Trending Articles

Friends of SOAR

For great posts about the business of art, check out The Artsy Shark HERE!
ArtistsBillofRights.org reviews competitions and appeals seeking creative content, listing those that respect your copyrights and highlighting those that don't. Art Matters! publishes calls to artists, and not all of them may be compliant with ABoR's standards. Visit their site to learn more.
We support the Embedded Metadata Manifesto.  Metadata is information such as copyright notice and contact info you can embed in your images to protect your intellectual property, save time when uploading to social sites and promote your art. Click to visit the site and learn more.

New Ideas for the New Year From LightGarden Glass Art!

1086 Washburn                            January 2015
Medford, OR                                   Tues-Fri 10-5pm
www.lightgarden.net                 Sat  10-1p
(541) 779-0272                                 Closed:  Sun & Mon.

 

We have a free new resource for you!

     

Check out LightGarden’s Page on Pinterest!

Click here!

Pinterest makes it easy to share pictures and ideas for hundreds of new projects!  There are also free patterns that can be used for stained, fused or mosaic art as well as free instructional videos! 
New ideas added every week! 
 
Click and follow us now to find your next project, and keep inspired throughout the year!
 

 Flowers of Hope Fusing Workshop

Even if you’ve never done any glass fusing before you can make an 8″ x 8″ fused panel to donate to Flowers of Hope.
$10 buys you a base piece of glass, access to all frits, stringers and noodles, hanging hardware and firing. Come in and try your hand at fusing and find out how easy and fun it can be. You’ll also be doing a wonderful thing for a woman going through a tough time.
OR

TRY FUSING!  Workshop

The same class only you get to keep it!  Learn about using frits, stringers and noodles in this easy workshop!    $15
February 7                   10-12
March  14                    10-12
April 11                        10-12

 Painting with Frit

January 17
10a-12N
Lunch (by Peruvian Point)
1-3pm
 (two spaces left!)
Learn to use frit, hand pulled stringers and confetti to quickly add dimension and a painterly quality to your fused glass art.

Find out how easy it is to develop your sketches from photos and other inspiration. These panels can be a great reference guide for future projects.
All frit, confetti, stringers, glass and lunch are included.

Glass Fusing Basics or equivalent is required.
$125

 Glass Fusing: Basics 

January 24 & 31
1-4pm

Learn one of the fastest growing mediums in glass! In this two week class you’ll complete a 4″ tile and a small fused & slumped plate. Covers firing programs, prepping kiln shelves and ware and much more!

All supplies are included.
$85

 

 Fused Glass Switch Plates

February 7
1-4pm

Learn how easy it is to make these very cool fused glass switch plates. All the instructions, materials and firing are included in the $20 fee.  A small amount of 96 glass is required.      

Basic fusing or equivalent is required.     

 

 Fused Glass: Dichroic Jewelry

February 21
1-4pm

Grab attention with beautiful dichroic glass jewelry you make yourself! Cabochons for necklaces or earrings; they all will dazzle your friends!

Learn to cut them so they come out perfect every time. Compatible glass and lots of dichroic glass is included.

  Make several pieces for $55

 
Is there a class listed on our website that you would like to take that isn’t scheduled yet?  Send me an email and let me know.  That’s how I know when to schedule our classes.  If you have 5-6 people we can schedule private parties.click here to check out our classes

Need a Kiln?  Rent one of ours!

Bring in your fused work and we will fire it for you!

Projects small enough to fit on a 7″ shelf:              $   5.00

One or more projects on a 13″ round shelf:                8.00

Fuse + Slump on 13″ shelf:                                         12.00

Projects on a 20″ shelf:                                                11.00

Fused + Slump on a 20″ shelf:                                    14.00

Long Bubble Squeeze  add                                            3.00

 Morning Workshops:

Come join our morning workshops on Wednesday and Saturday mornings from 10a – Noon.  Use our tools and workshop space.  $10 for 2 hours!  Call to reserve your space.  You can do a Flowers of Hope panel during any of our workshops…or a “Try Fusing” panel to get you started in fusing.  You can also schedule bigger projects.  Contact us for more information.

Classes and Workshop at LightGarden Glass Art

 Flowers of Hope Fusing Workshop

Even if you’ve never done any glass fusing before you can make an 8″ x 8″ fused panel to donate to Flowers of Hope.
$10 buys you a base piece of glass, access to all frits, stringers and noodles, hanging hardware and firing. Come in and try your hand at fusing and find out how easy and fun it can be. You’ll also be doing a wonderful thing for a woman going through a tough time.
OR
TRY FUSING!  Workshop
The same class only you get to keep it!  Learn about using frits, stringers and noodles in this easy workshop!    $15
January  17                 10-12
February 7                   10-12

 Painting with Frit

January 17
10a-12N
Lunch (by Peruvian Point)
1-3pm
 
Learn to use frit, hand pulled stringers and confetti to quickly add dimension and a painterly quality to your fused glass art.

Find out how easy it is to develop your sketches from photos and other inspiration. These panels can be a great reference guide for future projects.
All frit, confetti, stringers, glass and lunch are included.

 

Glass Fusing Basics or equivalent is required.
$125

 Glass Fusing: Basics 

January 24 & 31
1-4pm
Learn one of the fastest growing mediums in glass! In this two week class you’ll complete a 4″ tile and a small fused & slumped plate. Covers firing programs, prepping kiln shelves and ware and much more!All supplies are included.
$85
 

 Fused Glass Switch Plates

February 7
1-4pm
Learn how easy it is to make these very cool fused glass switch plates. All the instructions, materials and firing are included in the $20 fee.  A small amount of 96 glass is required.Basic fusing or equivalent is required.
 

 Fused Glass: Dichroic Jewelry

February 21
1-4pm
Grab attention with beautiful dichroic glass jewelry you make yourself! Cabochons for necklaces or earrings; they all will dazzle your friends!Learn to cut them so they come out perfect every time. Compatible glass and lots of dichroic glass is included.Make several pieces for $55

 
Is there a class listed on our website that you would like to take that isn’t scheduled yet?  Send me an email and let me know.  That’s how I know when to schedule our classes.  If you have 5-6 people we can schedule private parties.click here to check out our classes

 

Need a Kiln?  Rent one of ours! 

Bring in your fused work and we will fire it for you!

 

Projects small enough to fit on a 7″ shelf:              $   5.00

One or more projects on a 13″ round shelf:                8.00

Fuse + Slump on 13″ shelf:                                         12.00

Projects on a 20″ shelf:                                                11.00

Fused + Slump on a 20″ shelf:                                    14.00

Long Bubble Squeeze  add                                            3.00

 

  

 Morning Workshops:

Come join our morning workshops on Wednesday and Saturday mornings from 10a – Noon.  Use our tools and workshop space.  $10 for 2 hours!  Call to reserve your space.  You can do a Flowers of Hope panel during any of our workshops…or a “Try Fusing” panel to get you started in fusing.  You can also schedule bigger projects.  Contact us for more information.

 LightGarden Glass Art is located at:

1086 Washburn                            December 2014
Medford, OR                                   Tues-Fri 10-5pm
www.lightgarden.net                 Sat  10-1p
(541) 779-0272                                 Closed:  Sun & Mon.

11 Art Destinations That Double As Therapeutic Retreats

There are many reasons to see art — to get a taste of something beautiful, to engage in new ways with today’s pressing questions, to escape to another era of the past, to see for a moment through another person’s eyes. Yes, there are probably infinite reasons to spend some one-on-one time with an artwork or four this holiday season, but today we’re focusing on one reason: healing.

Art can reveal, shock and delight, that much we know — but sometimes it has the ability to go deeper than the senses, to shift something inside us that is hard, if not impossible, to pinpoint or explain. For some, art has a certain spiritual or therapeutic power to change the viewer just by holding them in a certain time and place. Experiencing art can often be more otherworldly than a church, restorative than a yoga retreat, soothing than a day at the spa. We’ve compiled a list of 11 art destinations that, more than the average museum, intentionally cater to both the senses and the soul, in one way or another.

Check one out if you’re feeling particularly tapped out this holiday season, or whenever you want to treat yourself to a transcendent aesthetic experience. Behold, 11 art spots that will please your senses and soothe your insides. Let us know what we missed in the comments.

1. Rothko Chapel

rothko chapel

Visitors at the Rothko Chapel, Houston, 1977. Completed in 1971, it was designed in collaboration with American painter Mark Rothko and contains fourteen of his black paintings. (Photo by Romano Cagnoni/Hulton Archive/Getty Images)
Where: Houston, Texas
What: Founded by Houston philanthropists John and Dominique de Menil, Chapel is a non-denominational sanctuary combining the powers of spirituality and art. It is part spiritual retreat, part modern art museum, part human rights center, featuring a series of dark purple and black works by Mark Rothko.
Vibes:We are reasserting man’s natural desire for the exalted, for a concern with our relationship to absolute emotions,” wrote Barnett Newman, whose sculpture “Broken Obelisk” sits outside the chapel.

“[The paintings are] sort of a window to beyond,” explained Suna Umari, whose worked at the Chapel for over 30 years. “[Rothko] said the bright colors sort of stop your vision at the canvas, where dark colors go beyond. And definitely you’re looking at the beyond. You’re looking at the infinite.”

2. Salvation Mountain

salvation mountain california

Where: Niland, California
What: Leonard Knight’s adobe clay masterpiece, which is 50 feet high and 150 feet wide, revolves around the simple idea: “God Is Love.” The outsider art mecca features paintings of trees, sculpted flowers, biblical quotes, bluebirds and a giant red heart, made from over 100,000 gallons of donated paint.
Vibes:The resulting lumpy, undulating structure, saturated with biblical verses and sayings, is a testament, as its name implies, to Knight’s religious salvation,” said Sam Lubell of The New York Times. “But it seems more inspired by Candy Land and LSD. Swirling and striped reds, whites, yellows, greens, aquas and blues surround you.”

3. The Lightning Field

walter de maria lightning field

Where: Catron County, New Mexico
What: The piece of land art, made by sculptor Walter De Maria, features 400 stainless steel poles with pointed tips arranged in a rectangular grid amidst a vast New Mexican vista. The sculpture, which is meant to be both walked through and viewed, interacts with the surrounding landscape, creating an immersive experience best seen at sunrise and sunset.

Vibes:Seen from the porch, the rods marched away in phalanxes to the south. As the sun sank over our right shoulders, the metal spikes started to glow in the golden light. Their pointed tips took fire first, like candles, but soon the spikes themselves lighted up, top to bottom, as if glowing from within,” wrote Cornelia Dean in The New York Times. “For me, it was as if a piece of formal music, a Bach invention, perhaps, had taken material form and was playing before my eyes, not my ears.”

4. The Great Gallery of Horseshoe Canyon

horseshoe canyon

Where:Canyonlands National Park Maze District, Utah
What: This remote Utah canyon is known for its collection of Barrier Canyon Style rock art — a distinctive style of pictographs and petroglyphs thought to be over 6,000 years old. The mecca of ghostly figures has been dubbed The Great Gallery, though the space feels more like a forbidden sandstone temple.
Vibes:They were strangely shaped with neither arms nor eyes and standing up to 4 feet high,” said David Kelly in The LA Times. “One figure had feathers dangling from his arms. There were insect-like creatures and butterflies. Were they men, spirits, symbols? No one knows, so scientists refer to them as anthromorphs and describe the art as Barrier Canyon style, after the original name of this place.”

5. Storm King Art Center

storm king

Where:Hudson Valley, New York
What: 500-acres of hills, fields and endless green expanses serve as home to 100 massive sculptures, yielding an adult art lover’s version of a giant, zenned-out playground.
Vibes: “The view made me think that Ralph Waldo Emerson, an inspiration to the Hudson River School painters (whose work Storm King’s founders originally intended to house here in the 1960s), must have been nearby when he wrote: ‘The health of the eye seems to demand a horizon. We are never tired, so long as we can see far enough,'” wrote John Motyka.

6. ‘Twilight Epiphany’

james turrell twilight epiphany

Where: Houston, Texas
What: This site-specific installation is James Turrell’s 73rd “skyspace,” which performs with 40-minute light shows that lead up to sunrise and follow sunset, with slight variations depending on the weather and season. LEDs sync up with the changing colors of the sky, yielding a magical experience that feels like looking out unto infinity.
Vibes:If you take a photo of the sky in this skyspace, the color you see in the opening is not actually going to show up in your camera because in fact it is not there,” Turrell told Here Houston. “We do create the world in which we live to a much larger extent than we are willing to take responsibility for.”

7. The Dream House

mela foundation dream house

Where: TriBeCa, New York
What: The collaborative Sound and Light Environment, made by composer La Monte Young and visual artist Marian Zazeela, lives on the third floor of a TriBeCa building, housing within it “a time installation measured by a setting of continuous frequencies in sound and light.” The very long term, ongoing exhibition opened in 1993 and runs until 2015.
Vibes:Visiting The Dream House can be a baffling, delirious experience,” wrote The Observer’s Andrew Russeth. “The room is soaked in purple light. Huge speaker stacks emit a constant, potent drone, which music critic John Rockwell called a ‘cosmic throb.’ It is often very hot, but it is not uncomfortable. There are pillows, and you can recline, letting the sound work on you. It’s really something.”

8. The Integatron

integ

Where: Landers, California
What: In 1957, believing that he was following orders of visitors from planet Venus, George Van Tassel built a structure supposedly capable of rejuvenation, anti-gravity and time travel due to the intermittent magnetic fields inside the space. The large white dome now serves as a site for quartz sound baths, where visitors can recline in the acoustically perfect sound chamber and feel the vibrations of musical quartz bowls.
Vibes:It’s 105 degrees outside, and sunlight is streaming in through 15 windows ringing the rotunda,” wrote The LA Times’ Scott Gold. “Somehow, it is not hot, not in here. The notes clash over your head, some in breathtaking harmony, some in startling dissonance. Just when you’re starting to see patterns in the grain of the wood in the soaring ceiling, it’s over. There is silence, and no one moves. The acoustics are so good you can hear a man swallow from across the room. It has been either the shortest or the longest half-hour of your life.”

9. The Isamu Noguchi Playscape

noguchi playscape

Where: Atlanta, Georgia
What:Noguchi constructed this severe, minimalist playground in 1976 in Atlanta’s Piedmont Park, discarding prescribed methods of “playing” for something more imaginative and exploratory. The avant-garde sculptor toys with the space between art and experience, equipment and sculpture, object and landscape, seriousness and play, letting each viewer — kid or adult — encounter the unusual art experience in his or her own spontaneous way.
Vibes:Kids are challenged to decide how to creatively play with these oversized objects,” said Robert Witherspoon of the City of Atlanta’s Public Art Program. “It’s not scripted what to do on the climbing cubes, play mound, and jungle gyms — you have to improvise.”

10. International Car Forest of the Last Church

car forest nevada

Where: Goldfield, Nevada
What:Artists Chad Sorg and Mark Rippie have turned the desert into a museum, installing over 40 automobiles tipped on their heads and stacked on top of each other, like a set of rotting Hot Wheels for the gods.
Vibes:The dream project of two Nevada artists, the International Car Forest of the Last Church looks more akin to a druidic henge of junkers than any Christian chapel,” reads a description from Atlas Obscura

11. The Chinati Foundation

the chinati foundation

Where: Marfa, Texas
What:In 1986, artist Donald Judd opened a contemporary art museum with permanent and public exhibitions which are linked to (and inseparable from) the surrounding landscape, turning the entire city of Marfa into a dreamy space somewhere between an artistic fabrication and real life. It includes John Chamberlain’s mangled automobiles and Judd’s maze of 100 milled-aluminum boxes, each the same size yet with slightly different interiors.
Vibes: “It takes a great deal of time and thought to install work carefully,” Judd wrote in his first catalogue. “This should not always be thrown away. Most art is fragile and some should be placed and never moved again. Somewhere a portion of contemporary art has to exist as an example of what the art and its context were meant to be. Somewhere, just as the platinum iridium meter guarantees the tape measure, a strict measure must exist for the art of this time and place.”

Artists Prove SocialValue of Art in Ferguson, St. Louis

A few weeks after Michael Brown’s death rocked residents in and around Ferguson, Missouri, a small printshop in St. Louis took action. The graphic design studio, dubbed Firecracker Press, began hand printing posters emblazoned with the words “Promote peace in St. Louis.”

Amidst protests and heightened police presence in the city, the posters were made available to customers free of charge. Not surprisingly, the shop “sold out” of the wood type creations, though the print continues to live on in photos across sites like Twitter and Instagram. “Tell the world you support the debate that’s happening in Ferguson, MO and in the St. Louis region,” Firecracker wrote on its website. “Issues of inequality touch everyone… some more than others. Making posters is our small way of sharing our voice.”

Firecracker post in St Louis, MO 2014

Firecracker began offering its “Peace Posters” online, charging only for shipping and handling. “FedEx got its cut,” Firecracker owner Eric Woods explained. “But we didn’t make a penny off the posters. Some people wanted to donate money. And that money went to our nonprofit, Central Print.” (Images courtesy of Firecracker Press)
Firecracker owner Eric Woods, the mind behind the design, is one among many artists who spoke out after the shooting of an unarmed 18-year-old three months ago. From street art to paintings, murals to illustration, artists have been quick to echo the nation’s near constant calls for justice and clarity in the wake of Brown’s killing. The landscape of West Florissant might be marred by isolated acts of vandalism and law enforcement crackdowns, but art is still flourishing.

“I was so upset seeing Michael Brown’s mother on TV… that I felt I had to do something to express my grief and anger at the way the police handled the situation,” painter Mary Engelbreit recalled to HuffPost over email. Her illustration, “In the USA,” made headlines in August. The image depicts a black mother and her young son sitting over a newspaper headline that reads “Hands Up! Don’t Shoot.” Above the cartoon are the words: “No One Should Have To Teach Their Children This.”

I will not stay silent so you can stay comfortable

Images courtesy of Mary Engelbreit
“Art has been used to express feelings about every kind of situation since people could make marks on cave walls,” Englebreit added. “I was happy to be able to do something that helped the Brown family even in a small way. And it’s not over. It will never be over until black lives matter as much as white lives.”

Street artist Damon Davis agrees. “Artists play a vital role, telling these stories and keeping history alive,” he proclaimed in an interview with Mic. Like Firecracker, Davis created a series of posters; his also inspired by the popular “Hands up, don’t shoot” rally cry. Taped onto local businesses that have closed after an outbreak of violent protests in Ferguson, the massive photos showcase a simple pair of hands, raised in solidarity with the gesture Brown allegedly made when Officer Darren Wilson shot him.

“[The posters] are important for people who may be on the fence to see,” he explained. “Maybe they’ll change their minds [and start supporting us]. And for those who aren’t on our side … now they know we’re still here. And we’re not going to back down.”

Damon Davis posters

St. Louis artist Damon Davis installs posters from his Push Forward Project on a boarded up business along West Florissant Street on November 19, 2014 in Ferguson, Missouri. (Photos by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
Along with Woods’ and Davis’ work, an organization called Paint for Peace has been bringing art to the walls of Ferguson as well. Using boarded up businesses as canvases, the group aims to spread messages of hope and love with the help of local artists.

Paint for Peace St Louis

St. Louis is a beautiful and resilient city. It is my home,” Artbar STL owner and Paint for Peace founder Tom Halaska wrote in a message on Facebook. “I believe we are strong enough to come out the other side better than we started if people can listen, have compassion, and work to change what needs to be changed on so many levels. I have high hopes and expectations for our city. I know I won’t be disappointed.”

 

Some art projects that originated prior to the events in Ferguson have since been appropriated for the cause. For example, New Orleans-based artist Candy Chang has been encouraging individuals to replicate her “Before I Die” mural, first painted on a chalkboard on the streets of her hometown. The work prompts passersby to complete the sentence “Before I die I want to…” In Ferguson, a group of local teachers took up Chang’s torch. The chalkboard posters have collected responses like “see equality for all” and “see systematic reform.”

Before I die I want to see justice

Image courtesy of Huffington Post reporter Ryan Reilly
Artists outside of St. Louis have responded in kind. In particular, New York-based artist Molly Crabapple recently debuted a time-lapse of illustrations detailing the controversial police response to demonstrators over the past few months. The video was released days before a grand jury decided not to indict Officer Wilson in Brown’s death. Crabapple has also lent her images to apparel company Teespring, which is selling hoodies in support of a Ferguson bail fund.

The power of the Internet has allowed works based in and out of St. Louis to reach national audiences. Firecracker’s Woods estimates that around 500 posters left his shop, some shipped to individuals living as far away as California and New York. “The design was born out of frustration. Some people want to yell and protest, which we fully support. Other people, for whatever reason, they don’t feel safe or they don’t want to add to the chaos. And they wonder what they can do. They still want to contribute.”

“Printers have a history of being rabble-rousers,” he added. “We wanted to spread as much positive vibes across St. Louis and other places as we can.”

The original “Peace Poster” is no longer in print — the handset design, like many of Firecracker’s creations, was meant for a limited run. But Woods has ideas for a new image. As the nation reels over Eric Garner’s death, and yet another grand jury’s decision not to indict a police officer in the death of an unarmed black man, frustration continues to be felt. But as Ferguson proves, art will thrive in the face of frustration.

Do you know of more activist art in your area? Whether you live in Kiev or Hong Kong, New York City or St. Louis, send your submissions to photos@huffingtonpost.com below. (Art Matters! Editor’s Note: Sadly, I know of little activist art in our area, and none concerning the Ferguson issue. Wish there were  more…)

This article originally posted at the Huffington Post: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/12/05/ferguson-art_n_6257340.html?utm_hp_ref=arts

I Remember Better When I Paint

Editor’s Note: As an advocate for the arts, it’s important to me that the power of the arts for healing gets the attention it deserves. I have not seen this documentary (though it is not newly released), but it was recommended to me by a fan of one of my clients. The reviews are so impressive, and the memory loss associated with Alzheimer’s is such a concern for so many, that I wanted to share it with you.

I Remember Better When I Paint, narrated by Olivia de Havilland, is the first international documentary about the positive impact of art and other creative therapies on people with Alzheimer’s and how these approaches can change the way we look at the disease. A film by Eric Ellena and Berna Huebner, presented by French Connection Films and the Hilgos Foundation. Among those who are featured are noted doctors and Yasmin Aga Khan, president of Alzheimer’s Disease International and daughter of Rita Hayworth, who had Alzheimer’s.

The Hilgos Foundation’s mission is to support and encourage the ongoing process of artistic creation with people who have memory problems and/or Alzheimer’s and who require assistance in creating art that is meaningful and enriching. The Hilgos Foundation was created in memory of Hilda Gorenstein, an accomplished painter whose career spanned 75 years. She died at age 93 and left behind her the legacy of an inspired artistic life. Choosing to call herself Hilgos, Ms. Gorenstein was known for her beautiful marine paintings, which are now in collections all over the world. She was such a skillful painter of water vessels she was chosen to paint an enormous mural depicting the history of the U.S. Navy for Chicago’s Century of Progress celebration in 1933. She completed hundreds of paintings in the last three years of her life, while she struggled with profound memory loss. The vestiges of her early, masterful renderings of waves, birds, and boats remain, but have been transformed into a new system of spontaneous, personal gestures, bordering on the abstract. The sophisticated color choices and compositions of these late works reveal how sharp her artistic eye remained up until the very end of her life.

The Hilgos Award provides student funding at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago to support and encourage the ongoing process of artistic creation. The award was established by family and friends in memory of the artist Hilgos, who studied at the Chicago Art Institute as a young woman, graduated in the 1920s, and became a well respected painter and sculptor, specializing in marine themes. Hilgos painted well into her 90’s. She returned to painting with several Art Institute students even after suffering memory loss, which almost forced her to stop painting. An award has been created in her spirit and memory at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago.

See a gallery of Hilgos’ watercolors at the Hilgos Foundation website for inspiration and hope for those who struggle with, or who are caring for a loved one who struggles with, Alzheimer’s and/or memory loss.

The website has a link to an article with fascinating insights on the connection between art and a brain failing due to Alzheimer’s, which you can access directly here: http://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2013/01/creative-aging-the-emergence-of-artistic-talents/266799/

I Remember Better When I Paint has been released as part of a DVD package which includes the documentary as well as a series of short supplemental films that further highlight special programs and flesh out the how-tos of organizing an outing, a creative workshop or recreating social bonds between people with Alzheimer’s and their families.

To buy a copy of the DVD package: http://www.amazon.com/REMEMBER-BETTER-WHEN-PAINT/dp/B003UN4CIA

Learn more and read reviews and comments on the film’s website: http://irememberbetterwhenipaint.wordpress.com/about/

Be sure to check out the blog – this film is still touring 4 years after its initial release, and most screenings are free!

Arts & Alzheimer’s documentary to air on Oregon Public Broadcasting

The filmmakers contacted us yesterday to announce exciting news – “I Remember Better When I Paint” will  be airing on Oregon Public Broadcasting TV station on November 19, 2014 at 7 pm. Put it on your calendar so you don’t miss it, particularly if you have a friend or family member with Alzheimer’s! There is hope ~ all is not lost when there is art to step in and help with communication.

Remember Better When I Paint, narrated by Olivia de Havilland, is the first international documentary about the positive impact of art and other creative therapies on people with Alzheimer’s and how these approaches can change the way we look at the disease. Among those who are featured are noted doctors and Yasmin Aga Khan, president of Alzheimer’s Disease International and daughter of Rita Hayworth, who had Alzheimer’s.

The inspiration for the documentary was the painter Hilgos, who grew up in Portland, Oregon. In her later years while struggling with Alzheimer’s, she stated “I remember better when I paint.” With art students facilitating, Hilgos began painting again. Painting allowed Hilgos to maintain, and even regain, some of her core identity, and her extraordinary enthusiasm and energy, while living with profound memory loss.

This film, directed by Eric Ellena and Berna Huebner, is presented by French Connection Films and the Hilgos Foundation. To learn more, visit our previous post, the film’s website, and the Hilgos Foundation Wikipedia page.

Here’s a trailer:

News from Light Garden

The

Flowers of Hope

Artists’ Reception

at Roxy Ann Winery

was amazing!!

Great friends, good food, drink
 and lots of fun!
Thank you to everyone who came out to support the artists!
and….
The votes are in!
Melanie Dines’
Fuchsia Panel
won the
$50 gift certificate
  
It was a close call between many panels
 but Melanie’s panel won by one vote.
Congratulations!

Thank you to Brenda

and everyone at Roxy Ann

for being part of our program!

Fall Class Lineup
 
 Fused Glass: Dichroic Jewelry
September 27th
One Saturday Afternoon
1-4pm
Grab attention with beautiful dichroic glass jewelry you make yourself! Cabochons for necklaces or earrings; they all will dazzle your friends!Learn to cut them so they come out perfect every time. Compatible glass and lots of dichroic glass is included.

Make several pieces for $55

 Glass Fusing Basics

October 11th & 18th
Two Saturday Afternoons
1-4pm

Learn one of the fastest growing mediums in glass! In this two week class you’ll complete a 4″ tile and a small fused & slumped plate. Covers firing programs, volumn control, prepping kiln shelves and ware and much more!
All supplies are included.
$85

 Painting with Frit

October 25th
One Saturday

10a-12pm
Lunch
1-4pm

Learn to use frit, hand pulled stringers and confetti to quickly add dimension and a painterly quality to your fused glass art.
Find out how easy it is to develop your sketches from photos and other inspiration. These panels can be a great reference guide for future projects.

All frit, confetti, stringers, glass and lunch are included.

 

Glass Fusing Basics or equivalent is required.

$125

 
 Flowers of Hope Fusing Workshop

Even if you’ve never done any glass fusing before you can make an 8″ x 8″ fused panel to donate to Flowers of Hope.
$10 buys you a base piece of glass, access to all frits, stringers and noodles, hanging hardware and firing. Come in and try your hand at fusing and find out how easy and fun it can be. You’ll also be doing a wonderful thing for a woman going through a tough time.
OR
TRY FUSING!  Workshop
The same class only you get to keep it!  Learn about using frits, stringers and noodles in this easy workshop!    $15
October   18               10am-12n
November 15              10am-12n
Is there a class listed on our website that you would like to take that isn’t scheduled yet?  Send me an email and let me know.  That’s how I know when to schedule our classes.  If you have 5-6 people we can schedule private parties.

click here to check out our classes

 

Need a Kiln?  Rent one of ours!

 

Bring in your fused work and we will fire it for you!

 

Projects small enough to fit on a 7″ shelf:              $   5.00

One or more projects on a 13″ round shelf:                8.00

Fuse + Slump on 13″ shelf:                                         12.00

Projects on a 20″ shelf:                                                11.00

Fused + Slump on a 20″ shelf:                                    14.00

Long Bubble Squeeze  add                                            3.00

 

  

 Morning Workshops: 

Come join our morning workshops on Wednesday and Saturday mornings from 10a – Noon.  Use our tools and workshop space.  $10 for 2 hours!  Call to reserve your space.  You can do a Flowers of Hope panel during any of our workshops…or a “Try Fusing” panel to get you started in fusing.  You can also schedule bigger projects.  Contact us for more information.

The President Presents the 2013 National Medal of Arts and National Humanities Medal

When presenting the 2013 National Medal of Arts and National Humanities in July, President Obama remarked: “The arts and humanities aren’t there to be consumed when we have a free moment. We need them like medicine. They help us live.” We couldn’t agree more!

Carole Karemera – healing social trauma through the arts

Carole Karemera – healing social trauma through the arts

image

“It’s a fantastic experimental place to live…”

“It was a hard wake-up call…!”

“We need to educate all of us…”

“We need to keep Rwanda as a laboratory…”

“We need to play the role of the bridge…”

I caught up with Carole Karemera during the “hellwach” (bright-awake) 6th International Theatre Festival for young audiences at the Helios Theater in Hamm, later also witnessed one of their performances of “Little Hill”, a theatre play for people from 4 years old, and recorded the after-performance talk with Carole and her team. Carol pursued a successful career as a saxophone player, film and theatre actress and contemporary dancer. She is the director and founding member of the Ishyo Art Centre in Kigale.

link to playlist 1 of interview and further intro

The main part of our conversation is dedicated to Carole’s description of the 1994 genocide in Rwanda and especially, the role that women played in the genocide. Carole then recounts for us the courageous journey of women in the arts in Rwanda, who picked up the task of listening carefully to the needs of their society and the daunting process of reworking their historical “heritage”, the social trauma of genocide together with perpetrators and victims and the new generations.

link to playlist 2 of interview and further intro

In 2005, together with eight other women, they founded a cultural initiative to respond to the needs of their country and society through arts and creative projects, beginning with storytelling in schools, later in bars. The initiative became “Ishyo Art Centre”, a vibrant cultural centre in Kigale. The centre offers space and opportunities for artists to develop and produce new work as well as a varied programme of events and workshops, which seeks to make arts and culture available for everyone.

Carole emphasizes the heightened awareness of women in the arts in Rwanda for the troubles and needs of societies elsewhere on the continent and their wish, hope and willingness to share their valuable experiences widely, and especially with their sistaz in Africa.

link to playlist of clips from Carole’s interview

link to playlist of the after-performance talk with the team of Ishyo Art Centre Kigali

imageWith this post, we are opening a new additional page of Contributions “from the far sides of the Zambezi” in our audio-library of the stories of African women. The posts will be on the blog for 10 days, then they will move to the special page of contributions with a small reference and link remaining on the front page.

 

Carole Karemera on the All Africa Sound Map. Contribute your recordings and place African arts and culture on the global map!

MOther's Day News from the Children's Healing Art Project

 

Children’s Healing Art Project
brings the healing power of art to children in crisis and their families. 
At CHAP children are known for the creative ingenuity,
not by disability, disease or diagnosis. 
(left-right) Amara, Dayle & Hania at the CHAP Studio in SE Portland
 
This spring CHAP joins you honoring moms.
(did you know that Mother’s Day is only 13 days away?!)
We are grateful to all the moms of the child artists we serve, grateful to the moms who teach art in the hospitals, moms who serve on our board, moms who volunteer, and moms who donate and support CHAP’s mission.
We celebrate moms like Dayle and the many amazing moms whose lives are touched by our work. Please give now in honor of Dayle and all the moms who CHAP serves.
Your donations mean that moms like Dayle, who are fighting (and beating!) cancer, can use art to play and bond with their families while in the hospital, both bedside, in family rooms and waiting rooms. 
You can provide kids like Amara and Hania beads, paint, glitter, clay, feathers, sequins, crayons and art supplies galore so they can come to Art Club, be kids, express themselves, have fun, and be a part of our community.  
CHAP would like to extend a special appreciation 
to the following funders who make our programs possible: 
 
Autzen Foundation * Equity Group Foundation 
Henry Lea Hillman, Jr. Foundation *Oregon Arts Commission
Oregon Jewish Community Foundation * Maybelle Clark Macdonald Fund
PGE Foundation * Regional Arts & Culture Council * Reser Family Foundation
Spirit Mountain Community Fund * Work for Art
 
Children’s Healing Art Project
503-243-5294
1910 SE 11th
Portland, OR 97214
Like us on Facebook Follow us on TwitterView our videos on YouTubeFind us on Pinterest