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Call to Artists for 2017 Port of Bandon Boardwalk Art Show

Call to Artists for 2017 Port of Bandon Boardwalk Art Show

Artists are invited to submit work for “Blossoms, Butterflies and Bees,” the 2017 Port of Bandon Boardwalk Art Show.

Port of Bandon Boardwalk Art Show 2016 judges Linda Mecum and Reg Pullen cruise the boardwalk.

2017 Port of Bandon Boardwalk Art Show : Port of Bandon Boardwalk Art Show 2016 judges Linda Mecum and Reg Pullen cruise the boardwalk.

The annual show is an open air, public art display on the picturesque Bandon boardwalk. Submissions are accepted March 31 through May 19, 2017, at 12:00 p.m. Artwork will be displayed Memorial Day weekend through the second weekend in September.
Artists of all ages create original works on weatherproof boards. Acrylic or oil painting are the most common media, but past shows have featured photography, collage and three-dimensional works. Art boards and entry forms are available in Bandon at the Port of Bandon office, 390 1st St. SW; and Art by the Sea Gallery, 125 Chicago Ave. SE. A $10 entry fee covers the cost of art boards and prizes. Scholarship boards are available: inquire at the Port of Bandon.
Now in its 15th year, the boardwalk art show features works by amateur and professional artists living throughout southwestern Oregon. Prizes are awarded in youth and adult categories, along with people’s choice winners. Winning and honored works are featured in an encore exhibition at the Bandon Professional Center.
The theme “Blossoms, Butterflies and Bees,” celebrates native plants and the pollinators that help them grow. Artists may explore all aspects of native plant pollination. Insect pollinators include bees, butterflies, moths, wasps, ants and beetles. Birds, mammals and reptiles can also be pollinators, such as hummingbirds, bats, mice and lizards. Even the wind is a pollinator.
The show is sponsored by the Port of Bandon with the Bandon Professional Center. Contact port staff for more information, 541-347-3206, or visit portofbandon.com.

Writing, Learning, Living in the Blogosphere

Editor’s Note: We hope artists will find value in Geneva’s interview with this mom and blogger who has successfully written her blogs for compensation. Plenty of food for thought here, and not just for mothers!


Geneva Miller for Southern Oregon Artists Resource

Adventures in Babywearing blogger Stephanie Precourt took her blog from an online parent journal to a wage earning site. Since her move to Bandon, Oregon, she’s rebooted her personal adventures in blogging—writing about the move, her children, her life. No product reviews required.

Adventures excerpt, Feb 15
I haven’t counted the stop lights yet but there are only a few, and two fast-food restaurants – Dairy Queen and Subway. We have plenty of coffee shops and cafes, which I also love. And a hardware store with a dog who follows you around . . . . This place doesn’t feel foreign to me . . . . Not like I feel like I’ve been here before or déjà vu but like, the pieces just fit. Like, oh, I get it.

Stephanie and Ivy

Stephanie and Ivy Precourt

When Precourt started blogging, her third child was an infant. (She’s mother to four children.) She was literally wearing her baby in a sling most of the day, so the title “Adventures in Babywearing” seemed like a fun spin on the 1980s movie title “Adventures in Babysitting.” She wrote about mothering. She mused, asked questions. Am I doing this right? Are there other parents out there like me? The answer she found in the mommy blogosphere was, yes. Yes to both questions and a whole lot more.

Precourt writes with a relaxed, conversational style. She shares observations mothers understand—how the day her daughter got her ears pierced was both exceptional and ordinary. She explores challenging topics carefully.

“I’m definitely glass half full,” said Precourt. “Especially now they’re getting older, I’m delicate about what I share about (the children), but I’m honest about me.”

Adventures excerpt, Feb 23
Ivy got her ears pierced . . . . We went out for sushi afterwards and she ate an entire veggie roll, miso soup, and cucumber salad. She also thoughtfully asked me, “Who’s the guy on the penny again?” And not one person we encountered the entire day didn’t find out about her new earrings. The best part was that every single one made a big to-do about it and she just gobbled that up.

As her writing gained momentum, Precourt signed up for blog conferences. She attended events hosted by BlogHer and the Mom 2.0 Summit. She met face-to-face with the friends she’d ordered up online. She taught sessions on writing.

The conferences even led to paid blog spots. Writing product endorsements quickly lost its appeal, however. Blogging started to feel like a grind. One by one, Precourt completed her contracts and did not renew.

“Some day I’m going to look back and wish that sponsored stuff wasn’t there,” she said.

Precourt moved to Bandon in February. Posts since she arrived on the coast reveal a mother and writer fully engaged in her new surroundings.

Adventures excerpt, Feb 19
I’m feeling great . . . . There’s just so much to do, the days are content with full bellies and the roar of the ocean is our soundtrack.”

Precourt says her blog reads more like her original journal style these days.

“I’m right back to where I started, full circle. I’m in the mood for this now,” she said. “Now that we’re moved in, I’m ready to be settled so that I can get into a groove. I always said if this feels like work, I’ll quit. I feel peaceful about it. I can’t ever see myself quitting-quitting.”

In addition to her own blog, Precourt manages online content for Listen to Your Mother, a national series of live local reading by online writers held each Mother’s Day. She also publishes video blogs at mommalogues.sheknows.com.

 

Where the Magic Happens: Bandon Arts & Culture Club

Geneva Miller for Southern Oregon Artists Resource

It’s four o’clock in the afternoon. The Harbor Lights Middle School gymnasium is thrumming with activity. Young men sprint across the floor, balance a basket ball on their fingertips, reach for the perfect arc between arm and basket. Next door, the art room hums with a sympathetic energy. Here there be dragons, inspired by Chinese mythology and brought to life with crayons, paper, rhinestones and glue.

The Bandon Arts and Culture Club is reconvening after winter break. Art instructor Vicki Affatati demonstrates techniques for creating sinuous mixed media dragons. Students form a huddle around her. Last year, members of the club contributed to the Year of the Rabbit art exhibit on the Bandon boardwalk. In 2012, Affatati tells students, the boardwalk show will celebrate the Chinese Year of the Dragon.

Swish. Nothing but net. Students cheer, pump their fists. Bunnies may be cute, but dragons are fierce.

“The kids show up excited and ready—for snacks, of course—but open to any project I have in mind for them,” said Affatati. “They’ve formed these creative friendships with each other around making art together. It’s a dream come true.”

Bandon Arts and Culture Club. Photo by Geneva Miller.

Bandon Arts and Culture Club. Photo by Geneva Miller.

Bandon Arts and Culture Club offers after school enrichment for Bandon’s middle school students. Now in its third year, the program is filled to capacity with students on a waiting list. The club is supported financially by grants and donations and benefits from dedicated volunteers. Harbor Lights Principal Deborah Greenfield encouraged Affatati to launch the program for students who were not interested in sports or other extracurricular activities then offered at the school.

Greenfield says the club helps students feel connected and positive about their middle school experience. “When students feel that connection, they have better attendance and increased achievement,” she said.

Students confirm that the Arts and Culture Club is more than an invitation to hang out after school. The club allows them to study and learn beyond the regular school day.

“I show up week after week because I like art,” said Mazy. Mazy is a sixth grader at Harbor Lights. Lately, three dimensional media such as wax and clay have captured her interest, in part because the club is the only place she can get her hands on sculpting supplies.

In 2011, director, actor and playwright Mike Dempsey introduced club members to theater arts through improvisation. At the students’ request, improv and comedy workshops continue this spring with instructors Neal Davis and Jackie Lawrence.

“We gave students an overview of basic improvisation, with the goal of honing their listening, verbal, and creative skills,” noted Dempsey. “The improv skills and games gave them tools to rein in when they get over stimulated by focusing more on supporting each other within the context of the exercise.”

Listening and focused verbal communication are tools Dempsey hopes benefit students in daily life. “This is definitely a participation course—there is no sitting back on the sidelines. The kids get to be themselves in a safe and fun environment, with strong, non-judgmental feedback from their peers.”

Helping students claim ownership of their art outside the confines of the classroom is an integral part of the club’s mission and its success. “It’s my overarching goal,” said Affatati, “because the arts have always attracted diverse audience participation.”

Out in the community, students paint murals, stage drops and shop windows, or spruce up their own school grounds. Their creative relationships grow to include the club’s instructors, parents and volunteers—all of whom boast rich life and work experiences. Affatati watches, listens, as art provides the catalyst for conversations between young people and adults. She hears the echo of her students’ discoveries when she washes paint brushes and prepares for the next lesson.

“That’s when the magic happens,” she said.

Look for Bandon Arts and Culture Club exhibits at Coos Art Museum in March, Bandon Public Library in May and the Port of Bandon boardwalk from Memorial Day through September.

Where the Magic Happens: Bandon Arts & Culture Club

Geneva Miller for Southern Oregon Artists Resource

It’s four o’clock in the afternoon. The Harbor Lights Middle School gymnasium is thrumming with activity. Young men sprint across the floor, balance a basket ball on their fingertips, reach for the perfect arc between arm and basket. Next door, the art room hums with a sympathetic energy. Here there be dragons, inspired by Chinese mythology and brought to life with crayons, paper, rhinestones and glue.

The Bandon Arts and Culture Club is reconvening after winter break. Art instructor Vicki Affatati demonstrates techniques for creating sinuous mixed media dragons. Students form a huddle around her. Last year, members of the club contributed to the Year of the Rabbit art exhibit on the Bandon boardwalk. In 2012, Affatati tells students, the boardwalk show will celebrate the Chinese Year of the Dragon.

Swish. Nothing but net. Students cheer, pump their fists. Bunnies may be cute, but dragons are fierce.

“The kids show up excited and ready—for snacks, of course—but open to any project I have in mind for them,” said Affatati. “They’ve formed these creative friendships with each other around making art together. It’s a dream come true.”

Bandon Arts and Culture Club. Photo by Geneva Miller.

Bandon Arts and Culture Club. Photo by Geneva Miller.

Bandon Arts and Culture Club offers after school enrichment for Bandon’s middle school students. Now in its third year, the program is filled to capacity with students on a waiting list. The club is supported financially by grants and donations and benefits from dedicated volunteers. Harbor Lights Principal Deborah Greenfield encouraged Affatati to launch the program for students who were not interested in sports or other extracurricular activities then offered at the school.

Greenfield says the club helps students feel connected and positive about their middle school experience. “When students feel that connection, they have better attendance and increased achievement,” she said.

Students confirm that the Arts and Culture Club is more than an invitation to hang out after school. The club allows them to study and learn beyond the regular school day.

“I show up week after week because I like art,” said Mazy. Mazy is a sixth grader at Harbor Lights. Lately, three dimensional media such as wax and clay have captured her interest, in part because the club is the only place she can get her hands on sculpting supplies.

In 2011, director, actor and playwright Mike Dempsey introduced club members to theater arts through improvisation. At the students’ request, improv and comedy workshops continue this spring with instructors Neal Davis and Jackie Lawrence.

“We gave students an overview of basic improvisation, with the goal of honing their listening, verbal, and creative skills,” noted Dempsey. “The improv skills and games gave them tools to rein in when they get over stimulated by focusing more on supporting each other within the context of the exercise.”

Listening and focused verbal communication are tools Dempsey hopes benefit students in daily life. “This is definitely a participation course—there is no sitting back on the sidelines. The kids get to be themselves in a safe and fun environment, with strong, non-judgmental feedback from their peers.”

Helping students claim ownership of their art outside the confines of the classroom is an integral part of the club’s mission and its success. “It’s my overarching goal,” said Affatati, “because the arts have always attracted diverse audience participation.”

Out in the community, students paint murals, stage drops and shop windows, or spruce up their own school grounds. Their creative relationships grow to include the club’s instructors, parents and volunteers—all of whom boast rich life and work experiences. Affatati watches, listens, as art provides the catalyst for conversations between young people and adults. She hears the echo of her students’ discoveries when she washes paint brushes and prepares for the next lesson.

“That’s when the magic happens,” she said.

Look for Bandon Arts and Culture Club exhibits at Coos Art Museum in March, Bandon Public Library in May and the Port of Bandon boardwalk from Memorial Day through September.

Instrument Ink

by Geneva Miller

2 July 2011 ~ A rousing fiddle tune played in an open field sets Amy Shahparast’s feet in motion while her imagination dances a jig. As the creative hand behind Instrument Ink, Shahparast invites fellow artists to combine their love for music and art.

[slidepress gallery=’instrument-ink’]


For Shahparast, the desire to design original instrument art was born of her excitement for music and her love of the natural world. “The best learning I found was just drawing everything around me. How I started doing art on musical instruments was just a simple thought at first, and then I started experimenting on my instruments to see if it would work,” explained the lifelong artist.

Vines climb along a violin’s curve; flowers bloom on the body of a guitar. The face of a bodhran is a perfect playground for dancing mice or doves on the wing. Celtic inspired designs by Shahparast range from simple knots to detailed illustrations. Using ink dyes, she brings a signature touch to each instrument without compromising sound or playability.

Shahparast makes her home and her art in Northern California. Learn more about her work at instrumentink.com.

2 ORPHAN looms rescued from a drive- way/ needs new reeds, warp…

2 ORPHAN looms

rescued from a drive-

way/ needs new reeds,

warp spindle bits.

Free – must take all.

Classified, Bandon Western World Coffee Break, May 2, 2011.

Get your fill of picking, carding, felting and spinning this month at Star Castle Fiber Mill & Farm and Wild Rivers Wool Factory. Read more at Art Matters!

Fiber Frenzy

Geneva Miller for Art Matters!

5 May 2011

Farmers across Western Oregon are turning livestock loose on newly ripe pastures. As the fields dry, wooly creatures shake off the winter wet. In the spinning room, fiber artists revel in the textures, colors, even the scent of fleece.

Star Castle Fiber Mill and Farm Open House

Barbara Simpson in her home at Star Castle Fiber Mill and Farm, Coquille

Barbara Simpson in her home at Star Castle Fiber Mill and Farm, Coquille. Image by Geneva Miller.

Saturday, May 21, 10 AM to 4 PM

56778 Fat Elk Road, Coquille, Oregon

(2.5 miles from Highway 42S)

541-396-6416

starcastlefarm.com

In an era of ready-made clothing and mass produced textiles, it’s easy to forget there are still spinners in the world. “People are always amazed,” said Barbara Simpson, owner of Star Castle Fiber Mill and Farm. According to Simpson, visitors to her mill gaze at the mid 20th century equipment in wonder, and say, “Tell me more about this process. Show me.”

Together, Coos and Curry counties boast approximately one wooly ruminant for every four human residents. So fiber arts entrepreneurs are a boon to the regional economy, not just weavers and knitters.

On the short drive up Fat Elk Road to Star Castle, visitors enjoy a picturesque view of the south bank of the Coquille River. This time of year, the riparian habitat supports a host of birds, from local egrets to migrating flocks of ducks and geese. Simpson specializes in alpaca, fiber once reserved for Peruvian royalty. She also processes llama fiber and sheep wool. The electric carders and spinning machines in her mill were recycled from commercial mills in North Carolina. Her operation is overseen by a small herd of alpaca who greet guests with a shy but curious gaze. Inside her home, Simpson spins and weaves by hand. She first learned to knit, crochet and sew as a child, so young that she doesn’t remember a time when she wasn’t proficient in fiber arts.

Spring is a busy time of year at Star Castle, though Simpson wouldn’t have it any other way. “We’re so busy right now, it’s a little bit crazy,” said Simpson. “We’re also trying to get our farm put together after the long wet winter.” She looks forward to the annual open house, Saturday, May 21. Tour the mill, join the spinning and knitting, share in the pot-luck. As Simpson puts it, enjoy “a good day out doing something different.”

Wild Rivers Wool Factory 3rd Annual Birthday Open House

Cindy Schaumburg at Wild Rivers Wool Factory, Langlois

Cindy Schaumburg at Wild Rivers Wool Factory, Langlois. Image by Geneva Miller.

May 28, 29, 30, 10 AM to 5 PM

48443 Highway 101S, Langlois, Oregon

541-348-2033

wildriverswool.com

“I’m a survivalist. Wool is the most durable fiber on the planet,” said Sandie McDonald. It was a chilly, damp mid March afternoon on the coast, easy for McDonald to express her appreciation for the age-old fiber that has kept mankind bedded and clothed for centuries. “I always come back to wool because of its incredible versatility.”

This month, McDonald and her business partner Cindy Schaumburg celebrate the third anniversary of the Wild River Wool Factory retail shop in Langlois. McDonald and Schaumberg have created a demand for regional wool produced by ranchers and hobby farmers in Coos, Curry and Del Norte counties. Their hand spun yarn, made with either drop or foot pedal spindles, is guaranteed perfectly matched and uniform for up to 1800 yards—enough for an adult sized sweater.

Debbie Stewart, felt artist for Wild Rivers Wool Factory, in her studio at Debbie's Hair Station, Bandon

Debbie Stewart, felt artist for Wild Rivers Wool Factory, in her studio at Debbie's Hair Station, Bandon. Image by Geneva Miller.

Schaumburg reports the yarn simply flies off the shelf as fast as they can spin at Wild Rivers. McDonald says she loves the smell of dirty, fresh shorn wool, since the scent evokes the future product. Schaumburg finds herself lost for words, explaining the sensory experience of dyeing wool. “When you make felt with different colors, it’s amazing,” she concluded with a sigh. And their enthusiasm is catching. Wild Rivers Wool features work by fifty five local artisans who sort, pick, and card; spin yarn, knit crochet and felt—all by hand.

Memorial Day weekend, visitors to Wild Rivers Wool Factory can look forward to “three full days of cake, refreshments and hourly door prizes,” said Schaumburg. Inspired by the sunshine, she also reports that she and McDonald have put the shop through a rigorous spring cleaning. New yarn displays make for easier access to the products, and finished works by local artisans enjoy even better displays.

Geneva Miller is a freelance writer. She lives on the southern Oregon coast.

Inventing new characters is the hardest part of novel…

Inventing new characters is the hardest part of novel writing.

-Jim Lynch, author, “The Highest Tide” (Bloomsbury, 2005)

Award winning journalist turned fiction writer Jim Lynch met with readers at the Bandon Public Library on Thursday, April 28. Fans praised Lynch’s “gift for words” and spoke of their fondness for the realistic characters who populate his first novel, “The Highest Tide.” Lynch said thirteen year old protagonist Miles O’Malley consistently strikes a familiar chord with adult readers who remember time spent exploring the wild places of their youth—much as Miles scours the mud flats of Puget Sound.

Bandon readers responded in kind, sharing their memories of childhood visits to Lynch’s native Washington coast. Asked if he might reprise the character of Miles in a future book, Lunch said he’s toyed with the idea of Miles as an adult marine explorer, noting, “Miles feels like a part of my extended family.”

“Border Songs” (Vintage, 2010) is the latest novel by Lynch. His forthcoming novel, as yet untitled, is set in Seattle during the 1962 World’s Fair.

Feeling peckish? Redfish takes fish and chips up a notch or...

Feeling peckish? Redfish takes fish and chips up a notch or two.

If the halibut looks tempting, use the photo click-through link to see the full gallery of edibles, plus staff and guests at Redfish on Easter Sunday 2011.

Every time is different, and that’s just great! -Donna…

Every time is different, and that’s just great!

-Donna Roselius, Port Orford artist and musician

The performing arts are best experienced in person, and the monthly open house at Roaring Sea Arts is no exception. For an introduction to the music, the art and the camaraderie, read “Home for the Arts.” 

Visit Geneva Miller, Writer on Facebook for a video slide show featuring sights and sounds from the March 2011 open house.