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More Classes at Kindred Spirits- April 2019

                       More Classes

Workshops for April 2019- sign up here: https://www.kindredspiritsartalewine.com/

A Show of Hands
April 20th, Saturday,  11-4
Cast hands collaged with Old School Tattoo Images or India Henna images.
All materials provided.

$55.

Moonlight Dancers
April 27th, Saturday,  1-4
Acrylic and mixed media.
$45
Sumi-e
Ink Painting
Tuesday mornings at 10:00

$25
Copyright © 2019 Cathy Dorris Studios, All rights reserved.
We are sending art event and workshop information to people who wanted to be on the mailing list.

Our mailing address is:

Cathy Dorris Studios

106 Talent Ave. #2

TalentOR 97540

Chardin’s dreaming

 

When I was a boy, I used to take a toy, whether or not it was meant to represent something aeronautically sound, and I would hold it out in front of me and “fly” it above the sofa mountains of our living room or, outside, over the terrain in our East St. Louis yard: a stone wall, peonies and day lilies, an actual manual pump (like the ones in Westerns) drawing air from an unproductive well, apple trees and woods. The scale of everything would be altered by whatever I was holding in my hand, an airplane, a Superman, or a scuba diver. I wanted to be a scuba diver more than anything in grade school. (Or a sardonic gambler with a six-shooter on my hip in a frontier Nebraska saloon.) A little molded plastic figure of a diver, lime green or blue, would swim over vast underwater canyons carpeted with bluegrass. I was the invisible giant holding him up: a giant or a god. The world was my diorama. Everything became more interesting.

I get the same feeling looking at a close-up detail I shot a few months ago at The Getty of a masterful Chardin still life I’d never seen before. Up close, the objects on Chardin’s mantle look massive, like magical alien minarets and a flat-topped stadium, a terrain out of Gulliver’s Travels. It’s a strange city built with things from his kitchen. Bachelard would have been nudged by this scene into a reverie, another unique poetic measure of space, if he imagined everything in the picture a thousand times larger than its actual size. (I suppose you have to leave out the fish.) It becomes like one of those clockwork models of cities rising up out of the earth during the title sequence of Game of Thrones. This effect is partly what draws me to enlarged images of ordinary objects—making them massively larger on canvas than they are in my daily, disenchanted world—to bring out their formal resonance with so many other things with similar shapes and tones. In a way, I think this is related to what Braque meant in his notebooks about the centrality of transformation in painting, the alchemy that takes an ordinary interior space, full of utterly familiar things, and turns it into a painting’s dream. His transformations were more radical, obviously, but Chardin is just as concerned with the feel of the paint itself and the tactile quality of what’s seen–making you aware of the medium that invites you into its world, the same as yours, but cooler, fresher, more alive.

I was familiar with many of the objects in this picture from his other paintings, because he kept returning to these old inanimate friends again and again, as still life painters like to do: shallots, garlic, a couple gougeres (they look like cream puffs), several ceramic bowls with covers secured by lengths of twine, and a silver dish designed to hold two glass-and-silver cruets for oil and vinegar. Freshly-caught mackerel in the background are the wild card. Chardin did this at least a couple times—showing you fish and game ready for cooking. But he indicates the shining white underside of the fish with impasto streaks of paint uncharacteristic of his usually subtle handling. In a photograph, it looks right. In front of the actual painting, it distracted me and felt like the part of an overexposed photograph where highlights wash out into too much white. In the end, though, the problematic fish and the way he painted them make the painting even more interesting.

My detail shot is of the two cruets and a few other objects, and I’ve been gazing at them fondly this morning because of Chardin’s brushwork and his color. The ziggurat of silver tiers forming the lids on these cruets is done in such a way that it looks scrupulous about edges and mass. But the pair doesn’t even really match up: the stem for the rear cap is longer than it appears on the near one. Yet everything looks perfect. What’s so delightful, and triggers dreaming, is the way Chardin shows interior and exterior light on the surface of those cruets. If you look at the handle jutting toward you, behind it in the curve of the tray there are warm tones that echo the color of the vinegar while indicating something reddish in the room near where the painter was sitting. Maybe it’s what he’s wearing. It’s evident in the lid as well, little daubs of pink. So the warmth of the room, or the painter himself, itself shines back toward you subliminally. Yet in the S-shaped handle and the lip of the tray, you see the most perfect hint of blue/green/gray, the chillier glow of the entire outside world concentrated into small areas that bank it toward your eyes. Somehow Chardin gets these areas of the cruets to look as if they are shiny objects covered with another skin of shine, a transparent glaze. A tiny world of greenery swims between the lights.

If anyone paints with this kind of mastery now—technique so skilled that it disappears into a seemingly unmediated translation of feeling into paint—I’m not aware of it. The close-up reminds me only of John Singer Sargent, except that Chardin’s brushwork isn’t showy. He was as confident as Sargent, but behind and around the visible brushwork are laborious and careful layers of glazing, like Vermeer’s but less exact in the result, and that’s the magic. Things seem to disappear into the recessed areas and yet persist. There was no flourish in his work, no flaunting his sorcery by resorting to Sargent’s swaths of paint, even though the surface is his obsession too, getting the paint to look almost as delectable as whatever it renders, the way Thiebaud does.  From a foot away you see indefinite forms that resolve into clarity as you back away from the painting when your eyes find the weighty presence of whatever Chardin wanted you to see. The effect is to see both a seamless field of paint and also this delicately modulated scene lit by a nearby window, almost but not quite merging—in the shadows—into the wall behind it, alive with almost indiscernible shifts in tone, warm and cool, like a silty creek bed at the height of summer. 

2019 Annual Medford Open Studio Tour

Annual Medford Open Studio Tour

June 8-9, 2019

10:00 AM – 4:00 PM

Annual free event. Local artists open their studios to the public for viewing and shopping. Learn how artists create their “magic”. 2nd weekend in June.

Medford Open Studio Tour June 8-9 2019

We are happy to announce the following artists (to date) will be participating in this year’s popular studio tour.

Charles Anderson, watercolor
Betty Barss, watercolor
Len and Violet Burton,sculptured wood items, photography, acrylic
Lisa Case, “Mad Hatter
Kim Faucher, watercolor, acrylic, oil, mixed medi
Karen Gilsdorf, decorative gourds
Tom Glassman, photography
Claire Harkins, oil, funky birdhouses
Cathy Nicholson, acrylic in, watercolor, jewelry
Charlotte Peterson, watercolor
Teri Sutton, acrylic, oil, paper mache
Ben Wood, pottery

Martin Steele, watercolor ink on metallic paper

Roy Musitelli, photo illustration, and Gail O’Dell, silversmith will be showing with Roy.

We have 12 locations and 16 participating artists.

More info on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Annual-Medford-Open-Studio-Tour-538995009857874/

Central Art Supply Pear Blossom Hours

Come For The Parade, Stay For The Artistic Inspiration!

Central Art Suply 2019 Pear Blossom Hours

 

Come for the pears, stay and shop for art supply wares!

Central Art Supply Pear Blossom Hours

 

Stop by Central Art this Saturday, April 13th – We’ll be open between 1:00pm and 5:00pm and ready to help you find what you need to create your next masterpiece!

Visit Central Art!

Small Business Saturday November 24 2018 Central Art Supply, Medford, Oregon

Inspiration Center
Get your creative juices flowing!
Click Here

Products & Services
Explore a world of art essentials at Central Art.
Click Here

Events & Classes
Plug in to the local art & education scene!
Click Here

Kay Myer Announces Spring Workshop

Kay Myer fkyer for June 2019 painting workshop

Kay Myer Watercolor Workshop

Kay Myer is so excited to announce her new watercolor workshop for painters, to take place at Long Hollow Ranch in Sisters, Oregon on June 18 and 19, 2019.  She is honored that they asked her to share her skills and says the location is just awesome. Join her! Pre-register by calling Shirley Bloomfeldt at 541-604-0327 or by email at [email protected]

“It’s tough” is relative

Face Painting, Jonas Wood (2014). Courtesy of the artist and David Kordansky Gallery, Los Angeles. Photo: Brian Forrest.

Bill Santelli sent me this interview, which is a good read. Jonas Wood makes Hockney-esque paintings that look like graphic art, colorful in unpredictable and interesting ways, and dense with detail. They feel immediate and carefully observed but executed with almost childlike simplicity. I love the embrace of flatness because it forces him to put so much of his feeling into the color and his color can be extremely good (but sometimes not all that interesting.) What you see is what you get and that has to be part of his appeal, the ordinary quality of the experience he conveys. It’s funny to hear Wood talking about his staff and his office. Who does he think is going to hire a staff after reading this? The only staff I could imagine wanting or needing is Gmail with a good spam filter and auto-reply as my receptionist. Which he would applaud, if it worked to manage the tsunami of demand I anticipate any day now. It’s sort of his point: detach yourself from all pressures other than the work and get it done, but that’s easier to say when you are selling work for $2 million in an auction. There’s a no-nonsense fearless voice here, but it’s speaking back towards us in a foreign tongue he picked up in this other dimension of big art world success where nothing is commensurate with the way all but one percent of one percent of artists live. All of this reminds me of France before the storming of the Bastille. Where did Fragonard go after the revolution? I think he just dematerialized. Or maybe he finally hired a staff. But it doesn’t seem we are at that point, income inequality notwithstanding. We’re facing something different. Economically, Wood is among the elite of the elite. This world the rest of us live in, the world nearly everyone else lives in, can’t imagine hiring a staff. But who doesn’t envy Wood’s ability to just do what he loves doing and, voila, the money and attention flows? Reading his comments feels like watching the Kardashians have breakfast while they talk about how you need to become an Instagram star as practice for your reality TV show. Working hard isn’t what gets these results. Most of the factors that make Wood’s work so lucrative are beyond anyone’s control–and if art schools teach anything about the market it should be that you aren’t going to face his choices. It happens to an infinitesimally small number of people who get beamed up to this rarified world, and then have to find a way to shelter in place from the abundance of their new planet, the way Wood does, in order to keep working. Hard work is a given, but it isn’t enough. Van Gogh ramped up to a painting a day, more or less, near the end. Nobody has ever worked harder. It got him something far preferable to sales. 

Some good advice here, with the intro from art.net:

Jonas Wood is not shy. He won’t hold back, takes aim when he fires, and doesn’t seem concerned about ruffling anyone’s feathers. He’s also busy—very, very busy—and seems to have a lot on his mind.

When artnet News spoke with the artist earlier this month, he was preparing for the first institutional survey of his work at the Dallas Museum of Art, which opened last week. The show is a real boon; although Wood has earned a solid reputation for his lush interiors, tender portraits, and vibrant still lifes, which he has shown in dozens of commercial gallery exhibitions, museum support has largely eluded him until now. Not that he has much time to bask in his success. In April, Gagosian will present new works by the artist in New York, which means he has to quickly shift gears and look ahead.

From Wood’s answers to artnet’s questions:

I think it happens to be that I have a broad audience right now. Maybe that’s not always the case, but the reason I paint is not for those people. I think it’s for my own mental health and for my own sort of goals as a painter, but I’m aware of the viewer.

I worked with Laura Owens. And I got this really good advice—and from other people too—which was just, if you want to separate yourself from the noise, you’ve got to create some distance.  Another thing was just saving my own work and not being so greedy, and being aware that, okay, $5,000 now is $5,000 now. If I sell three more paintings, yes, I’ll get a little bit more money, but it’s not like life-changing money. Maybe I should start holding onto things for myself and not selling everything. I mean, the dealers are going to hate hearing this, but maybe they won’t. Maybe it’s good because they want an empowered artist. But they would offer to give me money to buy stretchers and buy stuff for my studio, and I didn’t really want them to buy stuff for me because I didn’t want them to know how many paintings I was making.

I was painting for me, and I knew that I didn’t want to paint for the collector audience. I wanted to paint for me. 

So establishing that was really important for me because I was able to keep my practice open. I didn’t want to be pigeonholed right away. I showed a lot of different kinds of work, and I didn’t really cut myself off and be like, “He’s the tennis court painter.” Or, “He’s the sports portrait painter,” or, “He’s the guy who makes the still life.” I guess I’m kind of all of those things, which is better than just being one of those things.

Well, when I was at school in 2002 at the University of Washington, my goal was to teach at a liberal arts school, have a studio on campus, have the summers off. That was probably my ideal.

Man, it’s fucking tough because people say crazy shit about your work. You have to be super thick-skinned, and it’s hard. That’s a big part of it. I would say that you just have to take all that energy back to your studio and try to be critical in your own way and just take that criticism. Just say, “Okay, yeah, I’m going to keep looking because maybe these people have a point.”

But that type of shit is tough. Dealers saying crazy shit, your friends saying crazy shit, collectors saying crazy shit, having a show where you don’t sell a bunch of stuff. That shit is tough.

 

 

Magnetic and inexhaustible reality

Iris Murdoch

I’ve just reread Iris Murdoch’s The Sovereignty of the Good, in reaction to my rereading of Dave Hickey’s The Invisible Dragon, in an effort to see the contrast between their ideas about beauty. Hickey speaks about beauty and desire. Murdoch about beauty and love. One might think they are speaking the same language, Hickey at a very high rate of speed, full of rebellious spunk, and Murdoch deliberately, cautiously and in the dry language of a professional philosopher. They were both pushing back against a tide of thinking and theorizing, in their time, about what it means to be a responsible social human being. There is some commonality. It would seem Hickey would have been very uncomfortable with Murdoch’s wisdom. They arrive at what sound like very different conclusions, yet I’m wondering if Hickey might have appreciated Murdoch’s embrace of Greek philosophy a little more than he lets on in his own book. On the evidence, his view of beauty seems entirely utilitarian compared to hers, but his assertion that artists need to do beautiful work in familiarity with a tradition of past beauty that has some kinship with Murdoch’s concept of attention.  

She starts off in the weeds of shop talk, fending off one academic philosopher after another, trying to somehow save the idea of individual subjective consciousness against all the 20th century efforts to render human beings merely an agglomeration of genetic/cellular activity–or an isolated will, an abstract freedom of choice, completely detached from any governing reality external to the individual will. (The latter, existentialist view, has certainly receded since she wrote her book.) In rereading the book, at first, I was annoyed and puzzled by how dense her thinking gets, right out of the gate, as she fends off the other thinkers–analytic and existentialist both–who want to dismiss the idea of what used to be called the human soul, a consciousness that isn’t simply the epiphenomenon of bodily activity. She tentatively asserts subjective consciousness as the only way to describe the actual experience of being alive and human–an inner life apart from actual behavior that proves to others it exists–in order to build her philosophy of Goodness. Everything good in human behavior for her depends on a lone individual’s effortful attention to other people and things external to the self and she needs that inner life, that inner struggle of attention, which goes on invisibly from moment to moment (essentially a sort of continuous, daily discipline of contemplation) for her view of moral goodness to make sense. (Though she probably would have been disheartened by the current ubiquity of mindfulness meditation, complete with helpful apps on your phone, her thinking isn’t all that far from the moral dimension of mindfulness.)

For now, here’s a long series of excerpts from throughout her book. Any painter, including abstract painters, will recognize how much this describes the act of painting, how little depends on personal choice and how much relies on obedience to the requirements of a given picture, even though her focus is on moral behavior. She sees very little space between moral attention and creative attention:

But if we consider what the work of attention is like, how continuously it goes on, and how imperceptibly it builds up structures of value around about us, we shall not be surprised that at crucial moments of choice most of the business of choosing is already over. This does not imply that we are not free, certainly not. But it implies that the exercise of our freedom is a small piecemeal business which goes on all the time and not a grandiose leaping about unimpeded at important moments. The moral life, on this view, is something that goes on continually, not something that is switched off in between the occurrence of explicit moral choices. What happens in between such choices is indeed what is crucial.

If I attend properly I will have no choices, and this is the ultimate condition to be aimed at. The ideal situation . . . is . . . to be represented as a kind of ‘necessity’. This is something of which saints speak and which any artist will readily understand. The idea of a patient, loving regard, directed upon a person, a thing, a situation, presents the will not as unimpeded movement but as something much more like ‘obedience.’

This is what Simone Weil means when she said ‘will is obedience not resolution.’ As moral agents we have to try to see justly, to overcome prejudice, to avoid temptation, to control and curb imagination, to direct reflection.

One of the great merits of moral psychology which I am proposing is that it does not contrast art and morals, but shows them to be two aspects of a single struggle.

In one of those important movements of return from philosophical theory to simple things we know about great art and about the moral insight which it contains and the moral achievement which it represents. Goodness and beauty are not to be contrasted, but are largely a part of the same structure. Plato, who tells us that beauty is the only spiritual thing which we love immediately by nature, treats the beautiful as an introductory section of the good. So that aesthetic situations are not so much analogies of morals as cases of morals. Virtue is au fond the same in the artist as in the good man in that it is a selfless attention to nature: something which is easy to name but very hard to achieve. Artists who have reflected have frequently given expression to this idea. (For instance Rilke praising Cezanne speaks of a ‘consuming love in anonymous work.’)

And here we retrieve the deep sense of the indefinability of good, which has been given a trivial sense in recent philosophy. Good is indefinable not for the reasons offered by Moore’s successors, but because of the infinite difficulty of the task of apprehending a magnetic and inexhaustible reality. Moore was in a way nearer the truth than he realized when he tried to say both that Good was there and that one could say nothing of what it essentially was. If apprehension of good is appreciation of the individual and the real, then good partakes of the infinite elusive character of reality.

We need a philosophy in which the concept of love, so rarely mentioned by philosophers, can once again be made central.

Stepping away from her argument briefly, for me, the problem with discussions about art, such as this, is that the terms goodness, beauty and love all sound trite or can easily be taken to refer to their most shallow examples. Goodness can be misinterpreted as the rote obedience to socially acceptable customs, beauty a meretricious commodity when seen in a fashion plate or a showroom car, and love merely romance or sex. What Murdoch refers to is goodness not tied to the self—anyone who has ever worked weeks and months on a painting knows how much pleasure has to be sacrificed, how much gratification has to be postponed or relinquished, and how much the self has to be subdued to simply see what needs to be done, let alone do it. Pursing order and beauty in the work itself, paying such diligent attention to what the work requires, that you simply try to fulfill whatever it demands in a sort of endless submission to the work’s necessities. The question simply becomes “What do I need to do to get this perfectly right?” The only motivation and reward for this is love. 

Back to Murdoch:

In the moral life, the enemy is the fat relentless ego. Goodness appears to be both rare and hard to picture. It is perhaps most convincingly met with in simple people—inarticulate, unselfish mothers of large families—but these cases are also the least illuminating.

There is nothing odd or mystical about this, nor about the fact that our ability to act well ‘when the time comes’ depends partly, perhaps largely, upon the quality of our habitual objects of attention.

Of course the good man may be infinitely eccentric, but he must know certain things about his surroundings, most obviously the existence of morality (and also in art) is personal fantasy: the tissue of self-aggrandizing and consoling wishes and dreams which prevent one from seeing what is there outside one. Rilke said of Cezanne that he did not paint “I like it,” he painted “there it is.” One might say here that art is an excellent analogy of morals, or indeed that it is in this respect a case of morals. We cease to be in order to attend to the existence of something else, a natural object, a person in need. We can see in mediocre art, where perhaps it is even more clearly seen than in mediocre conduct, the intrusion of fantasy, the assertion of self, the dimming of any reflection of the real world.

A deep understanding of any field of human activity (painting, for instance) involves an increasing revelation of degrees of excellence and often a revelation of there being in fact little that is very good and nothing that is perfect. Increasing our understanding of human conduct operates in the same way.

Art presents the most comprehensible examples of the almost irresistible human tendency to seek consolation in fantasy and also of the effort to resist this and the vision of reality which comes with success. Success in fact is rare. Almost all art is a form of fantasy-consolation and few artists achieve the vision of the real. The talent of the artist can be readily, and is naturally, employed to produce a picture whose purpose is the consolation and aggrandizement of its author and the projection of his personal obsessions and wishes.

The consumer of art has an analogous task . . . the appreciation of beauty in art or nature is not only the easiest available spiritual exercise; it is also a completely adequate entry into (and not just an analogy of) the good life, since it is the checking of selfishness in the interest of seeing the real. But the greatest art . . . shows us the world, our world and not another one, with a clarity which startles and delights us simply because we are not used to looking at the real world at all.

It is important too that great art teaches us how real things can be looked at and loved without being seized and used, without being appropriated into the greedy organism of the self. Unsentimental contemplation of nature exhibits the same quality of detachment: selfish concerns vanish, nothing exists except the things which are seen. Beauty is that which attracts this particular sort of unselfish attention. It is obvious here what is the role, for the artist or spectator, of exactness and good vision: unsentimental, detached, unselfish, objective attention. It is also clear that in moral situations a similar exactness is called for.

The direction of attention is, contrary to nature, outward, away from self. . . toward the great surprising variety of the world, and the ability to so direct attention is love.

It is in the capacity to love, that is to see, that the liberation of the soul from fantasy consists. The freedom which is the proper human goal is the freedom from fantasy, that is the realism of compassion. What I have called fantasy, the proliferation of blinding self-centered aims and images, is itself a powerful system of energy, and most of what is often called ‘will’ or ‘willing’ belongs to this system. What counteracts the system is attention to reality inspired by, consisting of, love. In the case of art and nature such attention is immediately rewarded by enjoyment of beauty.

Freedom is not strictly the exercise of the will, but rather the experience of accurate vision which, when this becomes appropriate, occasions action. It is what lies behind and in between actions and prompts them that is important, and it is this area which should be purified. By the time the moment of choice has arrived the quality of attention has probably determined the nature of the act.

Beauty appears as the visible and accessible aspect of the Good. The Good itself is not visible.

The ‘there is more than this’, if it is not to be corrupted by some sort of quasi-theological finality, must remain a very tiny spark of insight, something with, as it were, a metaphysical position but no metaphysical form. But it seems to me that the spark is real, and that great art is the evidence of its reality. Art indeed, so far from being a playful diversion of the human race, is the place of its most fundamental insight, and the centre to which the more uncertain steps of metaphysics must constantly return.

 

Art of The Passion Week

PASSION WEEK
with Masterpiece Christian Fine Arts
| THE CROSS | THE RESURRECTION |
|WE BELIEVE |

WELCOMING IN THE EASTER SEASON!
Connect your family and friends to truth by creating a dedicated wall or clusters of inspiration and beauty in your home.
Pieta by Michelangelo, The Believer by Frank Ordaz,
Christ Before His Crucifixion by Henry Thomas Bosdet
Below: Triumphant Entry by Tom duBois
– ART LOVERS –

Is this celebration not the pivotal event in history?
Move over Easter bunny. Let your walls and your home speak to hearts and minds and affirm the truth of this season. Masterpiece is featuring new ways that you can invite the presence of truth through art, both historic and contemporary, into the beauty of your home.  See these beautiful suggestions and more at our online store!

With this selection of both historical and contemporary artworks expressing the powerful message of the Passion week, we are offering several canvas sizes, framed prints, and mounted miniature canvases for each artwork image. Now you have all the options needed to create the perfect custom collection of Passion Week art to enhance your home with beauty and passion!

Start Shopping
| FREE SHIPPING on orders of $100 + |
orders take 6-10 days for shipping.
So order by April 10th for guaranteed delivery by Easter.

Crucifixion
by Peter Paul Rubens

Peter Paul Rubens (1577 – 1640) was considered the most influential artist of Flemish Baroque tradition. Rubens’s highly charged compositions reference many of the highly emotional aspects of Christian history. Perfect for a “Cross” wall or home wall of inspiration. View the multiple framed color options!

Shop this Item »

Ecco Homo
by Antonio Ciseri

This beautiful historic painting, available as a 5×7 inch miniature mounted canvas is sure to carry a passionate presence in your home. The ‘miniature’ size of this piece is excellent for a table top easel or a seasonal addition to your wall of inspiration!.

Shop this Item »

The Disciples Peter and John Running to the Sepulchre on the Morning of the Resurrection
by Eugene Burnand

The urgency and excitement in the disciples’ eyes as they bolt to see their Lord has risen! Add to your home a breath of refreshment this Easter season with the addition of this passionate piece that speaks new life with its brushstrokes! Available now!

Shop this Item »

He is Risen
by Ruth Heath

The moment Mary observes Christ’s empty tomb–it connects your family and friends to visually declare this pivotal event in history. Perfect for wall cluster art displays, small table top easels, or multiple clipped hanging systems.

Shop this Item »

Copyright © 2019 Masterpiece Christian Fine Arts Foundation, All rights reserved.

Our mailing address is:
Masterpiece Christian Fine Arts Foundation
17575 Highway 66
Ashland, OR 97520-9406

Acrylics or Watercolor? Choose Your Own Art-venture with 2 FREE Art Demos this April!

Central
                                                          Art Logo

 

2 FREE Painting Demos this April!

Presented by Jeanne LaRae

 

Acrylic Demo – Monday, April 8th – 10am-Noon

Watercolor Demo – Wednesday, April 10th – 2pm-4pm

 

Where: Central Art

Fee: Both Demos are FREE (limit 20 participants per day)

*Pre-registration is required. Seating is limited. Call or visit Central Art to reserve (One reservation per individual, please. No group reservations will be accepted). 541.773.1444

 

Jeanne LaRae uses light and shadow to create and tell a story she relates throughout her paintings of nature, landscapes, architecture, people, and animals.

 

Organizations –

American Impressionists Society, California Art Club, Intermountain Society of Artists, Oil Painters of America, Southern Oregon Society of Artists, Laguna Plein Air Painters Association – Artist Members

 

For more information on demos and upcoming classes, contact:

Jeanne LaRae

(714)743-3622

www.jeannelarae.com

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Ashland's First Friday Art Walk, April 3rd 2019, from 5 to 8 PM

Ashland’s First Friday Art Walk

Ashland Gallery Association Art Exhibit Openings & Artist Receptions

April 5th, from 5 to 8 PM

Stroll the galleries and take in the visual delights in downtown Ashland and the Historic Railroad District.  Enjoy this free year-round community event, filled with a diverse array of artwork, live music, artist demonstrations, refreshments and lively conversation!

A Taste of Ashland, Art Food & Wine Festival is April 27th & 28th. Also featuring a “Pop-up” Art Show at Ashland Springs Hotel Crystal Room. Please see attached information & visit: www.atasteofashland.com

For more information about all of our exhibits and to download the April Gallery Tour map, please visit: www.ashlandgalleries.com  

A Taste Of Ashland Pop-up Art Show

Ashland Springs Hotel – Crystal Room

Art Sales during “A Taste of Ashland,” April 27 & 28, 12:00–4:00 PM

As an added attraction to A Taste of Ashland wine, food, and art festival, we will have a group of Ashland Gallery Association artist members participating in a special “Pop-up Art Show!”  On display will be paintings, drawings, sculpture, photography, printmaking and pastels. 

Ashland's First Friday Art Walk, April 3rd: Jeanne LaRae Lagano, “Chef's Love of the Flame,” oil painting

Jeanne LaRae Lagano, “Chef’s Love of the Flame,” oil painting

“A Taste of Ashland” Food, Wine, and Art Festival

Celebrating its 30th Year Anniversary!

The Ashland Gallery Association’s signature fund-raising event, A Taste of Ashland takes place Saturday and Sunday, April 27th and 28th from noon to 4 PM.

Participants follow a map to 17 galleries discovering Ashland’s culinary delights and regional wines while enjoying the local visual arts.  AllAboard Trolley will offer rides to all galleries, but most are within walking distance. 

For tickets and more information about A Taste of Ashland 2019 a complete list of pairings go to: www.atasteofashland.com or call 541-951.9442.

LOCAL TICKET OUTLET: Ashland Art Center, 357 East Main St., Ashland. Tickets can also be purchased (dependent on availability) and wine glasses picked up prior to A Taste weekend at the Ashland Plaza Kiosk from 12 Noon to 2 PM April 20th – April 26th.  The Kiosk will open at 11 AM on the days of the event, April 27th and 28th.

Hanson Howard Gallery

Deborah Oropallo, Dark Landscapes for a White House, video and photomontage

In conjunction with The Ashland Independent Film Festival and The Schneider Museum of Art we will be featuring Deborah OropalloDark Landscapes for a White House, video and photomontages on paper.
Show runs April 5-23
Opening reception during the Ashland First Friday Art Walk April 5th, 5-8 pm.
Artist talk and reception Thursday, April 11th, 5:30-7:30.  *This event is free to the public.
Dark Landscapes for a White House critiques our cultural habituation to political and ecological traumas. Oropallo employs photomontage as a strategy for visualizing how media-based images accumulate and overwhelm our collective consciousness.
DEBORAH OROPALLO was born in Hackensack, New Jersey. She received a Bachelor of Fine Arts from Alfred University, and a joint Master of Arts/Master of Fine Arts from The University of California, Berkeley. Although originally trained in painting, Oropallo’s practice incorporates mixed media including photomontage, computer editing, print technique and paint. Her composite works use layered visual sources to produce a dense interplay between time, place, form and content. The resulting works bear traces of the distortions that evolve or remain from digital manipulation and removal.

*image courtesy of the Catharine Clark GalleryDeborah Oropallo, Video Frame: Pirates, Paris, photomontage on paper

Deborah Oropallo, Video Frame: Pirates, Paris, photomontage on paper. *image courtesy of the Catharine Clark Gallery.

Gallerie Karon

Artist as Poet

Gallerie Karon’s annual show, “Artist as Poet” showcases artists who are poets and poets who are artists.

It’s interesting to unveil the backgrounds and current talents of our artists that few know about! Who knew that Judy Benson Le Nier wrote an occasional (and stunning) poem to go with her wildlife photography? Horst Wolf has limericks, paintings and books. Jesse Widener has his photography with us but also writes poetry and music. Ken Deveney contributes poetry, paintings (several mediums) photography and music. 

New this year – a whole family of artistic people! Dan Felman, our popular guitarist, writes original music and lyrics. HIs two children have contributed photography and poetry (Abigail) and line drawing and poetry (Reuben).

We’re also proud to showcase new work by Rebecca Gabriel and Jonah Bernstein.

Not to be missed, The Taste of Ashland here at Gallerie Karon on April 27 & 28 with Callahans’s Mountain Lodge and Cuckoo’s Nest Cellars!

Gallerie-Karon-image: photo by Jesse Widener

photo by Jesse Widener

       

Shepherd’s Dream

PNW Wonderland

Jessica Johnson is a contemporary landscape oil painter born in San Francisco and raised in the Pacific Northwest. Passionate about the outdoors since her earliest backpacking trip, just 3 years old, she works to capture and communicate the inspiring beauty of the landscapes that surround her home and permeate her adventures. 

Jessica creates vibrant oil paintings through bold brushstrokes, color, and movement, and invites the viewer to feel more connected to this beautiful planet, “to revel in her landscapes.”  Mastering her impressionist styling silently communicates that message.     

Ashland's First Friday Art Walk, April 3rd: Jessica Johnson, Still Mind, oil painting

Jessica Johnson, “Still Mind,” oil painting

Thank you for your support of the Visual Arts in our communities!

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