Art Matters! http://blogs.soartists.com/ArtMatters Journal of the Southern Oregon Artists Resource Sat, 23 May 2015 17:42:42 +0000 en-US hourly 1 UCLA Medical School’s ‘Guest Artist’ Is Helping To Teach Doctors About Disease http://blogs.soartists.com/ArtMatters/ucla-medical-schools-guest-artist-is-helping-to-teach-doctors-about-disease/ http://blogs.soartists.com/ArtMatters/ucla-medical-schools-guest-artist-is-helping-to-teach-doctors-about-disease/#comments Sat, 23 May 2015 17:42:10 +0000 http://blogs.soartists.com/ArtMatters/?p=99223 Reposted from Huffington Post Arts & Culture

Ted Meyer, Scarred for Life: Meyer uses block-print ink to transform human scars into vibrant colorful abstractions in his “Scarred for Life” series, inviting others to share the physical remnants of their survival stories. 

Ted Meyer is the guest artist at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA. If you weren’t aware that medical schools had guest artists, you’re not alone. But this initiative is very real, aiming to teach doctors about illness through the practice of art.

Yes, Meyer’s work brings artists together to help educate future physicians and epidemiologists on the more human aspects of disease. “The artists use their work to tell a story,” Los Angeles-based Meyer told The Huffington Post. “It helps the doctors look at people as more than something to cure.”

Daphne Hill, Avian Flu: “Daphne does work about germs and her fears

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Reposted from Huffington Post Arts & Culture

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Ted Meyer, Scarred for Life: Meyer uses block-print ink to transform human scars into vibrant colorful abstractions in his “Scarred for Life” series, inviting others to share the physical remnants of their survival stories.
 

Ted Meyer is the guest artist at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA. If you weren’t aware that medical schools had guest artists, you’re not alone. But this initiative is very real, aiming to teach doctors about illness through the practice of art.

Yes, Meyer’s work brings artists together to help educate future physicians and epidemiologists on the more human aspects of disease. “The artists use their work to tell a story,” Los Angeles-based Meyer told The Huffington Post. “It helps the doctors look at people as more than something to cure.”

avian

Daphne Hill, Avian Flu: “Daphne does work about germs and her fears of them sickening herself and her children. Her talk was interesting as she explained how her fears developed and how doctors might talk with someone like her who has already been checking the Internet and read the possible worst case scenarios.”
Meyer began his stay at the medical school in 2010, though the foundation of his ongoing project began much earlier — in fact, his inspiration dates back to his birth. “I was born with a very rare genetic condition,” said Meyer, who grew up with Gaucher’s disease, a disorder in which fatty substances accumulate in cells and organs. “There was no treatment for it. Starting at about age 6 I was in and out of the hospital all the time. I grew up thinking maybe I’d make it to thirty, maybe not.” Among other things, manifestations of the illness include bruising, fatigue, anemia and skeletal disorders.

During his time in the hospital, Meyer turned to art as a means of expression, release and inner healing. Creating imagery filled with skeletal bodies contorted in pain, Meyer’s resulting series was titled “Structural Abnormalities.” He often made use of the materials around him, incorporating bandages and IVs into his images, all revolving around the idea of, in Meyer’s words, “being in a body that didn’t work particularly well.”

Bandaid, by Damienne Merlina

Damienne Merlina, Bandaid
And then, something unexpected happened. Meyer’s health began to improve. “I really hit a point where, thanks to Western technology, there was a new treatment. Almost all of my symptoms disappeared,” he said. “I had my hip replaced so I could walk normally.” Although undoubtedly a miracle in terms of his life and wellbeing, the sudden shift left Meyer directionless as an artist.

After a period of uncertainty, Meyer resolved to shift his artistic perspective entirely. While still focused on the body, his work shifted from its “singular and isolated” mode to one more “happy and sexual.” More importantly, instead of sharing his own story, he began inviting others to share theirs.

For this series, which Meyer dubbed “Scarred for Life,” he applies block-print ink to human scars and the skin surrounding them. He then proceeds to press paper to skin, and subsequently accents the images with paint and pencil, turning physical remnants of suffering into inimitable splashes of color and line. Although the project center around scars, the art is less about suffering and more about survival. “I make these prints that look like Rothkos — color field prints,” he said. “I don’t want [to emphasize] the shock value of, ‘Oh, look how disfigured they look.’ For me, it’s a story more like mine: let’s make the best out of this that we can from this point forward.”

breast

Ted Meyer, Breast Cancer-Mastectomy
Meyer explained the intense reactions he received in response to the works, which toured everywhere from the United Nations to the Pasadena Armory; reactions of an intensity he never experienced when painting. “People would come look at my work and just sort of break down crying,” he said. “Others came up to me and said, ‘Look at my scar, let me tell you about my scar.'” He was receiving emails twice a week from people all around the world, all wanting to share their personal scar story.

This gave Meyer an idea. With so many people grappling with illness and using art as an outlet, perhaps their creative efforts could serve as a means of unorthodox education as well. “It became very apparent to me that all these people who do work about their illnesses, really have a lot to say,” Meyer said. “Maybe they could teach something to medical professionals. There has been art therapy designed to help patients, but I thought maybe there is something to teach the doctors here. Perhaps they can look at patients’ artworks and see something beyond the clinical. It’s not just ‘oh, they have multiple sclerosis’ or ‘it’s a broken neck.’ In a way, it’s like art therapy for doctors.”

As a result, for the past five years, Meyer has served as a guest artist at the UCLA’s medical school, a position he carved out and created for himself, curating artist talks and exhibitions that serve to educate the medical staff. In particular, Meyer’s programming is designed for first and second year medical students, most of whom have not yet had an opportunity to work with patients in person. To provide future doctors with more tangible understanding of living with certain afflictions, artists speak about their condition, their artworks, and the relationship between the two.

susan

Susan Trachman, Order #2
Susan has MS and does work about organization and control as she has less control over her body. He media is all the old medical supplies used in her treatment
Mainly, his position entails recruiting and curating a network of artists exploring issues of illness and identity, inviting them to show their work and tell their stories. The conditions represented are as diverse as the artistic media explored. “There is a woman Susan who has multiple sclerosis,” Meyer said, “and for 25 years she’s been keeping all the bottles she’s used — all the saline and everything — she takes them and she organizes them in patterns. She explained to the medical students that when you have MS you have absolutely no control over your body. You can’t predict your own movements. But by organizing these bottles, she had found one area she could control.”

Meyer’s program caters to doctors who, though familiar with all the technicalities of medical proceedings, aren’t as well versed in the human aspects of the profession. “There are a number of doctors who are very smart but when they get on the floor and have to start dealing with patients they break down,” he said. Especially today, many doctors don’t have the proper time to truly get to know their patients, the ways their various struggles have shaped the people they are.

“There was another woman who had a headache for around four years. During that period she had lost her ability to name things, she couldn’t remember the nouns. When she finally got rid of her migraine, she went back and photographed all the things she couldn’t remember. For someone to tell their story to first year med students — it’s not just, ‘Oh, you have a headache, what medicine should I give you?’ It’s a new way to understand the life process of living with an illness.”

Meyer’s unorthodox merging of art and medicine proves that art therapy isn’t only helpful for patients, but doctors as well. “It’s a new way to connect,” Meyer said. “We are making positive things out of these horrible situations.”

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A Brief Yet Complex Color History Of Crayola Crayons http://blogs.soartists.com/ArtMatters/a-brief-yet-complex-color-history-of-crayola-crayons/ http://blogs.soartists.com/ArtMatters/a-brief-yet-complex-color-history-of-crayola-crayons/#comments Sat, 23 May 2015 17:19:32 +0000 http://blogs.soartists.com/ArtMatters/?p=99222 Reposted from Huffington Post Arts & Culture

Few things stir up childhood nostalgia as quickly as a fresh box of crayons. It’s easy to see what makes them an appealing collectors’ item. For Ed Welter, a former Nike project manager from Oregon, the allure went a step further.

No one, not even Crayola, had recorded a full history of crayons. So it became Welter’s challenge.

As a devoted collector, he began focusing on crayons around 2000, soon after selling off an extensive beer-can collection. Welter gathered box after box, with some dating back to the 1880s. Old catalogs from libraries around the country (and, later, on Google Books) allowed him to cobble together a timeline. By 2014, Welter had amassed over 3,000 boxes of colored wax, about half of which were Crayola. Then he sold everything (Crayola purchased its namesake boxes while the others went to various collectors) and retired

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Reposted from Huffington Post Arts & Culture

Few things stir up childhood nostalgia as quickly as a fresh box of crayons. It’s easy to see what makes them an appealing collectors’ item. For Ed Welter, a former Nike project manager from Oregon, the allure went a step further.

No one, not even Crayola, had recorded a full history of crayons. So it became Welter’s challenge.

As a devoted collector, he began focusing on crayons around 2000, soon after selling off an extensive beer-can collection. Welter gathered box after box, with some dating back to the 1880s. Old catalogs from libraries around the country (and, later, on Google Books) allowed him to cobble together a timeline. By 2014, Welter had amassed over 3,000 boxes of colored wax, about half of which were Crayola. Then he sold everything (Crayola purchased its namesake boxes while the others went to various collectors) and retired to Spain.

What Welter had discovered in his 14 years of collecting is that Crayola’s color history is absurdly complicated. On his website, Crayon Collecting, Welter laments how singlehandedly piecing it all together was difficult not only “just from the sheer amount of detail, but also because of the convoluted swapping and renaming of colors.” For example, the crayon which the company named “Blue” when it got its start in 1903 was not the same “Blue” by the 1930s. It was given a new name, which no longer exists today, and “Blue” became a brighter shade of the color.

Confused? It’s okay. It took about eight whole months for Welter to piece together Crayola’s history, which he described to The Huffington Post as “complex” and, pun intended, “colorful.”
There are crayon colors that no longer exist today, many of them coming from old painters’ palettes.

In essence, Crayola became such a hit because the company figured out a way to inexpensively combine paraffin wax with safe pigments, according to Welter. Colors in the early years drew from paints available from art suppliers at the time, and many of these shades have since dropped out of production.

Among the original shades that have been unceremoniously discontinued, according to Welter’s research: Burnt Umber, Celestial Blue, Charcoal Grey, Cobalt Blue, English Vermillion, Madder Lake, Ultramarine Blue, Van Dyke Brown and Venetian Red. Raw Sienna lives on in name, but as a different shade of brown than its predecessor. Crayola officially “retired” Raw Umber in 1990 along with seven other shades. Still others have dropped out without so much as a goodbye.

discontinued crayons 2

Original Crayola shades that have been discontinued. Courtesy Ed Welter.

“New” Crayola crayons aren’t often new, just renamed. By 2013, Welter had counted 755 color names that had ever been sold, but only 331 individual colors.

In 1903, the company used 54 names for 38 separate colors. By the end of 1958, the company had created 138 names for 108 colors sold at any point in time. By 2015, it had bestowed 759 names upon 331 colors.

Special crayon boxes with colors like Iron Man Blue and Liberty Blue are just the plain old Blue you’d find in any regular box. Sweet Georgia Peach is really just Melon. Tye Dye Lime is Green Yellow. (Crayola might be on to something, though, for wanting to keep things simple.)

blues and reds

Blue and red shades from Crayola’s early years, compared. Courtesy Ed Welter.

Crayola once issued a box with several crayons of the same color under different names.

In 1949, Crayola debuted a new 48-count box of crayons, filled with lies.

“They pulled a fast one on everybody,” Welter wrote on his site. Light Turquoise Blue and Turquoise Blue look identical, as do Dark Green and Green. And good luck figuring out the difference between Brilliant Rose, Medium Rose and Light Magenta. Or Medium Violet and Violet.

same colors

Courtesy Ed Welter.

Certain colors have been renamed for political reasons, like “Flesh.”

What color is flesh? According to Welter, it’s the lightly pigmented, roughly universal shade we see on our palms — like the Crayola crayon by that name. For most people, however, flesh refers to skin tone, and the problem with making one beige-y shade the only skin-tone crayon available is obvious. But until the early 1960s, Welter explained, the company hadn’t yet realized how the name could cause consternation. A social researcher noticed children using the shade to draw people, teasing darker-skinned classmates who didn’t match the crayon. Shortly after the researcher wrote a letter to the company in 1962, (after a couple back-and-forth years with the name Pink Beige, for some reason) the Crayola shade became known as Peach.

Indian Red was also renamed, though not until 1999. The name actually referred to a pigment from a plant found in India, Welter told HuffPost, and could have been tweaked to “India Red.” To avoid misconceptions, however, the company chose a completely new — and completely neutral — name: Chestnut.

flesh v peach

“Flesh” or “Peach”? Courtesy Ed Welter.

The Macaroni and Cheese crayon was named by a pasta-loving 6-year-old.

For much of the company’s history, Crayola’s crayon names were plain. Then in 1983, a new line for small children with names like Birdie Blue and Kitty Cat Black was introduced. Metallics, like Tiger Eye and Moonstone, followed a few years later with other specialty crayons. And, in 1992, the company opened up naming rights to anyone. Fans of all ages got the chance to name sixteen brand-new colors — which Welter says were, indeed, not recycled from past boxes.

“I wrote a letter to Crayola (all by myself, a proud six-year-old), entering the contest,” a grown-up Adrienne Watral told The Huffington Post in an email. When she found out that her submission had won a month later, the crayon company flew Watral’s whole family out to Hollywood, showering them with “enough Crayola swag to last a lifetime.” And the new orange crayon had a name: Macaroni and Cheese. “I remember being interviewed for various news stations on television and being asked how I thought of the name,” she wrote. “This was the easiest question … I named the color of my favorite food!”

Another famous color was named by a 12-year-old Sam Marcus, who drew small facial expressions to correspond with each new crayon. His “laughter” face was colored pink because, Marcus told HuffPost in an email, he’d blush when someone tickled him as a kid. Hence Tickle Me Pink was born.

We’d also like to note that Purple Mountain’s Majesty was named by an 89-year-old Mildred Samson — proving that coloring knows no boundaries.

mac and cheese crayon

Adrienne Watral with her winning crayon. Courtesy photo.

Despite all the changes, Welter says the color quality has remained fairly consistent throughout the past century.

The biggest overall change, Welter explained, happened after World War II, when many of the pigment suppliers Crayola had been using for years could no longer sell to the company. Either the supply had been ruined or the business relationship had altered, putting the company in the odd position of finding new and ever-so-slightly-different sources.

“You know how people are with, ‘Oh, back in my day, colors were so much richer!'” Welter told HuffPost. “But I actually colored on paper with all of them.” By and large, there were only very gradual changes, like the new pigments and perhaps minor tweaks to different formulas. “Since the ’60s, they’ve kept pretty true to their basic colors.”

crayola spreadsheet

Click to view the complete color chart
As for Welter, he now spends his time “virtually collecting” crayons by digging up information and fixing inaccuracies around the Internet. He warns that Wikipedia is particularly inaccurate when it comes to Crayola, but since the site does not allow contributors to cite their own research, the false information remains unchecked. It bothers him, but not enough to stop his efforts.

“When you’re a collector,” he said, “you’re in it for the minutia.”

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Rogue Gallery June Classes http://blogs.soartists.com/ArtMatters/rogue-gallery-june-classes/ http://blogs.soartists.com/ArtMatters/rogue-gallery-june-classes/#comments Sat, 23 May 2015 17:04:22 +0000 http://blogs.soartists.com/ArtMatters/?p=99214 Two great classes starting in June That’s less than 2 weeks away! Impressionist Plein Air Painting Carla Palmese, View of Ashland Hills, Sunrise Number 1 Mondays and Wednesdays June 1-24, 9am-noon

Develop the skills to capture the beauty of nature on your canvas. The first class begins with a lecture and demonstration of the history and techniques of impressionist painting. The rest of the classes will explore the beauty of Southern Oregon while painting at Lithia Park, Hanley Farm and RoxyAnn Winery.

$275 members, $300 non-members. Register Here! Instructor Carla Palmese holds a BFA from Chouinard Art Institute and an MA in Theater Arts from SOU. She worked as a giftware, costume, and set designer. She has taught painting and costume design at RCC. Woodcut Printing Workshop Nancy Jo Mullen, Homecoming for my Soul Mondays and Wednesdays June 1-10, 1-4pmProduce beautiful prints with woodcuts inspired by your own subject

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20 May 2015 EDU artblast header

Two great classes starting in June
That’s less than 2 weeks away!

Impressionist Plein Air Painting

Carla Palmese, View of Ashland Hills, Sunrise Number 1 Mondays and Wednesdays
June 1-24, 9am-noon

Develop the skills to capture the beauty of nature on your canvas. The first class begins with a lecture and demonstration of the history and techniques of impressionist painting. The rest of the classes will explore the beauty of Southern Oregon while painting at Lithia Park, Hanley Farm and RoxyAnn Winery.

$275 members, $300 non-members.
Register Here! Instructor Carla Palmese holds a BFA from Chouinard Art Institute and an MA in Theater Arts from SOU. She worked as a giftware, costume, and set designer. She has taught painting and costume design at RCC.

Woodcut Printing Workshop
Nancy Jo Mullen_ Homecoming for my soul
Nancy Jo Mullen, Homecoming for my Soul Mondays and Wednesdays
June 1-10, 1-4pmProduce beautiful prints with woodcuts inspired by your own subject matter. Learn traditional mark-making methods and discover and explore new approaches.

$135 Members, $150 Non-Members.
Register Here! Nancy Jo Mullen is a printmaker and past director of the Rogue Gallery & Art Center. She holds an MFA in printmaking from the University of Oregon. She was featured in OPB’s program Oregon Art Beat. She exhibits regionally, is a member of Print Arts Northwest, and the contemporary art group, AMBUS. Summer is coming soon.
Check out our art camps for youth here>> COMMUNITY ART EVENTS

Artists for Equamore, art show and sale. May 31st from 3-6pm at Equamore Sanctuary, 4723 Highway 66, Ashland.  Enjoy an afternoon in the country featuring: original artwork for sale from nearly 20 local artists, dancing with Band du Pays Swing Band, fine wines poured by local vintners, sumptuous snackshobnobbing with the horses of Equamore. for more information contact Ellen Falkner at ellenfalkner@gmail.com or 541-482-3110.

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Book Signing with Artist/Author Richard McKinley at Art Du Jour http://blogs.soartists.com/ArtMatters/book-signing-with-artistauthor-richard-mckinley-at-art-du-jour/ http://blogs.soartists.com/ArtMatters/book-signing-with-artistauthor-richard-mckinley-at-art-du-jour/#comments Sat, 23 May 2015 16:52:21 +0000 http://blogs.soartists.com/ArtMatters/?p=99204 You’re invited!

With more than 100 pieces represented, this book explores Richard McKinley’s life’s work of pastel and oil paintings and writing in one large compilation.

Please tell us you are coming! We will hopefully have enough copies of Richard’s beautiful book on hand!

BOOK SIGNING with Artist/AuthorRICHARD MC KINLEY during Art Du Jour Gallery’s Third Friday Event Friday, June 19, 2015 5:00 to 8:00 pm

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Richard McKinley book signing at Art du Jour Gallery announcementYou’re invited!

With more than 100 pieces represented, this book explores Richard McKinley’s life’s work of pastel and oil paintings and writing in one large compilation.

Please tell us you are coming! We will hopefully have enough copies of Richard’s beautiful book on hand!

BOOK SIGNING with Artist/AuthorRICHARD MC KINLEY during Art Du Jour Gallery’s Third Friday Event

Friday, June 19, 2015

5:00 to 8:00 pm

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Ashland Art Center Classes and Events http://blogs.soartists.com/ArtMatters/ashland-art-center-classes-and-events/ http://blogs.soartists.com/ArtMatters/ashland-art-center-classes-and-events/#comments Sat, 23 May 2015 16:45:30 +0000 http://blogs.soartists.com/ArtMatters/?p=99201 NEW ASHLAND ART CENTER CLASSES and EVENTS Reduction Linoleum printing with Amy Godard Navickas

May 23 and 30

3:30 pm – 6:30 pm $75.00 general, $60.00 Members $10.00 materials fee paid directly to the teacher LIMIT 6 SPACES Pre registration required. More info In this intensive class you will explore the linoleum reduction printmaking process. Each student will learn techniques to carve a linoleum plate, apply ink and print. In order to make a linoleum reduction print you must carve a linoleum block, print it, carve it again and print it again over the first print. You can do this many times to one block. This creates a print with many different layers of colors or values. In this class there will be an emphasis on color theory and applying the elements of design to printmaking. You will also cover methods of registry, using the press and hand

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NEW ASHLAND ART CENTER CLASSES and EVENTS

 

Reduction Linoleum printing with Amy Godard Navickas

pears

May 23 and 30

3:30 pm – 6:30 pm
$75.00 general, $60.00 Members
$10.00 materials fee paid directly to the teacher
LIMIT 6 SPACES
Pre registration required. More info
In this intensive class you will explore the linoleum reduction printmaking process. Each student will learn techniques to carve a linoleum plate, apply ink and print. In order to make a linoleum reduction print you must carve a linoleum block, print it, carve it again and print it again over the first print. You can do this many times to one block. This creates a print with many different layers of colors or values. In this class there will be an emphasis on color theory and applying the elements of design to printmaking. You will also cover methods of registry, using the press and hand printing techniques. Students may bring a notebook for note taking.


Plein Air Paint-out Competition

FullSizeRender


 June Pottery on the Wheel with Stephanie Friedman

pottery with stephanie

4 consecutive Thursdays starting on June 4
10:30 AM  to 12:30 PM
$80 + clay and firing fee
More Info Limit 6 students.
Pre Registration required


June Kids Summer Camp 2 Spaces Left

6a00d8341d1cc153ef0133f2a1efcf970b

June 22 @ 1:00 pm – 5:00 pm
$200 per camp
Ages 7 and up
Register with Instructor: educationdirectoraac@gmail.com

Contact us

ideas

Please let us know what classes do you want to see happen at the Ashland Art Center.
Give us feedback, comments and ideas at educationdirectoraac@gmail.com


All Classes and Events held at Ashland Art Center unless otherwise specified.
Ashland Art Center, 357 E Main Street, Ashland, Oregon 97520
ashartcent@gmail.com

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Art For A Cause http://blogs.soartists.com/ArtMatters/art-for-a-cause/ http://blogs.soartists.com/ArtMatters/art-for-a-cause/#comments Sat, 23 May 2015 16:33:23 +0000 http://blogs.soartists.com/ArtMatters/?p=99196 We are looking for more artists to participate. They do need to be there that day, but can work in teams. Plein air painters and artisans who would like to craft while they sell are welcome!! Art For A Cause poster 2015

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We are looking for more artists to participate. They do need to be there that day, but can work in teams. Plein air painters and artisans who would like to craft while they sell are welcome!!
Art For A Cause poster 2015

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Woman Made Gallery Releases New Study on Gender Representation in Major US Commercial Galleries http://blogs.soartists.com/ArtMatters/woman-made-gallery-releases-new-study-on-gender-representation-in-major-us-commercial-galleries/ http://blogs.soartists.com/ArtMatters/woman-made-gallery-releases-new-study-on-gender-representation-in-major-us-commercial-galleries/#comments Sat, 23 May 2015 15:00:15 +0000 http://blogs.soartists.com/ArtMatters/?p=99169 Report’s Release Timed to Coincide with WMG’s presentation of “The Gallery Tally Poster Project” and “Feminism (n.): Plural” exhibitions, May 15 – June 25, 2015 ___________________________________________________________ CHICAGO, IL- In conjunction with its forthcoming exhibition The Gallery Tally Poster Project, Woman Made Gallery has issued a Report on Gender Representation in US Commercial Galleries, based on data collection conducted by WMG staff in 2013. The resulting Report is a team effort on the part of WMG staff and Board: Former Gallery Coordinator Ruby Thorkelson led the study and worked with gallery interns to collect the data, which was subsequently reviewed by WMG Board member Monica Staco, a specialist in marketing research with over ten years of consumer insights, strategy and research experience. An infographic visualizing the final data was created by WMG Board member Erin Waser, a graphic designer for ABC 7 Chicago (WLS-TV). The Report consists of an infographic

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Woman Made Gallery logo, chicago, IL

Report’s Release Timed to Coincide with WMG’s presentation of “The Gallery Tally Poster Project” and “Feminism (n.): Plural” exhibitions, May 15 – June 25, 2015

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CHICAGO, IL- In conjunction with its forthcoming exhibition The Gallery Tally Poster Project, Woman Made Gallery has issued a Report on Gender Representation in US Commercial Galleries, based on data collection conducted by WMG staff in 2013. The resulting Report is a team effort on the part of WMG staff and Board: Former Gallery Coordinator Ruby Thorkelson led the study and worked with gallery interns to collect the data, which was subsequently reviewed by WMG Board member Monica Staco, a specialist in marketing research with over ten years of consumer insights, strategy and research experience. An infographic visualizing the final data was created by WMG Board member Erin Waser, a graphic designer for ABC 7 Chicago (WLS-TV).
The Report consists of an infographic and accompanying analytic essay interpreting the data and commenting on the study’s broader cultural and historical implications, written by Joanna Gardner-Huggett, Associate Professor and Department Chair, History of Art and Architecture at DePaul University in Chicago.
To read or download a copy of WMG’s Report, please click here.
 
In her commentary, Gardner-Huggett summarizes WMG’s data findings as follows:
“From a national perspective, Woman Made’s study reveals that Chicago earns second place for women artists securing solo gallery exhibitions. Miami is first with 44% and San Francisco comes third at 37%. Washington D.C. follows at 36%, Boston at 33%, Houston and Los Angeles at 30% and New York City at 18%. Curators regularly acknowledge that group shows establish greater visibility for women. Therefore, the 2013 data validates that the presence of women artists increases substantially with commercial group exhibitions and illuminates specific ways in which women find access to the art market since they cannot rely on being awarded solo exhibitions in commercial venues. In Boston 60% of the artists in groups shows consisted of women and 50% in California. Houston and Miami follow close behind with 49% and 48% respectively, with San Francisco at 44%. Washington D.C. trails with 36%, Chicago at 32% and New York City takes last place with 30%. As with solo exhibitions, Miami is the best place for women to find gallery representation at 44%, with Washington D.C. coming in second place with 41%. Boston is third with 39%, then Chicago at 36%, Houston 34%, San Francisco 32%, New York 28% and Los Angeles 25%.”
Gardner-Huggett’s analysis offers numerous observations on the significance of WMG’s data collection efforts as a tactic of awareness and advocacy for women artists; she notes that “(d)ata collection is one of the oldest and continues to be one of the most effective tools of feminist protest. When museums and galleries are faced by the reality of actual demographics being circulated in public, they are forced to respond.”
 
Gender Representation in US Commercial Galleries
The Report’s release is timed to coincide with Woman Made Gallery’s presentation of hundreds of posters from The Gallery Tally Poster Project, a crowd-sourced, social engagement art project in which more than 180 artists from around the world joined efforts to collect and visualize statistical data regarding ratios of male and female artists in top contemporary art galleries. Artists were invited to make one poster for each gallery they tallied, in whatever style or medium they chose. The project began with galleries in Los Angeles, with subsequent phases planned for galleries in New York, Berlin, London, Chicago, Santa Fe, Portland, Pittsburg, and other cities. At Woman Made Gallery, the Gallery Tally posters are installed floor to ceiling, occupying an entire lower-level gallery space and essentially acting as a giant, room-scaled infographic.
The Gallery Tally Poster Project is on view at Woman Made Gallery in conjunction with the group exhibition “Feminism (n.): Plural,” May 15 – June 25, 2015. Both exhibitions are organized by Woman Made Gallery’s Executive Director, Claudine Ise. The opening reception is on Friday, May 15th from 6-8pm, with a gallery talk by Los Angeles artist Micol Hebron, one of the organizers of the Gallery Tally Project, taking place at 5pm immediately prior to the reception. 

Press contacts: Claudine Ise, Executive Director [claudine@womanmade.org]

Sydney Stoudmire, Gallery Manager [sydney@womanmade.org]
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about

 

Woman Made Gallery (WMG) is a tax-exempt, not-for-profit organization founded in 1992. Its mission is to support, cultivate, and promote the diverse contributions of women in the arts through exhibitions and other programs that serve, educate, and enrich our community. We rely on membership contributions and individual donations to create the programs that support our mission.

 
PLEASE JOIN WOMAN MADE GALLERY OR DONATE

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Confluence http://www.bonidelaire.net/confluence/ http://www.bonidelaire.net/confluence/#comments Sat, 23 May 2015 02:47:45 +0000 http://www.bonidelaire.net/?p=335 Thanks for subscribing to Boni dé Laire - Capturing the Timeless Beauty of Southern Oregon! Here's my most recent post:

12″ x 16″ Pastel on Paper I stopped to enjoy this lovely view of the confluence of Little Butte Creek and the Rogue River on my way to join family for Thanksgiving dinner in Prospect, Oregon.

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Thanks for subscribing to Boni dé Laire – Capturing the Timeless Beauty of Southern Oregon! Here’s my most recent post:

12″ x 16″ Pastel on Paper

I stopped to enjoy this lovely view of the confluence of Little Butte Creek and the Rogue River on my way to join family for Thanksgiving dinner in Prospect, Oregon.

This post Confluence appeared first on Boni dé Laire. Until next time, Boni dé Laire.

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Pat Moore Photography Show at South Stage Cellars! http://blogs.soartists.com/ArtMatters/pat-moore-photography-show-at-south-stage-cellars/ http://blogs.soartists.com/ArtMatters/pat-moore-photography-show-at-south-stage-cellars/#comments Fri, 22 May 2015 23:52:13 +0000 http://blogs.soartists.com/ArtMatters/?p=99157 Pat Moore South Stage Cellars Photography Exhibit Announcement, June 2015: South Stage Cellars presents 'World Travels' The Photographic Adventures of Pat Moore, international travel photography collection on exhibit from June 4 through July 9, 2015 from 1-7pm daily. Artist reception June 13 from 5-8pm. South Stage Cellars is located at 125 S. Third St in Jacksonville, Oregon.

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Pat Moore Photography Show at South Stage Cellars Exhibit Announcement, June 2015: South Stage Cellars presents 'World Travels' The Photographic Adventures of Pat Moore, international travel photography collection on exhibit from June 4 through July 9, 2015 from 1-7pm daily. Artist reception June 13 from 5-8pm. South Stage Cellars is located at 125 S. Third St in Jacksonville, Oregon.

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Bringing Inspiration Home http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/UrbanFolktales/~3/iONfSIqiIe4/bringing-inspiration-home.html http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/UrbanFolktales/~3/iONfSIqiIe4/bringing-inspiration-home.html#comments Fri, 22 May 2015 21:16:00 +0000 http://blogs.soartists.com/ArtMatters/?guid=cf967106b041c0ad8ee26492e497b5ac Summer is upon us and we will be travelling - maybe only in our own backyard, but there is plenty of inspiration. Vacations exotic or local, are an opportunity to be present and live intensely. See things with new eyes and collect the memories - they w...

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Summer is upon us and we will be travelling – maybe only in our own backyard, but there is plenty of inspiration. Vacations exotic or local, are an opportunity to be present and live intensely. See things with new eyes and collect the memories – they will show up in your art.
We recently returned from a trip to Hawaii. We stayed on Kauai, which is also know as the “Garden Island.” Lots of inspiration to be had everywhere you looked, but I was taken by a place called Allerton Gardens. It is part of the National Tropical Botanical Gardens and was created as a private retreat. It is part garden, part art exhibit and entirely unique. It is a collection of garden “rooms,” tropical plants and sculptures. Each room has a water feature or plant theme. I felt a bit like Alice walking through a door into wonderland. Here is some of my favorite photos of the garden.

Cocoa pods
Morton Bay Fig trees, used in the filming of Jurassic Park.

Now it is your turn….get outside, enjoy some early summer inspiration and share!

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