarist Rod Petrone is scheduled to perform. Please see our Facebook page (www.facebook.com/ArtduJourGallery) for updates.

Guest Artist Jeanne LaRae-Lagano in Salon through November

Jeanne LaRae-Lagano has a resume listing many accomplishments as an exhibiting and published artist.  Her current duties with the Ashland Art Center includes gallery curator and manager, studio artist, window display, and instructor. She is also a board member “Artist Liaison” with the Ashland Gallery Association. In her artists statement she writes:

“I am an artist. I am enthralled with color, value, shapes, design and I can’t seem to let things go by that capture my attention. My opportunities to paint Alla Prima and Plein Air are what I love most… They are loose and fresh, and they portray what I am most excited about with the view in front of me. I began to take a strong liking to landscape painting because of the daily need to show landscaping in my renderings. I escaped outside to paint landscapes and found my love for Plein Air painting.”

“Like a composer conducting a symphony, I am in the middle of it all, I get to orchestrate the bass cello creating the darks and the main shapes, then the violins leading the viewer through the path of color with the final bells and frills of highlights and details making the light dance and the crescendo to fulfill my mission as I step back into the silence of my surroundings.”

“I was born into a family that enabled me to be who I am, as unique, true to myself, individual, creating my own path. Creative thinking was encouraged, and I decided at an early age to take a path leading to an art career. Painting is my spiritual meditation as I am connecting to my subject through my soul using my acquired knowledge to guide me on my adventurous endeavors, always exploring and pushing myself for greater personal achievements. My photography helps me paint in the studio and because it is something I love, I get lost in photographing for future paintings. I am captivated and drawn to people and I photograph their emotions as events take place. My love for photography enhances my art and my love for art enhances my photography.”

For more information on this artist go to her website at: http://www.jeannelarae.com

"Autumn Casting Color", 24 X 24 oil painting by Jeanne LaRae-Lagano. Image provided by the artist

“Autumn Casting Color”, 24 X 24 oil painting by Jeanne LaRae-Lagano. Image provided by the artist

Featured Wall Celebrating Fall Colors

Occasionally an artist scheduled for the back wall in our beautiful gallery must leave our co-operative for one reason or another before their Featured Artist month arrives. When this happens our board of directors must scramble to fill the open slot. This month we will have a combined exhibit by participating AdJ members built around the theme Celebrating Fall Colors.  We think that our friends and visitors will enjoy this presentation in recognition of the splendor of the autumn season.

Calling All Rogue Valley Artists!!!

Art du Jour is happy to welcome two new artists into our membership ranks, Max Brown and MaryAnn Macey.  We think their work will be complementary to that of our other artists and look forward to their presence. We are still actively seeking new artists living in the Rogue Valley region who would like to join our co-operative and display their work to the Medford community. Membership includes an active role in the Art in Bloom festival in May, as well as our monthly Third Friday event. Media to be juried for membership includes pottery, sculpture, photography and jewelry.  Contact the gallery by email at [email protected], or log into our website (www.artdujourgallery.com) for full membership information.

Art du Jour Gallery
213 E. Main Street
Medford, OR 97501
(541) 770-3190
OPEN Tues – Sat., 10AM – 4PM

Opportunity in the overlooked

Laid Down, Erin Raedeke, oil on canvas

I first noticed Erin Raedeke’s paintings when she was a member at First Street Gallery in Chelsea some years ago and was immediately charmed by her handling of color. Her delicate, playful images of birthday party detritus, strewn across the field of view, gave her endless ways to improvise with tones that created deeply felt, personal color harmonies. The work was representational but also “all over,” without the negative space typical in a still life, the objects in the foreground against an empty background. The work was fine-tuned, with attention to unique details, but gracefully and effortlessly executed. If she worked from photographs, it didn’t show. My first thought was that Fairfield Porter would love the work. Nothing is overdone; the paintings appear to be first responses to whatever she sees without much going back over earlier marks. I saw her work again in 2015 at a group show curated by Matt Klos at Anne Arundel Community College. The painting in that show was simpler and harder to read, but still executed in the same steady, quiet and idiosyncratically personal insistence on representing humble objects in recognizable space in order to come up with results as close to abstraction as representation.

Her birthday party images give her an ample and varied palette of hues—almost any color can be made to fit into an image. Conical hats and flaccid balloons could be strewn across a surface to create patterns and shapes at will, though she was sedulous about keeping her subjects as random-looking, as “found” as possible. Departing from the party leftovers, she has used layered fabrics to create quasi-minimalist abstractions, some almost as radically simplified as Rothko or a Barnett Newman zip. The top layer of fabric would be torn or punched in places to reveal the color or pattern of what was underneath. Some of these paintings were as large as five feet tall, adding to their sense of kinship with abstracts from the mid-20th century. Yet even in this flat, minimal work, Raedeke has been just as diligent in capturing factual detail—the frayed tendrils of thread bristling from a torn edge running across a canvas as demarcation between large areas of nearly uniform color. She has an insistence on rendering lines as thin as spiderweb. Such minute detail in a sea of color seems like a pyrrhic effort to pull back from the larger strategy of enveloping the viewer—but it works. Oh, OK, we’re looking at cloth. There is something compulsive in this, in the way that much of what’s best in a particular artist’s style represents a surrender to inarticulate instincts about what needs to happen simply to make a picture come alive. Yet that adherence to minor detail makes even these larger, more amorphous paintings approachable, humble, amiable—when you recognize what’s been represented they snap back into insignificance, studies of what nearly anyone else wouldn’t even have bothered to notice. The fabric even looks a little stained. 

Her recent work is included in Manifest’s Painted, and it seems like a culmination, in a way, of what she’s been doing over the past decade, from the versatile color of her birthday party messes to the almost ascetic renunciations of the fabric paintings where she seems to want to improvise as simply as possible with color and form and space and yet still show you something you might actually see on the surface of a bed or countertop. She’s sticking with fabric, but there’s more depth—and the patterns of this fabric give her room to vary color and line and shape It hangs like a curtain, and its decorative print gives the painter a way of bringing back the musical tones. In this case, it’s just a pair of muslin sheets, it seems, decorated with floral patterns, a scattering of blue pansies on the cool side of the painting. The fabric hangs in supple folds, against a deep red background that shows as a slash of color at the bottom, beneath the hems. It’s as humble and unspectacular as possible, but the patterns are rendered with care, almost gratitude for the opportunities they offer.

The particular integrity she brings to her work shines through in this insistence on painting nothing but what she sees—even if it’s merely the torn edge of monotone, porous cloth—in order to create a nearly flat field of color. If you allow for varying degrees of flatness, this is a pursuit common to countless painters, but she brings a lyrical, almost wistful quality to her images, as if she’s nostalgic for the moment, a few seconds ago, that she last glanced at her subject. And in the work I enjoy the most from her, the impression of flatness gives way to depth—albeit the shallow relief of curtains or layers of wrapping paper under a half-eaten hamburger. They’re fragments of a larger experience, not signifying anything but rather saturated with her sense of how life feels.

Mighty mite

Towards Dam, Michael McCaffrey, oil on panel, 8″ x 8″

This little work is lit with an intensity that Van Gogh went south hoping to find, painted with an economy of means Edwin Dickinson pulled off in his premier coup canvases. It’s tiny, eight inches square. At that size, Michael McCaffrey invests a humble power and life into his kinetic, tactile marks. It makes De Kooning’s slashes of paint seem hyperbolic and theatrical by comparison. McCaffrey’s targets are way harder to hit, being so finely calibrated, which concentrates the power of his marks, his accuracy of representation making the brute physicality of his brushwork so energizing. The stucco promontory in the front looks as dazzling as coral, and yet also gently evocative of early growth in the spring. It works observationally, gives a convincing glimpse of a grassy patch, yet that sandpapery swath of color easily could be a detail from Braque.

One of the many mysteries of painting is how such rough execution, such raggedy shreds of paint, applied as if the project were masonry rather than a picture, conveys the raw light and air, no less, the clean scent of that tumbling breeze, almost by accident–the way rhyme somehow coincides with the exact articulation of something new in a sonnet. The sky and clouds are a sort of hyper-blue that feels like one of those noons in March, warm with spring sun but still chilly with late-winter wind. The wiped-away blur of olive and ochre and murky blue-green across the middle works as a distant landscape with a tree for this miniature world to pivot around. It looks as if he’d painted with blunt, bristly instruments, and maybe a cotton rag, that little random scribble under the cloud carved into the wet paint with the dull point of a brush handle, like a jerky signature.  Michael McCaffrey’s work can be seen in Painted at Manifest Gallery, and spotting his name in that show, I went hunting, and I found this wonder from the past along with a few equally impressive little landscapes, executed with the same kind of heedless joy.

Get Your Tickets for RGAC’s 2019 Auction and Fundraiser and See New Art

October 9 artblast Stefan Wolf
Detail of Home Invasion, woodblock print by Stefan Wolf
NEW EXHIBIT BEGINNING FRIDAY
IN THE COMMUNITY GALLERY

Deep Impressions:
Handmade Prints by Stefan Wolf

October 11 – November 22, 2019

Wolf Stefan_Parable_Rich Fool

Reception: Friday, October 18, 5:30-8:00 pm

Stefan Wolf demonstrates his passion for relief printing with his striking hand carved linoleum and woodblock prints. His work reflects on universal themes inspired by orthodox Christianity and Western tradition.
TIME TO BUY YOUR TICKETS!
Front Save the Date 2019 auction Roman HolidayThe annual auction is our most important fundraiser of the year.
Please join us.

Rogue Valley Country Club
2660 Hillcrest Road, Medford
5:00 p.m.
Evening includes silent auction, cocktail hour, dinner,
live auction, and live music by “Band du Pays Swing”

Dinner Menu
Mixed Greens Salad with Assorted Toppings and Dressings
Artisan Bread Rolls
Tomato and Mozzarella Salad
(Vegetarian) Pasta Salad
Seasonal Vegetables
Herb Roasted Petite Pearl Potatoes
Chicken Chasseur
Gluten Free Spinach Florentine Ravioli
Chocolate Mousse Parfait
New York Style Cheesecake
Roxy Ann Claret and Pinot Gris Wine

Tickets $65 per person

Purchase tickets HERE>>

UPCOMING CLASSES IN THE ROGUE STUDIO

Rogue Studio Figure Drawing Sessions
All media welcome
All skill levels welcome
Six Sessions, Fall Series: Tuesdays, October 15–November 19, 6 pm–8:30 pm

Six Tuesday evenings for 2 1/2 hours of moderated, uninstructed figure drawing sessions with a live model in the Rogue Studio. Adults 18 years and older from beginning to advanced levels are welcome. The sessions will include short gestures and longer, sustained poses. Students must provide their own drawing materials. Drawing boards, worktables and easels are available for use.
$45 FOR THE SIX SESSION SERIES, $15 PER SESSION
Register Here >>

Figure Painting with Ilene Gienger-Stanfield
All skill levels welcome
Oil or pastel media
Friday-Sunday, October 25–27,
9 am–4 pm

The human figure is an elegant and detailed subject. In this workshop Ilene gives you the tools to successfully address the figure, including fundamentals of drawing, value, edges, and color theory. Using live models and photo references, she will help students with their individual goals and challenges.
MEMBERS $300,
NON-MEMBERS $325
 Materials List
Register Here >>

Woodblock Print Making:
Traditional and Modern Methods with Walt Padgett
All skill levels welcome
Woodblock Print Making
Optional after class
open studio 3 pm–5 pm
4 Sessions, Thursdays,
October 24–November 14, 11 am–3 pm

Japanese woodblock prints have been created for centuries to capture a variety of subject matter. Using influences from cultures of the West and the East this class will explore various techniques for creating timeless woodblock prints. Learn a variety of methods to streamline and simplify centuries-old, time-proven, traditional Japanese techniques with world-class printmaker Walt Padgett.
MEMBERS $275, NON-MEMBERS $300 Materials List
Register Here >>

CALLS FROM OTHER ORGANIZATIONS
Habitat ReStores is looking for artists interested in volunteering their skills in designing beautiful designs and painting on their walls, floors, and windows. Contact Alex Jones, ReStore Director at (571) 773-9095 or [email protected]

Habitat ReStores is also taking donation of donations of artwork and furniture.

Follow Rogue Gallery & Art Center
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Please “like” Rogue Gallery & Art Center on Facebook and follow us on Twitter, Pinterest, and Instagram.
Forward this message to a friend
Call the Gallery for more info: (541) 772-8118

Check out more fun activities at: www.roguegallery.org

The Rogue Gallery & Art Center is the Rogue Valley’s premier non-profit community art center founded in 1960 to promote and nurture the visual arts in the Rogue Valley. The Art Center showcases emerging and established artists, presents fine crafts by area artisans, and offers a broad range of visual art classes and workshops for all ages.

Rogue Gallery & Art Center is located in downtown Medford at 40 South Bartlett Street. The hours of operation are Tuesday through Friday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Saturday from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. We are open third Friday 5:30 pm – 8:00 pm.

Dive Into Another Watercolor Odyssey with Katrina Meister & Central Art!

Dive Into Another Watercolor Odyssey with Katrina Meister & Central Art!
Central
                                                          Art Logo

 

Watercolor Exploration Workshop Series “Autumn Pears”

with Katrina Meister

 

When: Thursday, October 17, 2019

Where: Central Art

Time: 2pm – 5pm

Fee: $45 – Supplies are included

*Space is limited. Pre-registration required. Payment is required at time of registration.

 

Katrina has teamed up with Central Art to create the Watercolor Exploration Workshop Series!

Each class is focused on supplies or techniques, all materials are included in the cost of the class, and you will have some to take home to continue on your own!

For our next installment, we will be drawing and painting Pears using Daniel Smith Primatek paints to create wonderful granulation effects.

 

Call 541-773-1444 or visit Central Art to register!

 

To see more of Katrina’s work, visit www.katrinascards.com

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Adult Art Classes at GPMA October, November, December 2019

Click on any picture to reach our website class signup page.
We now have two levels of pricing for classes.
 Museum members receive a $5 discount on all adult art classes.
To become a member or to renew a membership:

Elements of Art – Texture, Form, & Shape

with Kristen O’Neill

Saturday, October 12

1 – 4 pm

Part of the series of fundamental art classes: Elements of Art
We will explore texture and how it creates the quality of an object, how form is created in 2D & 3D artworks, and how artworks have used shape.
Class includes:
  •  An art history exploration of works that focused on texture, form, and shape.
  • Art projects to explore all three: texture, form, & shape.
  • Looking at art in person and applying what we have learned.
$30/Members,
$35/Non-Members.
All materials provided.

Folk Art Dolls
with Karen O’Brien
Saturday, October 19
1 – 4 pm
In this workshop you will learn primitive doll making techniques to create a simple doll. Karen will share her mixed media tips and techniques to create amazing, whimsical faces using a variety of media. In this class you will make a simple “stump” doll. The term “stump doll” refers to an early design made from a single continuous shape, often without arms or legs with stitched or drawn features. She will provide a pre-sewn “body,” so you can forgo sewing machines and cover each step in creating your doll. You will cover pattern design, hand sewing, antiquing, clothing, drawing the face and options for adding “ears” for a black cat? – Halloween is just around the corner! No painting or sewing experience is required. This class is for all skill levels.
$35/Members
$40/Non-Members
All supplies included

Mini Books

with Cindy Hernandez

Saturday, October 26

1 -4 pm

Students will create a mini-book and will also receive supplies to make an additional book. These mini-books are ideal for sketchbooks and are made with watercolor paper.
$45/Members
$50/Non-Members
All supplies included

Needlefelting Birds

with Corbin Brashear

Saturday, November 2

12:30 – 4 pm

Needlefelting is a fun way to create small, soft sculptures out of wool. Corbin will teach you how to create the body shape, then add lots of exciting details. They always come out great. No experience is necessary. All the supplies are provided.
$40/Members
$45/Non-Members
All supplies included

Get Social Media Fit!

with Kelli Matthews

Friday, November 8

1 – 5 pm

Join us for an interaction workshop to build your social media muscles! Building healthy social media for your business or non-profit doesn’t have to take a lot of time. With a good plan, a practical calendar, and some simple tools, you can be social media fit in 10 minutes a day (or less). Learn how!
Kelli Matthews, Sr. Instructor, University of Oregon & Managing Director, Verve Northwest Communications
Kelli has worked in public relations for nearly two decades. She’s a strategic communications professional with extensive experience providing counsel, researching, planning, implementing and evaluating communication initiatives. Her 15 years of teaching experience at the University of Oregon keeps her on the cutting edge of research and practice. Particular areas of focus include: digital strategy, media relations and crisis communications.
$50/Everyone
$40/Non-Profits
All supplies included

Origami Card Holders

with Linda Dunn

Saturday, November 9

1 -4 pm

Join fabric artist Linda Dunn for a fun filled afternoon learning how to dress up those holiday gift cards with origami card holders using both paper and fabric variations…no sewing required!
Class instruction will walk you through the entire process from paper/fabric selection & preparation to simple origami construction and finally creative embellishing ideas for that artistic touch. The fabric cards holders are very durable, suitable for everyday use and are perfect for credit cards/store cards and business cards.
Class fee includes all material and supplies to complete 2 paper card holders plus 1 fabric card holder. Additional prepared fabric may be available for purchase.
$25/Members
$30/Non-Members
All supplies included

Elements of Art – Space, Balance, & Composition

with Kristen O’Neill

Saturday, November 23

1 – 4 pm

How do artists create space, and use balance and composition in their artwork?
Class includes:
  • An art history exploration of works that focused on space, balance, & composition
  •  Art projects to explore all three: space, balance, composition
  • Techniques for problem solving works in progress (you can bring in your own work in progress if you want)
  • Looking at art in person, with a focus of applying what we have learned.
$30/Members
$35/Non-Members
All supplies included

Origami Fabric Boxes

with Linda Dunn

Thursday, Dec. 5

1 – 4 pm

Fabric artist Linda Dunn returns for another fun filled afternoon creating fabric origami boxes…no sewing required! This class will feature holiday themed boxes which are perfect for gift giving, stowing away small treasures or display as a unique decorating accent.
Class instruction will walk you through the entire process from fabric selection & preparation to simple box construction progressing to more complex variations and finally creative embellishing ideas for that artistic touch.
Class fee includes all material and supplies to complete paper “mock ups” plus 1 fabric box.
Additional prepared fabric sets will be available for purchase.
$35/Members
$40/Non-Members
All supplies included

Elements of Art – Emphasis & Movement

with Kristen O’Neill

Saturday, December 7

1 – 4 pm

Final class of the series of fundamental art classes: Elements of Art
Emphasis and movement can be key elements of art that help create interest and drama. Explore this concept in an art history presentation and learn how to:
  • Create a strong center of interest or focal point
  • Move the viewers eye through a piece in the way
  • Explore the illusion of action
  • Create a suspenseful moment and how to have use tension in your composition.
  • How to use emphasis and movement to finalize an artwork.
$30/Members
$35/Non-Members
All supplies included

All class sign ups are considered final and refunds are not given. The Museum will give a full refund in the case of a class being cancelled.
Unsure if your membership is active? Check in with the Museum staff by calling 541-479-3290, or email [email protected].
Thank you for supporting the arts!

Grants Pass Museum of Art | 229 SW G StGrants Pass, OR 97528