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Seeing for the first time

Jim Mott, from his recent show at ROCO

My next post will be about the current, marvelous exhibition at ROCO: a group of artists showing work that celebrates a particular place worthy of preservation in this region. But first I wanted to catch up on Jim Mott, whose own work would have found a place into that show if only he hadn’t had a solo exhibition there just a short while ago. Jim does, all of the time, what the artists now on view at ROCO did simply for the curatorial purposes of the exhibition:  to pick a place, sometimes at random, and depict whatever he sees as equally worthy of consideration, no matter what it is. 

Mott came by for a cup of tea recently and talked about a variety of things and rather than take time to rework our conversation into a regular post, I’ll just pass along the conversation, as I’ve done before, which should be of interest to his fans. I have high hopes for the residency he’s seeking at the University of Michigan. I think his proposal should get some serious interest, but the ordinariness of his work almost puts it outside the mainstream now—but he has an interesting angle on how he might present his project, which he discusses. He stayed long enough to touch on a lot of different things, yet left in time to get in some cross-country skiing at Mendon Ponds Park before it got dark: 

Jim: I’ve been reading this longish book. Richard Powers? A friend of mine from Nature Conservancy gave me this novel of his about trees. The first half is brilliant but the second is good but not as exciting. He takes nine different characters, odd people who are moved by trees toward something and then he goes to a showdown in the Northwest. It’s intensely poetic and full of information. He got a genius award.

That always helps.

Jim: He gets all ecstatic about trees. I didn’t loan you Julian Bell did I?

I don’t think so. Are you still communicating with him?

Jim: Yeah, I have an open invitation if I ever get to England. 

<I mention that I’m reading the last volume of My Struggle, which includes a long essay about Hitler and how Knausgaard thinks the modern era has de-individualized society and has cut people off from nature so that

Robert Ryman, 1930-2019

This is spot on. From an interview with Robert Ryman:

RYMAN: I came from music. And I think that the type of music I was involved with—jazz, bebop—had an influence on my approach to painting. We played tunes. No one uses the term anymore. It’s all songs now, telling stories—very similar to representational painting, where you tell a story with paint and symbols. But bebop is swing, a more advanced development of swing. It’s like Bach. You have a chord structure, and you can develop that in many ways. You can play written compositions and improvise off of those. So, you learn your instrument, and then you play within a structure. It seemed logical to begin painting that way. I wasn’t interested in painting a narrative or telling a story with a painting. Right from the beginning, I felt that I could do that if I wanted to, but that it wouldn’t be of much interest to me. Music is an abstract medium, and I thought painting should also just be what it’s about and not about other things—not about stories or symbolism.

ART21: You don’t think of meaning?

RYMAN: There is a lot of meaning, but not what we usually think of as meaning. It’s similar to the meaning of listening to a symphony. You don’t know the meaning, and you can’t explain it to anyone else who didn’t hear it. The painting has to be seen. But there is no meaning outside of what it is.

ART21: So, meaning is closer to an emotional reaction?

RYMAN: I think that’s the real purpose of painting: to give pleasure. I mean, that’s really the main thing that it’s about. There can be the story; there can be a lot of history behind it. But you don’t have to know all of those things to receive pleasure from a painting. It’s like listening to music; you don’t have to know the score of a symphony in order to appreciate the symphony. You can just listen to the sounds.

ART21: How does your work fit into the contemporary art world?

RYMAN: I don’t think of myself as being part of anything. I don’t get involved with art. I mean, I’m involved with painting, but I just look at it as solving problems and working on the visual experience. I’m not involved with any kind of art movement, and I’m not a scholar. I’m not a historian, and I don’t want to get into that kind of thing because it would interfere with my approach. So, it’s better that I not think of that. (LAUGHS)

Your Voice Is Needed to Continue the Cultural Trust Tax Credit!

Your Voice Is Needed to Continue the Cultural Trust Tax Credit!

Hello Friends of Arts and Culture in Oregon!  The time to engage with policymakers is now!

We’ve been preparing for all the action in the 2019 legislative session and the opening move is coming on Monday, February 18th when the House Committee of Economic Development will hold a hearing on HB 2052 — a bill to extend the sunset on the cultural tax credit for the next ten years.  We hope you will contact your legislators to encourage them to support HB 2052 and to share with them the priority that you and other Oregonians put on access to creative expression in this state. 

Oregon is unique in the Nation in having the Cultural Trust but we are far from the $200 million fund that was originally envisioned.  We need to collectively raise our voices in support of building this fund and using tax incentives to help do it — remember dollars in the Cultural Trust are distributed to every county and to tribal partners.  This tax credit is an important engagement tool for this state and critical to our cultural ecosystem.  Please add your voice!  Best — Cultural Advocacy Coalition

Send your support letter for HB 2052 in by Friday, February 15th to:  [email protected]


Cultural Advocacy Coalition of Oregon   

Columbia Center for the Arts- Exhibitions & Events in February 2019

UPCOMING EVENTS

National Identity

February 2019 Exhibition

January 30 through February 24, 2019

Artists illustrate their emotional and intellectual responses to their sense of National Identity—perhaps through their country of birth, their ancestral past, or their own ideology of their personal identity.

Participating Artists: Kecia Florendo, Anita Jackson, Anita Davis, Brianna Stacon, Edward Heath, Paul Rowley, Roya Mahjour, Ghazal Mahjour, SEPALI Artisans, Francisco Bautista, Laura Bautista, David Bautista, Cinthya Bautista, Teri-Jo Yazzie, Kayla Jones, Brutis Baez, James Greeley, Unique Bryant,Greta White Elk, Shayleen Eagle Speaker, Wiona Strong, Beaulah Tsumpti, Emily Courtney, LaMinnie Caldera, and Jason Smartlawit

Also this February, Windermere will feature an Exhibition of Michael Dinning’s work. Columbia Center for the Arts curates a monthly art exhibition at the Hood River Windermere Real Estate Office at 315 Oak Street in downtown Hood River, OR.

More Info

Oregon Scholastic Art Awards

February 2019 Lobby Show

January 30 through February 24, 2019
136 Hood River Valley High School Art entries in 2D art and 3D art received Gold Key, Silver Key or Honorable Mention Scholastic Art Awards at the state level this year!

(State level Gold Key winners will go on to the national Scholastic Art competition to compete for medals and a chance to attend the Medal award ceremony at Carnegie Hall in New York if they win a Gold Medal after the second round of judging).

Gold Key winners’ work will be displayed at a special exhibit in the lobby at the Columbia Art Gallery for the month of February.

Participating Artists: Erika Anderson, Emma Berens, Claire Bokovoy, Elieana Bounds, Alexandra Buckles, Melissa Campos-Medina, Grace Clute, Ayva Sunshine Levin, Teddy Parkinson, Sandra Piatt, Nate Schutt, Grace Skakel, Ellen Sova, Kelsey Stewart, Daniela Valle (Senior Portfolio Gold), and Zane Yinger (Senior Portfolio Gold)

More Info

You can read more about this art competition here: artandwriting.org

Julie

National Theatre Live

February 12, 2019 at 6pm
Running Time: 100 Minutes
$12 for Adults
$8 for Seniors and Students (must present student ID)
Vanessa Kirby (The Crown, NT Live: A Streetcar Named Desire) and Eric Kofi Abrefa (The Amen Corner) feature in the cast of this brand new production, directed by Carrie Cracknell (NT Live: The Deep Blue Sea) and broadcast live from the National Theatre to cinemas.

Wild and newly single, Julie throws a late night party. In the kitchen, Jean and Kristina clean up as the celebration heaves above them. Crossing the threshold, Julie initiates a power game with Jean – which rapidly descends into a savage fight for survival.

This new version of August Strinberg’s play Miss Julie, written by Polly Stenham, remains shocking and fiercely relevant in its new setting of contemporary London.

Purchase tickets online, in the Columbia Arts Gallery at 215 Cascade in Hood River, or at Waucoma Bookstore. Please note that tickets are non-refundable, except in the event of cancellation.

More Info

Baba Yaga

One-Woman Show

February 8, 2019 and February 9, 2019 at 7pm, Doors at 6:30
$5 for Adults and Free for Students (must present a student ID)

Baba Yaga is a morally ambiguous witch who relishes doling out romantic advice to those brave enough to visit her hut–or perhaps she would rather eat you instead. Often described as a hideous crone who lives deep in the forest, Baba Yaga is an unpredictable force from Russian folklore, who  occasionally helps and often hinders her fairy tale visitors. Sometimes kind and often cruel, she imparts the audience with romantic advice, told through three classic Russian fairy tales from her perspective.

Baba Yaga is written, devised, and performed by Sam Reiter. True to its Russian fairy tale roots, the show developed primarily in Moscow, where its creator studied for a semester at the Moscow Art Theatre (in conjunction with the National Theatre Institute). Baba Yaga weaves shadow puppets, expressive movement, Pushkin, unconventional anecdotes, Russian dance, and improvisation into a unique storytelling experience. Don’t miss the performance that Oregon Arts Watch hailed as a “majestic, loving invocation of an old spirit.”

More Info

Rising Stars Pianist: Filippo

Portland International Pianist Filippo Gorini

February 10, 2019 at 2pm, doors at 1:30pm
Adults: $12
Seniors / Students: $10 (must present student ID)

Portland Piano International’s Rising Stars are young, up-and-coming pianists who have the potential to become internationally known performers. Selected by Artistic Director Arnaldo Cohen, the young artists perform several times at vaious locations across the country, including performances in Oregon with this special appearance on the CCA stage.

Italian pianist, Filippo Gorini, is praised for his “rare intellect, temperament…and vivid imagination”. In 2015, he received both the first and audience prizes at the Telekom Beethoven Competition Bonn, for his performances of works by Schubert, Beethoven, Schönberg, Bartok and Thomas Andés. In summer 2018, Filippo made his debut at Rheingau Festival and Festspiele MecklenburgVorpommern, alongside appearances at Mude Salentine in Italy, and Plush Festival in Dorset, UK.

Previous awards and competition succes includes the 2017 Beethoven-Ring prize from the Citizens for Beethoven Association in Bonn, first prise at the Neuhaus Competition in Moscow, and prize of the Young Euro Classics Festival in Berlin. Filippo’s debut disc of The Diabelli Variations was released from The Guardian, Le Monde, BBC, as well as a Diapason D’or. Filippo continues his studies with Maria Grazia Bellocchio and Pavel Golilov as Mozarteum University in Salzburg, as well as receiving mentorship from Alfred Brendel.

Sense of Place

Schemes, Dreams and Teams: a Century-Long Saga to Protect the Columbia Gorge with Kevin Gorman

February 13, 2019 at 7pm. Doors open at 6:30pm
Friends of the Columbia Gorge Executive Director Kevin Gorman explores steps to protect the beautiful areas we are all drawn to, and think through our impacts as explorers, travelers and stewards.  Can we develop practices to replenish ourselves and the Gorge at the same time? Join Kevin for a dive into history, conflict and how technology might help all of us keep the Columbia Gorge wild and beautiful for generations to come

More Info

Copyright © 2016 by Columbia Center for the Arts. All rights reserved.

Our street address is:
215 Cascade Avenue, Hood River, OR 97031
Our mailing address is:
PO Box 1583, Hood River, Oregon 97031
Phone: 541-387-8877

Spring Painting Workshop with Ron DiCianni and Oregon Gardens Soiree

You’re invited!


What makes a great painting connect so powerfully with the viewer?  And as artists, how can we create works that are increasingly effective and emotionally impacting?

Study with renowned artist Ron DiCianni for this two day hands-on painting workshop in exploration of this fascinating topic. Plus enjoy an evening (Thurs.) with Ron as he tells his story and expounds on his vast experiences in the role of art and faith in culture spanning 4 decades.

Ron’s works have spiritually and emotionally connected with people all over the world. Because of this strength of vision and connection he has worked alongside well-known authors such as Max Lucado, Randy Alcorn, Joni Eareckson Tada, Frank Peretti, and many more. In combination with these emotionally compelling works, Ron’s spiritual connection to truth in his paintings propels his message all the more powerfully to the hearts and minds of the viewers.
See more of Ron’s work

EMOTIONAL POWER – IN A FIGURATIVE PAINTING 
Early registration discount:  $295 before March 15th
Masterpiece and Pacific Rim Guild members discount
before March 15th:  $265
$325 after March 16th
Lodging:
Pacific Rim Art Guild (Eugene faith based art guild) offers host housing
or dorm lodging at New Hope College
Contact Dan Chen 541.461.3735 or [email protected]
or enjoy one of the many other Eugene hotels or Inns
Full Details and registration

Love Art and Beauty but not an artist?
DiCianni and Gardens pairing Event May 16 & 17th

Additionally we are pairing this Ron DiCianni event with our Oregon Gardens Soiree event May 16 & 17th for additional art and beauty lovers who are not attending the painting workshop, but want an opportunity to meet and have dinner with Ron, hear his story and enjoy the stunning beauty of this Oregon destination gem – The  Oregon Gardens.
$99 two day event
$80 for Masterpiece and Pacific Rim Guild members

For more info

Sponsored by Masterpiece Christian Fine Arts & Pacific Rim Art Guild

Copyright © 2019 Masterpiece Christian Fine Arts Foundation All rights reserved.
Our mailing address is:
17575 Hwy. 66, Ashland, Or. 97520, 541.601.7496
[email protected]  www.mcfineartsfoundation.org
Masterpiece is a registered 501(c)3 non -profit corporation registered in Oregon

Love, Nature & Art from Natural Earth Paint

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~~~ LOVE IS IN THE AIR! ~~~

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Natural Earth Flag Kit

Hang L.O.V.E. in your home with the Earth Flags Craft Kit.

Hemp flags and rope, bamboo paint brush, creamy Earth Paint and biodegradable mixing cups. ORDER HERE

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~Show your LOVE with a gift of creativity!~

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FP 6p Kit-web

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Natural Painting & Fresco Workshop in Italy!

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Send your love on the trip of a lifetime, to a magical little village in Northern Italy. They will participate in a Natural Painting and Fresco Workshop, lead by the founder of NEP, Leah Fanning and Alma Ortolan. Enjoy the scenic views in the foothills of Dolomites, stay in the historic and elegantly restored Palazzo Galleti, and indulge in delicious home-cooked Italian meals. Sept. 2019

Click here for more details about our amazing trip to Italy.

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Pinsterest V-day-WEB

Check out our BLOG!

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For DIY Natural Crafts, Interviews with Eco Artists, Tips for Eliminating Toxins in your Studio, Video Tutorials and more.

Check out our **Marble Art Valentine Craft* – all you need are 3 marbles and some Natural Earth Paint!

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YouTube

Subscribe to our YouTube channel!Learn how to decorate Earth Flags, Mix Natural Oil Paint, Paint Stones, Create Natural Face Paint designs, and much more.

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LET THEM CHOOSE!!!

Unsure of what to get your Valentine this year? We have you covered! Our Gift Certificate is the perfect gift for any artist in your life, you choose the amount and they choose the product.

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©2019 Natural Earth Paint | 330 E. Hersey Street, Suite 6, Ashland, Oregon 97520

Fruit and flowers

Still Life with Lemons, Oranges and a Rose, oil on canvas, Francisco de Zurbarán 

Zurburan’s fascinating, austere Still Life with Citrons, Oranges and a Rose hangs directly opposite the entrance of its period room so that it commands your attention as soon as it comes into view at the Norton Simon Museum. When I saw it a few weeks ago during our visit to the museum in Pasadena, I immediately recognized the work from its visit to The Frick a decade ago. What I actually remembered was Peter Schjeldahl’s review of the show and his justly ecstatic paean to this particular painting—similar to his raptures over Morandi in another essay. It’s simple, spare, and as perfectly balanced and restful as a Matisse, but also full of mysterious grandeur, in an almost ironic way, since it’s a depiction of the most commonplace things. It’s a surprisingly large painting by traditional still life standards, close to four feet wide, so that the depicted objects are larger than their actual size. The layers of Catholic symbolism—the objects standing both for the Holy Trinity and the Virgin Mary—has little resonance now and yet the painting’s power and subdued beauty hasn’t diminished. Its simplicity feels as integral as ever, as if it embodies some kind of alternate mathematical axiom—five + seven + three = one. Stripped of its religious symbolism, it continues to shine with its intended spirit, as if Zurburan’s religion was merely a way of climbing a ladder, as an artist, to quotidian serenity not limited to its theological expression.

The ideas have fallen away leaving the perceptual power of the image to keep working on the viewer and marvelously urging the same orientation toward the world as the ecclesiastical one. The lesson has faded, but its wisdom remains: humility, self-abnegation, attention to the abundance of ordinary experience, and gratitude for any glimpse of ordinary goodness and truth and beauty. Both artist and viewer marvel at the generous luxury of the earth’s simple gifts, its fruit and flowers. These subjects still look like offerings on an altar but at the same time seem to be just the opposite: not sacrifices, but gifts going in reverse, from a greater to a lesser power—from one who can make a lemon to one who can make a picture of one—offered to whomever stands before them as sustenance for either body or spirit. 

In other words, even without all the intellectual trappings that gave Zuburan a pretext for making this painting, they pass along the same monk-like devotional intensity—in the assiduously achieved formal qualities of the painting, the long hours of solitude in the studio—without consideration of his religious justification for painting them.  They stand as an example of how the greatest art embodies a life that spills up over the lip of every meaning and purpose meant to contain it—and meant for it to contain—conveying a quality of attention that operates as a moral and spiritual corrective in and of itself. A great still life conveys psychological qualities that have moral consequences—silence and calm.  The painting stands as one of the supreme justifications for the still life genre—not nearly as congenial and charming as Chardin, but just as magical as the French master’s best. The humblest and most commonplace objects, simply by reflecting light a certain way, seating themselves naturally in their space, bearing the pull of gravity in their own particular ways, can convey the quiddity of life itself, long before the mind has time to go to work breaking down what it sees into what it ostensibly means and, in the process, gets further and further from the actual work—and life—itself. 

It’s Just A Little Snow! Join Us For Day 2 of Central Art’s Extravaganza!

A Bit Of Snow Never Spoiled Anyone’s Creative Spark! And It Won’t Spoil Ours!

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We’ve heard there might be a little snow in the forecast,

but never fear! We’ll all be here!

 

Join us for Day 2 of Central Art’s 8th Annual Art Extravaganza, happening tomorrow (Sat. 2/9) from 10am – 3pm!

 

Vendors! Live Demos! Mini Workshops! Free Samples! Prizes!

And Much More!

 

A little snow won’t be able to stop us from having a fantastic time, and we hope it won’t stop you either!

 

Come one, come all! Art is calling!

VISIT CENTRAL ART!
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Inspiration Center
Get your creative juices flowing!
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Explore a world of art essentials at Central Art.
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Plug in to the local art & education scene!
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So, You Want to Be an Artist?!

Silvia Trujillo teaching at Rogue Gallery & Art Center

Here I am with students I mentored in 2017.

 

Every year the Rogue Gallery Art Center connects creative teens with professional artists through the Teen Mentor program. I’ve participated in the Teen Mentor program for five years now and always feel just as inspired by the students as they do by me.

The mission of the program is to not just teach teens practical art skills, but to also give them some idea of what it’s like to be a professional artist. I’m honest, so I may have scared away one or two by now! It’s certainly not an easy job. There have been many points in my career that I’ve almost given up — and I think it’s important to be able to admit that. Life is not as it plays out on television. Sometimes you feel as if you’re taking one step back for every two steps forward.

Why do art? For the true creative, there isn’t really a choice. We feel driven to translate the beauty of the world onto the canvas (or into the page, through the camera lens, etc). We are so lucky, sometimes, to get paid to do it.

The Teen Mentor program is not something I do because it’s lucrative, but because it’s rewarding to show teens that being a professional artist is a real possibility. The Rogue Valley may be small and out-of-the-way but I have seen some very talented artists come through the program. They are the future and you never know what these kids are going to do next!

You can support the Teen Mentor program by becoming a member of Rogue Gallery & Art Center. Or, you can support me, the mentor, by purchasing a painting or contacting me about commissioned work.

Thank you for your support which allows me to give back to my community.

FOTAS Rescued Bunny Adoption Event – February 9th and 10th!

Thinking about adding a bunny to your family? Check out this adoption booklet for additional information and please adopt!  Bunny Companion Booklet 2-6-17  

 

 

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