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AGA June Art Oportunities

Ashland Galleries
June Visual Arts News
June = Art Opportunities

We’re excited to share a handful of art opportunities that are being offered this month to foster your inner creativity. 

Denise Miller, Sunrise on Lake Miller, Mosaic

The Rogue Gallery & Art Center 
Berryman Gallery in The Craterian Theater at the Collier Center for the Performing Arts
Deadline: Ongoing (June – September) 

The Lindsay Berryman Gallery is a satellite exhibition space of the Rogue Gallery & Art Center, located on the second floor lobby of the Craterian Theater. The Berryman Gallery is open to the public before performances and to ticket holders during performances. Please see the Craterian’s website for performance dates. Artists working two-dimensionally may apply for solo exhibitions lasting approximately two months each, between September and June.

For those who are interested in participating, please click here and visit craterian.org



Jerryck Murrey, Untitled, Acrylic 

Central Art Gallery
Display Your Artwork!
  Deadline: No Deadline 
  Central Art Gallery is a 650 square foot exhibition space located at 101 N. Central Avenue in Medford. The gallery will be offering exhibition opportunities for visual artists monthly during Downtown Medford’s Third Friday Art Walk.  

For those who are interested in participating, please click here or email all inquiries to [email protected]


Cherri Van Syoc, Oh, Happy Day, Oil

Grants Pass Museum of Art
Volunteers Needed!

  Deadline: Ongoing 
1:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.


Interested in being surrounded by art and in a museum setting? 

The Grants Pass Museum of Art will be offering full hours soon and help will be needed. Hours are 1:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m. and tasks include greeting visitors, answering questions about current exhibitions, and general office-related tasks. 

For those who are interested, please click here


Dawn Cerny, Untitled, Sculpture (2020 Recipient)

Seattle Art Museum
Call for Entries: The Betty Bowen Award

  Sunday, August 1, 2021 11:00 a.m.

Administered by the Seattle Art Museum, the annual Betty Bowen Award honors a Northwest artist for their original, exceptional, and compelling work. The winner is awarded an unrestricted cash prize of $15,000, and a selection of his or her works is shown at the Seattle Art Museum in the spring of 2021. In addition, up to two Special Recognition Awards in the amount of $2,500 are often granted at the discretion of the Betty Bowen Committee.

The award is open to visual artists in all media working in Washington, Oregon, or Idaho. Artists of diverse backgrounds are encouraged to apply.

Please click here to apply and for more information. 

 
Art by Elin Babock and Coloring by Ann DiSalvo Copyright © 2021 Ashland Gallery Association, All rights reserved.

AGA Outdoor Open Studios
Support A Taste of Ashland! Purchase a Coloring Book!
Saturday, June 19, 2021
12:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.

  In lieu of the traditional Open Studio Tour, the AGA has decided to bring the art outdoors! Chat with artists and watch live demonstrations while enjoying acrylic and oil paintings, textile art, plein air and abstract paintings, and glass work. Works in clay, silver jewelry, mixed media, textiles, wood, and garden art can be viewed inside of the galleries.

A Taste of Ashland Coloring Books will be sold at a suggested donation of $10.00 to assist with future planning of A Taste of Ashland. The limited-edition coloring book is a great way to escape, decompress, and create a collaboration between you and all of the local artists who created pages for it. 

This will be a free outdoor event hosted by Ashland Art Works, located at 291 Oak Street.

ASCEND Young Creatives Conference


Great news!!

Get out….get back…get going!

To the
 

 Ascend 2021 – Young Creatives Conference

for artists, musicians, and film-makers happening again this summer August 19th-21st in Grants Pass, Oregon with SOOOOO many exciting features and presenters!

Join other young creatives from across the West Coast ages 15 – 35 for this 3 day event!   
Study with professional instructors and inspiring speakers to up your game and inspire your faith.

Including world renowned artist
Ron DiCianni!
Ascend 2021 Creatives Conference
August 19 – 21, 2021
Sponsored by Masterpiece Christian Fine Arts Foundation
Host:  Edgewater Fellowship, Grants Pass, Oregon

Calligraphy Show Reception

Download (PDF, 2.6MB)

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I love New York. Again.

Social Network, Bernard Siciliano, oil on canvas, 2019, 76″ x 100″

I had an exhilarating visit to Manhattan three weeks ago. It’s been a year and a half since I went into the city to see the Salinger relics, as it were, at the New York Public Library. (I have yet to finish a post about that, though it’s nearly done.) The pandemic started a few weeks later and the world seemed to come to a halt. Time stopped. It has restarted. On my weekend in the city, things were hopping, much more alive and back up to speed than I’d thought the place would be. Saturday foot traffic was actually pretty heavy throughout Chelsea and SoHo. Midtown, where I stayed a couple nights, was sketchy and a little weird, as if the idleness of the pandemic drew people into stagnant eddies in alcoves, on corners, everyone just idling in public, harmlessly enough, people discarded by that more purposeful river of humanity to the north and south. Trash everywhere was overflowing nearly every visible container. That New York scene of urine was detectable at regular intervals. A mile uptown, in Central Park and along Fifth Avenue, as well as on the West Side, things seem quietly jubilant and populous.

The galleries were open but not packing anyone in—in other words, back to normal, but with masks. Zwirner had plenty of visitors, but I didn’t want to stick around. Ray Johnson’s solo exhibition was amusing. The motto on the wall as you walked in: “If you take the cha-cha out of Duchamp you get what a dump.” On display in a glass case were some rubber stamps he’d created that made me laugh. With them you could ink some labels onto an envelope or sheet of paper: Collage By A Major Artist, Toilet Paper, Odilon Redon Fan Club. Somebody could make some extra money with an extensive line of rubber stamps in that vein, if people only used paper to communicate now. I spent most of my time at Arcadia, Meisel, Hauser and Wirth, Paul Kasmin and wherever I could find representational painting of one sort or another. Much of what I saw in the galleries I visited was rewarding and, in the galleries I didn’t check out, much of what I could see through the windows seemed clearly avoidable. I caught the last day of the curated group show of figurative painting at Sugarlift, which was the highlight of my weekend. If Sugarlift can make a go of it in Manhattan, after holding its own in Brooklyn, good things remain possible in the world of painting. I rode the elevator up at Pace (what next, an escalator like the ones at Target a few blocks away?) to see the Agnes Martin show, a selection of nearly all-white stripes with only one or two bearing the faintest colors. I felt as I’d felt seeing her retrospective at the Guggenheim. She’s such an enigmatic figure, her abstraction seems intensely personal, cherishing her Platform Sutra, periodically living in isolation, creating one horizontally striped canvas after another, paintings that seem to belong at Dia Beacon next to Robert Ryman. Somehow, though, they are more poetic and wistful, albeit almost as minimal. Why her painting works this way for me, I have no idea, other than the general mystery of painting and what undetectably goes into it and then comes back out. Yet again I was struck by how idiosyncratic her paintings felt, the lines she seemed to have drawn free-hand in graphite to define the stripes, so that the pencil meandered like a lady bug leaving a trail around the little irregularities in the surface, a tiny trickle of graphite (it would appear) that looked serpentine from a few inches away but straight from six feet. Seeing a small collection of her work on view together, the repetitiveness, the sense of slight variations within the confines of a voluntarily apophatic format, gave me courage to keep painting my repetitive images of taffy, seeing where it will lead. (But the work proceeds so slowly, like Issa’s snail. I told Tom Insalaco when I went to see him in his studio last Friday that doing this series takes so much time, it feels like trying to sprint through a swamp.)

My visit to the Metropolitan on Sunday, more than at any previous time, made me feel as if I hadn’t ever understood paintings I’ve looked at many times before, either there or in reproductions. Again and again I thought, I’ve never really seen what was going on in this painting as clearly as I do now. It’s a great state of awareness, to look with that kind of fertile attention, especially in that museum. I spent a lot of my time in the gallery spaces devoted to the evolution of Degas, an artist I’ve begun to admire more and more, though I hardly gave him any attention when I was younger. It was humbling and awe-inspiring to see him grow from a conservative realist to a man who succeeded in getting pastel to do things it hadn’t done before through candid and intimate images of women rendered in long parallel single-hatch marks. But these long lines of color, furrows almost, with the gauzy effect of pastel rather than the crisp marks in a Durer, say, using the tools of drawing or print-making. Those parallel lines that surfaced and receded across the image gave it a vibrating energy, a pulse, that worked in counterpoint to the soft, diffuse light pastel typically gives off. Seeing his transformation from earlier and brilliant academic work to these late, radiant studies drenched in rich color, as I moved from one work to the next, was like watching a caterpillar shape-shift into a butterfly in a time-lapse film.

I had dozens of surprises like that: a Lee Krasner that was reminiscent of Matisse, painted a decade or so before she died; a de Kooning that, up close, revealed that he’d pressed newspaper pages into his gesso, or whatever ground he was using, to leave a ghostly image of the words and pictures pulled from the newsprint, reversed, the way kids once did and maybe still do with Silly Putty; a pair of worn shoes from Van Gogh that reminded me of Heidegger’s famous quote; a vertiginous overhead view of a long table and floor from Sheeler that was part of my inspiration for the series of large tabletop still lifes; one of Braque’s great paintings from his middle period, along with the gueridons, a pool table also seen from directly above, but shaped like an hour-glass; one of the Ocean Parks from Diebenkorn; and maybe my favorite paining from Cezanne, View of Domaine Saint-Joseph, a painting closer to the work of the Impressionists than most of what he did, but with an utterly unique sense of color. He knew how to create a network of marks across a canvas, where every spot of color lives in its own subtle purity, no going-over, no pentimento, once and done, each mark unique—creating maybe the most complex and lovely greens of any landscape ever painted—and yet despite all that energy and perfection in the mark-making, considered on its own, it also serves to convey the humming, brilliant energy of a summer day in the hills. The Metropolitan was full of people. The line for the Alice Neel show was half an hour long, according to the guard. Skipped it, but nice to see things are heating up. All that waiting-in-line patience has been honed by deprivation, probably. On the other hand, the guard told me that shows in the near past have drawn lines that snake out the front door and around the block.

I got the distinct impression that right now might be a rare opportunity for a gallery that wants to open or re-open in New York. For years now, art galleries have had to make more and more money to remain operational in Manhattan. George Billis has left, moving his space to Westport. OK Harris closed a while back, though not simply because of the cost of renting the gallery space. Danese/Corey ended its brick-and-mortar exhibitions, which felt like another Gotterdammerung blow to anyone who longed for islands of sanity and taste in the anarchic and often underwhelming sea of visual art. Five years ago, Steven Diamant packed up and left his gallery in New York to open exclusively in Los Angeles, first in Culver City and then in Pasadena. Both of those locations looked bigger and brighter than the one he’d had in SoHo. He spent five years trying to adapt to California. When I came into the gallery he was in his office, available to visitors as always. I asked about his move back to New York and he said he hated California. I went down the checklist sardonically, after he said he didn’t do yoga. Sushi? Never eats it. Pilates? As if. Charlie don’t surf, and I gather neither does Steve. I found him, as usual, on site in his office, there to answer questions and talk about the show, and his other artists. And this is where he told me some things that ought to signify a little inflection point for the art scene in Manhattan—or maybe a window of opportunity this year, at least. He said that his location is far better than he’d ever had in Manhattan and his exhibition space on W. Broadway at the edge of SoHo is now larger than any space he’s previously had and yet the rent is lower than what he paid twenty years ago.

People should be flocking back and locking in long leases. In major cities and across the country, the real estate mania is driving inflation in housing prices—even as commercial real estate looks more and more like a graveyard for burying cash. The pandemic drove people out of the cities, many of them for good, and is still driving them out, because so many city dwellers learned they can work remotely. Offices are emptying out. The pleasant surprise is that, commercial real estate is getting cheaper. It would seem to be the time to get a deal and open galleries like Sugarlift, dedicated to genuinely good new art, for those who love good art, rather than investors seeking an alternative to precious metals. To put it precisely: do all the gallerists out there realize that this represents an opportunity to move back into a prime location at a much lower rate than before? This undoubtedly won’t last, with all the money the government is pumping into the economy. But, as the city opens back up, maybe some galleries can move back in.

Jerryck Murrey at Central Art Supply on 6/18 Third Friday!

Central Art Supply logo

June Art Show at Central Art GalleryFEATURING: JERRYCK MURREYDuring Medford’s 3rd Friday Art WalkJune 18th, 2021 5-8pm

Central Art Gallery is proud to announce our Featured Artist for June, Jerryck Murrey. The show will be at Central Art Gallery from 5-8pm on Friday, June 18th during Medford’s 3rd Friday Art Walk. Central Art Gallery is located at 101 N. Central in Medford.Born in Oakland, California, and raised in multiple cities across America, Jerryck “J.Roc” Murrey is an American mixed media artist residing primarily in Oregon. Incorporating elements of street art such as spray paint, wheat paste, stencil, newspaper and acrylic paint, J.Roc’s art illustrates the paradigm of inner City living from around the world.Heavily influenced by comic book art and scripting, J.Roc’s use of bright colors and bold outlines highlights the dynamic nature of the hero journey. By working on large format wood panels, sculpture, paper and canvas he

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June 2021 Virtual Exhibition

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Ali Banisadr’s dark, gestural menagerie

After a year and a half of not having crossed a bridge or driven through a tunnel into Manhattan, the most impactful exhibit I saw on my quick tour of Chelsea and SoHo two weeks ago was Ali Banisadr’s work at Paul Kasmin on W. 27th. The Iran-born Brooklyn painter has found a way to […]

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Figurative states of being

You have a few more days to catch the exhibit of egg tempera paintings from Julio Reyes at Arcadia on W. Broadway in SoHo. They are well worth the visit. He has an ability to use figurative painting to convey internal states of mind and heart. He searches for objective correlatives, as T.S. Eliot referred […]

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The Art Inspector: Saving the Earth by Changing Art

The Art Inspector

Architecture has adopted LEED Performance design into standard practice, and Industrial Design begins with thinking about the end of life of a product and how to leave the least amount of impact on the environment. Both of these industries fought for decades, since the 1970s, against changing habits, systems and academic content. Resistors during the transformation proclaimed they would all go out of business; it was impossible to get all stakeholders on board; and they didn’t want to be creatively strangled. This shared history of transforming creative industry leads us to a problem we are facing within the Art world. Can artists change the way they create work to make a healthier planet? Personally, I believe so…

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June 2021 Gallery Exhibits

Art Presence Art Center cautiously continues the new hours introduced last month. The gallery is now open every Friday, Saturday and Sunday from 12–5 pm. Our guest exhibit for June showcases fiber art by members of the Southern Oregon Longarm Association (SOLA). SOLA is a group of textile artists dedicated to educating, supporting, and promoting […]

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