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Studio Snapshot – Art On The Go! – Folding Origami Mandalas

I’m finding that it’s been harder to do art while traveling than I had supposed. As I have written earlier, Paul and I are on a 2 month trip in our 19′ van. It took a bit of preparation to cut and package the few art supplies I could fit between our clothes and food.

It takes 8 pieces of paper 1″ by 4″ to make one origami mandala.

So far, I’ve not been able spend as much time making art as I would like. On days when we drive 8 to 12 plus hours, very little art gets done.

Origami mandalas I’ve made so far on our trip. These will be made into finished pieces once I get home.

We’ve been doing a lot of visiting with family and friends. While I’ve been able to eek out a bit of  time for folding and box making, it’s been in very short periods of time. We’ve also been making new friends, attending numerous potlucks, dancing, trying new foods and restaurants, hiking and so much more. We’ll be visiting Biosphere 2 this next week and probably a number of other places. This is leaving me less time for my art than I expected. But, I am relaxing and enjoying myself.

Sometimes I just have a few minutes, so I can fold just a few pieces and add to my stash of folded paper to make into my origami mandalas.

I’m still trying to get into a rhythm for my days. This traveling is new to me and I’m loving it. I know everything will fall into place eventually. Meanwhile, I’ll keep trying to eek out my art in small periods of time.

Enjoy, Candy

Online Class: Paper Illuminated by Helen Hiebert

A number of years ago I took a class from paper artist, Helen Hiebert, just before she moved to Colorado. I learned a lot and enjoyed the class immensely. Helen is a great teacher.

This is the shoji screen we will be making in Helen Hiebert’s Paper Illuminated online class.

I thought I’d like to take another class from Helen. However, Colorado is a bit far for me to travel to take a class.

This is the bendable paper lamp we will be making in Helen Hiebert’s Paper Illuminated online class.

So when I heard Helen was going to do an online class, I jumped at the opportunity to sign up for it. It starts on March 8, and I expect to be back home from my travels by then (thankfully). P.S. There is an early bird discount available if you sign up before February 1.

This is the chochin lampshade we will be making in Helen Hiebert’s Paper Illuminated online class.

I am going to clear my schedule (as much as I can) so I can have time to play with the structures Helen is going to teach. It’s a 5 week class, so it shouldn’t be too difficult to find enough time during each week. It’s so easy for me to overbook my time, but this is going to be so worth it.

This is the wraparound lampshade we will be making in Helen Hiebert’s Paper Illuminated online class.

There’s going to be a private Facebook page for those of us who are taking the class. It’s going to be a lot of fun seeing what everyone is doing. We’ll be able to ask questions of Helen too.

These are the five projects we’ll be making in Helen Hiebert’s Paper Illuminated online class.

In addition to the class, I’ve ordered the Supply Kit for the class to make it easier for me to make the projects. If you take the class, you will need a few other materials like a cutting mat, straight pins, a craft knife and such. You can check out the materials need on Helen’s website link below.

Materials in the supply kit for Helen Hiebert’s Paper Illuminated online class.

If you’re interested in taking this class, or want more information on it, see: Helen Hiebert’s Online Class: Paper Illuminated.

Enjoy, Candy

Plein Air Painting vs Painting in The Studio

in this video Baumann discusses Plein Air Painting vs Painting in The Studio. What should one do? In this conversation we ask the hard question do you have to paint on location, from life or from photos. Inspiring Millions to paint outdoors This video is about Touch Move and Inspire. Get a free Book at his website www.StefanBaumann.com. The paintings of Stefan Baumann reveal the true spirit of nature by transporting the viewer to distant lands that have gone unseen and undisturbed. With the huge success of Baumann’s weekly PBS television series “The Grand View: America’s National Parks through the Eyes of an Artist,” millions of people witness for themselves the magic Stefan portrays on canvas, his passion for nature and the American landscape. By distilling his love of nature into a luminous painting of brilliant, saturated color that transcends conventional landscape and wildlife art, Baumann has captured the hearts and imaginations of a generation. Each painting becomes an experience rather than merely a picture – a vivid manifestation of his special and personal union with nature and the outdoor world. Through his mastery of light, color and artful composition, Baumann invites you to experience nature in its purity. It is no wonder that for many years distinguished American collectors, including former presidents and financial icons, have sought out his work.

The post Plein Air Painting vs Painting in The Studio appeared first on Stefan Baumann – The Grand View: Paintings by Stefan Baumann.

Studio Snapshot – Art On The Go! – Making Boxes

Traveling for two months in a 19′ van has made it a little more difficult form me to make art than I imagined. Welcome to reality. I haven’t quite found my rhythm yet.

One of the boxes in my series for Random Kindness and Senseless Acts of Beauty.

We visited family over the holidays and I did manage to appropriate a bit of space on a  counter to set up my supplies to make boxes. These are boxes I’m making to leave for people to find. You can see more about that on my blog post: Gifts of Random Kindness & Senseless Acts of Beauty.

One of the boxes in my series for Random Kindness and Senseless Acts of Beauty.

What I have found is that folding is much easier to do while traveling, assuming the paper has already been cut ahead of time. I think that’s because I can fit folding into short blocks of time. Box making, however, takes a bit of preparation.

One of the boxes in my series for Random Kindness and Senseless Acts of Beauty.

Before we left on our trip, I cut enough pieces of binders board to make 30 boxes. I also brought lots of paper for collaging the boxes once I made them.  I had hoped to be able to make a box every other day on my trip. We’ll see if I can catch up to my expectations.

One of the boxes in my series for Random Kindness and Senseless Acts of Beauty.

While relaxing and visiting with family and friends is important, I find that I feel so much better when I make time to do art each day. So, that is going to be my goal for this next week.

Enjoy, Candy

Its Not Your Subject Your Painting It is what you do to with it!

Its Not Your Subject Your Painting
It is what you do to with it! I Smell Something Fishy…
In this video Baumann discusses insights to how to take you painting to the next level using composition and light. Baumann also talks about changing your prospective about the subject
Inspiring Millions to paint outdoors This video is about Touch Move and Inspire. Get a free Book at his website www.StefanBaumann.com. The paintings of Stefan Baumann reveal the true spirit of nature by transporting the viewer to distant lands that have gone unseen and undisturbed. With the huge success of Baumann’s weekly PBS television series “The Grand View: America’s National Parks through the Eyes of an Artist,” millions of people witness for themselves the magic Stefan portrays on canvas, his passion for nature and the American landscape. By distilling his love of nature into a luminous painting of brilliant, saturated color that transcends conventional landscape and wildlife art, Baumann has captured the hearts and imaginations of a generation. Each painting becomes an experience rather than merely a picture – a vivid manifestation of his special and personal union with nature and the outdoor world. Through his mastery of light, color and artful composition, Baumann invites you to experience nature in its purity. It is no wonder that for many years distinguished American collectors, including former presidents and financial icons, have sought out his work.

The post Its Not Your Subject Your Painting It is what you do to with it! appeared first on Stefan Baumann – The Grand View: Paintings by Stefan Baumann.

The Secret of Painting from Life

The Secret of Painting from Life

If you want to see the world as spectacular as it is, take a walk in the forest with an artist. The painter’s eye is more sensitive and receives a vast amount more information than a normal person who is seeing the same view. When students first come to my classes, within weeks they report that they have never before seen the world “in color” as they are able to do now and that painting has opened their eyes to the beauty that surrounds them.

The first assignment for new students who come to my classes is to paint a white egg on a white plate that is sitting on a white table cloth. This exercise requires that they really look at their subject before beginning to paint. Most students look at the setup and only see white. Then, with coaching, they look deeper and see that white has little to do with painting eggs at all. At this point, their consciousness has undergone a small expansion and the artist has increased awareness about the painting process. Once the shadows are discovered, then and only then, can the student focus his awareness on the effects that light has on the subject matter.

After that, it is the composition that commands the focus. Gradually or suddenly, the realization that the artist is the one directing the viewer’s perception and that perception can be directed to only one thing at a time. We can not see light, shadow and color at the same time.  And we cannot see composition, temperature, and air with just a single glance. We cannot see the windshield and the road at the same time. Creating art is like juggler trying to keep 15 balls in the air.  It’s no wonder that artists begin painting from photos just to make the process easier. But when an artist paints from photos, something is lost, and the connection between the artist and subject is disconnected, filtered and dumbed down.

When setting up a still life in your studio, the setup must be created just as it you want it to appear in your painting. If you want your painting to have a dark wall with Japanese print wallpaper in the background, you must carefully set up the still life subject using the same objects, values and colors. If you are going to add something red, it must be placed into the composition you are working from before you begin your painting so that everything appears on the “stage” just as you want it to appear in your painting.

Also, when painting a still life, lighting the stage is as complicated and as important as setting up the composition. I am amazed that many artists who paint from life often don’t have a proper light to work with.  Having a light that can be adjusted to be brighter or dimmer, that is easy to move around the studio, and that has a stand that allows the light to be moved up and down is as essential as setting the stage. It is also helpful to have a light that has a barn door attachment that can dim and focus the light stream, or a light that can be dimmed or made stronger with a dimmer switch. Without the ability to adjust the lighting, you can not produce a masterpiece.

All of these elements and many more are important to your success as a still life painter long before you even lay your first brush stroke down. Imagine what it would be like to be that familiar with your subject before you start painting!  Then, you can enjoy experimenting and noticing what happens as you really see what you are painting; and once you do,  you may never work from photos again!

 

The post The Secret of Painting from Life appeared first on Stefan Baumann – The Grand View: Paintings by Stefan Baumann.

My 2017 Gifts of Random Kindness & Senseless Acts of Beauty

I am an idealist and generally a positive person. Lately, however, I have noticed more and more people concentrating on negative things rather than positive ones. I know that my health suffers when I am surrounded by negativity and improves when I am surrounded by love and kindness. After a lot of introspection, I have decided that for 2017, I will offer the world more love and kindness through Random Kindness & Senseless Acts of Beauty.

One of the boxes I made to leave for someone to find.

I am making handmade little boxes and will be leaving them in random locations throughout my travels. I want to share love and bring smiles to the faces of strangers I will never meet.

Close up of the bead/handle on the lid of the box.

I have written a little tag explaining the gift that I will be attaching to each box that I leave for someone to find. It says:

To whoever finds this:
This is for you!

I’m glad you’ve found it and I hope this gift lifts your spirits and makes your day happier. Please accept it and enjoy it!

This box is a handmade original, one of a series I’ve created to surprise others with random kindness and senseless acts of beauty. I believe that when we put more love into the world, we help heal the rifts tearing us apart.

You may even want to “pay it forward” to others with your own random kindness and senseless acts of beauty.

Handmade box I made as part of my desire to spread more love and happiness in the world.

This is what I feel I can do to bring more love into the world. I would like to encourage others who are so inclined to find their own way to practice Random Kindness & Senseless Acts of Beauty.

Let’s send more love into the world, Candy

Paper Star From Helen Hiebert’s 2017 Twelve Months of Paper Calendar

While traveling, I am not able to make January’s paper project from Helen Hiebert’s 2017 Twelve Months of Paper Calendar. There just wasn’t enough room to pack everything. I purchased both the calendar as well as the custom paper pack, so it’s going to be fun to make this once I get back home.

Paper star, January’s project from Helen Hiebert’s 2017 Twelve Months of Paper Calendar.

Meanwhile, I thought I’d share Helen’s photo of the paper star she made from kite paper. The instructions for making this are included in her calendar, one project for each month of the year. If you are interested in getting your own calendar see: 2017 Twelve Months of Paper Calendar.

Enjoy, Candy

The Secret Key To Painting – Painting from life

in this video Stefan Baumann reveals The Secret Key To Painting ,
Painting from life. Baumann talks to a group of artist about his experiences to master painting in his classes. You can get more information by going to his website www.StefanBaumann.com The Secrets of Painting from Life
If you want to see the world as spectacular as it is, take a walk in the forest with an artist. The painter’s eye is more sensitive and receives a vast amount more information than a normal person who is experiencing the same view. When students first come to my classes, within weeks they report that they have never before seen the world “in color” as they are now able to do and that painting has opened their eyes to the beauty that surrounds them. The first assignment for new students who come to my classes is to paint a white egg on a white plate that is sitting on a white table cloth. This exercise requires that they really look at their subject before beginning to paint. Most students look at the setup and only see white. Then, with coaching, they look deeper and see that white has little to do with painting eggs at all. At this point, their consciousness has undergone a small expansion and the artist has increased awareness about the painting process. Once the shadows are discovered, then and only then, can the student focus his awareness on the effects that light has on the subject matter.

After that, it is the composition that commands the focus. Gradually or suddenly, the realization that the artist is the one directing the viewer’s perception and that perception can be directed to only one thing at a time. We can not see light, shadow and color at the same time. And we cannot see composition, temperature, and air with just a single glance. We cannot see the windshield and the road at the same time. Creating art is like juggler trying to keep 15 balls up in the air and it’s no wonder that artists begin painting from photos just to make the process easier. But when an artist paints from photos, something is lost and the connection between the artist and subject is disconnected, filtered and dumbed down. When setting up a still life in your studio, the setup must be created just as it will appear in your painting. If you want your painting to have a dark wall with Japanese print wallpaper in the background, you must carefully set up the still life subject using the same objects, values and colors. If you are going to add something red, it must be placed into the composition you are working from before you begin your painting so that everything that appears on the “stage” is just as it appears before you begin to paint it. Also, when painting a still life, lighting the stage is as complicated and important as setting up the composition. I am amazed that many artists who paint from life often don’t have a proper light to work with. Having a light that can be adjusted to be brighter or dimmer, that is easy to move around the studio, and that has a stand that allows the light to be moved up and down is as essential as setting the stage. It is also helpful to have a light that has a barn door attachment that can dim and focus the light stream, a light that can be dimmed or made stronger with a dimmer stitch. Without the ability to adjust the lighting, you can not produce a masterpiece. All of these elements and many more are important to your success as a still life painter long before you even lay your first brush stroke down. Imagine what it would be like to be that familiar with your subject before you start painting! Then, you can enjoy experimenting and noticing what happens as you really see what you are painting; and once you do, you may never work from photos again!

The post The Secret Key To Painting – Painting from life appeared first on Stefan Baumann – The Grand View: Paintings by Stefan Baumann.

2016 Year End Review and Preview of 2017

As 2016 comes to a close, I am amazed at how much art I accomplished while attending to the needs of others. 2016 has been the most stressful year of my life, and I think making art has been what got me through the year. I would not have made as much art this past year if I had not felt so committed to all of you who read and comment on my blog. I wish to thank you from the bottom of my heart.

My square envelopes with interlocking heart closure was one of my favorite DIY projects of 2016. DIY – Square Envelope With Interlocking Heart Closure

The square envelope with an interlocking heart closure is one of my favorite DIY’s from 2016. It has also received a lot of shares on the internet.

This Paper Origami Mandala is made with 8 pieces of paper 4 times longer in height as in width. DIY – Tea Bag Folding & Paper Origami Rosettes

My most popular blog post from 2016 was: DIY – Tea Bag Folding & Paper Origami Rosettes. This post includes links to instructions to make a number of different patterns.

This tea bag rosette was made from 8 tea bag wrappers like the one in the photo above. DIY – Tea Bag Folding & Origami Rosettes.

I actually save my tea bag wrappers, fold them, and make origami rosettes. The above photo shows one of the many patterns that can be made using tea bag wrappers.

These Puffy Pentagon Boxes are perfect to hold a Chocolate Dagoba Taster Square. DIY – Puffy Pentagon Box

I designed my Puffy Pentagon Box for the Oregon Chocolate Festival. This has been a favorite of many of my personal friends as well as those who read my blog on the internet. You can download the template from my blog post: DIY – Puffy Pentagon Box.

These origami envelopes are fun to make and quite addictive, too. They were another favorite DIY blog post. DIY Origami Envelope

I wish to thank Paula Bearded Krieg for the instructions for these wonderful envelopes. My blog post: DIY Origami Envelope includes a link to her instructions.

This photo shows the different burl wood I was looking at for the base of this Nuptial Spirit Vessel. Nuptial Spirit Vessel – The Processl

Although I can look at the numbers and know which post got the most views, it’s impossible to decide which is my most successful blog post of the year. Some posts are viewed a lot. Others have lots of comments. Some are shared a lot, or have lots of Facebook likes or are pinned on Pinterest. Some blog posts have been up for most of the year and some only a few months or weeks.

Two little birds made from watercolor blobs. DIY – From Blobs To Birds

Going through my statistics, I found that my blog has been viewed from 168 countries. The internet is an amazing place. I am so happy that I can reach so many people who love paper art.

50 triangle boxes are a whole lot of boxes.

My most popular photo on Pinterest brings thousands of views to the blog post 50 Triangle Boxes for a 50th Wedding Anniversary.

Quite a few of my older blog posts are still getting a lot of views too. 50 Triangle Boxes for A 50th Wedding Anniversary gets thousands of views from a photo on Pinterest. The DIY – Triangle Boxes, which includes a link to the template for making these triangle boxes, gets lots of views too.

Winter Walk book designed by Camille Riner that I made from her digital files. This photo has been shared a lot on Pinterest. Tiny Winter Walk Book

So what’s ahead for 2017? Obviously I will continue to do DIY blog posts. There will also be a lot of Art On The Go! blog posts about the paper art I make and see on my travels. And I will be writing about practicing random kindness and senseless acts of beauty throughout 2017 too.

Happy New Year! I look forward to a new and wonderfully creative 2017.

Enjoy, Candy