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What will we send out?

When I created the Word-Painting Project, the idea was to do something that could encourage others…and cover my grocery bill while chalet-sitting for friends in Switzerland (I’m a practical poet!). 

Though I thought I was making time for the project, the project made time for me. It gave me time to watch the light on the Alps and the clouds catch on their peaks. It gave me time to listen to the symphony of cowbells on the Holsteins munching wildflowers on the slope of the next-door chalet. And it was a joy to share that time in words and images by creating a word-painting every day for ten days. 

Back home, the prints of those originals already arrived, and I’ve hand-addressed the first of ten batches to go out over the summer. This week, a stack of Word-Painting No. 1 prints began their stamped way through the postal system to their recipients, and I blessed them as I dropped them into the post-office slot.  

This was the last image I created for the Word-Painting Project. It seemed appropriate to end with a question: What will we send out into the bright world beyond us? Some days, the world is bright, as in sunny and good—like this summer solstice day. And some days, the world is bright, as in the harsh glare of a world in need. Regardless of the natural or emotional weather, I choose to send out something encouraging. And with it, a big dose of gratitude. 

So, in each of Switzerland’s three, official languages, thank you for being part of the Word-Painting journey: danke, merci, grazie.

The sorrows and joys of taffy

Here I am with a taffy painting I started in February, but have been deterred from finishing because of multiple family obligations. Nevertheless, slow but steady.

I embarked on a series of enlarged images of salt-water taffy last year, unable to reach cruising speed for the work because of a slow flood of continuous family obligations. Over the past year, I’ve had to keep halting my painting (and writing) every two or three weeks for multiple reasons, including several trips to Florida to prepare my parents’ condo for rental or sale, since they’re no longer able to get down there—as well as flights to L.A. to spend a welcome week with my kids and grandkids, after long absences. Having just gotten back from one of those weeks in L.A., my mother fell and broke her hip and then amazed the Highland Hospital staff with her rapid ability to get moving again after a partial hip replacement at the age of 94. So, with my time devoted to helping both parents adapt to all of this at home, my work has been on hold for yet another week as of today. 

Caring for aged parents has provided an energizing counterpoint to work at the easel, especially because I’ve been focused on such what seems at first such a trivial subject, dollops of salt-water taffy veiled behind twists of waxed paper, in contrast to the somber, chastening experience of advanced age. Lauren Purje, after she saw my paintings of candy jars seven or eight years ago, remarked, “There’s sadness in them.” It was undoubtedly what charmed her about the paintings, though at the time I was nonplussed by the comment, unconscious of everything about those paintings other than my formal intentions. Sad candy seemed like an oxymoron. They offered me a way to bring more color to a still life—giving me a softened geometric image, a grid, and the format let me choose the colors I could put down. It also offered a balance between flatness and representational depth. The emotional pull of the image wasn’t even on my radar—I was too aware of my formal goals to be alert to what the act of painting had smuggled into the image on its own, while my attention was diverted to the paint itself. In other words, the candy jars were a reminder of how I think art actually operates, embodying a world of feeling and imagination despite an artist’s conscious intentions, conveying more than the artist is, or can ever be, aware of.

I chose taffy for formal reasons as well: the way in which it enabled me to pick and choose different color harmonies and presented loosely abstract properties in the shapes of the paper and the molded nougat-like candy full of supple curves with a few sharp edges. Each bit of wrapped taffy, when the image is enlarged, looks sculptural, muscular, but also ethereal and vulnerable to me—like the contrast between the modeled wax and fabric of Degas’ sculpture of an adolescent dancer. The spirals and tiers and spots of color in the candy itself feel—to me—like wistful, sotto voce references to color field painting, translated into three dimensions. Stacking them and setting them near a window for the shadows cast by a single source of natural light, I’m fascinated by how much drama the images can evoke, like glimpses of rare birds. Their shapes and lines, and the variation in opacity and transparency, give them an almost psychological resonance when I look at the finished work. They seem full of personality. And, simply in their shape and the way they catch the light, a stacked pair of these treats evokes for me a dozen different things: insect wings, tropical fish, rock faces, raptors, carved marble, Elizabethan portraits, skulls, and flesh clothed in sheer fabric. There is a slightly erotic allure in the way these little chunks of sugar present themselves for viewing though the lumpy quality of their form makes this sort of reflection amusing. All of it is amusing. It’s a little funny simply to find oneself painting images of candy and talking at any length about it. Thiebaud kept having to fight the notion that he was crazy to pick his sweet subject matter in the beginning. 

Whether or not anyone else has an inkling about any of this while looking at these paintings, it’s what makes me want to stick with it for quite a while: all of these associations give the act of painting these images a luxuriant feel of being immersed in an encouraging certainty that this is exactly what I should be painting right here and now. That’s a rare feeling, because it’s so easy to get away from the feel of settling into exactly what you most want to do with paintings that answer to what you want to see when you are done. I forget about how slowly the work proceeds and delight in the process itself, in the feel of the paint as I apply it. When you are in that zone, it hardly matters what you are depicting or how, because there’s a sense of perfection in the process that justifies itself anc conveys something essential about painting to a viewer. Again, this is ironic. I’m representing objects riddled with imperfections, wrinkles, crimps, dimples, and cracks, squeezed, smudged, torn here and there, and yet by painting all of that a certain way, they look exactly right and they evoke for me the perfection of any and all imperfections in a subject when they are subsumed into a good painting.  

Lately, too, these paintings feel like an intersection between life and art for me. I’ve been surprised at how the light itself, the way it falls on these punished-looking yet stubbornly cheery servings of empty calories reminds me of the slow, suffering decline my parents are enduring. A sentinel of mortality hovers in my peripheral vision every day now, the sense of impending surrender that skulks around the emotional family campfire, waiting for the flames to gutter.  They aren’t going anywhere. Their health is comparatively good, broken bones notwithstanding. But the erosion of age is relentless. The perky quality of this candy, seemingly eager to be unwrapped and enjoyed, reminds me inevitably of how my parents continue to crack jokes despite the indignities and disorders of advanced age and how they delight in the simplest things, the company of nearly anyone—how they still revel in the color of new leaves in the spring, the beauty of their grandchildren (as hard to make out through the distortions of macular degeneration as it is to see edges of candy behind waxed paper), the weary smile of a son showing up every other day to help. The nurses and techs who came to my mother’s room loved her after three days. She and my father still live independently at home, but it’s a cluttered place now, full of devices to help my father move around, countless pill bottles, machines to magnify whatever my mother needs to read, and lingering smells that wouldn’t have been there ten years ago. They are at the age when they still want to live, and be with the ones they love, though they are ready for whatever might follow the encroaching squalor of a struggle that gets harder from one month to the next.  I could try painting portraits of my parents, but in an oblique way, for me, these taffy paintings are representations of their lives, their struggle, their spirit.

So the sadness of jelly beans may be in the process of being upstaged by the brave tristesse of taffy. Whether the work conveys joy or sadness, life or death, if they turn out the way I want, the images this subject gives me will—I hope—hint at a larger beauty that encompasses all of those polarities. One thing that hasn’t changed and doesn’t fluctuate is love and much of this work is a celebration and direct expression of it. I love my family. I love my work. I may be painting taffy for quite a while, and all those wings that will never fly. I hope I can find time to paint other things as well, though maybe I shouldn’t worry about that just yet. 

July 2019 Press Release

Art du Jour Gallery, 213 E. Main Street in Medford is featuring the work of long time member Carol Sharp along with the classical painting of Charity Hubbard for the month of July.  Musical entertainment for Third Friday on July 19 will be announced at a later date on Facebook. Featured Artist Carol Sharp Carol Sharp has been an artist… Read more →

Call to Artists for the Oregon State Fair Fine Art Show

2019 CALL To ARTISTS

Oregonstatefair.org
Online Registration Open NOW

oregon state fair logo
Professional Artist Online Entry Deadline:
July 15, 10 pm
Non-Professional Artist, Young Artist and Oregon Award Online Entry Deadline:
August 7, 10 pm


NEW AWARDS FOR 2019 

(in addition to our traditional awards)

Show your Oregon Pride!
To be eligible, entries
need to be Oregon-
centric – highlighting a physical aspect
of Oregon or promoting an export or
commodity. The winner will receive a
special ribbon and cash prize.

And
Governor’s Choice Award
This year we are honored to have Oregon’s Governor, Kate Brown,
selecting a prestigious Governor’s Choice award winner. Sponsored by Dick Blick Art Supplies and Gamblin Paint

Please contact us with any questions. 971-701-6571 or email
[email protected]

Sorry for the Confusion!

Thanks for trying to sign up for the newsletter! The sign up box format didn’t work correctly over email – EEK! If you have commented, I made sure you have been added manually. If you were confused and would still like to sign up, follow this link to the webpage where the format is working […]

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David Smith’s material magic

I recently received my copies of INPA 8, from Manifest Creative Research Gallery, and I’ve been finding much to admire in its pages. I’m going to post some of the work over the next few weeks. It was especially pleasant to see David Smith represented yet again. He’s pitching almost a perfect game since Manifest […]

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Ch-ch-ch-changes

I’m terrible at blogging, so I’m changing with the times and removing the blog and creating a newsletter. Sign up to stay in the loop for shows, events and anything exciting that happens.

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Serene solitudes

I visited Arcadia, in Pasadena, after Shawn Downey’s solo show closed nearly half a year ago now, yet some of his work was still hanging in the rear gallery and I was able to get a close look at half a dozen paintings, which was a great treat—including this one hanging above its shipping crate, […]

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Art du Jour News June 2019

Art du Jour student art show entry. Image provided by Charity Hubbard

June 2019 Third Friday

Art du Jour Gallery, 213 E. Main Street in Medford eagerly anticipates a return of Charity Hubbard’s student art exhibit for our Third Friday reception on June 21st, 5-8 pm. Despite an earlier announcement that our musical entertainment would be held back for this months’ event, due to popular demand we have scheduled classical guitarist Rod Petrone to perform for the evening.

Featured Guest Artist Charity Hubbard in Salon June and July

Frequently painting from life on location “en plein air” and people from life is important to Charity Hubbard. She feels that the regular exercise of painting from life enables her to better capture life, light and a truer sense of atmosphere, even when painting from life is not possible.

Still life by Charity Hubbard. Image

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June 2019 Oregon Arts Commission News & Updates

Mildred Quaempts (left), dentalium work, Confederated Tribes of Umatilla, and Wilson Wewa (right), storyteller, Warm Springs. Both will participate in the 2019 Tradition Keepers Folklife Festival at Four Rivers Cultural Center on Saturday, June 29. Photo by Riki Saltzman,©Oregon Folklife Network.

June 2019

News & Updates

G. Lewis Clevenger honored with Governor’s Office exhibition, NEA spring grants announced and upcoming grant deadlines!

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Beaverton student wins Congressional Art Competition

Congratulations to Jennie Cho, a freshman at Westview High School in Beaverton, on winning the Congressional Art Competition for Northwest Oregon – Congresswoman Susan Bonamici’s district. Her winning entry, “Suffocating,” was selected by a panel of artists including Brian Rogers, executive director of the Arts Commission. Jennie and her work will be recognized along with other national winners at a ceremony in Washington, DC, and will be displayed for one year at the U.S. Capitol. “I was very impressed by the many beautiful and provocative entries,” says Congresswoman Bonamici. “The arts have a bright future in Oregon!”

Continue reading June 2019 Oregon Arts Commission News & Updates