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2014 Au Naturel Reception and Awards

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Artists pictured left to right:
BACK ROW: Lisa Taylor (Dublin, CA), Andrea Moni (Irvine, CA), Ben Rosenberg (Portland, OR), Deborah Shapiro (Tigard, OR), Patrick Kernan (Portland, OR), Georganne Watters (Rhododendron, OR), Bethany Rowland (Portland, OR), Reed Clarke (Portland, OR), Evan Degenfelder (Lebanon, OR), Joseph Besch (Portland, OR)
MIDDLE ROW: Michael Kelly (Beaverton, OR), V.E. Long (Angwin, CA), Soo Ock Ryu
(Katy, TX), Ellen Soderquist (Dallas, TX), Alexandra Becker-Black (Portland, OR)FRONT ROW: CCC’s Kristin Shauck, Founding Director of the Au Naturel international competition and Charles Froelick, the 2014 Au Naturel juror and owner/director of Froelick Gallery in Portland, OR.
ALSO IN ATTENDANCE: James Archer (not shown, Portland, OR), Annie Heisey (not shown, Portland, OR)

The opening reception of Clatsop Community College’s eighth annual juried art exhibit, Au Naturel: The Nude in the 21st Century was held Thursday, January 30, 2014 in the CCC Art Center Gallery.

This year, artists from 28 states, the District of Columbia, and Canada, Germany, and the Netherlands submitted nearly 800 images for consideration. After careful deliberation, this year’s juror, Charles Froelick chose 57 works of art representing 45 artists from 17 states in addition to artists from Canada and Germany.

Seventeen of the selected artists were present for the reception, including artists who traveled from California and Texas.  During the opening reception, juror Charles Froelick gave a gallery talk and awards were announced, including cash prizes, purchase awards, and three workshop awards, which are supported by submission fees paid by all artists who entered the competition. The Bridgewater Bistro, Clemente’s Restaurant, and Dairy Maid generously provided hors d’oeuvres and Erickson Floral Company provided a stunning bouquet for the reception. Thanks also to the Astoria Coffee House and Bistro, the Fort George Brewery & Public House, and the Cannery Pier Hotel for their support.

This year’s Au Naturel exhibit will remain on display in the CCC Art Center Gallery, 1799 Lexington, Astoria, through March 20, 2014. All visitors are invited to cast a vote for the People’s Choice award, which will be announced at the close of the exhibition.

The Au Naturel exhibit is free and open to the public. The CCC Art Center Gallery is located at 1799 Lexington Avenue, Astoria. The gallery is open Monday-Friday, 8am-6pm and Saturday, 11am-4pm; Sundays and holidays by appointment only.

Annie Heisey, of Portland, OR, whose work was selected for first place in the 2012 competition, won first place again this year for her mixed media piece Haunted.  As second place, Mr. Froelick selected a graphite drawing entitled Subtle Drama by Susan Boehm of Lake Geneva, WI.   Nick Reszetar of Milan, MI, was awarded third place for his conté on mylar piece entitled Javon Twice.

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Charles Froelick speaks to a gallery full to capacity of visitors attending the reception.

All of the artists selected to participate in the 2014 exhibit were invited to submit proposals for the solo show and workshop awards, which were reviewed by the art faculty. From among these submissions, V.E. Long of Angwin, CA, was chosen for the solo show award as well as a workshop award. V.E. Long’s solo show entitled Cakes, Nudes, and Bowling Balls will open the CCC Art Center’s 2014-2015 exhibition season next fall.

Cynthia Lahti of Portland, OR was also selected to teach a workshop that will focus on the creative process, experimentation, and risk-taking, which will be held during the next academic year (time and date to be announced).  Ellen Soderquist of Dallas, TX was selected to teach a workshop entitled Gesture: The Essence of Figure, which was held Friday, January 31, 2014.

View images of the award-winning artwork as well as those of this year’s exhibit and prior exhibits at www.aunaturelart.com. Visitors to CCC also have the opportunity to view the purchase awards from previous Au Naturel exhibitions in the Dora Badollet Library, 1680 Lexington Avenue, Astoria. Library hours are: Monday-Thursday, 8am-6pm; Friday, 8am-5pm; and Sunday, 12pm-5pm.

Great Article About Eve’s Artwork

Fire and Ice-copy

IN THE PLAZA GALLERY

By Dick Warren

June 2013

Hold on to your hats! The Plaza Gallery is showing the work of Eve Withrow, perhaps the most dynamic, exciting painter in the Valley.

The exhibit is not for an afternoon’s rest, but more like a roller coaster or windstorm.  The wonder is that Eve has a secure hand on everything and the threat of chaos is carefully controlled. Using water media, a delicate medium, and collage, she somehow manages to create images in color and line in particular, at their strongest and most expressive.

The paintings are anything but delicate.  The fact that finally they are secured within their frames is testament to her statement that her art is to “finally remind us of the benevolent patterns of the Universe”. The compositions somehow hold together in their frames.

Eve is familiar to many at the Manor.  She has been painting and teaching in the Valley for some time.  Her work is highly regarded all over the West where she has exhibited constantly.  Eve is a director of the successful Art and Soul Gallery in Ashland, and has been in the Members Gallery at the Rogue Gallery and Art Center in Medford for many years.

Eve will talk about her work at a reception on Wednesday, June 5 at 5:00 p.m.

 

 

 

Taste of Summer: Jacksonville PResents Plenty for Arts & Culture Lovers today from 11 - 4!

Begin with lots of art & activities on the lawn of Jville's historic courthouse!

Begin with lots of art & activities on the lawn of Jville’s historic courthouse!

 

 

Anne Brooke, founder of the Art Presence Art Center, is setting up tables on the lawn in front of the gallery where kids can play with different mediums to whet a personal taste for creating art. Kids who complete a work of art get a free ride on the Jacksonville trolley! The gallery’s current exhibition is a beautiful show of member works called “Coastal, By-the-Sea” with – you guessed it – a seashore theme. There will be additional children’s games & activities, face painting, Wildlife Images and much more!

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"Nautilus," handpainted silk wall hanging by Judy Elliott on display at Art Presence

“Nautilus,” handpainted silk wall hanging by Judy Elliott on display at Art Presence

 

On the other side of the historic Jacksonville Courthouse, SOAR member Cathy Gallatin and her chalk artist compadres have begun the process of creating five chalk art masterpieces! We’ll post shots of their progress throughout the day…

Chalk artist Cathy Gallatin and Britt Festival staff member Sara King Cole setting up some shade for the day.

Chalk artist Cathy Gallatin and Britt Festival staff member Sara King Cole setting up some shade for the day.

 

We'll post shots of the progress of Cathy's chalk art piece throughout the day!

We’ll post shots of the progress of Cathy’s chalk art piece throughout the day!

Chalk artists setting up their grids early this morning.

Chalk artists setting up their grids early this morning.

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Cross the street to enjoy today’s specials at the C Street Bistro, a fabulous house smoked pork chile verde torta ($8) or a classic Caesar salad ($6). Chef Paul Becking, who earned his degree in art, was trained by culinary icon Julia Child and his pulled pork is the talk of the town! Take advantage of the great price on this special version today only and see a classic piece of metal sculpture by Jacksonville artist Cheryl D Garcia.

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If you're coming from the other side of town...

If you’re coming from the other side of town…

 

There will be live music on Third Street, where Art Presence and SOAR member Judy Elliott will be demonstrating the art of handpainting silk in her booth, filled with her handsewn kimonos and Happi coats (the hip-length version of a kimono). Also showing his beautiful black and white photography is Ron Moore. You can see more of her gorgeous silk wall hangings at the Art Presence Art Center.

Judy Elliott of Dragonfly Designs West shows her newest Kimono...

Judy Elliott of Dragonfly Designs West shows her newest Kimono…

One of the silk pieces Judy will be transforming into a wall hanging beofre our eyes today!

One of the silk pieces Judy will be transforming into a wall hanging beofre our eyes today!

Judy models her newest Happi Coat

Judy models her newest Happi Coat

 

There will also be live music on California Street next to Pico’s and on the Courthouse lawn throughout the day, and additional food vendors, including the Frau Kemmling Schoolhaus Brauhaus and Front Porch Barbeque.

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Walking across town, you can enjoy many beautiful antique and classic cars parked along California Street, Jacksonville’s main drag. Don’t forget to stop in to some of our wonderful retailers, including Willowcreek Gifts, now under the new ownership of Jo Parker.

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A few of the classic cars parked on California Street today

A few of the classic cars parked on California Street today

WillowCreek Gifts owner Jo parker welcomes you!

WillowCreek Gifts owner Jo parker welcomes you!

Once you’ve gotten to the other end of town, stop in at the GoodBean to cool off with a famous Jacksonville Thrill (or another of their lovely hot weather coffee and tea beverages) and see stunning forals in watercolor by Jacksonville artist Elaine Frenett, a watercolor piece by the artist who started the GoodBean’s art tradition 20 years ago, Wynn Pedersen, and another wall hanging by Judy Elliott called Tropical Splendor. The GoodBean, previous winner of the Best Coffee in Oregon competition, is sponsoring this years event, and the judges are in town for a practice session leading in to the June 22nd preliminary competition, also at their Jacksonville cafe.

 

Elaine Frenett's spectacular watercolor florals at the GoodBean

Elaine Frenett’s spectacular watercolor florals at the GoodBean

Tropical Splendor, by Judy Elliott, at the GoodBean

Tropical Splendor, by Judy Elliott, at the GoodBean

Best Coffee in Oregon judges at the GoodBean to do a practice tasting for the June 22 preliminaries, to be held  at the GoodBean

Best Coffee in Oregon judges at the GoodBean to do a practice tasting for the June 22 preliminaries, to be held at the GoodBean

From 11:30 – 2:30, enjoy some homemade strawberry shortcake, a Taste of Strawberries, and old-fashioned strawberry festival at the Jacksonville Presbyterian church.

The featured “taste” is a wine walk from 12-4 pm, where for $25 you can taste the finest offerings from local wineries at various businesses and locations around town. Participating wineries include 2Hawk Winery, Adit Public House, Belle Fiore Winery, Caprice Vineyards, Cliff Creek Cellars, Daisy Creek Vineyard, Dancin vineyards, Devitt Winery, EdenVale Winery, Grizzly peak Winery, LaBrasseur Vineyard, Ledger David, Pebblestone Cellars, Quady North Winery, Serra Vineyard, Soloro Vineyards, South Stage Cellars, Umpqua Tasting Room, Valley View Vineyards and Weisinger’s Winery.

So, join us in Jacksonville to enjoy a day of arts and culture as we celebrate a new season of the Britt Music Festival together!

Updates coming soon…have to get back out there and see how everyone’s art demonstrations are coming along!

[liveblog]

C Street Bistro, chockers full of happy patrons...

C Street Bistro, chockers full of happy patrons…

People getting the Wine Walk tickets...

People getting their Wine Walk tickets…

This time juggling with two partners...and a very good (and loud) band next to them. NIce work with many distractions in play...

This time juggling with two partners…and a very good (and loud) band next to them. NIce work with many distractions in play…

As always when Jacksonville hosts a citywide event, gussied up ladies are seen strolling around in their finery.

As always when Jacksonville hosts a citywide event, gussied up ladies are seen strolling around in their finery.

Our neighbor Josh juggles with a partner

Our neighbor Josh juggles with a partner

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Wow! Judy sure is making quick work of her lily pond scene...

Wow! Judy sure is making quick work of her lily pond scene…

Jaime Bryn's guitar is starting to take shape!

Jaime Bryn’s guitar is starting to take shape!

Taylor Conlin is painting kids with painted faces. Kids are having their faces painted right around the corner!

Taylor Conlin is painting kids with painted faces. Kids are having their faces painted right around the corner!

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Cathy Gallatin's piece is coming along fabulously!

Cathy Gallatin’s piece is coming along fabulously!

JN Garrett is making beautiful progress on her chalk piece, too...

JN Garrett is making beautiful progress on her chalk piece, too…

Laila Dzene's chlak art in progress, and looking great! They're having a little lunch break with food from C St. Bistro as we post these shots...

Laila Dzene’s chalk art in progress, and looking great! They’re having a little lunch break with food from C St. Bistro as we post these shots…

These young ladies rock the house!

These young ladies rock the house!

Kathleen Hoevet discusses her photography with visitors to the Art Presence Art Center gallery

Kathleen Hoevet discusses her photography with visitors to the Art Presence Art Center gallery

FREE TROLLEY RIDE FOR A BUNCH OF KIDS ALREADY!!

FREE TROLLEY RIDE FOR A BUNCH OF KIDS ALREADY!!

Anne Brooke encourages the kids trying their hand at watercolors.

Anne Brooke encourages the kids trying their hand at watercolors.

Fun with art! ...and balloons...but he didn't seem quite as excited about that as he did working on his creation...

Fun with art! …and balloons…but he didn’t seem quite as excited about that as he did working on his creation…

Art Presence member Randall Grealish and his lovely wife Tara watch their nephews making art...

Art Presence member Randall Grealish and his lovely wife Tara watch their nephews making art…

What could be better than kids making art and some finished pieces frying already?!

What could be better than kids making art on a summer afternoon with finished pieces drying already?!

[liveblog]

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[liveblog]

Judy finished these two incredible silk wall hanging today!

Judy finished these two incredible silk wall hangings today!

Looked like she might make a sale at the end of the day, too.

Looked like she might make a sale at the end of the day, too.

Laila's finished chalk art

Laila’s finished chalk art

Jennifer's finished chalk art - and can you believe this is her first chalk art?! Well done, Jen!

Jennifer’s (almost) finished chalk art – and can you believe this is her first?! Well done, Jen!

Cathy's larger piece looks great, but will take longer to complete. She's still working out there and it's 6:40. I hope she's got water...better go check on her when this live blog is done...

Cathy’s larger piece looks great, but will take longer to complete. She’s still working out there and it’s 6:40. I hope she’s got water…better go check on her when this live blog is done…

Taylor's finished chalk art

Taylor’s finished chalk art

Jaime's finished chalk art

Jaime touches up the border on her finished chalk art

Another portion of Cathy's chalk masterpiece in progress

Another portion of Cathy’s original chalk masterpiece in progress

 

Laila and Jennifer put the finishing touches on their pieces

Laila and Jennifer put the finishing touches on their pieces

7pm -

Laila's chalk art - finished and signed!

Laila’s Jacksonville scene with classic cars – finished and signed!

Jennifer's chalk art - finished and signed!

Jennifer’s finished portrait of Anne Brooke painting – finished and signed!

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Taylor's chalk art - finished and signed!

Taylor’s kids with faces painted – finished and signed!

 

Jaime's chalk art - finished and signed!

Jaime’s rockin’ guitar players – finished and signed! Jaime was hired by the Britt to do another piece of a saxophone at a later date when they saw this one – nice work, Jaime!

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Tired and well-roasted from working on a 96 degree day, Cathy is presses on to finish her centerpiece with Laila's help.

Tired and well-roasted from working on a 96 degree day, Cathy is presses on to finish her centerpiece with Laila’s help.

 

Late passers by stop to admire the finished work

Late passers by stop to admire the finished work

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Cathy puts the finishiing touches on the wine glasses and Laila paints the outlines for definition

Cathy puts the finishing touches on the wine glasses and Laila paints outlines for definition

It was hot, there was art, and wine, and summer dresses, and a lot of wonderful people in Jacksonville today. Everyone I spoke with had a great day. I hope you were one of them, but if you couldn’t make it this year, I hope you will come join us to celebrate the opening of the Britt Festival’s 2014 concert season! Signing off for tonight…

[liveblog]

Morning after update, with the largest piece of chalk art completed and signed…Click any image in the post to see a larger view – view this one first, and then stop at the courthouse to see all these lovley chalk art pieces before they’re gone!  Many thanks to the Britt Festival for this artistic addition to their opening celebration festivites – a fabulous taste of summer by Cathy Gallatin.

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A Taste of Summer, by Cathy Gallatin

A Taste of Summer, by Cathy Gallatin

Hilltop Gallery - From Classroom to Cézanne

For former art professors, ‘retirement’ means operating an art gallery

By Edward Graham

(This article appears in the 2013 May issue of “This Active Life” published by the National Education Association. This is from their website; the actual magazine article contains more pictures. ~ Richard and Rochelle Newman)

Richard and Rochelle Newman knew they wanted to continue their lifelong passion for art when they retired after a combined 60-plus years of teaching—they just didn’t know how or where.

The couple met when both were art students in Michigan at Cranbrook Academy of Art in Bloomfield Hills. After their marriage, they moved to Massachusetts where they kept up their love of art by creating it and teaching it to others.

Richard worked with painting and sculpture, and taught full time for 34 years at Bradford College, located in a section of Haverhill, Mass. He also chaired the college’s Creative Arts Division for many years. Rochelle created tapestries and collages, and worked full time for 28 years at Northern Essex Community College in Haverhill. Later she worked at Merrimack College in North Andover. The Newmans loved spending time in a collegiate setting, surrounded by people with similar artistic interests.

In 2000, Bradford College closed its doors and the Newmans began looking for another artistic environment to spend their retirement. In 2003 “we discovered Ashland and Oregon when we attended a conference here in the city,” says Richard. “It’s a small-town atmosphere with a world-class theater component.”

Ashland, Ore., has only 22,000 residents but attracts hundreds of thousands of tourists every year for the Oregon Shakespeare Festival and the Ashland Independent Film Festival. The city is also home to Southern Oregon University, which was a major draw for the Newmans.

“We came for the three C’s—climate, culture, and community,” says Rochelle.
The couple traversed 3,500 miles, then settled in the Mountain Meadows Retirement Community—a serene development that is run and operated by some 270 homeowners, who are also actively involved in the community of Ashland. “It really reminded us of where we used to live and teach in Massachusetts,” says Richard.

“Minotaur,” above, was created by 
retired professor and artist Richard
 Newman, who owns Oregon's 
Hilltop Art Gallery with his wife 
Rochelle, also a retired professor 
and artist.

“Minotaur,” above, was created by 
retired professor and artist Richard
 Newman, who owns Oregon’s 
Hilltop Art Gallery with his wife 
Rochelle, also a retired professor 
and artist.

The Newmans had moved to Ashland with a vague idea of how they would spend their time, but quickly found themselves pursuing an entirely new and exciting venture—opening and maintaining an art gallery. “Within a month of moving to Mountain Meadows Retirement Community we were serendipitously introduced to an unused space in the heart of the campus,” says Rochelle. “In unison, my husband and I said this would make a great art environment, and so the Hilltop Gallery came into being.”

The Newmans transformed the 850-square-foot, one-room space into an elegant gallery. They put in new paint, carpeting, and lighting. In 2010, the Hilltop Gallery officially opened for business.

The gallery “is close to the clubhouse and next to the fitness center so people drop in easily,” Richard says.

The art also can have a therapeutic effect on the residents. “We promote the idea that the aging population needs to keep both their bodies as well as their minds fit,” he says. “We have also hosted workshops given by local artists for our community.”

To date, the gallery has held 18 exhibits and a variety of art workshops. Admission to events is free, and the Newmans work to attract retirees and other Ashland residents. “We try to connect with the Ashland community as a whole, as well as with those in the retirement community,” says Rochelle.

The Newmans strive to bring in the best artists—from nearby or further away. They have even featured the work of a young woman from South America. “Our tastes in art are broad so we have shown everything from paintings, sculptures, prints, photos, fabric art, jewelry, and digital art,” says Richard. The gallery is open one afternoon a week or by appointment, while the Newmans reserve their mornings to work on their own projects in the artists’ studio they built beneath their home.

It may not have been in their original retirement plans, but operating an art gallery is an experience the Newmans say they wouldn’t trade.
Rochelle says she and her husband enjoy the opportunity to share their expertise and provide the community with a wide range of artists and styles to view. “For us,” she says, “It’s a labor of love as well as an educational experience.”

For more information, visit the Newmans and the Hilltop Art Gallery.

Elements Show at RGAC

Hannah, editor of Art Matters! writing…I went to the Rogue Gallery and Art Center this afternoon to attend a meeting of southern Oregon arts leaders. It was a fabulous time of exchanging ideas and affirming our mutual desire to bring our arts community closer together and make a greater case for the value of art to the broader community. You’ll be hearing more about the ideas we’ve had and what we’re planning soon…

After the meeting adjourned, I stayed a little while longer to look at the Elements show, and I have to say that I did not know that fiber arts could be so very well done, so truly artful. The quilted pieces on display range from intricate embroidery to painted silk, from garments to wall art, and from abstract to landscape to figurative. Definitely a fabulous display of the broad range of creativity possible with fabric, needle and thread! This show will only be up for another week, ending next Friday, so I strongly recommend you go see it soon if you haven’t already. You’ll be glad you did!

Here’s a quick look around the show…

Au Naturel Awards Highlight Artists’ Reception

The opening reception of Clatsop Community College’s seventh annual juried art exhibit, Au Naturel: The Nude in the 21st Century, was held Thursday, March 7, in the CCC Art Center Gallery.

 

2013 Au Naturel Artists

Artists pictured left to right: Denise Weir (Edmonds, WA), Jim McComas (Superior, CO), John Whitehouse (West Linn, OR), Bethany Rowland (Portland, OR), Sebastian Hyde (Oakland, CA), Lisa Ackerman (Astoria, OR), Jessica Marshall (Corvallis, OR), Paul Rutz (Portland, OR), Alexandra Eyer (Gold Beach, OR), Rhoda Draws (Mill Valley, CA), Ted Chilles (Portland, OR), Patrick Kernan (Portland, OR), Jessica McCoy (Claremont, CA), Rob Bibler (Salem, OR) with CCC’s Kristin Shauck, Founding Director of the Au Naturel international competition. Photo by David Homer.

This year, over 600 images were submitted for consideration by artists from 26 states and Canada, Mexico, China, Morocco and the United Kingdom. The 2013 show includes 52 works by 47 artists from 16 states and Canada.

 

Fourteen of the selected artists were present for the reception, including artists who traveled from as far away as San Francisco and Claremont, California, and Superior, Colorado. This year’s juror Clint Brown, Professor Emeritus at Oregon State University, gave a gallery talk. During the opening reception, awards were announced including cash prizes, a purchase award, a combined solo show and workshop award, and four additional workshop awards. Awards for this competition are supported by submission fees paid by all participating artists. Bridgewater Bistro and Clemente’s Restaurant generously provided hors d’oeuvres and Erickson Floral Company provided flowers for the reception. Thanks also to the Astoria Coffee House and Bistro and the Cannery Pier Hotel for their support. A No-Host Post-Reception party at the Astoria Coffee House and Bistro was held immediately following, and on Friday, March 8, Mr. Brown gave a presentation titled “Nude vs. Naked” to an audience of students, faculty, staff and community members.

 

This year’s Au Naturel exhibit will remain on display in the CCC Art Center Gallery, 1799 Lexington, Astoria, through March 28. All visitors are invited to cast a vote for the People’s Choice award, which will be announced at the close of the exhibition.

 

For the first time in the history of the Au Naturel competition, an artist has been awarded first place for the second time.  Michael Reedy, of Ann Arbor, MI, whose work was selected for first place in the 2009 competition, won first place again this year for his mixed media piece Expulsion. As second place, Mr. Brown selected a conté, pastel and charcoal drawing entitled The Source by Robert Bibler of Salem, OR. Grace Benedict of Lafayette, IN was awarded third place for her colored pencil drawing entitled Cradle. All of the artists selected to participate in the 2013 exhibit were invited to submit proposals for a solo show award. From among these submissions, Paul Rutz of Portland, OR was selected by the art faculty. In conjunction with his solo show, scheduled to open the 2013-2014 exhibition season, Dr. Rutz will also lead a workshop instructing participants in his unique approach to artmaking.

 

In addition to cash prizes and the solo show award, multiple workshop awards were announced. Jessica McCoy, Assistant Professor at Pitzer College in Claremont, CA was chosen to lead a workshop on color theory, and Jennifer Cutshall, an accomplished mural painter in Portland, was chosen to lead a workshop that will deal with abstraction of the figure. Grace Benedict, who teaches at Purdue University in West Lafayette, IN and Cathy Locke, who teaches in the graduate department at the Academy of Art in San Francisco, were both invited to teach workshops in the coming academic year. Cathy Locke’s graphite drawing on mylar titled Torso 4 was selected for this year’s purchase award by art department faculty and will become part of the College’s growing permanent collection.

 

To view images of the award winning artwork as well as those of this year’s exhibit and prior exhibits, visit www.aunaturel.com. Visitors to CCC also have the opportunity to view the purchase awards from previous Au Naturel exhibitions in the Dora Badollet Library. For library hours, call 503-338-2466.

 

The Au Naturel exhibit is free and open to the public. The CCC Art Center Gallery is located at 1799 Lexington Avenue, Astoria. The gallery is open M-F, 8am-6pm and Saturday, 11am-4pm; Sundays and holidays by appointment only. Please note special Spring Break hours from March 25 through March 28 of 11am-4pm.

 

Please direct inquiries to Kristin Shauck, 503-338-2472; kshauckatclatsopccdotedu  (kshauckatclatsopccdotedu)  .

 

 

Jacksonville Elementary School Announces 9th Annual Student Art Exhibition

Jacksonville Elementary continues Parent Art Program and Art Exhibition THURSDAY, March 21st, 5-7:30

For the Love of Art, by Alaya Metwally

For the Love of Art, by Alaya Metwally

Students at Jacksonville Elementary School have learned about perspective, pointillism, color and collage.  They can tell you the difference between fine art and illustration – realism and abstraction.  A unique partnership of parents, teachers, administrators and community members study and teach art in K-6 classrooms to bring their students an excellent art program.

Between October and March, parents lead the students through projects designed to teach art basics such as shape, color, line and texture.  Parent volunteers are in the process of teaching 20+ projects to their students.  They’ve introduced students to the work of master artists such as Pablo Picasso, Jackson Pollock, Andy Warhol, Georgia O’Keefe, Vincent van Gogh, Albrecht Dürer, Eric Carle and Henri Matisse.  They’ve exposed students to a wide variety of materials and techniques that include: paints, pastels, clay, wire, textile and gourd.The support received from teachers is also outstanding.  They participate in every art class and help students understand how their art relates to other subjects.  The program, first introduced and managed by local artist and teacher Tami Lohman, continues in good health, due in large part to incredible parent volunteers and staff support. JES has had the program in place since 2005.

Tami Lohman helps an art student prepare before the 2012 Chinese New Year parade in Jacksonville, Oregon

Tami Lohman helps an art student prepare before the 2012 Chinese New Year parade in Jacksonville, Oregon

“Kids love art…and art teaches them so much – like planning, estimating and spatial thinking.” 

~ Tami Loman, author of Jacksonville Elementary’s art program curriculum.

Special thanks to the caring businesses and organizations that have donated to or helped support this Program or Art Exhibition to date:  The Jacksonville Review, Art Presence Art Center, Cammy Davis, Anne Brook, Willow Creek Gift Store, Artisan Landscapes, Inc., Southern Oregon Orthopedics, Jennifer Dollarhide, Southern Oregon Clay Distributors, Lions Club of Jacksonville, and the parents of Jacksonville. Without the support of these generous organizations and individuals, the children in our school would not experience the high-quality program we are able to bring them.  We are so grateful for your support!

This year’s Art Program themed “For the Love of Art” will hold its 9th Annual Exhibition in the Jacksonville Elementary school gymnasium on Thursday, March 21st, from 5:00-7:30.  Art will proudly be displayed and the whole community is invited to attend.  Refreshments, music and inspiring art is provided.  Please join us for this fun and exciting event!

Note: Arts in education are more important than many understand and are becoming even more important with the changes happening in the current and future job markets. Yet funding for arts programs continues to be cut with every move made to trim down the budget in Washington D.C., so every surviving art program needs help from the community to continue. For more information about how you can help support the art program at Jacksonville Elementary, look for Jessicca Haynes, the Art Program Chair, at the show and have a chat, or contact her at jessthaynes4atgmaildotcom.

Below: Tami Lohman now teaches art at St. Mary’s School. Her 2012 students created dragon heads for Jacksonville’s annual Chinese New Year parade, then became dragons! At the same time, her St. Mary’s colleague Betsy Moore’s students had a show of Valentine’s Day art at GoodBean Coffee, located at the starting line of the parade. Far from merely whimsical hearts, each piece represents a student’s practice of specific combinations of artistic techniques, demonstrating lessons of increasing sophistication learned in classes by young children to preteens. The art and fun had by both sets of students shows how art in public schools can not only expand the curriculum, but helps to involve them in the community and provides important confidence and identity building to cap the vital abstract thinking and collaborative problem solving skills art instruction is known to cultivate in young minds, all of which are necessary to prepare students to set themselves apart from the crowd in today’s job market. Click any image to view a larger version, and please, support art education in public schools!

 

ORGANIC NATION wins the Gold!

Cascade Peak Spirits Distillery, home of ORGANIC NATION has done it again and more!  both our certified organic vodka and gin won Gold medals at the third annual GOOD FOOD AWARDS competition for artisan food and beverage producers throughout the U.S.  This competition is the brain child of the famous Alice Waters of the internationally renowned Chez Panisse restaurant in Berkeley, CA.  It honors crafters of chocolate, charcuterie, pickles, preserves, convections, cheese, coffee, beer and SPIRITS!
We are proud to be the top Gold Medal winners amongst the quality artisan producers that won this year.  In order to receive the Gold Medal distinction, you have to be certified organic, which of course, we are!

I was fortunate enough to meet Alice and get a hug, made my day! Along with being given the honor to receive the Spirits Category awards for the other nine distilleries.  I gave a 3.09 minute speech that validated and rewarded all of the Micro-Distilleries for crafting more palatable quality spirits.

King Lear

Asbestos Arks

Asbestos Arks, by Catie Faryl

KING LEAR

The day after seeing King Lear at Oregon Shakespeare Festival’s Thomas Theatre, I hurried to the library and checked out three different books about the play.  Of course I’ve seen King Lear at least four or five times, but in the intimate setting of the smallest theatre on OSF’s campus I saw and heard things that I hadn’t truly understood or previously perceived.

One thing that hit home was how very dark and un-redeeming this tragedy is for virtually every character in it.  Next thing was how rift with incredible quotes from the Bard this play is.  If “Ripeness is All” (Act  5, Scene 2) we are really treated to a very dirty, gritty, smelly production this time around!

The set is dark with lots of wrought iron gates, hardware and technology features.  Center stage a “dumbwaiter from hell” serves as a map case for the bequeathed kingdom, a conveyance for darklings in the dark, a sand and fire pit and a hovel hole for hairy homelessness.  A massive staircase stretches upward into the ethereal regions of majesty and ego. It is the golden light leading to an afterlife (whom many will hope for, but few here have earned)  built straight up into the rafters.  Shadows lurk up there too and there’s plenty of noise – timpani drums and indecent, reverberating curses from fathers, and viperous verbal bites from serpent-toothed offspring and pelican daughters.  Set changes and management of props  are cleverly handled by officers in uniform who start out as roadies and techies to handle TVs and other devices, and evolve over the course of the play to security guards, Police, a full riot gear Swat Team and finally a terrifying military force.

I always try to read the Director’s notes in the Playbill before the action starts, and also I like to close my eyes when the house goes dark, and open them to a new world.  I was instantly struck by a direct reference by Director Bill Rauch to Climate Change – “Eternally relevant, this play has a renewed urgency in our current era of frightening weather extremes.  We have left intact some of the often-cut political machinations.” In this story, “sin is plated with gold” (Act 4, Scene 6) and “even dogs are obeyed in office”!

What is most important to me about theatre, and why I write reviews, is to see what we can learn about our own times and experiences from art and drama of the past . . . . Bill Rauch continues in his notes to say “ One of my all-time favorite lines is in King Lear – The Storm Rages”.  Director Rauch touches on the plight of the homeless in his note “How does the former king describe a mentally challenged homeless person groveling in the mud as “Thou art the thing itself? ”.  This production of King Lear doesn’t pull any punches.  It exposes all our folly and foolishness; no age group, class, caste, sex or group is spared, and the visceral events remind us of how close we all live on the edge by the grace of benevolent climes and with the support and love from community, good friends and families.

“Elf all my hairs!”  (Edgar, Act 2, Scene 3); I love that line!  As if all that befalls us is caused by some impish malice!  Sometimes it happens that “Age is unnecessary”. . .  (Act 2, Scene 1) and we become useless. “The young arise when the old do fall!” There is a tempest in Lear’s mind and his anger is riled when his youngest and favorite daughter does not follow suit with over-glorious (and false) praise and glorified, flowery flatteries that her two older sisters have bestowed on their father, Lear.  Lear has apportioned one third of his kingdom to each of his daughters, but ends up cursing and banishing his favorite, Cordelia, when she answered him with facts and reminders of her devotion to him, rather than making grand yet meaningless statements like her sisters.

This sets into action the tragic story of how things in families can go from so-so to bad to worst.  Halfway through I began to wonder, where is Lear’s wife? (clues in Act 3, Scene 4).  Without a mother present, the family dynamics seem to have gone completely a-rye!  The question is raised   “Is man no more than this – unaccomodated man is an animal!”.  What incestuous nonsense has transpired or just how demented are all these people?  The two older sisters prove to be quite self-serving and disloyal as the play evolves, but one must wonder, beyond the obvious jealousy of the favoritism previously showered on Cordelia by her father, that there is a huge unbalance in the mix.  I suppose inheriting the wealth and power Lear has passed on to his heirs,(pre-mortem and with plenty of hooks)  is motivation enough.  But all around, there is distrust, anger and envy.  Envy and ego make a deadly combination, and as has been said about the Seven Deadly Sins, envy is the one without redeeming gratifications of the carnal senses.

The story of King Lear is reminiscent of the Saturn and his offspring.  His “power does curtsy to his wrath”.  Is it creeping senility or Alzheimer’s that adds wind and fire to this storm?  Like Saturn, Lear is so intent on his rage that he ends up destroying the things and people dearest to him.  Saturn ate his children and Lear’s appetite for self-aggrandizement and praise unleashes all his rage and unhinges his sensibilities.  The loyal fool and angelic Kent try to pull Lear back from the brink, but his anger has blinded him even as the Earl of Gloucester is cruelly blinded.

When trust is gone, and dragons’ wrath is given rein to storm, forgetting all prior sweetness and love, lives are lost. “As flies to wanton boys are we to the Gods, times plague when madmen lead the blind”.  Yet in Lear’s story, as ours, we can only look to our own misdeeds and “darker purpose” to place the blame.  Human folly is Infinite Jest.

Some say when we’re born we cry because we miss God. In this play Shakespeare states “When we are born we cry to be borne to this stage of fools”.  Quote the Fool, “Prithee, nuncle, be contented: ‘tis a naughty (wicked) night to swim in.  Now a little fire in a wild field were like an old lecher’s heart – a small spark, all the rest on’s body cold.  Look, here comes a walking fire.”

Catie Faryl    www.catiefaryl.net     March 5, 201