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Prepare For Plein Air This Summer with Incredible Savings!

Central
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Over the river, through the woods, or right here at home in the beautiful Rogue Valley, inspiration is sure to follow wherever you may roam.

Whether it’s sketching the daily grind of a local coffee shop or capturing the highlights of your camping trip on canvas, Central Art has your best artistic interests at heart. Maybe you’re just getting started, and don’t know your palette knife from your pochade box; we’ll help you climb that mountain.

Taking your act on the road? The possibilities for portable art essentials are endless, but never fear – we’ve thought of everything, and can prepare a “survival kit” just for you!

Take the stress out of planning a plein air getaway knowing Central Art has your creative challenges covered, from street lights to state parks!

-Adam

P.S. Feeling social? There’s an app for that! Share your art adventures with us on Instagram! Be sure to tag @centralart1 in your post, and use the hashtag: #rogueartadventures . We look forward to seeing what you create in the places that inspire you!

VISIT CENTRAL ART!
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Schmincke Watercolor

12 Half-Pan Set

Schmincke has been developing and manufacturing its Horadam line of watercolors since 1881, and the company is now owned by the fourth generation of the original family.

They are the only watercolor manufacturer in the world that uses the exact same formula for their tube and pan colors. The pan colors are consistent all the way to the bottom, and they last and last!

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New Wave Palette Paper

New Wave Grey and TIMBr Pad Disposable Palettes feature neutral toned sheets that make it easier to mix accurate colors and gauge values. The sheets are glued on three sides, so they won’t blow away while you’re painting outdoors. Plus, the covers are scored, which makes it easier to tear them off or fold them back without messing up the rest of the pad.
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Rembrandt Soft Pastels
Rembrandt pastels are made from the purest pigments and mixed with the finest quality kaolin clay binder. No pigments containing heavy metals, such as cadmium, lead, and cobalt, are used in production which ensures that the pastels have no hard bits or sharp edges. These pastels are harder in consistency than many soft pastels, allowing for more control and definition in your painting.
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Ampersand Floater Frames
Every detail of the Ampersand FloaterFrame has been designed and engineered to deliver a simple, all-in-one framing solution that protects your artwork while giving it the finished look it deserves. Made with premium hardwood, the Ampersand FloaterFrame features precisely constructed reinforced corners, a wider drill base, and pre-drilled countersunk mounting holes. All mounting and hanging hardware is provided to quickly and easily attach your artwork to the frame, including mounting screws, screw eyes, a hanger, picture wire, and bumper pads.

Catch These Deals While They’re Fresh!

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PanPastel

Loaded with the highest quality artists’ pigments, PanPastel colors are made using a unique manufacturing process requiring minimal binder and fillers, resulting in a rich, ultra soft, low-dust formulation. These professional quality colors are highly pigmented and have excellent lightfastness. They are erasable and fully compatible with traditional pastel sticks, pastel surfaces, and conventional fixatives. They can be mixed, blended, layered, and applied like paint for an infinite palette of colors.
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Portable Painter Palette

The Portable Painter Watercolor Palette is the perfect hands-free travel palette for watercolor painting. With a unique design created by an experienced watercolor artist, it’s packed with special features optimized for plein air painting. It’s compact, too — when folded, the palette is about the size of a smartphone (6″ × 3¼” × 1½”).
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Central Art’s SIDEWALK SALE! Fri & Sat, July 13 & 14, 2018

Scoot on over to Central Art for our annual Sidewalk Sale this summer and find unbelievable deals on overstock, discontinued items and even storage and fixtures! Word on the street is that you won’t want to miss this sale event!
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Pie in the Sky

The other day, I was hunting for a file deep in the recesses of my Dropbox folders when I found a document from over twenty years ago. It was a self-assessment essay, written for my senior portfolio as an undergraduate.
At some point, I must have transferred it from a floppy disk, and I hadn’t read it since I wrote it. I winced before clicking “open,” wondering what young Anna had “assessed.” I started to scan the double-spaced, Times New Roman font. Two paragraphs in, and it wasn’t as terrible as I’d thought. I read on. In one section, I detailed the then-highlights of my writing education. One was a seventh-grade project on The Odyssey. Calypso’s fire of the future inspired me, and I wrote an essay musing on my grown-up life.  
I was simultaneously back in my college basement apartment writing that memory and back in the grade-school classroom writing the original. Meta-historical-memory, maybe.
Toward the end of my nine-page self-assessment came this paragraph about my post-graduation dreams: “Once I have the diploma in my hands, I could find myself teaching, working on the staff of a literary magazine, publishing, curating…or even traveling as a freelance artist and poet. I cannot predict what will burn in Calypso’s fire this time, and I do not want to. Through serendipity and grace, the right things come. I am willing to wait.”
I blinked. I hadn’t realized my twenty-year-old self had known all the things she wanted to do. And then I realized I had done them all—including the “or even” of being a traveling freelance artist and poet—the least likely element on the list at the time, especially since I had no role model for that in pre-social-media 1997. It was my pie-in-the-sky dream.
Young me just reminded middle-aged me of serendipity and grace: Thank you, Anna.
Let’s remind ourselves of our dreams, live them, and keep hatching new ones. Apparently, it’s time I hatch some new dreams….

And apparently, there’s pie in the sky after all!

Serenity and Joy at Butler

Palm Pattern #125, Edith Bergstrom, at Butler Institute of American Art

The Butler Institute of American Art, the nation’s first museum devoted exclusively to American art, is a jewel tucked way in an old, slimmed-down Rust Belt town, which was booming when America’s industrial age was in full swing. Youngstown is probably one of the communities hardest hit by the migration of heavy industry out of the U.S. and has had to rebuild since huge job losses in the 1970s. Once a city of 170,000 people, it shrank to around a third of that in the 70s and 80s. As with most cities once nourished by the Erie Canal (like the one in which I live), it has had to find ways to diversify its economy and attract and grow innovative new technology firms despite the Great Lakes climate. In the past decade, Youngstown began to stir with new economic life and because of its history as an industrial powerhouse, back when it attracted immigrant workers from around the world, it remains one of the most racially and culturally diverse cities in the nation. Flint and Detroit may get all the publicity, but Youngstown has to have been buffeted and betrayed by the global economy about as severely as any town in the world—and yet it has found a path forward to a new sort of identity and pride in itself. The Butler seems to assert a kind of unassailable character, an affirmation that a few quiet human virtues—gratitude, appreciation, taste—won’t just survive but can prevail in our current feverish media culture. It feels a little miraculous to walk into this little oasis of beauty and wisdom hidden in “flyover country,” among the ghosts of steel mills almost exactly halfway between New York City and Chicago, in the foothills of the Appalachian Mountains.

I delivered a painting to the Butler this past week for the Midyear exhibition by driving west through Buffalo and Erie. I was startled, when I turned onto Wick Avenue, where the museum is situated on the Youngstown State University campus. It’s a beautiful structure, a little grander in person than in its photographs, with a columned façade that looks as if it were modeled after one of Piero’s early Renaissance piazzas. After I dropped off my still life in its wooden crate, I decided to linger for a look at my destination. It was such a pleasure, I ended up staying far longer than I’d intended. It was like being introduced to someone with whom you feel a deep affinity—both the permanent collection and the current temporary exhibits were evidence of a guiding, deeply affectionate intelligence about great art. That sense of welcoming affinity is how I feel every time I visit the Phillips Collection, and to a slightly lesser degree, smaller museums like the Morgan and the Frick—as if I’m perfectly at home in the space and with the work itself. Many of the museums in cities that once thrived because of the Erie Canal offer art museums whose character is akin to the Butler’s—The Albright-Knox, the Memorial Art Gallery, The Everson and Munson-Williams Proctor. The emphasis on American Art at Butler makes it somehow feel the most companionable of them all. By contrast, this hospitable sense of belonging is what I don’t feel when I tour many galleries and some museums. The Tate Modern in London, for example, had an atmosphere of severity, an almost impersonal sense that the art on display was meant to be a rude awakening, which is fine. That’s certainly a recurrent quality in modernist and post-modern work, and there’s nothing wrong with the occasional swift kick to the head, but here, everything I saw seemed to be imbued with a sense that art can celebrate life as a welcome gift. It was moving to feel this kind of serenity in a community that has endured enormous tribulations as America’s economy reconfigures itself.

It was a pleasure that a few of the paintings I was seeing for the first time had been familiar to me from reproductions for decades–while others were unfamiliar works by some of my favorite artists. It was a delight to finally see, in person, Edward Hopper’s Pennsylvania Coal Town, James Valerio’s Ruth and Cecil Him, and Music by John Koch along the mezzanine in the museum’s central gallery.  Each is an example of the painter’s mastery at its peak. They were on display along with equally powerful work by Janet Fish, Neil Welliver, Alfred Leslie, Will Barnett, Jules Olitski, Paul Jenkins, Motherwell, Avery, Gorky, Ivan Albright and Pollock. Much of the work is exceptionally good, sometimes in ways that aren’t entirely characteristic of the painter’s best-known style. Alfred Leslie isn’t represented with one of his figures lit from below, but with a large grisaille watercolor landscape, a twilight view of a road in Massachusetts. A large abstract by Jenkins, Phenomena Panning Gold, isn’t anything like the intensely colorful swirls of paint most familiar to his admirers, but an almost monotone study of molten lobes that look like a fossil record of an orchid blossom. The work by Chuck Close was a complete surprise, maybe one of the most charming images he’s ever done, a mid-sized portrait of his daughter, Georgia. It’s another grisaille image, hung on the wall opposite the Leslie watercolor, constructed as a mosaic of thick paper pulp chips squeezed through a metal mesh. As always with his more recent work, it’s a marvel how Close creates an impressionistically accurate and convincing glimpse of the human face—this time cheerful and smiling—through such rough deconstructions of its photographic source. His usual grids are here replaced by chunks of pulp organically arranged, like an assembly of thumbprints. Even seeing Arsen Roje’s work for the first time was eye-opening. In reproductions, his depictions of scenes from classic movies look a little too ironic, sharing the slightly jaundiced irony that seems to be essential to Pop Art, yet the dramatic scene from To Have and Have Not is technically masterful. It goes to interesting places with oil paint that seem unique to Roje. It made me grin to see the perfect likeness of Sheldon Leonard—the bartender from It’s a Wonderful Life, and an actor who went on to produce of the Dick Van Dyke show —finding his nook here in an art museum.

And that was just the central gallery. Other smaller gallery spaces at the museum were devoted to different themes and mediums: print-making, pastels, art about sports, art about the American west. Each one was just as interesting, surprising and beautifully curated. Wolf Kahn’s small drawings of old barns looked exactly right in proximity to Mary Sipp-Green’s twilight scenes as well as an Olitski impressionistic drawing of a dusk landscape. In the print room, a lithograph by Bellows, a quick sketch of one of his daughters, showed amazing draftsmanship, as quick and confident as a Rembrandt or a Matisse line drawing, the shine of her hair effortlessly rendered with a few quick strokes of crayon on stone. And the solo show, Edith Bergstrom: Exotic Palms, was equally impressive. Her work uses the distinctive patterns of palms, their fronds, the thorny armor they leave behind as they wither and fall off the trunk, the spikes, all aspects of a palm’s anatomy are sources for her to use in creating images that straddle representation and abstraction, some palms looming up like titans, others just a web of syncopated light and dark blades and stripes. Most exceptional were Bergstrom’s watercolors that simplify a dense thatch of leaves into backlit plumage, plants that look like winged raptors swooping in for the kill, or angels hovering directly in your path, just off the ground. The confidence, precision and simplicity of these paintings, as well as their sense of color, is breathtaking.

Mount Lassen National Park Painting Plein Air with Stefan Baumann

Travel with Stefan Baumann and watch him painting outdoors in Mt Lassen National Park. Witness as he captures painting trees, lakes and grass. This is part of Baumann’s PBS television show

Inspiring Millions to paint outdoors This video is about Touch Move and Inspire. Get a free Book at his website

www.StefanBaumann.com. The paintings of Stefan Baumann reveal the true spirit of nature by transporting the viewer to distant lands that have gone unseen and undisturbed. With the huge success of Baumann’s weekly PBS television series “The Grand View: America’s National Parks through the Eyes of an Artist,” millions of people witness for themselves the magic Stefan portrays on canvas, his passion for nature and the American landscape. By distilling his love of nature into a luminous painting of brilliant, saturated color that transcends conventional landscape and wildlife art, Baumann has captured the hearts and imaginations of a generation. Each painting becomes an experience rather than merely a picture – a vivid manifestation of his special and personal union with nature and the outdoor world. Through his mastery of light, color, and artful composition, Baumann invites you to experience nature in its purity. It is no wonder that for many years distinguished American collectors, including former presidents and financial icons, have sought out his work.

The post Mount Lassen National Park Painting Plein Air with Stefan Baumann appeared first on Stefan Baumann – The Grand View: Paintings by Stefan Baumann.

Call to Artists 7th Annual Artoberfest

Call to Artists

SouthernOregonGuild.org

for 7th Annual Artoberfest  
A Juried Art & Fine Craft Fair 
in the Beautiful Illinois Valley of Southern Oregon

Saturday & Sunday, October 20 and 21

Sponsored by the Southern Oregon Guild of Artists & Artisans
For Prospectus & Application go to
APPLY ONLINE
<http://www.southernoregonguild.org
Questions: Call 541-659-3858 or 541-592-5019
DEADLINE
SATURDAY, JULY 14, 2018 


 
Guild Gallery & Art Center
Hours: 10-4pm, Tue-Sat
541-592-5019
 
Mailing
P.O. Box 1596, Cave Junction, OR 97523
The prospectus with details about the show, as well as the application, is online at:
SouthernOregonGuild.org

Art du Jour June 2018 Featured Artists

During the month of June, Judy Benson LeNier’s work will be featured in the Salon and Mary Jo Heath will be the featured artist on the back wall at Art du Jour Gallery, 213 E. Main in Medford. Music on Third Friday will be provided by Minstrel Stream.

A professional photographer who specializes in photographing Wildlife, Judy Benson LaNier

Guest Artist Judy Benson LaNier

A professional photographer who specializes in photographing Wildlife, Judy Benson LaNier’s love of Africa began in 1961 when her family hosted Ashland, Oregon’s first Rotary-sponsored exchange student who was from South Africa. The bond forged then has continued through the years as the two families visit each other in Africa and the U.S.A. The magnetism of Africa is strong and Judy has returned there eight times. Her range of photography has expanded to include North American and Hawaiian Flora and Fauna as well as landscapes.

Judy Benson LaNier says, ““When I first went to Africa I was amazed that the animals ignored us completely. They went about their business as if nothing extraordinary was happening. Little did they know that something quite extraordinary was happening inside me! I was experiencing a catharsis, a cleansing of my soul. I was being taught what is truly important in life and I was filled with joy by the lessons!

I hope that my photographs bring you a taste of life in the Bush.”

Her photographs capture the essence of the wildlife in amazing detail. For many years Judy led Photographic Safaris to countries in Eastern and Southern Africa, teaching photography and holding workshops for participants. Her Photographic work is currently represented in five art galleries in Oregon. Judy has published seven books of her photography, the latest being FACING LIONS which recounts an adventure she enjoyed in Africa.

Mary Jo Heath presents a body of work themed “Southern Oregon”

Featured Artist Mary Jo Heath

As the featured artist for the month of June, Mary Jo Heath presents a body of work themed “Southern Oregon”. She was born in Coos Bay, Oregon. At the age of five, she moved to the Rogue Valley with her family and attended school at Central Point and graduated from Medford High School

Mary Jo taught art in public schools for more than 30 years.  The majority of her teaching experience is in Central Point Schools. In 1994, she began working with pastels and has won several awards from the Pastel Society of Oregon National and Membership shows.

When asked about her art, she said, “I have gained experience with a variety of art media during my time teaching art in public schools. Of all the media that I have tried, pastel is the most immediate, the most expressive, and the most forgiving. The pastels become an extension of my hand as I try to interpret what I see and how I feel about a subject matter.  It could be the light, the compositions or the challenge of something I have never painted before. Sometimes the subject matter becomes a vehicle for a more abstract expression. Whatever the inspiration, pastel says it for me.”

Please come and enjoy the wonderful art of both Judy Benson LaNier and Mary Jo Heath at the Art du Jour Gallery. Judy’s photos will bring you closer to wildlife in an exciting way.  Mary Jo Heath’s pastels show her passion for pastels.

Southern Oregon Plein Air 2018 Is Coming! Plan Your Life Accordingly.

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Art In The Rough:

A Plein Air Vendor Fair  at Central Art! 

It’s your first plein air “field assignment.” The easel’s packed, brushes are stowed, paints and canvas tucked into the nooks and crannies of your rig – which is now bursting at the seams! “But wait,” you say, “what am I missing? Is there something better I could be using?”

Bring that intrepid spirit to Central Art during our Plein Air Vendor Fair

Wednesday June 20th, 2018,

and expand your artistic horizons with a plethora of the latest and greatest in plein air essentials that will enrich your experience.

Watch live demonstrations and talk with the experts about what’s new and exciting, enjoy great discounts, and enter to win a Grand Prize!

Plus: don’t forget to share your art adventures with us on Instagram! Be sure to tag @centralart1 in your post, and use the hashtag: #rogueartadventures . We look forward to seeing what you create in the places that inspire you!

*For full schedule of events and to Register Online, be sure to visit

www.soartistsworkshop.com

VISIT CENTRAL ART!

 

Hello, Summer! Hello, Berries! Hello, Poets & Painters!

Hello, Southern Oregon friends!
Summer’s here. Might I suggest a Saturday afternoon Poets & Painters workshop at Pennington Farms? Their summer berries inspired Mindy Carpenter & me so much, we’re holding a workshop to celebrate the sweet harvest: we’ll eat ’em, we’ll write about ’em, we’ll paint ’em.
Here’s one of Mindy’s berry celebrations:

I’ll help you write a poem (zero pressure!) and Mindy will help you paint a painting (also zero pressure!). No experience needed; this workshop is more like a playshop…it’s all about having fun 🙂
So grab a friend and come play with us:
When: Saturday, June 9 from 11-3 pm
Where: Pennington Farms | 11341 Williams Highway | Grants Pass, OR 97527
Cost: $95 per person (includes all painting & writing supplies, coffee, & berries! Savory treats will be available for purchase)
Register: Email me at [email protected], let me know how many people you’re bringing, & I’ll send you payment info.
You’ll leave the workshop with a finished 8″ x 10″ painting, a poem & berry-stained fingers 😉
Space is limited, so register soon!
Love,
anna elkins
art word spirit

Painting – How to use Your Imagination To Create Original Fine Art

Painting – How to use Your Imagination To Create Original Fine Art
Stefan Baumann Inspires Millions to paint outdoors This video is about Touch Move and Inspire.
Get a free Book at his website www.StefanBaumann.com.

abstract The paintings of Stefan Baumann reveal the true spirit of nature by transporting the viewer to distant lands that have gone unseen and undisturbed. With the huge success of Baumann’s weekly PBS television series “The Grand View: America’s National Parks through the Eyes of an Artist,” millions of people witness for themselves the magic Stefan portrays on canvas, his passion for nature and the American landscape. By distilling his love of nature into a luminous painting of brilliant, saturated color that transcends conventional landscape and wildlife art, Baumann has captured the hearts and imaginations of a generation. Each painting becomes an experience rather than merely a picture – a vivid manifestation of his special and personal union with nature and the outdoor world. Through his mastery of light, color, and artful composition, Baumann invites you to experience nature in its purity. It is no wonder that for many years distinguished American collectors, including former presidents and financial icons, have sought out his work.

The post Painting – How to use Your Imagination To Create Original Fine Art appeared first on Stefan Baumann – The Grand View: Paintings by Stefan Baumann.

Painting – How to use Your Imagination To Create Original Fine Art

Painting – How to use Your Imagination To Create Original Fine Art
Stefan Baumann Inspires Millions to paint outdoors This video is about Touch Move and Inspire.
Get a free Book at his website www.StefanBaumann.com.

abstract The paintings of Stefan Baumann reveal the true spirit of nature by transporting the viewer to distant lands that have gone unseen and undisturbed. With the huge success of Baumann’s weekly PBS television series “The Grand View: America’s National Parks through the Eyes of an Artist,” millions of people witness for themselves the magic Stefan portrays on canvas, his passion for nature and the American landscape. By distilling his love of nature into a luminous painting of brilliant, saturated color that transcends conventional landscape and wildlife art, Baumann has captured the hearts and imaginations of a generation. Each painting becomes an experience rather than merely a picture – a vivid manifestation of his special and personal union with nature and the outdoor world. Through his mastery of light, color, and artful composition, Baumann invites you to experience nature in its purity. It is no wonder that for many years distinguished American collectors, including former presidents and financial icons, have sought out his work.

The post Painting – How to use Your Imagination To Create Original Fine Art appeared first on Stefan Baumann – The Grand View: Paintings by Stefan Baumann.