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Royal Pears: New Collector; Plus A Bit of Imagination, Freedom & Embracing Process

Sometimes its just about freedom and exploration; that is, taking a moment to release your inner adventurous spirit.

Freedom: Royal Pear Lavender Moon

Intentions.

Greetings!  I would like to share with you the story about my two Royal Pear watercolor paintings.  The smaller is the first version and a new friend and collector purchased it this week.

The Story.

One day I wondered what kind of wild, crazy pear I could draw.  What if the pear were sitting on a table at night, under a pale lavender moon?  Can you imagine?  And, what if it were a festive pear?  Come to think of it, what if it were a pear like one you’ve not seen before?

Be The Pear.

What does it mean to be the pear?  OK, just a bit of silliness but, what can I say about a pear that might be little bit different?

Still Life With Pear.

You see, pears are a favorite fruit that one sees in still life paintings.  They are beautiful and have a nice organic shape.  Come to think of it, they are not all that easy to paint.  You see, yes, I have drawn and painted pears in a more realistic manner and, in spite of their simple shape, it was challenging!

Freedom.  Imagination.

So, out came paper, pencil and imagination.  I just embraced the idea of festive but regal pears.  I freed myself to think “what if”…the light was from a lavender moon.  Then, there is the wonder of nature in general.  But, this is a painting from imagination and I can have fun.  Liberate yourself from the tyranny of the subject!

(OOPS, over-doing it again).

Embrace the Process.

In other words, I mean to allow myself to be free and enjoy the process.   Sometimes, an idea takes hold and it just must be done!  And so it was: a jeweled, festive, purple royal pear.

Freedom: Royal Pear

Thank You Art2Business.

Thank you to Wanda Pepin of Art2Business for helping my new collector contact me.  And, for the shows that help my work reach a larger audience!

Layaway Is An Option.

Speaking of the sale, I would like to share with you that this is the first time we are trying out the layaway option.  This is a service available to collectors.

Royal Pears.

Thank you!  I hope you enjoy the freedom of expression, that is to say the joy and exuberance of my two royal pears.

 

 

 

The post Royal Pears: New Collector; Plus A Bit of Imagination, Freedom & Embracing Process appeared first on Margaret Stermer-Cox.

Talent: A Word Rattling Around My Brain! Plus, Its Where I Live.

Talent: a special aptitude, skill or gift someone seems to have; the t-word.

Talent Railroad Depot

Just Thinking.

Greetings!  The word and concept of “talent” has been rolling around in my head for a week or two.  Its odd, I think, but recently I’ve read good blog posts by other artists on the subject of talent, skills, passion; you know, the special gift.  So, naturally, I decided it was a topic I wanted to explore.

My intention is just to share my mind’s meanderings.  To clarify, I don’t have a great, deep answer about what talent is or is not.  Rather, I’m just riffing on the concept.

Compliment.

You see, the “t-word” seems to be something that people (and artists in particular) are driven to talk about from time to time.  Granted, it’s not really so surprising.  Consider this, if you have achieved a certain level of competence in drawing or painting (or pretty much anything), chances are that someone has complimented you and said that you’re gifted or special, (t-word again).

Talent Library

Are We All Talented?

I wonder, do you suppose we call people “talented” if they’re good at mathematics or the sciences?

Come to think of it, some schools do have a “gifted” program.

Can We Grow It?

What do you think, wouldn’t it be fun to grow and harvest that gifted, special aptitude stuff?   Or, rather, I gather that we do grow our skills and abilities when we work at our favorite thing; that special aptitude we have.

Hard Won Skill?

Back to the blog posts I’ve been reading, artist David Hettinger, for example, talks about his hard won skills as “talent”.  To elaborate, he has studied and worked hard to achieve the special skills so noted by other people.

I like the title of his blog post:  “Talent is a Reward For Work Done”.  Well said!

Talent 76 Gas Station

What About…?

But what about the child who displays a gift or special ability?

I would say we love to look at a child’s drawings and paintings.  Its interesting and fascinating to see how the young mind works.  Perhaps some of us do have a pre-disposition to drawing, painting, mathematics, science and etc.  I wonder.

Nurture, Nature, Both?

I do remember loving drawing as a child and wanting to figure out how to do things better.

Odd, don’t you think?  Or, are we hardwired of born with that urge to get better even at a young age?

So, mix nature and nurture; teaching and praise; and then perhaps the we give the gift of talent to children.  Just a thought from my meandering mind.

Inspired.

And for me, I am inspired by what my fellow artist said.  To re-iterate, talent is a hard won skill; I can relate.

Most of all, I know in my bones that a special aptitude serves me best when I work and develop it!  Put another way, who cares if I have talent especially if it lays dormant?  Its the work that matters.

Talent, Organic Grind Coffee

Talent: Its Where I Live!

Then, there is the fact that I currently live in Talent, OR.  See?  No wonder the word rattles around my head!

What about you and your skills?  Thoughts?

 

 

 

 

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Award at Watercolor Society Of Oregon’s Spring Experimental Exhibition

Award, that is to say a special recognition of achievement. 

Good News!

Greetings!  I am pleased to say that my painting Three Minute Egg V11 earned the Fourth Place “High Desert” award in the Watercolor Society of Oregon (WSO) Spring Experimental Exhibition, Florence OR. (Yay!). The exhibition opened on Saturday, April 7th at the Florence Events Center, (715 Quince St) and you may view the show during business hours through the 23rd of April.

Award, Painting, Artist

 

Award Donors.

I would like to send my deepest thanks to the sponsors of the Fourth Place “High Desert” Award:  Jack Richeson & Co and the WSO 100 Club, Inc.

Jack Richeson & Co is one of the few family run art supply manufacturing companies remaining.  Located in Wisconsin, their company “is based on a belief in the Importance of Art, its relevence, its necessity in life”, (quote from their Facebook page).  I think its wonderful that they have nine full time working family members and the occasional seasonal member.  Thank you Jack Richeson & Co!

The WSO 100 Club is a non-profit corporation established by WSO in 1984 as an endowment fund.  The purpose of the fund is to subsidize member education and the WSO Awards Program.  Thank you WSO 100 Club!

Award-Winning Paintings.

My watercolor is one of twenty award-winning paintings. The paintings will continue on in a traveling show through the end of September, including galleries in Florence, Newport and Carlton, (please see the schedule below).

Award Ceremony: WSO Spring 2018 Convention

WSO Spring Juried Exhibition.

The Watercolor Society of Oregon (WSO) hosts two juried exhibitions per year: one in the fall and one in the spring. To explain the process for the show, artists submit paintings for consideration into a juried show.  The submitted painting must past an initial jury to be accepted into the show. Then a juror (or jurors) selects award winners.

In the case of this particular juried show, the juror accepted 80 paintings from 279 entered by 163 artists.  And, from the shows 80 paintings, she selected 20 award winners.

This spring’s Juror was artist Ms. Fran Larsen of Santa Fe NM. She is a nationally recognized artist and instructor.

What’s special about the Spring show is that artists can be experimental.  That is to say, while the paintings are primarily water media, they may incorporate elements of other media, like colored pencil, ink, pastel, etc.

About the Watercolor Society of Oregon.

The Watercolor Society of Oregon was started in 1966. The society currently has over 800 members from around the state. Its purpose is to promote the interest of watercolor paintings. The Spring Experimental Exhibition is one of two shows held annually in the state of Oregon.

Award Winning Painting: 3 Minute Egg V11

About the Painting, Three Minute Egg V11.

This is the eleventh painting in a series of works exploring a still life setup.  For background information, the set up includes eggs, egg cup, timer, spoon and napkin.  With each new painting, I allow myself the freedom to explore composition, color, meaning and whatever else strikes my fancy.  Incidentally, you may notice that in this painting I was playing with angles.

So, what’s the meaning, you might ask.  Well, three minute eggs were one of my favorite childhood breakfasts.  Strangely enough, I didn’t particularly enjoy the taste of eggs.  Instead, what I liked was being able to dunk my toast into the egg.  Plus, we had egg cups from Spain which made the eggs ever more exotic.

With that in mind, you might say this painting is about the memory of exotic breakfasts.  Or, the breakfast where Peggy was allowed to play with eggs and toast!

Exhibition Details.

April 7 – 23. Florence Events Center, 715 Quince St., Florence OR.  Hours: Mon – Fri: 9am to 4:30pm.

April 24 – May 31. Backstreet Gallery, 1421 Bay Street, Florence OR.  Opening reception Saturday, May 12 from 3-5 pm.  Hours: 10am to 6pm daily.

May 31st – July 31st.  Newport Visual Arts Center, 777 NW Beach Dr., Newport OR.  Hours:  Tue – Sun: 12 noon to 4pm.

August 1st – September 31st.  Wallow Gallery, 125 W Main St., Carlton OR.  Hours: Fri – Sun: 12 noon to 5pm.

 

The post Award at Watercolor Society Of Oregon’s Spring Experimental Exhibition appeared first on Margaret Stermer-Cox.

Paintings Showing At Linda Vista and Two Spring Daffodil Drawings

The daffodil: an early flower and symbol of hope; a nice way to end the month of March and start the month of April.

The Artist At Linda Vista, Ashland OR

Intentions.

Greetings! I would like to share with you an announcement about my latest art show. Plus, I have a couple of daffodil drawings to show you. You see, I thought they would be a nice way to close out the month of March and greet the month of April.

Stermer-Cox Artwork At Linda Vista

New Show:  Linda Vista (Ashland OR).

First up, I am pleased to announce that I have 18 paintings now hanging at Linda Vista Nursing and Rehabilitation Center in Ashland, OR.  The wonderful people at Linda Vista will show my work through the month of June.

Displayed in the nursing facility’s lobby hallway, you may view the paintings during normal business visiting hours.  Linda Vista’s address is 135 Maple St., Ashland OR.

Some of you may recall, I displayed my artwork here before in late 2015 to early 2016.

Art2Business.

I would like to acknowledge that this is an Art2Business show.  Let me elaborate.  Art2Business acts somewhat like an agent or go-between.  They facilitate the meeting of artists, art and venues.  In other words, Linda Vista has an arrangement with Art2Business. And they selected me, as one of the Art2Business artists, to show in their venue for approximately three months!

So, thank you Art2Business and Linda Vista!

Artist Statement.

I thought I’d share my artist statement with you.  First, though, it might be helpful to know that I curated my paintings to ensure a bright and cheerful collection.  In other words, I wanted to create a joyful display to greet patients, family members, visitors and staff.

I like to paint the joy of life and do so by including people, cats, ponies and coffee cups.  Drawn from imagination, these are the characters through which I like to show the wonderful, humorous side of life.

Naturally, bright colors and fun shapes help support the message of joy.

Stermer-Cox Artwork Linda Vista Long Walls

Daffodils In Bloom.

To begin with, the daffodils are in bloom these days in our Rogue Valley of Southern Oregon.  They have been blooming for a couple of weeks.  And, coincidentally, I have a few in my garden.  Such festive bright flowers in early spring.

On Drawing A Daffodil.

So, naturally, I thought I’d draw and paint them while they are still in bloom.  To my surprise, they are challenging to draw from life.  Their are a couple of issues, you see.  For one thing, there is the perspective of the corona or cup.   I chose to draw the flower with the cup in a nearly frontal position.  Its like looking down at a tube head on.

Daffodils: A Single Flower

Take the point of view and add on the fact that the flower is yellow and, then, you have an interesting challenge.  To explain, what color are the shadows of yellow flowers?  As I look at the flower, the colors look greenish or gray.  Hmmm, my mind does not want to paint a yellow flower greenish gray.  I will have to persuade it, that is my mind, to do so.

Also, parts of the yellow tend toward orange, and others, again, toward green.   In any case, its sometimes amazing to note that a seemingly simple subject like a daffodil has its challenges!

I did draw a different point of view on my iPadPro using the app Procreate.

Daffodil, Single Flower Digital Study M.Stermer-Cox Artist

 

Daffodil As Floral Symbol.

Sometimes when I’m drawing or painting a subject, I like to look up symbology, history and other small cultural “gee whiz” type facts.  For example, daffodils are a national flower for Wales.

The symbology and meaning of daffodils is complicated.  For example, one daffodil, like in my artworks, implies misfortune; OOPS!  I ought to add more!  Because, you see, multiple daffodils mean joy and happiness!  I guess one daffodil just looks lonely.

And, as you might gather, meaning and symbology varies with country, culture and history.  If you are intrigued by such floral messages, you might want to check The Daffodil Society of Great Britain.  Their blog has an interesting article about the language of flowers and the daffodil in particular.

So, with that, I leave you with two drawings of a single daffodil.  I hope that since there are two drawings then that counts as multiple daffodil.  Its about being joyful and happy!

The post Paintings Showing At Linda Vista and Two Spring Daffodil Drawings appeared first on Margaret Stermer-Cox.

Tools of The Artist’s Trade: Using Symbols To Enhance Meaning

Symbols, in my case, images or colors representing ideas, thoughts or emotions.

St. Patrick’s Day.

Hi!  Its “St. Patrick’s Day” weekend!  I have always understood this day to be one in which people of certain cultural descent honor St. Patrick, the Patron Saint of Ireland.

In the frame: Irish Breakfast Tea. Symbols

Of Celtic Descent.

Even though I am a descendent of Irish, Welsh and Scottish ancestors, I am not versed in the ins and outs of St. Patty’s Day.  Its been a couple hundred years since my ancestors left the isles, you see.

Memories Of St. Patty’s Day.

So, instead, I grew up with St. Patty’s Day being the day I dressed up in one of my many favorite colors: green.

Do you remember being pinched on St. Patrick’s Day if you didn’t wear green?  And, drawing endless shamrocks as part of grade school class projects?  I liked the drawing shamrock part.  However, I was sure to display lots of green to avoid getting pinched.

Celtic Celebration.

That being said, lets get back to more recent events.  To explain, about three years ago the local Rogue Gallery and Art Center started having a “Celtic Celebration Art Show”.  The show sparked my imagination and I started thinking about creating a painting.  But what subject and how?

Tea cups and Celtic mythical goddesses came to mind.  However, as you might imagine, its quite a road from idea to reality!

Internet Research.

Thank goodness for research and the tons of information available on the internet.  My favorite Celtic things include the wonderful knots and symbols.  So, I looked them up and went to work.

Sidebar:  Irish and Celts.

I think a quick sidebar is necessary here. To explain, the Irish are considered to be one of the Celtic cultures.  So, while the symbols I use may have an Irish meaning, they may be used by other peoples as well.  Furthermore, since the Celts have been around for a couple of millennia or so, the symbols may be found in many different countries.

Symbol Meanings Are Complicated.

In the two paintings shown here, I have included some Celtic symbols.  I’d like to share their meaning with you, however, please note, the descriptions are simplified.  Apparently, meaning for many Celtic symbols is complex.

 

Celtic Cymbols, Irish Breakfast Tea
Symbols Used in “Irish Breakfast Tea

For more, I invite you to look at the references listed at the bottom of this page.

What’s the Point?  Meaning!

So, what’s the point to all this discussion about symbols?  I wanted to incorporate symbols to give an extra layer of meaning to my painting.  True, the titles, plus the green color indicate that the paintings are about something or someone Irish.  The symbols just add another layer of meaning to discover.  Think of it this way, we get to share something like private messages together through the painting.

Green Is Complicated Too!

Speaking of green color.  As I stated before, meaning in Celtic symbols seems to be complicated.  And, apparently, so is the color green and its association with Ireland.

For example, when I was growing up, we all wore green on St. Patricks Day.  My point of reference is dominated by how Americans celebrate.  We wear green shamrocks or green hats, etc.  So, I made the logic leap that green is some sort of national color.

Is Green Ireland’s National Color?

The national flag of Ireland has green, white and orange.  Plus, I think of Ireland as the “Emerald Isles”.

And, yet, there is not an official national color apparently!

Blue?

Also, as I learned in my research on line, the constitution of Ireland is encased in blue.  Even more, the Presidential standard is blue with a gold harp.  So, I wonder, would blue be a more appropriate color?

Again, Meaning?

So, what does this all have to do with art?  Well, if I’m using a particular color to convey meaning, I figure it helps to ensure a common understanding.  Otherwise, meaning is lost or in error.  So green it is because, as an American, that’s the color I link with Ireland.

Symbols: Irish Maiden

By the way, for a more in-depth description how I created, of “Irish Maiden”, please see my earlier blog posting:  Creating “Irish Maiden” from Start to Finish.

I’m glad I started out someone simple with all this symbolism.  I had an idea about doing a mythical Celtic goddess.  Maybe next year or so.  And, perhaps she’ll be blue!

Thanks!

References:

Whats-Your-Sign.com.  Celtic Symbol Meaning.

Saint Patrick’s Day – Wikipedia.

GaelicMatters.com.  Celtic Knot Symbols – Meaning.

TheJournal.ie.  So you know Ireland’s national color might not be green, right?

 

 

The post Tools of The Artist's Trade: Using Symbols To Enhance Meaning appeared first on Margaret Stermer-Cox.

Art Teachers & Five Tips About Workshops. Its About Being A Student!

Teachers, as in people who help others learn and acquire knowledge.

Teachers: Its About Being A Student

Famous Artists As Teachers.

Hi!  Recently, Daniel Smith Art Materials asked the following question on their Facebook page’s “Sunday Salon Art Question”:

“If you could learn from, and paint with any artists in history, who would you choose?”

Hmmm.  Oddly enough, I had to think a minute.  And,  you might say, I’m still thinking!

In any case, a list of my favorite artists scrolled through my head like Picasso, Rembrandt, Michelangelo, DaVinci, Velasquez, Miro, Singer Sargent, etc.  Not as easy a question as it looks to be.

Me As Art Student.

And, then I started to think about my own experience as an art student.  What do I value as an art student?  That is to say, what kind of instructor do I respond to?  Who has been most helpful?

Before I delve in to the issue of types of art instructors, I think I ought to say a word or two about being a student.  To explain, we have a role to play in our own education.  This is a point driven home to me by my father and artist John Stermer.

Story Time: Lesson From Dad.

You see once upon a time I was chattering on about going to school and the quality of teachers and on and on.  And, I babbled about art instructors and asked my Dad how to know if instructors were any good.  My father quietly reminded me that my role was to listen to the instructor and learn everything I could.  It is only later, after I have gained experience, that I can gage the quality of the instruction.

You might imagine an “oops” bubble floating over my head; the type that happens when I notice I’ve been totally clueless.  Dad was absolutely right.  Furthermore, as a rank beginner, it was a bit misguided and ridiculous for me to worry about the quality of teachers.

Teachers: From Sarah F. Burns Still Life Class

Tip One.  Be The Student!

That is to say, you, as the student, are there to learn from the teacher.  For many people, that may not be a problem.  However, if you’re like me, there are times when its helpful to remember!

Tip Two.  Be Open Minded.

Building on tip one, students ought to approach class with an open mind.  Yes, even though this is supposed to be about the teacher, students need an open mind in order to learn.

Case in point.  A few years ago I signed up for a workshop from one of my favorite watercolor artists.  I had read his book and thought it was great.  I could hardly wait for the class.  Then, workshop day came and I had to force myself to stay in class.

You see, the workshop was not as I imagined it would be.  That is to say, I had built up the class in my mind and there were things I expected to learn from the instructor.  But, the workshop was something different.  It took me a little while to let go and, then, open my mind to what the instructor was trying to say and do.

Teachers: Gabriel M. Lipper

Tip Three.  Go Local.

You can learn a ton from art classes in your local community.  I have had several excellent instructors and they were just down the street.  The instruction was first rate and just what I needed.

Later, if you want to go take a workshop from your favorite artist, you will be ready with a strong foundation.

And, you can always (still) go local!

Tip Four.  Learn From Your Fellow Students.

Its kind of a “we are all in this together” attitude.  We all have something to share, something we have learned that is useful.   Think of it as a total learning experience.

Wait a minute, when am I going to get around to the teachers…what do I value?

Tip Five.  Match Skill Level With Class Intention.

No, this is not about the teacher yet.  However, when I thought of value I was reminded about one of the classes I took.  I wanted to take the workshop because I loved the artist’s work.  I wanted to learn how to do what she does.  So, the workshop sponsor had an opening and I signed up.

But, there was a little qualification from the workshop teacher.  She said her class was meant for intermediate and advanced watercolor artists.  What does that mean?  I had been painting for a year to 18 months.  Was I an intermediate?  Certainly, I wasn’t still a beginner.  (Little did I know…and that’s the point!)

I asked – how do I know if I’m an intermediate or advanced student?  Oddly enough, I never received an answer.  Maybe its one of those cases where if you have to ask, maybe you’re a beginner.

In any case, it was probably not the best workshop for my skill level but I enjoyed it anyway.

Back To Art Teachers.

So, after five tips I’m no where near to what I value in an instructor…or am I?

I love to have teachers who are approachable and knowledgeable.  Beyond that, I’m not certain there is such a thing as the perfect instructor.  As I look back, I’ve learned something valuable from all my instructors!

Still, it would be fun and work to take a workshop from John Singer Sargent, Winslow Homer, Pablo Picasso, Rembrandt Van Rijn.  I just hope I could be a good enough student!

Acknowledgement.

Websites for two of my local art teachers.  They are first class instructors.

Gabriel Mark Lipper.

Sarah F. Burns.

Art teachers: Gabriel Mark Lipper

 

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Continuity; Day 30 of #30paintingsin30days Challenge: Pitcher & Cup

Continuity, as in an ongoing flow of work.  Its all part of a bigger picture!

Day 30!  Closing or Opening?

Greetings!  With today’s painting I arrive at the end of the #30paintingsin30days challenge hosted by Leslie Saeta Studios.  And, yet, it feels more like an opening rather than a closing of my work.

continuity: Frothing Pitcher & Cappuccino Cup V2
Day 30 #30paintingsin30days

Open To New Possibilities.

You see, I figure that all this daily painting has shown me possibilities I had not yet discovered.  Put another way, the studies are an extension of potential larger projects.

Continuity, Rather Than Starting & Stopping.

Plus, an ending implies that there needs to be a beginning.  But, beginning and starting can be the hardest part of painting.  So, how about continuity instead?

Change Direction.

However, a shift in direction might be in order.  After 60 plus days of posting a drawing or a painting a day, I am thinking I may take a break.  To explain, these studies are just that: studies.  And, then, the next step in the process is using the studies to generate some larger paintings.

So, I might take a break from daily paintings.  But, I will not take a break from drawing and painting in general, I ought to clarify!  More on what is next below.

Experimentation.

What I find particularly exciting is the experimentation toward the end.  In my view, that is one of the benefits of an intense period of daily paintings.  To elaborate, as one’s confidence grows, I think its natural to try different things.  Or, to focus on more than just getting one painting done per day.

Continuity: February Daily Paintings
All 30, #30paintingsin30days Challenge

Accomplish Challenge Goals?

So, how did I do as far as my goals for this challenge?  I finished it, that’s success in my book!  It was never a foregone conclusion that I would reach the finish point.  There were days when I thought about moving on; but I didn’t and so here I am.

Back to my goals.  I reviewed my day one posting I realized that I gave myself some “outs”.  That is to say I was a bit vague about goals beyond finishing.

The Plan.  However, I had ideas about how I might proceed by mixing “from life” and “toward abstraction” type paintings.  More specifically, I was thinking I’d do one “from life” then follow up with five or so “toward abstraction” based on the first “from life” painting.

Be Flexible.  Well, that “from life” to “toward abstraction” idea was almost as cumbersome as describing it.  In the end, I mixed things up.  Some days I worked from a still life arrangement.  Other days I worked toward abstraction.  However, the themes were generally consistent.

Change is Good.  One always allows for exceptions, though.  And, perhaps it was the fact that my plan allowed for change that I was able to complete the challenge.  To explain, it was struggle enough to finish the challenge.  Who cares if I did a “from life” instead of a “from imagination”?

Challenges, Worthwhile?

Hmmm.  Was it worth it?  I would say yes.  And, I would say that working back-to-back challenges was extra worth it!  Thank you hosts Strada Easel (January) and Leslie Saeta Studios (February).

New Experience.

Daily Painting; Its different.  You see, daily painting was a new experience for me and I certainly produced more work!  I had to be decisive and finish paintings.  Its a “get down to business” situation.  An added benefit, I’m starting to feel more comfortable with acrylic paint.

Next Year.  I suppose the final question might be, will I do it again next year?  The answer: I have no idea!  Oh, and that’s also assume the challenges continue.

What’s Next?

I will build on the experience gained by finishing some acrylic paintings I have waiting in the wings.  I also have a new design that I want to transfer to a new painting.

A third project is developing a mini workshop on starting from life then simplifying, deconstructing and abstracting.  Or from life to abstraction.  Does this sound familiar? That’s what I’ve been doing the past 30 days!

It Is About Continuing!

So, do you see how I get the idea of continuity?  The work and studies from the past 30 to 60 days are all in part of a longer term plan!

Lessons Learned: All 31 Days!
All 31 Days #stradaeasel “from life” challenge.

Thank you!

With that, thank you for sharing in my adventure this past 30 to 60 days.  I am grateful for the interest and support.

 

 

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Continuity; Day 30 of #30paintingsin30days Challenge: Pitcher & Cup

Continuity, as in an ongoing flow of work.  Its all part of a bigger picture!

Day 30!  Closing or Opening?

Greetings!  With today’s painting I arrive at the end of the #30paintingsin30days challenge hosted by Leslie Saeta Studios.  And, yet, it feels more like an opening rather than a closing of my work.

continuity: Frothing Pitcher & Cappuccino Cup V2
Day 30 #30paintingsin30days

Open To New Possibilities.

You see, I figure that all this daily painting has shown me possibilities I had not yet discovered.  Put another way, the studies are an extension of potential larger projects.

Continuity, Rather Than Starting & Stopping.

Plus, an ending implies that there needs to be a beginning.  But, beginning and starting can be the hardest part of painting.  So, how about continuity instead?

Change Direction.

However, a shift in direction might be in order.  After 60 plus days of posting a drawing or a painting a day, I am thinking I may take a break.  To explain, these studies are just that: studies.  And, then, the next step in the process is using the studies to generate some larger paintings.

So, I might take a break from daily paintings.  But, I will not take a break from drawing and painting in general, I ought to clarify!  More on what is next below.

Experimentation.

What I find particularly exciting is the experimentation toward the end.  In my view, that is one of the benefits of an intense period of daily paintings.  To elaborate, as one’s confidence grows, I think its natural to try different things.  Or, to focus on more than just getting one painting done per day.

Continuity: February Daily Paintings
All 30, #30paintingsin30days Challenge

Accomplish Challenge Goals?

So, how did I do as far as my goals for this challenge?  I finished it, that’s success in my book!  It was never a foregone conclusion that I would reach the finish point.  There were days when I thought about moving on; but I didn’t and so here I am.

Back to my goals.  I reviewed my day one posting I realized that I gave myself some “outs”.  That is to say I was a bit vague about goals beyond finishing.

The Plan.  However, I had ideas about how I might proceed by mixing “from life” and “toward abstraction” type paintings.  More specifically, I was thinking I’d do one “from life” then follow up with five or so “toward abstraction” based on the first “from life” painting.

Be Flexible.  Well, that “from life” to “toward abstraction” idea was almost as cumbersome as describing it.  In the end, I mixed things up.  Some days I worked from a still life arrangement.  Other days I worked toward abstraction.  However, the themes were generally consistent.

Change is Good.  One always allows for exceptions, though.  And, perhaps it was the fact that my plan allowed for change that I was able to complete the challenge.  To explain, it was struggle enough to finish the challenge.  Who cares if I did a “from life” instead of a “from imagination”?

Challenges, Worthwhile?

Hmmm.  Was it worth it?  I would say yes.  And, I would say that working back-to-back challenges was extra worth it!  Thank you hosts Strada Easel (January) and Leslie Saeta Studios (February).

New Experience.

Daily Painting; Its different.  You see, daily painting was a new experience for me and I certainly produced more work!  I had to be decisive and finish paintings.  Its a “get down to business” situation.  An added benefit, I’m starting to feel more comfortable with acrylic paint.

Next Year.  I suppose the final question might be, will I do it again next year?  The answer: I have no idea!  Oh, and that’s also assume the challenges continue.

What’s Next?

I will build on the experience gained by finishing some acrylic paintings I have waiting in the wings.  I also have a new design that I want to transfer to a new painting.

A third project is developing a mini workshop on starting from life then simplifying, deconstructing and abstracting.  Or from life to abstraction.  Does this sound familiar? That’s what I’ve been doing the past 30 days!

It Is About Continuing!

So, do you see how I get the idea of continuity?  The work and studies from the past 30 to 60 days are all in part of a longer term plan!

Lessons Learned: All 31 Days!
All 31 Days #stradaeasel “from life” challenge.

Thank you!

With that, thank you for sharing in my adventure this past 30 to 60 days.  I am grateful for the interest and support.

 

 

The post Continuity; Day 30 of #30paintingsin30days Challenge: Pitcher & Cup appeared first on Margaret Stermer-Cox.

Triad: Cappuccino Time-R V10; Day 29 #30paintingsin30days

Triad or three; which, in this case, involves the three primary colors.

Triad:  Yellow, Red And Blue.

Greetings!  Its Day 29 of the #30paintingsin30days challenge hosted by Leslie Saeta Studio.  I must be wildly ecstatic because today’s painting is, in a word, WILD!

Triad: Colorful "Cappuccino Time-R V10"

Or maybe, “Cappuccino Time-R V10” is just wildly colorful.  And, yet, I used a limited palette of the primary colors plus white.   Between mixing and glazing, I was able to create a wider spectrum of color.  That is, you can see areas that look green, orange and violet which are mixed from the primaries red, yellow and blue.

#30paintingsin30days Challenge.

Next?  Well, as this challenge winds down, I’m thinking about what next.  That is, what are my intentions and goals for my painting.  I want to build on the momentum gained through the challenge.  I have some projects in mind.  One includes coffee cups.

Evaluating Progress.  And, I’m also evaluating the work over the past 30 days.  I would say that toward the end of this 30 days, I started to get more experimental with the acrylic.  That is to say I started adding transparent passages along side the opaque areas.  I was delighted with the results; it was fun!

Wild, But Not Easy.

Rough Start.  However, as much as I have fun painting, it is not necessarily easy.  This particularly painting is a case in point.   I had a schematic made up before I started and an idea about where I wanted to go.  And, yet, it didn’t quite work out that way!  I struggled, got frustrated and almost gave up.

Relax!  Then, I remembered this is just a study; its not a performance!  Or, maybe it is a performance, but, anyway one can through caution to the wind and just go for it!  You know, that plunge I was talking about a couple of days ago.

Go For It!  So, plunging in, I started glazing passages with yellow, blues and reds.  Oh, fun!  Cool colors, but still the design resists coming together.  Ah, well, soldier on and add another layer or two.  Be wild!

And, then, suddenly, I like it!  Its a bold statement for such a small painting.

More Tomorrow: The Final, 30th Painting, or 61st?

Oops.  I realized I have digressed a bit from the paragraph about evaluating this past month’s work.  Must be still evaluating it!  No doubt, I’ll continue the conversation tomorrow – the last day of this particular challenge.

And, for those of you who might have been following this blog for the past couple of months, I did a 31 day “from life” challenge in January hosted by Strada Easel.  So, one could say tomorrow is day 61.  And, then, if I add the days before these challenge…OK, we won’t get too carried away.

Until then, I hope you enjoy my colorful painting based on the triad of yellow, red and blue!

 

 

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The post Triad: Cappuccino Time-R V10; Day 29 #30paintingsin30days appeared first on Margaret Stermer-Cox.

Triad: Cappuccino Time-R V10; Day 29 #30paintingsin30days

Triad or three; which, in this case, involves the three primary colors.

Triad:  Yellow, Red And Blue.

Greetings!  Its Day 29 of the #30paintingsin30days challenge hosted by Leslie Saeta Studio.  I must be wildly ecstatic because today’s painting is, in a word, WILD!

Triad: Colorful "Cappuccino Time-R V10"

Or maybe, “Cappuccino Time-R V10” is just wildly colorful.  And, yet, I used a limited palette of the primary colors plus white.   Between mixing and glazing, I was able to create a wider spectrum of color.  That is, you can see areas that look green, orange and violet which are mixed from the primaries red, yellow and blue.

#30paintingsin30days Challenge.

Next?  Well, as this challenge winds down, I’m thinking about what next.  That is, what are my intentions and goals for my painting.  I want to build on the momentum gained through the challenge.  I have some projects in mind.  One includes coffee cups.

Evaluating Progress.  And, I’m also evaluating the work over the past 30 days.  I would say that toward the end of this 30 days, I started to get more experimental with the acrylic.  That is to say I started adding transparent passages along side the opaque areas.  I was delighted with the results; it was fun!

Wild, But Not Easy.

Rough Start.  However, as much as I have fun painting, it is not necessarily easy.  This particularly painting is a case in point.   I had a schematic made up before I started and an idea about where I wanted to go.  And, yet, it didn’t quite work out that way!  I struggled, got frustrated and almost gave up.

Relax!  Then, I remembered this is just a study; its not a performance!  Or, maybe it is a performance, but, anyway one can through caution to the wind and just go for it!  You know, that plunge I was talking about a couple of days ago.

Go For It!  So, plunging in, I started glazing passages with yellow, blues and reds.  Oh, fun!  Cool colors, but still the design resists coming together.  Ah, well, soldier on and add another layer or two.  Be wild!

And, then, suddenly, I like it!  Its a bold statement for such a small painting.

More Tomorrow: The Final, 30th Painting, or 61st?

Oops.  I realized I have digressed a bit from the paragraph about evaluating this past month’s work.  Must be still evaluating it!  No doubt, I’ll continue the conversation tomorrow – the last day of this particular challenge.

And, for those of you who might have been following this blog for the past couple of months, I did a 31 day “from life” challenge in January hosted by Strada Easel.  So, one could say tomorrow is day 61.  And, then, if I add the days before these challenge…OK, we won’t get too carried away.

Until then, I hope you enjoy my colorful painting based on the triad of yellow, red and blue!

 

 

The post Triad: Cappuccino Time-R V10; Day 29 #30paintingsin30days appeared first on Margaret Stermer-Cox.