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11 Art Destinations That Double As Therapeutic Retreats

There are many reasons to see art — to get a taste of something beautiful, to engage in new ways with today’s pressing questions, to escape to another era of the past, to see for a moment through another person’s eyes. Yes, there are probably infinite reasons to spend some one-on-one time with an artwork or four this holiday season, but today we’re focusing on one reason: healing.

Art can reveal, shock and delight, that much we know — but sometimes it has the ability to go deeper than the senses, to shift something inside us that is hard, if not impossible, to pinpoint or explain. For some, art has a certain spiritual or therapeutic power to change the viewer just by holding them in a certain time and place. Experiencing art can often be more otherworldly than a church, restorative than a yoga retreat, soothing than a day at the spa. We’ve compiled a list of 11 art destinations that, more than the average museum, intentionally cater to both the senses and the soul, in one way or another.

Check one out if you’re feeling particularly tapped out this holiday season, or whenever you want to treat yourself to a transcendent aesthetic experience. Behold, 11 art spots that will please your senses and soothe your insides. Let us know what we missed in the comments.

1. Rothko Chapel

rothko chapel

Visitors at the Rothko Chapel, Houston, 1977. Completed in 1971, it was designed in collaboration with American painter Mark Rothko and contains fourteen of his black paintings. (Photo by Romano Cagnoni/Hulton Archive/Getty Images)
Where: Houston, Texas
What: Founded by Houston philanthropists John and Dominique de Menil, Chapel is a non-denominational sanctuary combining the powers of spirituality and art. It is part spiritual retreat, part modern art museum, part human rights center, featuring a series of dark purple and black works by Mark Rothko.
Vibes:We are reasserting man’s natural desire for the exalted, for a concern with our relationship to absolute emotions,” wrote Barnett Newman, whose sculpture “Broken Obelisk” sits outside the chapel.

“[The paintings are] sort of a window to beyond,” explained Suna Umari, whose worked at the Chapel for over 30 years. “[Rothko] said the bright colors sort of stop your vision at the canvas, where dark colors go beyond. And definitely you’re looking at the beyond. You’re looking at the infinite.”

2. Salvation Mountain

salvation mountain california

Where: Niland, California
What: Leonard Knight’s adobe clay masterpiece, which is 50 feet high and 150 feet wide, revolves around the simple idea: “God Is Love.” The outsider art mecca features paintings of trees, sculpted flowers, biblical quotes, bluebirds and a giant red heart, made from over 100,000 gallons of donated paint.
Vibes:The resulting lumpy, undulating structure, saturated with biblical verses and sayings, is a testament, as its name implies, to Knight’s religious salvation,” said Sam Lubell of The New York Times. “But it seems more inspired by Candy Land and LSD. Swirling and striped reds, whites, yellows, greens, aquas and blues surround you.”

3. The Lightning Field

walter de maria lightning field

Where: Catron County, New Mexico
What: The piece of land art, made by sculptor Walter De Maria, features 400 stainless steel poles with pointed tips arranged in a rectangular grid amidst a vast New Mexican vista. The sculpture, which is meant to be both walked through and viewed, interacts with the surrounding landscape, creating an immersive experience best seen at sunrise and sunset.

Vibes:Seen from the porch, the rods marched away in phalanxes to the south. As the sun sank over our right shoulders, the metal spikes started to glow in the golden light. Their pointed tips took fire first, like candles, but soon the spikes themselves lighted up, top to bottom, as if glowing from within,” wrote Cornelia Dean in The New York Times. “For me, it was as if a piece of formal music, a Bach invention, perhaps, had taken material form and was playing before my eyes, not my ears.”

4. The Great Gallery of Horseshoe Canyon

horseshoe canyon

Where:Canyonlands National Park Maze District, Utah
What: This remote Utah canyon is known for its collection of Barrier Canyon Style rock art — a distinctive style of pictographs and petroglyphs thought to be over 6,000 years old. The mecca of ghostly figures has been dubbed The Great Gallery, though the space feels more like a forbidden sandstone temple.
Vibes:They were strangely shaped with neither arms nor eyes and standing up to 4 feet high,” said David Kelly in The LA Times. “One figure had feathers dangling from his arms. There were insect-like creatures and butterflies. Were they men, spirits, symbols? No one knows, so scientists refer to them as anthromorphs and describe the art as Barrier Canyon style, after the original name of this place.”

5. Storm King Art Center

storm king

Where:Hudson Valley, New York
What: 500-acres of hills, fields and endless green expanses serve as home to 100 massive sculptures, yielding an adult art lover’s version of a giant, zenned-out playground.
Vibes: “The view made me think that Ralph Waldo Emerson, an inspiration to the Hudson River School painters (whose work Storm King’s founders originally intended to house here in the 1960s), must have been nearby when he wrote: ‘The health of the eye seems to demand a horizon. We are never tired, so long as we can see far enough,'” wrote John Motyka.

6. ‘Twilight Epiphany’

james turrell twilight epiphany

Where: Houston, Texas
What: This site-specific installation is James Turrell’s 73rd “skyspace,” which performs with 40-minute light shows that lead up to sunrise and follow sunset, with slight variations depending on the weather and season. LEDs sync up with the changing colors of the sky, yielding a magical experience that feels like looking out unto infinity.
Vibes:If you take a photo of the sky in this skyspace, the color you see in the opening is not actually going to show up in your camera because in fact it is not there,” Turrell told Here Houston. “We do create the world in which we live to a much larger extent than we are willing to take responsibility for.”

7. The Dream House

mela foundation dream house

Where: TriBeCa, New York
What: The collaborative Sound and Light Environment, made by composer La Monte Young and visual artist Marian Zazeela, lives on the third floor of a TriBeCa building, housing within it “a time installation measured by a setting of continuous frequencies in sound and light.” The very long term, ongoing exhibition opened in 1993 and runs until 2015.
Vibes:Visiting The Dream House can be a baffling, delirious experience,” wrote The Observer’s Andrew Russeth. “The room is soaked in purple light. Huge speaker stacks emit a constant, potent drone, which music critic John Rockwell called a ‘cosmic throb.’ It is often very hot, but it is not uncomfortable. There are pillows, and you can recline, letting the sound work on you. It’s really something.”

8. The Integatron

integ

Where: Landers, California
What: In 1957, believing that he was following orders of visitors from planet Venus, George Van Tassel built a structure supposedly capable of rejuvenation, anti-gravity and time travel due to the intermittent magnetic fields inside the space. The large white dome now serves as a site for quartz sound baths, where visitors can recline in the acoustically perfect sound chamber and feel the vibrations of musical quartz bowls.
Vibes:It’s 105 degrees outside, and sunlight is streaming in through 15 windows ringing the rotunda,” wrote The LA Times’ Scott Gold. “Somehow, it is not hot, not in here. The notes clash over your head, some in breathtaking harmony, some in startling dissonance. Just when you’re starting to see patterns in the grain of the wood in the soaring ceiling, it’s over. There is silence, and no one moves. The acoustics are so good you can hear a man swallow from across the room. It has been either the shortest or the longest half-hour of your life.”

9. The Isamu Noguchi Playscape

noguchi playscape

Where: Atlanta, Georgia
What:Noguchi constructed this severe, minimalist playground in 1976 in Atlanta’s Piedmont Park, discarding prescribed methods of “playing” for something more imaginative and exploratory. The avant-garde sculptor toys with the space between art and experience, equipment and sculpture, object and landscape, seriousness and play, letting each viewer — kid or adult — encounter the unusual art experience in his or her own spontaneous way.
Vibes:Kids are challenged to decide how to creatively play with these oversized objects,” said Robert Witherspoon of the City of Atlanta’s Public Art Program. “It’s not scripted what to do on the climbing cubes, play mound, and jungle gyms — you have to improvise.”

10. International Car Forest of the Last Church

car forest nevada

Where: Goldfield, Nevada
What:Artists Chad Sorg and Mark Rippie have turned the desert into a museum, installing over 40 automobiles tipped on their heads and stacked on top of each other, like a set of rotting Hot Wheels for the gods.
Vibes:The dream project of two Nevada artists, the International Car Forest of the Last Church looks more akin to a druidic henge of junkers than any Christian chapel,” reads a description from Atlas Obscura

11. The Chinati Foundation

the chinati foundation

Where: Marfa, Texas
What:In 1986, artist Donald Judd opened a contemporary art museum with permanent and public exhibitions which are linked to (and inseparable from) the surrounding landscape, turning the entire city of Marfa into a dreamy space somewhere between an artistic fabrication and real life. It includes John Chamberlain’s mangled automobiles and Judd’s maze of 100 milled-aluminum boxes, each the same size yet with slightly different interiors.
Vibes: “It takes a great deal of time and thought to install work carefully,” Judd wrote in his first catalogue. “This should not always be thrown away. Most art is fragile and some should be placed and never moved again. Somewhere a portion of contemporary art has to exist as an example of what the art and its context were meant to be. Somewhere, just as the platinum iridium meter guarantees the tape measure, a strict measure must exist for the art of this time and place.”

News from Light Garden

The

Flowers of Hope

Artists’ Reception

at Roxy Ann Winery

was amazing!!

Great friends, good food, drink
 and lots of fun!
Thank you to everyone who came out to support the artists!
and….
The votes are in!
Melanie Dines’
Fuchsia Panel
won the
$50 gift certificate
  
It was a close call between many panels
 but Melanie’s panel won by one vote.
Congratulations!

Thank you to Brenda

and everyone at Roxy Ann

for being part of our program!

Fall Class Lineup
 
 Fused Glass: Dichroic Jewelry
September 27th
One Saturday Afternoon
1-4pm
Grab attention with beautiful dichroic glass jewelry you make yourself! Cabochons for necklaces or earrings; they all will dazzle your friends!Learn to cut them so they come out perfect every time. Compatible glass and lots of dichroic glass is included.

Make several pieces for $55

 Glass Fusing Basics

October 11th & 18th
Two Saturday Afternoons
1-4pm

Learn one of the fastest growing mediums in glass! In this two week class you’ll complete a 4″ tile and a small fused & slumped plate. Covers firing programs, volumn control, prepping kiln shelves and ware and much more!
All supplies are included.
$85

 Painting with Frit

October 25th
One Saturday

10a-12pm
Lunch
1-4pm

Learn to use frit, hand pulled stringers and confetti to quickly add dimension and a painterly quality to your fused glass art.
Find out how easy it is to develop your sketches from photos and other inspiration. These panels can be a great reference guide for future projects.

All frit, confetti, stringers, glass and lunch are included.

 

Glass Fusing Basics or equivalent is required.

$125

 
 Flowers of Hope Fusing Workshop

Even if you’ve never done any glass fusing before you can make an 8″ x 8″ fused panel to donate to Flowers of Hope.
$10 buys you a base piece of glass, access to all frits, stringers and noodles, hanging hardware and firing. Come in and try your hand at fusing and find out how easy and fun it can be. You’ll also be doing a wonderful thing for a woman going through a tough time.
OR
TRY FUSING!  Workshop
The same class only you get to keep it!  Learn about using frits, stringers and noodles in this easy workshop!    $15
October   18               10am-12n
November 15              10am-12n
Is there a class listed on our website that you would like to take that isn’t scheduled yet?  Send me an email and let me know.  That’s how I know when to schedule our classes.  If you have 5-6 people we can schedule private parties.

click here to check out our classes

 

Need a Kiln?  Rent one of ours!

 

Bring in your fused work and we will fire it for you!

 

Projects small enough to fit on a 7″ shelf:              $   5.00

One or more projects on a 13″ round shelf:                8.00

Fuse + Slump on 13″ shelf:                                         12.00

Projects on a 20″ shelf:                                                11.00

Fused + Slump on a 20″ shelf:                                    14.00

Long Bubble Squeeze  add                                            3.00

 

  

 Morning Workshops: 

Come join our morning workshops on Wednesday and Saturday mornings from 10a – Noon.  Use our tools and workshop space.  $10 for 2 hours!  Call to reserve your space.  You can do a Flowers of Hope panel during any of our workshops…or a “Try Fusing” panel to get you started in fusing.  You can also schedule bigger projects.  Contact us for more information.

2014 Au Naturel Reception and Awards

aunaturel_artists_400x267

Artists pictured left to right:
BACK ROW: Lisa Taylor (Dublin, CA), Andrea Moni (Irvine, CA), Ben Rosenberg (Portland, OR), Deborah Shapiro (Tigard, OR), Patrick Kernan (Portland, OR), Georganne Watters (Rhododendron, OR), Bethany Rowland (Portland, OR), Reed Clarke (Portland, OR), Evan Degenfelder (Lebanon, OR), Joseph Besch (Portland, OR)
MIDDLE ROW: Michael Kelly (Beaverton, OR), V.E. Long (Angwin, CA), Soo Ock Ryu
(Katy, TX), Ellen Soderquist (Dallas, TX), Alexandra Becker-Black (Portland, OR)FRONT ROW: CCC’s Kristin Shauck, Founding Director of the Au Naturel international competition and Charles Froelick, the 2014 Au Naturel juror and owner/director of Froelick Gallery in Portland, OR.
ALSO IN ATTENDANCE: James Archer (not shown, Portland, OR), Annie Heisey (not shown, Portland, OR)

The opening reception of Clatsop Community College’s eighth annual juried art exhibit, Au Naturel: The Nude in the 21st Century was held Thursday, January 30, 2014 in the CCC Art Center Gallery.

This year, artists from 28 states, the District of Columbia, and Canada, Germany, and the Netherlands submitted nearly 800 images for consideration. After careful deliberation, this year’s juror, Charles Froelick chose 57 works of art representing 45 artists from 17 states in addition to artists from Canada and Germany.

Seventeen of the selected artists were present for the reception, including artists who traveled from California and Texas.  During the opening reception, juror Charles Froelick gave a gallery talk and awards were announced, including cash prizes, purchase awards, and three workshop awards, which are supported by submission fees paid by all artists who entered the competition. The Bridgewater Bistro, Clemente’s Restaurant, and Dairy Maid generously provided hors d’oeuvres and Erickson Floral Company provided a stunning bouquet for the reception. Thanks also to the Astoria Coffee House and Bistro, the Fort George Brewery & Public House, and the Cannery Pier Hotel for their support.

This year’s Au Naturel exhibit will remain on display in the CCC Art Center Gallery, 1799 Lexington, Astoria, through March 20, 2014. All visitors are invited to cast a vote for the People’s Choice award, which will be announced at the close of the exhibition.

The Au Naturel exhibit is free and open to the public. The CCC Art Center Gallery is located at 1799 Lexington Avenue, Astoria. The gallery is open Monday-Friday, 8am-6pm and Saturday, 11am-4pm; Sundays and holidays by appointment only.

Annie Heisey, of Portland, OR, whose work was selected for first place in the 2012 competition, won first place again this year for her mixed media piece Haunted.  As second place, Mr. Froelick selected a graphite drawing entitled Subtle Drama by Susan Boehm of Lake Geneva, WI.   Nick Reszetar of Milan, MI, was awarded third place for his conté on mylar piece entitled Javon Twice.

froelick_2014_400x267

Charles Froelick speaks to a gallery full to capacity of visitors attending the reception.

All of the artists selected to participate in the 2014 exhibit were invited to submit proposals for the solo show and workshop awards, which were reviewed by the art faculty. From among these submissions, V.E. Long of Angwin, CA, was chosen for the solo show award as well as a workshop award. V.E. Long’s solo show entitled Cakes, Nudes, and Bowling Balls will open the CCC Art Center’s 2014-2015 exhibition season next fall.

Cynthia Lahti of Portland, OR was also selected to teach a workshop that will focus on the creative process, experimentation, and risk-taking, which will be held during the next academic year (time and date to be announced).  Ellen Soderquist of Dallas, TX was selected to teach a workshop entitled Gesture: The Essence of Figure, which was held Friday, January 31, 2014.

View images of the award-winning artwork as well as those of this year’s exhibit and prior exhibits at www.aunaturelart.com. Visitors to CCC also have the opportunity to view the purchase awards from previous Au Naturel exhibitions in the Dora Badollet Library, 1680 Lexington Avenue, Astoria. Library hours are: Monday-Thursday, 8am-6pm; Friday, 8am-5pm; and Sunday, 12pm-5pm.

Great Article About Eve’s Artwork

Fire and Ice-copy

IN THE PLAZA GALLERY

By Dick Warren

June 2013

Hold on to your hats! The Plaza Gallery is showing the work of Eve Withrow, perhaps the most dynamic, exciting painter in the Valley.

The exhibit is not for an afternoon’s rest, but more like a roller coaster or windstorm.  The wonder is that Eve has a secure hand on everything and the threat of chaos is carefully controlled. Using water media, a delicate medium, and collage, she somehow manages to create images in color and line in particular, at their strongest and most expressive.

The paintings are anything but delicate.  The fact that finally they are secured within their frames is testament to her statement that her art is to “finally remind us of the benevolent patterns of the Universe”. The compositions somehow hold together in their frames.

Eve is familiar to many at the Manor.  She has been painting and teaching in the Valley for some time.  Her work is highly regarded all over the West where she has exhibited constantly.  Eve is a director of the successful Art and Soul Gallery in Ashland, and has been in the Members Gallery at the Rogue Gallery and Art Center in Medford for many years.

Eve will talk about her work at a reception on Wednesday, June 5 at 5:00 p.m.

 

 

 

Taste of Summer: Jacksonville PResents Plenty for Arts & Culture Lovers today from 11 - 4!

Begin with lots of art & activities on the lawn of Jville's historic courthouse!

Begin with lots of art & activities on the lawn of Jville’s historic courthouse!

 

 

Anne Brooke, founder of the Art Presence Art Center, is setting up tables on the lawn in front of the gallery where kids can play with different mediums to whet a personal taste for creating art. Kids who complete a work of art get a free ride on the Jacksonville trolley! The gallery’s current exhibition is a beautiful show of member works called “Coastal, By-the-Sea” with – you guessed it – a seashore theme. There will be additional children’s games & activities, face painting, Wildlife Images and much more!

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"Nautilus," handpainted silk wall hanging by Judy Elliott on display at Art Presence

“Nautilus,” handpainted silk wall hanging by Judy Elliott on display at Art Presence

 

On the other side of the historic Jacksonville Courthouse, SOAR member Cathy Gallatin and her chalk artist compadres have begun the process of creating five chalk art masterpieces! We’ll post shots of their progress throughout the day…

Chalk artist Cathy Gallatin and Britt Festival staff member Sara King Cole setting up some shade for the day.

Chalk artist Cathy Gallatin and Britt Festival staff member Sara King Cole setting up some shade for the day.

 

We'll post shots of the progress of Cathy's chalk art piece throughout the day!

We’ll post shots of the progress of Cathy’s chalk art piece throughout the day!

Chalk artists setting up their grids early this morning.

Chalk artists setting up their grids early this morning.

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Cross the street to enjoy today’s specials at the C Street Bistro, a fabulous house smoked pork chile verde torta ($8) or a classic Caesar salad ($6). Chef Paul Becking, who earned his degree in art, was trained by culinary icon Julia Child and his pulled pork is the talk of the town! Take advantage of the great price on this special version today only and see a classic piece of metal sculpture by Jacksonville artist Cheryl D Garcia.

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If you're coming from the other side of town...

If you’re coming from the other side of town…

 

There will be live music on Third Street, where Art Presence and SOAR member Judy Elliott will be demonstrating the art of handpainting silk in her booth, filled with her handsewn kimonos and Happi coats (the hip-length version of a kimono). Also showing his beautiful black and white photography is Ron Moore. You can see more of her gorgeous silk wall hangings at the Art Presence Art Center.

Judy Elliott of Dragonfly Designs West shows her newest Kimono...

Judy Elliott of Dragonfly Designs West shows her newest Kimono…

One of the silk pieces Judy will be transforming into a wall hanging beofre our eyes today!

One of the silk pieces Judy will be transforming into a wall hanging beofre our eyes today!

Judy models her newest Happi Coat

Judy models her newest Happi Coat

 

There will also be live music on California Street next to Pico’s and on the Courthouse lawn throughout the day, and additional food vendors, including the Frau Kemmling Schoolhaus Brauhaus and Front Porch Barbeque.

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Walking across town, you can enjoy many beautiful antique and classic cars parked along California Street, Jacksonville’s main drag. Don’t forget to stop in to some of our wonderful retailers, including Willowcreek Gifts, now under the new ownership of Jo Parker.

DSC00592

A few of the classic cars parked on California Street today

A few of the classic cars parked on California Street today

WillowCreek Gifts owner Jo parker welcomes you!

WillowCreek Gifts owner Jo parker welcomes you!

Once you’ve gotten to the other end of town, stop in at the GoodBean to cool off with a famous Jacksonville Thrill (or another of their lovely hot weather coffee and tea beverages) and see stunning forals in watercolor by Jacksonville artist Elaine Frenett, a watercolor piece by the artist who started the GoodBean’s art tradition 20 years ago, Wynn Pedersen, and another wall hanging by Judy Elliott called Tropical Splendor. The GoodBean, previous winner of the Best Coffee in Oregon competition, is sponsoring this years event, and the judges are in town for a practice session leading in to the June 22nd preliminary competition, also at their Jacksonville cafe.

 

Elaine Frenett's spectacular watercolor florals at the GoodBean

Elaine Frenett’s spectacular watercolor florals at the GoodBean

Tropical Splendor, by Judy Elliott, at the GoodBean

Tropical Splendor, by Judy Elliott, at the GoodBean

Best Coffee in Oregon judges at the GoodBean to do a practice tasting for the June 22 preliminaries, to be held  at the GoodBean

Best Coffee in Oregon judges at the GoodBean to do a practice tasting for the June 22 preliminaries, to be held at the GoodBean

From 11:30 – 2:30, enjoy some homemade strawberry shortcake, a Taste of Strawberries, and old-fashioned strawberry festival at the Jacksonville Presbyterian church.

The featured “taste” is a wine walk from 12-4 pm, where for $25 you can taste the finest offerings from local wineries at various businesses and locations around town. Participating wineries include 2Hawk Winery, Adit Public House, Belle Fiore Winery, Caprice Vineyards, Cliff Creek Cellars, Daisy Creek Vineyard, Dancin vineyards, Devitt Winery, EdenVale Winery, Grizzly peak Winery, LaBrasseur Vineyard, Ledger David, Pebblestone Cellars, Quady North Winery, Serra Vineyard, Soloro Vineyards, South Stage Cellars, Umpqua Tasting Room, Valley View Vineyards and Weisinger’s Winery.

So, join us in Jacksonville to enjoy a day of arts and culture as we celebrate a new season of the Britt Music Festival together!

Updates coming soon…have to get back out there and see how everyone’s art demonstrations are coming along!

[liveblog]

C Street Bistro, chockers full of happy patrons...

C Street Bistro, chockers full of happy patrons…

People getting the Wine Walk tickets...

People getting their Wine Walk tickets…

This time juggling with two partners...and a very good (and loud) band next to them. NIce work with many distractions in play...

This time juggling with two partners…and a very good (and loud) band next to them. NIce work with many distractions in play…

As always when Jacksonville hosts a citywide event, gussied up ladies are seen strolling around in their finery.

As always when Jacksonville hosts a citywide event, gussied up ladies are seen strolling around in their finery.

Our neighbor Josh juggles with a partner

Our neighbor Josh juggles with a partner

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Wow! Judy sure is making quick work of her lily pond scene...

Wow! Judy sure is making quick work of her lily pond scene…

Jaime Bryn's guitar is starting to take shape!

Jaime Bryn’s guitar is starting to take shape!

Taylor Conlin is painting kids with painted faces. Kids are having their faces painted right around the corner!

Taylor Conlin is painting kids with painted faces. Kids are having their faces painted right around the corner!

DSC00618

Cathy Gallatin's piece is coming along fabulously!

Cathy Gallatin’s piece is coming along fabulously!

JN Garrett is making beautiful progress on her chalk piece, too...

JN Garrett is making beautiful progress on her chalk piece, too…

Laila Dzene's chlak art in progress, and looking great! They're having a little lunch break with food from C St. Bistro as we post these shots...

Laila Dzene’s chalk art in progress, and looking great! They’re having a little lunch break with food from C St. Bistro as we post these shots…

These young ladies rock the house!

These young ladies rock the house!

Kathleen Hoevet discusses her photography with visitors to the Art Presence Art Center gallery

Kathleen Hoevet discusses her photography with visitors to the Art Presence Art Center gallery

FREE TROLLEY RIDE FOR A BUNCH OF KIDS ALREADY!!

FREE TROLLEY RIDE FOR A BUNCH OF KIDS ALREADY!!

Anne Brooke encourages the kids trying their hand at watercolors.

Anne Brooke encourages the kids trying their hand at watercolors.

Fun with art! ...and balloons...but he didn't seem quite as excited about that as he did working on his creation...

Fun with art! …and balloons…but he didn’t seem quite as excited about that as he did working on his creation…

Art Presence member Randall Grealish and his lovely wife Tara watch their nephews making art...

Art Presence member Randall Grealish and his lovely wife Tara watch their nephews making art…

What could be better than kids making art and some finished pieces frying already?!

What could be better than kids making art on a summer afternoon with finished pieces drying already?!

[liveblog]

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[liveblog]

Judy finished these two incredible silk wall hanging today!

Judy finished these two incredible silk wall hangings today!

Looked like she might make a sale at the end of the day, too.

Looked like she might make a sale at the end of the day, too.

Laila's finished chalk art

Laila’s finished chalk art

Jennifer's finished chalk art - and can you believe this is her first chalk art?! Well done, Jen!

Jennifer’s (almost) finished chalk art – and can you believe this is her first?! Well done, Jen!

Cathy's larger piece looks great, but will take longer to complete. She's still working out there and it's 6:40. I hope she's got water...better go check on her when this live blog is done...

Cathy’s larger piece looks great, but will take longer to complete. She’s still working out there and it’s 6:40. I hope she’s got water…better go check on her when this live blog is done…

Taylor's finished chalk art

Taylor’s finished chalk art

Jaime's finished chalk art

Jaime touches up the border on her finished chalk art

Another portion of Cathy's chalk masterpiece in progress

Another portion of Cathy’s original chalk masterpiece in progress

 

Laila and Jennifer put the finishing touches on their pieces

Laila and Jennifer put the finishing touches on their pieces

7pm –

Laila's chalk art - finished and signed!

Laila’s Jacksonville scene with classic cars – finished and signed!

Jennifer's chalk art - finished and signed!

Jennifer’s finished portrait of Anne Brooke painting – finished and signed!

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Taylor's chalk art - finished and signed!

Taylor’s kids with faces painted – finished and signed!

 

Jaime's chalk art - finished and signed!

Jaime’s rockin’ guitar players – finished and signed! Jaime was hired by the Britt to do another piece of a saxophone at a later date when they saw this one – nice work, Jaime!

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Tired and well-roasted from working on a 96 degree day, Cathy is presses on to finish her centerpiece with Laila's help.

Tired and well-roasted from working on a 96 degree day, Cathy is presses on to finish her centerpiece with Laila’s help.

 

Late passers by stop to admire the finished work

Late passers by stop to admire the finished work

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Cathy puts the finishiing touches on the wine glasses and Laila paints the outlines for definition

Cathy puts the finishing touches on the wine glasses and Laila paints outlines for definition

It was hot, there was art, and wine, and summer dresses, and a lot of wonderful people in Jacksonville today. Everyone I spoke with had a great day. I hope you were one of them, but if you couldn’t make it this year, I hope you will come join us to celebrate the opening of the Britt Festival’s 2014 concert season! Signing off for tonight…

[liveblog]

Morning after update, with the largest piece of chalk art completed and signed…Click any image in the post to see a larger view – view this one first, and then stop at the courthouse to see all these lovley chalk art pieces before they’re gone!  Many thanks to the Britt Festival for this artistic addition to their opening celebration festivites – a fabulous taste of summer by Cathy Gallatin.

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A Taste of Summer, by Cathy Gallatin

A Taste of Summer, by Cathy Gallatin

Hilltop Gallery - From Classroom to Cézanne

For former art professors, ‘retirement’ means operating an art gallery

By Edward Graham

(This article appears in the 2013 May issue of “This Active Life” published by the National Education Association. This is from their website; the actual magazine article contains more pictures. ~ Richard and Rochelle Newman)

Richard and Rochelle Newman knew they wanted to continue their lifelong passion for art when they retired after a combined 60-plus years of teaching—they just didn’t know how or where.

The couple met when both were art students in Michigan at Cranbrook Academy of Art in Bloomfield Hills. After their marriage, they moved to Massachusetts where they kept up their love of art by creating it and teaching it to others.

Richard worked with painting and sculpture, and taught full time for 34 years at Bradford College, located in a section of Haverhill, Mass. He also chaired the college’s Creative Arts Division for many years. Rochelle created tapestries and collages, and worked full time for 28 years at Northern Essex Community College in Haverhill. Later she worked at Merrimack College in North Andover. The Newmans loved spending time in a collegiate setting, surrounded by people with similar artistic interests.

In 2000, Bradford College closed its doors and the Newmans began looking for another artistic environment to spend their retirement. In 2003 “we discovered Ashland and Oregon when we attended a conference here in the city,” says Richard. “It’s a small-town atmosphere with a world-class theater component.”

Ashland, Ore., has only 22,000 residents but attracts hundreds of thousands of tourists every year for the Oregon Shakespeare Festival and the Ashland Independent Film Festival. The city is also home to Southern Oregon University, which was a major draw for the Newmans.

“We came for the three C’s—climate, culture, and community,” says Rochelle.
The couple traversed 3,500 miles, then settled in the Mountain Meadows Retirement Community—a serene development that is run and operated by some 270 homeowners, who are also actively involved in the community of Ashland. “It really reminded us of where we used to live and teach in Massachusetts,” says Richard.

“Minotaur,” above, was created by 
retired professor and artist Richard
 Newman, who owns Oregon's 
Hilltop Art Gallery with his wife 
Rochelle, also a retired professor 
and artist.

“Minotaur,” above, was created by 
retired professor and artist Richard
 Newman, who owns Oregon’s 
Hilltop Art Gallery with his wife 
Rochelle, also a retired professor 
and artist.

The Newmans had moved to Ashland with a vague idea of how they would spend their time, but quickly found themselves pursuing an entirely new and exciting venture—opening and maintaining an art gallery. “Within a month of moving to Mountain Meadows Retirement Community we were serendipitously introduced to an unused space in the heart of the campus,” says Rochelle. “In unison, my husband and I said this would make a great art environment, and so the Hilltop Gallery came into being.”

The Newmans transformed the 850-square-foot, one-room space into an elegant gallery. They put in new paint, carpeting, and lighting. In 2010, the Hilltop Gallery officially opened for business.

The gallery “is close to the clubhouse and next to the fitness center so people drop in easily,” Richard says.

The art also can have a therapeutic effect on the residents. “We promote the idea that the aging population needs to keep both their bodies as well as their minds fit,” he says. “We have also hosted workshops given by local artists for our community.”

To date, the gallery has held 18 exhibits and a variety of art workshops. Admission to events is free, and the Newmans work to attract retirees and other Ashland residents. “We try to connect with the Ashland community as a whole, as well as with those in the retirement community,” says Rochelle.

The Newmans strive to bring in the best artists—from nearby or further away. They have even featured the work of a young woman from South America. “Our tastes in art are broad so we have shown everything from paintings, sculptures, prints, photos, fabric art, jewelry, and digital art,” says Richard. The gallery is open one afternoon a week or by appointment, while the Newmans reserve their mornings to work on their own projects in the artists’ studio they built beneath their home.

It may not have been in their original retirement plans, but operating an art gallery is an experience the Newmans say they wouldn’t trade.
Rochelle says she and her husband enjoy the opportunity to share their expertise and provide the community with a wide range of artists and styles to view. “For us,” she says, “It’s a labor of love as well as an educational experience.”

For more information, visit the Newmans and the Hilltop Art Gallery.

Elements Show at RGAC

Hannah, editor of Art Matters! writing…I went to the Rogue Gallery and Art Center this afternoon to attend a meeting of southern Oregon arts leaders. It was a fabulous time of exchanging ideas and affirming our mutual desire to bring our arts community closer together and make a greater case for the value of art to the broader community. You’ll be hearing more about the ideas we’ve had and what we’re planning soon…

After the meeting adjourned, I stayed a little while longer to look at the Elements show, and I have to say that I did not know that fiber arts could be so very well done, so truly artful. The quilted pieces on display range from intricate embroidery to painted silk, from garments to wall art, and from abstract to landscape to figurative. Definitely a fabulous display of the broad range of creativity possible with fabric, needle and thread! This show will only be up for another week, ending next Friday, so I strongly recommend you go see it soon if you haven’t already. You’ll be glad you did!

Here’s a quick look around the show…

Au Naturel Awards Highlight Artists’ Reception

The opening reception of Clatsop Community College’s seventh annual juried art exhibit, Au Naturel: The Nude in the 21st Century, was held Thursday, March 7, in the CCC Art Center Gallery.

 

2013 Au Naturel Artists

Artists pictured left to right: Denise Weir (Edmonds, WA), Jim McComas (Superior, CO), John Whitehouse (West Linn, OR), Bethany Rowland (Portland, OR), Sebastian Hyde (Oakland, CA), Lisa Ackerman (Astoria, OR), Jessica Marshall (Corvallis, OR), Paul Rutz (Portland, OR), Alexandra Eyer (Gold Beach, OR), Rhoda Draws (Mill Valley, CA), Ted Chilles (Portland, OR), Patrick Kernan (Portland, OR), Jessica McCoy (Claremont, CA), Rob Bibler (Salem, OR) with CCC’s Kristin Shauck, Founding Director of the Au Naturel international competition. Photo by David Homer.

This year, over 600 images were submitted for consideration by artists from 26 states and Canada, Mexico, China, Morocco and the United Kingdom. The 2013 show includes 52 works by 47 artists from 16 states and Canada.

 

Fourteen of the selected artists were present for the reception, including artists who traveled from as far away as San Francisco and Claremont, California, and Superior, Colorado. This year’s juror Clint Brown, Professor Emeritus at Oregon State University, gave a gallery talk. During the opening reception, awards were announced including cash prizes, a purchase award, a combined solo show and workshop award, and four additional workshop awards. Awards for this competition are supported by submission fees paid by all participating artists. Bridgewater Bistro and Clemente’s Restaurant generously provided hors d’oeuvres and Erickson Floral Company provided flowers for the reception. Thanks also to the Astoria Coffee House and Bistro and the Cannery Pier Hotel for their support. A No-Host Post-Reception party at the Astoria Coffee House and Bistro was held immediately following, and on Friday, March 8, Mr. Brown gave a presentation titled “Nude vs. Naked” to an audience of students, faculty, staff and community members.

 

This year’s Au Naturel exhibit will remain on display in the CCC Art Center Gallery, 1799 Lexington, Astoria, through March 28. All visitors are invited to cast a vote for the People’s Choice award, which will be announced at the close of the exhibition.

 

For the first time in the history of the Au Naturel competition, an artist has been awarded first place for the second time.  Michael Reedy, of Ann Arbor, MI, whose work was selected for first place in the 2009 competition, won first place again this year for his mixed media piece Expulsion. As second place, Mr. Brown selected a conté, pastel and charcoal drawing entitled The Source by Robert Bibler of Salem, OR. Grace Benedict of Lafayette, IN was awarded third place for her colored pencil drawing entitled Cradle. All of the artists selected to participate in the 2013 exhibit were invited to submit proposals for a solo show award. From among these submissions, Paul Rutz of Portland, OR was selected by the art faculty. In conjunction with his solo show, scheduled to open the 2013-2014 exhibition season, Dr. Rutz will also lead a workshop instructing participants in his unique approach to artmaking.

 

In addition to cash prizes and the solo show award, multiple workshop awards were announced. Jessica McCoy, Assistant Professor at Pitzer College in Claremont, CA was chosen to lead a workshop on color theory, and Jennifer Cutshall, an accomplished mural painter in Portland, was chosen to lead a workshop that will deal with abstraction of the figure. Grace Benedict, who teaches at Purdue University in West Lafayette, IN and Cathy Locke, who teaches in the graduate department at the Academy of Art in San Francisco, were both invited to teach workshops in the coming academic year. Cathy Locke’s graphite drawing on mylar titled Torso 4 was selected for this year’s purchase award by art department faculty and will become part of the College’s growing permanent collection.

 

To view images of the award winning artwork as well as those of this year’s exhibit and prior exhibits, visit www.aunaturel.com. Visitors to CCC also have the opportunity to view the purchase awards from previous Au Naturel exhibitions in the Dora Badollet Library. For library hours, call 503-338-2466.

 

The Au Naturel exhibit is free and open to the public. The CCC Art Center Gallery is located at 1799 Lexington Avenue, Astoria. The gallery is open M-F, 8am-6pm and Saturday, 11am-4pm; Sundays and holidays by appointment only. Please note special Spring Break hours from March 25 through March 28 of 11am-4pm.

 

Please direct inquiries to Kristin Shauck, 503-338-2472; [email protected].

 

 

Jacksonville Elementary School Announces 9th Annual Student Art Exhibition

Jacksonville Elementary continues Parent Art Program and Art Exhibition THURSDAY, March 21st, 5-7:30

For the Love of Art, by Alaya Metwally

For the Love of Art, by Alaya Metwally

Students at Jacksonville Elementary School have learned about perspective, pointillism, color and collage.  They can tell you the difference between fine art and illustration – realism and abstraction.  A unique partnership of parents, teachers, administrators and community members study and teach art in K-6 classrooms to bring their students an excellent art program.

Between October and March, parents lead the students through projects designed to teach art basics such as shape, color, line and texture.  Parent volunteers are in the process of teaching 20+ projects to their students.  They’ve introduced students to the work of master artists such as Pablo Picasso, Jackson Pollock, Andy Warhol, Georgia O’Keefe, Vincent van Gogh, Albrecht Dürer, Eric Carle and Henri Matisse.  They’ve exposed students to a wide variety of materials and techniques that include: paints, pastels, clay, wire, textile and gourd.The support received from teachers is also outstanding.  They participate in every art class and help students understand how their art relates to other subjects.  The program, first introduced and managed by local artist and teacher Tami Lohman, continues in good health, due in large part to incredible parent volunteers and staff support. JES has had the program in place since 2005.

Tami Lohman helps an art student prepare before the 2012 Chinese New Year parade in Jacksonville, Oregon

Tami Lohman helps an art student prepare before the 2012 Chinese New Year parade in Jacksonville, Oregon

“Kids love art…and art teaches them so much – like planning, estimating and spatial thinking.” 

~ Tami Loman, author of Jacksonville Elementary’s art program curriculum.

Special thanks to the caring businesses and organizations that have donated to or helped support this Program or Art Exhibition to date:  The Jacksonville Review, Art Presence Art Center, Cammy Davis, Anne Brook, Willow Creek Gift Store, Artisan Landscapes, Inc., Southern Oregon Orthopedics, Jennifer Dollarhide, Southern Oregon Clay Distributors, Lions Club of Jacksonville, and the parents of Jacksonville. Without the support of these generous organizations and individuals, the children in our school would not experience the high-quality program we are able to bring them.  We are so grateful for your support!

This year’s Art Program themed “For the Love of Art” will hold its 9th Annual Exhibition in the Jacksonville Elementary school gymnasium on Thursday, March 21st, from 5:00-7:30.  Art will proudly be displayed and the whole community is invited to attend.  Refreshments, music and inspiring art is provided.  Please join us for this fun and exciting event!

Note: Arts in education are more important than many understand and are becoming even more important with the changes happening in the current and future job markets. Yet funding for arts programs continues to be cut with every move made to trim down the budget in Washington D.C., so every surviving art program needs help from the community to continue. For more information about how you can help support the art program at Jacksonville Elementary, look for Jessicca Haynes, the Art Program Chair, at the show and have a chat, or contact her at [email protected]

Below: Tami Lohman now teaches art at St. Mary’s School. Her 2012 students created dragon heads for Jacksonville’s annual Chinese New Year parade, then became dragons! At the same time, her St. Mary’s colleague Betsy Moore’s students had a show of Valentine’s Day art at GoodBean Coffee, located at the starting line of the parade. Far from merely whimsical hearts, each piece represents a student’s practice of specific combinations of artistic techniques, demonstrating lessons of increasing sophistication learned in classes by young children to preteens. The art and fun had by both sets of students shows how art in public schools can not only expand the curriculum, but helps to involve them in the community and provides important confidence and identity building to cap the vital abstract thinking and collaborative problem solving skills art instruction is known to cultivate in young minds, all of which are necessary to prepare students to set themselves apart from the crowd in today’s job market. Click any image to view a larger version, and please, support art education in public schools!