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Confluence

Thanks for subscribing to Boni dé Laire – Capturing the Timeless Beauty of Southern Oregon! Here’s my most recent post:

12″ x 16″ Pastel on Paper

I stopped to enjoy this lovely view of the confluence of Little Butte Creek and the Rogue River on my way to join family for Thanksgiving dinner in Prospect, Oregon.

This post Confluence appeared first on Boni dé Laire. Until next time, Boni dé Laire.

“Nature may reach the same result in many ways. Like a wave in the physical world, in the infinite…”

“Nature may reach the same result in many ways. Like a wave in the physical world, in the infinite ocean of the medium which pervades all, so in the world of organisms, in life, an impulse started proceeds onward, at times, may be, with the speed of light, at times, again, so slowly that for ages and ages it seems to stay, passing through processes of a complexity inconceivable to men, but in all its forms, in all its stages, its energy ever and ever integrally present. A single ray of light from a distant star falling upon the eye of a tyrant in bygone times may have altered the course of his life, may have changed the destiny of nations, may have transformed the surface of the globe, so intricate, so inconceivably complex are the processes in Nature. In no way can we get such an overwhelming idea of the grandeur of Nature than when we consider, that in accordance with the law of the conservation of energy, throughout the Infinite, the forces are in a perfect balance, and hence the energy of a single thought may determine the motion of a universe.
Nikola Tesla (via inthenoosphere)”

Nikola Tesla

Organic repetition in geometric form. To view similar pieces…

Organic repetition in geometric form.

To view similar pieces available for sale, visit www.animaanimus.org

“Ether” is the last painting in my alchemical elements series….

“Ether” is the last painting in my alchemical elements series. Quintessence is considered as permeating the whole of creation and binds all things together, the foundation without which the Elements would be dead matter.

“Ether” is the only painting still available in my elements series and may be viewed or purchased at True Love Art Gallery in Seattle through May 10th.

In alchemy,  the divine silver waters are associated with the…

In alchemy,  the divine silver waters are associated with the moon, which resides over the feminine. 

CCC Hosts Uku-Aotearoa-The Spirit of Materials Cultural Exchange

Tall Hinaki 4, Kapowai Series; Dragonfly Lake, 2007; Colleen Waata Ulrich

Tall Hinaki 4, Kapowai Series; Dragonfly Lake, 2007; Colleen Waata Ulrich

Clatsop Community College is honored to present Uku-Aoteroa-The Spirit of Materials, a ten-day cultural exchange with six visiting indigenous Maori clay artists from Aotearoa, New Zealand.  Invited artists include Colleen Waata Urlich, Baye Riddell, Dorothy Waetford, Todd Douglas, Carla Ruka, and Rhonda Halliday. These highly respected artists are supported by New Zealand Maori Art organizations, Creative New Zealand and Toi Maori Aotearoa to act as cultural representatives to communities around the world. The exchange will feature a series of events in the Astoria community that will provide a rare opportunity to interact with people from a unique indigenous culture.

A special exhibition of Maori clay artworks will be held in the CCC Art Center Gallery, 1799 Lexington Avenue, Astoria, from May 7 to July 30. This exhibit will open with a welcoming of the artists on Thursday, May 7 at 6:00 PM. The Maori artists will be in attendance and available to share their connections to their work and its surrounding mythological and historical origins.

The artists will also give a free public presentation at the CCC Performing Arts Center, 588 16th Street, Astoria, called, Uku-Aotearoa-The Spirit of Materials on Friday, May 8 from 6:00 PM to 8:30 PM. This presentation will include a conversation that will engage the community by examining critical issues surrounding cultural landscape, collective and individual vision, and the value of myth and memory. Nancy Cook, CCC Writing Instructor, will lead artists in a discussion on the spirit of materials and related relevant questions.

Artists, students and community members are also invited to participate in two all-day hands-on clay workshops led by the Maori artists on Friday, May 8 and Saturday, May 9 from 10:00 AM to 3:00 PM for both days in the CCC Art Center Ceramics Studio, 1799 Lexington Avenue, Astoria. Seating is limited for this event; please contact [email protected] for additional information.

Clay artist Colleen Waata Urlich has been made an Officer of the NZ Order of Merit (ONZM) for her service to Maori arts in the New Year Honours. 30 December 2014 Northern Advocate Photograph by John Stone NAG 31Dec14 -

Clay artist Colleen Waata Urlich has been made an Officer of the NZ Order of Merit (ONZM) for her service to Maori arts in the New Year Honours. 30 December 2014 Northern Advocate Photograph by John Stone

The Spirit of Materials Cultural Exchange is centered around the broad potential of the arts and humanities, and will cultivate the North Coast community’s knowledge of post-colonial indigenous identity and creativity. Events will include sharing of stories and meals, challenging dialogue, cultural/collaborative art-making workshops, and educational outreach. Community members will have an opportunity to learn about and consider the traditional and evolving meaning of oceanic arts. Our community will also have the opportunity to develop relationships through personal interaction and examination of shared values. This exchange continues the rich cross-cultural history that has existed at mouth of the Columbia for thousands of years.

Colleen Waata Urlich, who is leading the traveling Maori collective with Baye Riddell, has been sculpting, molding and nurturing Maori art for years. She is a Maori clay artist and senior foundation member of the National body of Maori clay workers. Colleen has been involved with various Maori art initiatives. She is a founding member and coordinator for the Maori contemporary clay artists’ movement that begun in the 1980s. Colleen, along with Manos Nathan, Maori clay artist, participated in the Pacific Rim Exhibition in 2012, an indigenous gathering of artists from around the Pacific Rim that took place at Clatsop Community College.

“Our return to Astoria with a group of younger clay artists, who have yet to experience the warmth and hospitality offered to us on our first visit, has been keenly anticipated. Our regret is that Manos Nathan has been unable to join us but all the current participants worked with Richard Rowland, ceramic artist and CCC Instructor, in January 2014, during the International Indigenous Artists Gathering “Kokiri Putahi,” in Kaikohe at Kohewhata Marae – a traditional meeting place – which brought together some 145 indigenous artists from Alaska to Australia,” says Urlich.

Seven Days, by Baye Riddell, 2012

Seven Days, by Baye Riddell, 2012

Baye Riddell began his vocation as a ceramicist in 1973 and has been working as a full-time ceramicist ever since. In 1987, he co-founded Nga Kaihanga Uku, a Maori clay workers’ organization. “When I took up pottery in the early 70s there were no Maori ceramic traditions to refer to and so my first attempts to express my culture in fired clay were very tentative and clumsy. I was nicknamed “the Native” in the local pottery circles at the time who were mainly influenced by Japanese and European approaches to ceramics. Since those days however I have been privileged to be a part of the birth and growth of an exciting Maori ceramic movement which has forged a unique identity in the ceramic world.”

Dorothy Waetford’s early career began as a performing artist as a member of the contemporary Maori dance company Taiao based in Auckland. Excited by developments in the contemporary Maori art scene, her interest led her to choosing clay as a preferred medium for art making. “The rich, cultural heritage I come from is the ground beneath my feet in the space I work from.  In that space, I search for sculptural forms connecting the past with the present and use clay as a medium to transfigure the spiritual into physical, contemporary space.”

Paihau (fin of a fish), 2013: Dorothy Waetford

Paihau (fin of a fish), 2013: Dorothy Waetford

Todd Douglas is a fulltime ceramic artist living and working at Muriwai Beach. Primarily self-taught, Todd’s work is recognized for utilizing a broad range of ceramic techniques and surface treatments as well as combining materials such as clay, wood, lashing and LED lighting. “As soon as I touched clay, I was hooked.  Bringing together the four elements – fire, earth, air and water, clay is like no other material.  It has fascinating physical properties such as its malleability but it also has many cultural and spiritual significances.   As it is at the heart of so many creation stories, it’s a reminder of the interconnectedness between people/s.”

Carla Ruka is a contemporary Maori clay sculptress. Her inspiration and ideas descend from her ancestors. 

The clay artworks and images she has developed over the years are based on the korero of her Marae (Mahuri), Kapa haka (Maori Performing Arts), Maori Spirituality, indigenous cultures, her whanau and the Taitokerau/Hokianga area. “Clay is my therapy. It molds and develops images of my wairura (spirit). As a contemporary Maori Clay Artist, the artworks and images I have created over the years descend from my ancestors and are inspired by the people around me.” “I continue to surround myself in cultural and community activities.”

Rhonda Halliday is a Maori clay artist whose work focuses on learning more about her cultural heritages, Maori and Pakeha, and finding an identity that integrates the two. “Our ancestors used metaphors to express themselves in their artworks; to tell a story, an historical account of a person/s or an expression of thoughts and beliefs. My work is also a metaphor used to express personal feelings from research into the many areas of history between my Māori and Pākeha connections. There are still many more conversations to be captured in clay.”

“These gifted artists have been selected by the Maori to honor and keep the life of their ancestors and their communities alive. Clatsop Community College has brought another educational and cultural experience that can impact our blended and evolving global community.” Richard Rowland

For information on any of the events please visit https://www.clatsopcc.edu/community/art-gallery/2015-maori-art-exhibit-cultural-exchange or contact [email protected] ; 503- 338-2449.

Workshop THIS WEEKEND!

Here’s information about a workshop I’m teaching in Medford starting this Saturday, May 2. As of now there are a couple of spots left, so if you’re interested please contact The Rogue Gallery to register;
(541) 772-8118 or http://www.roguegallery.org

Techniques in Palette Knife Painting
taught by Silvia Trujillo

Saturday and Sunday, May 2 & 3 11am – 4pm
Skill Level: All Skill Levels, 16 and older
The direct approach of applying paint to the canvas with a palette knife was very popular with the Impressionist, and of particular interest to artists like Van Gogh and Monet. The palette knife can render luscious texture and depth, while maintaining rich pure colors. In this class, you will develop skills with the palette knife to enhance your work in value, design, and color harmony.
$170 members, $195 non-members

I’ve just posted some recent palette knife – plein air paintings that were completed on the Oregon Coast. I’ve been living on the coast for the last few months and have become well acquainted with quite a few lovely plein air painting locations. If by chance you’re planning a trip to the central coast and would like to do plein air work or would like a studio lesson, let me know and maybe we can get together.

Also, if you’re in Florence, stop by the KB Gallery in Old Town on Maple St. to see my work and many others by local artists!

Wind Sculpture

Everything on the coast — from the trees to the sand dunes, clouds and even the marsh water — is shaped by the constant wind. All that varies is how fast the object in question can respond to that invisible force. When a day spent plein air painting results in work this stunning, I wonder if I myself am not also being transformed by the challenge of pushing back against the moving air.

Price: $500
Media: Oil on canvas
Size: 12”x16″

© Copyright 2015 Silvia Trujillo Art

© Copyright 2015 Silvia Trujillo Art

Cleawox Lake

Around Florence, Oregon, Monterey cypress trees grow into the wind with shapely results. Windy scenes are perfect for palette knife work, especially in capturing the subtle color variations in the dunes, sky and water.

Price: $250
Media: Oil on canvas
Size: 8”x8″

© Copyright 2015 Silvia Trujillo Art

© Copyright 2015 Silvia Trujillo Art

Creola of Florence

While those who fish the Pacific off the coast of Oregon are predominately male, their boats are almost always female. I painted Creola at the docks in Florence one sunny afternoon, as she patiently waited for her captain to arrive and take her out to troll for tuna.

Price: $250
Media: Oil on canvas
Size: 8”x8″

© Copyright 2015 Silvia Trujillo Art

© Copyright 2015 Silvia Trujillo Art