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Congress Considers Level Funding for NEA

It’s been a fast-paced appropriations season so far! On June 16, the U.S. Senate approved legislation (for the first time in six years!) in subcommittee to level fund the National Endowment for the Arts.The U.S. House also kept its pace for rapid consideration, approving its NEA funding bill in full committee today as well. Tomorrow, the bill that funds the federal museum agency and arts education is on tap for consideration (first time in three years!) in another House subcommittee. And on Thursday, the Senate returns to consider its bill to fund the NEA in full committee.Despite the substantial effort in Congress to advance bills in a timely way, the Administration last night issued a veto threat to the bill because of its numerous policy riders, thwarting any expected advancement.

What you need to know

Last week, the House Interior Appropriations Subcommittee approved a bill providing sustained funding for the National Endowment for the Arts. All the cultural institutions, like the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Smithsonian Institution, also were proposed at level funding.

June 16, the full committee reported out this legislation on a 30-21 vote, enabling it to next be considered on the House floor.

Rep. Steve Israel (D-NY) offering amendment to increase funding for NEA by $2 million to full committee
Rep. Steve Israel (D-NY) offers amendment to increase funding for NEA by $2 million to full committee

During full committee consideration, Rep. Steve Israel (D-NY) offered an amendment to boost funding for both the NEA and the NEH to the President’s request. This is roughly a $2 million increase to $148 million. Although his amendment did not receive a vote, Reps. Chellie Pingree (D-ME), David Price (D-NC), and Rosa DeLauro (D-CT) all spoke favorably on his amendment. Rep. Pingree noted the work of the Maine Humanities Council in her district; Rep. Israel spoke about Operation Homecoming: Iraq, Afghanistan, and the Home Front in the Words of U.S. Troops and Their Families, a publication of the NEA. A writer himself, Rep. Israel shared his interest to scale up healing arts therapy work with veterans going forward and in more areas across the country. Rep. Price shared with his colleagues another publication, the Heart of the Matter, tucking it in also as recommended reading. Rep. Price also shared with all appropriators that NEA and NEH are funded well below their historical levels. He compared funds to 1992 and said with just inflation, we’d be investing nearly double had we just retained those levels. You can watch the June 16 proceedings at this webcast link, in which Rep. Israel’s amendment can be found at the 2:57 timestamp.

The Senate subcommittee also considered their version on June 16. Both NEA and NEH are also proposed for level funding. The subcommittee’s statement can be found here. The full committee considered the bill June 16.

What’s next

House floor votes could occur as soon as the last week in June, prior to the 4th of July congressional recess. As the process moves forward, the NEA and other cultural agencies may be prime targets for proposed cuts, if history is any lesson. We will keep you posted on any harmful amendments as the bills head toward the House or Senate floor.

Help us continue this important work by becoming an official member of the Arts Action Fund. If you are not already a member, you can play your part by joining the Arts Action Fund today—it’s free and easy to join.

Thank you for your support of the arts!


1000 Vermont Avenue NW
6th Floor
Washington DC . 20005
T 202.371.2830
F 202.371.0424
One East 53rd Street . 2nd Floor
New York NY . 10022
T 212.223.2787
F 212.980.4857
[email protected]
www.AmericansForTheArts.org
www.ArtsActionFund.org

Editor’s Note: Yesterday we sent a message to Oregon House Representative Greg Walden via an ArtsUSA petition. It began with the petition text written by ArtsUSA advocates, but we wanted to add more. We hope you will also send your own message to our representatives about why level or increased funding for NEA programs—which fund Oregon state arts programs—before Congress votes on the proposed budget next week. Feel free to copy ours (below) if it resonates with you. We received a message back from Rep. Walden this morning indicating that he will keep our priorities in mind throughout the budget and appropriations process, but if he needs to hear from more of us. In his words, “At the end of the day, it’s your money that we’re talking about—you ought to have a say in how it’s being spent.” If hears from many, many more of us, we may actually get a $2 million increase in funding as proposed by Rep. Steve Israel of New York last week, but you need to know that continued efforts to cut funding to the National Endowment completely are still threatening this agency so vital to arts funding across the country and in our own home state.
“As your constituent, I urge you to increase or support a budget of $146 million for the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) in the FY 2016 Interior Appropriations bill to preserve citizen access to the cultural, educational, and economic benefits of the arts and to advance creativity and innovation here at home.

The arts mean jobs for our district! The nonprofit arts industry generates $135.2 billion annually in economic activity, supports 4.13 million full-time equivalent jobs in the arts and related industries, and returns $9.59 billion in federal income taxes.

Earlier this year, the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis and the NEA announced the latest figures on the arts and cultural sector’s contributions to U.S. gross domestic product (GDP), proving that the arts are a significant part of the GDP. Arts and culture activity produced $698.7 billion in goods and services annually or 4.32% of GDP – more than both the construction or transportation sectors.

Grants through the NEA are widely distributed to strengthen arts infrastructures and to ensure broad access to the arts. The NEA makes grants in every congressional district. Furthermore, the NEA distributes 40 percent of its program dollars to state arts agencies, on the condition that each state devotes its own appropriated funds as well. In partnership with the NEA, state arts agencies have awarded 22,000 grants to more than 18,300 organizations, schools, and artists in nearly 4,800 communities across the United States.

With funding for the arts having been cut from most of our schools, I am very concerned that our children are not getting enough exposure to the arts to help them achieve their goals and become productive member of society. I heard a parent recently tell me that her son, who is studying a pre-med curriculum in high school, was having trouble getting decent grades in biology classes because he couldn’t draw an accurate line drawing of an anatomical feature! That’s of grave concern, and this example makes a case for supporting availability and access to the arts outside of the school system. The NEA improves access to the arts, supports artistic excellence and fosters lifelong learning through grants, partnerships, research and national initiatives. The current level funding of $146 million amounts to just 45 cents per capita, as compared to 70 cents per capita in 1992. I am counting on you as my Representative to support at least level funding of $146 million for the NEA.

On a side note, I urge you to support the NEA’s STEAM educational model for our schools. This would add steam to the STEM program and improve student’s ability to learn, retain, and effectively apply information in a broad range of subjects by incorporating the arts into the curriculum. A society that does not value the arts beyond pretty pictures on the walls is NOT a world I want to live in! Numerous studies have proven that including the arts in education does far more than teach kids how to draw or paint or play the piano, but results in important enhancements to executive function and neurological development during a child’s formative and educational years, not to mention creative/collaborative problem solving (and oh do we need more people with those abilities active in our society!), and the fact that high school students with four years of art classes average 100 points higher on their SAT scores than those whose studies included one semester or less of art. And that’s just the tip of the iceberg of the many ways art can contribute tangibly to our lives. We should respect the truth these studies have discovered and give our kids every opportunity possible to excel in school and in their professional lives after school by reintroducing funding for the arts in education. It is deeply troubling, embarrassing and a poor reflection on the priorities of our society that they were ever cut to begin with.

Approving level funding for the NEA right now is a healthy start. Please commit to continuing funding for the NEA right now, and make it a part of your fight for preserving the quality of life in our country and our ability to complete on the global stage with creative innovations and solutions that only come when kids learn how to think creatively and effectively express their ideas by increasing the NEA’s funding from flat to being up-to-date with the increases in inflation and on par with historical levels at a minimum, and restoring funding for the arts in our schools.”

UCLA Medical School's 'Guest Artist' Is Helping To Teach Doctors About Disease

Reposted from Huffington Post Arts & Culture

amp

Ted Meyer, Scarred for Life: Meyer uses block-print ink to transform human scars into vibrant colorful abstractions in his “Scarred for Life” series, inviting others to share the physical remnants of their survival stories.
 

Ted Meyer is the guest artist at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA. If you weren’t aware that medical schools had guest artists, you’re not alone. But this initiative is very real, aiming to teach doctors about illness through the practice of art.

Yes, Meyer’s work brings artists together to help educate future physicians and epidemiologists on the more human aspects of disease. “The artists use their work to tell a story,” Los Angeles-based Meyer told The Huffington Post. “It helps the doctors look at people as more than something to cure.”

avian

Daphne Hill, Avian Flu: “Daphne does work about germs and her fears of them sickening herself and her children. Her talk was interesting as she explained how her fears developed and how doctors might talk with someone like her who has already been checking the Internet and read the possible worst case scenarios.”
Meyer began his stay at the medical school in 2010, though the foundation of his ongoing project began much earlier — in fact, his inspiration dates back to his birth. “I was born with a very rare genetic condition,” said Meyer, who grew up with Gaucher’s disease, a disorder in which fatty substances accumulate in cells and organs. “There was no treatment for it. Starting at about age 6 I was in and out of the hospital all the time. I grew up thinking maybe I’d make it to thirty, maybe not.” Among other things, manifestations of the illness include bruising, fatigue, anemia and skeletal disorders.

During his time in the hospital, Meyer turned to art as a means of expression, release and inner healing. Creating imagery filled with skeletal bodies contorted in pain, Meyer’s resulting series was titled “Structural Abnormalities.” He often made use of the materials around him, incorporating bandages and IVs into his images, all revolving around the idea of, in Meyer’s words, “being in a body that didn’t work particularly well.”

Bandaid, by Damienne Merlina

Damienne Merlina, Bandaid
And then, something unexpected happened. Meyer’s health began to improve. “I really hit a point where, thanks to Western technology, there was a new treatment. Almost all of my symptoms disappeared,” he said. “I had my hip replaced so I could walk normally.” Although undoubtedly a miracle in terms of his life and wellbeing, the sudden shift left Meyer directionless as an artist.

After a period of uncertainty, Meyer resolved to shift his artistic perspective entirely. While still focused on the body, his work shifted from its “singular and isolated” mode to one more “happy and sexual.” More importantly, instead of sharing his own story, he began inviting others to share theirs.

For this series, which Meyer dubbed “Scarred for Life,” he applies block-print ink to human scars and the skin surrounding them. He then proceeds to press paper to skin, and subsequently accents the images with paint and pencil, turning physical remnants of suffering into inimitable splashes of color and line. Although the project center around scars, the art is less about suffering and more about survival. “I make these prints that look like Rothkos — color field prints,” he said. “I don’t want [to emphasize] the shock value of, ‘Oh, look how disfigured they look.’ For me, it’s a story more like mine: let’s make the best out of this that we can from this point forward.”

breast

Ted Meyer, Breast Cancer-Mastectomy
Meyer explained the intense reactions he received in response to the works, which toured everywhere from the United Nations to the Pasadena Armory; reactions of an intensity he never experienced when painting. “People would come look at my work and just sort of break down crying,” he said. “Others came up to me and said, ‘Look at my scar, let me tell you about my scar.'” He was receiving emails twice a week from people all around the world, all wanting to share their personal scar story.

This gave Meyer an idea. With so many people grappling with illness and using art as an outlet, perhaps their creative efforts could serve as a means of unorthodox education as well. “It became very apparent to me that all these people who do work about their illnesses, really have a lot to say,” Meyer said. “Maybe they could teach something to medical professionals. There has been art therapy designed to help patients, but I thought maybe there is something to teach the doctors here. Perhaps they can look at patients’ artworks and see something beyond the clinical. It’s not just ‘oh, they have multiple sclerosis’ or ‘it’s a broken neck.’ In a way, it’s like art therapy for doctors.”

As a result, for the past five years, Meyer has served as a guest artist at the UCLA’s medical school, a position he carved out and created for himself, curating artist talks and exhibitions that serve to educate the medical staff. In particular, Meyer’s programming is designed for first and second year medical students, most of whom have not yet had an opportunity to work with patients in person. To provide future doctors with more tangible understanding of living with certain afflictions, artists speak about their condition, their artworks, and the relationship between the two.

susan

Susan Trachman, Order #2
Susan has MS and does work about organization and control as she has less control over her body. He media is all the old medical supplies used in her treatment
Mainly, his position entails recruiting and curating a network of artists exploring issues of illness and identity, inviting them to show their work and tell their stories. The conditions represented are as diverse as the artistic media explored. “There is a woman Susan who has multiple sclerosis,” Meyer said, “and for 25 years she’s been keeping all the bottles she’s used — all the saline and everything — she takes them and she organizes them in patterns. She explained to the medical students that when you have MS you have absolutely no control over your body. You can’t predict your own movements. But by organizing these bottles, she had found one area she could control.”

Meyer’s program caters to doctors who, though familiar with all the technicalities of medical proceedings, aren’t as well versed in the human aspects of the profession. “There are a number of doctors who are very smart but when they get on the floor and have to start dealing with patients they break down,” he said. Especially today, many doctors don’t have the proper time to truly get to know their patients, the ways their various struggles have shaped the people they are.

“There was another woman who had a headache for around four years. During that period she had lost her ability to name things, she couldn’t remember the nouns. When she finally got rid of her migraine, she went back and photographed all the things she couldn’t remember. For someone to tell their story to first year med students — it’s not just, ‘Oh, you have a headache, what medicine should I give you?’ It’s a new way to understand the life process of living with an illness.”

Meyer’s unorthodox merging of art and medicine proves that art therapy isn’t only helpful for patients, but doctors as well. “It’s a new way to connect,” Meyer said. “We are making positive things out of these horrible situations.”

Art For A Cause

We are looking for more artists to participate. They do need to be there that day, but can work in teams. Plein air painters and artisans who would like to craft while they sell are welcome!!
Art For A Cause poster 2015

LightGarden Glass Art May 2015 News

1086 Washburn                            May 2015
Medford, OR                                   Tues-Fri 10-5pm
www.lightgarden.net                     Sat  10-1p
(541) 779-0272                                 Closed:  Sun & Mon.

 
This is the Reason We Do It
 
It has been a lovely spring hasn’t it?  I miss seeing some of you but I know how busy this time of year is.  For me too!
I got a card the other day that I wanted to share with you. 
It’s a tougher time of year for some. 
But it reminded me again of why we do what we do.
 
Dear Jessica,
Thank you for allowing local artists to make the 8″ x 8″ glass panels for women diagnosed with breast cancer.  I didn’t or couldn’t grasp the concept when they told me to “pick a panel.”  I thought it was some form of subtle identification in the hospital waiting area.  Needless to say my mind was somewhere else the morning of my mastectomy; it was also the first day of spring.  All the panels had flowers & designs but my eyes fell to the solid red heart created by Deanna Gossner.
Thank you for your studio!!  I hope to some way connect and make a lot of panels, some day, and meet you.  My panel has become an inspiration daily to keep on because others out there have the love and understanding to care, when life seems so confusing and scary.
Even though we’ve never met, I know your heart is good.  I hope to create something to pay forward in the near future.  Gifts such as yours brings people together when times can be so tough.  Thank you!
You can make one of these panels
for $10 in 2 hours or less.
No experience necessary!
Come join us and make one soon.
You know you want to!
Does anyone know Deanna Gossner?  She is not on our mailing list and I have a personal card for her as well.
 
 *Beautiful marigold pansy by Diane Korbel.  Nice work Diane!
 

 
Amanda Berkeley was in the other day and picked out a sheet  of glass that I’d had on the shelf for awhile.  It was a sheet of yellow textured Kokomo glass. It’s a nice piece of glass but I wasn’t sure what to do with it either. The next day she sent me this picture of her beautiful work. She had used the striking yellow glass in the two focal point circles in her latest panel.  Amanda does a very nice job of incorporating bevels, glass nuggets and jewels, as well as combining different textured glasses.
 
You can see more of her work at
 

 
Any Wednesday or Saturday
we have a workshop scheduled
you can come in and make a
Flowers of Hope
or
Try Fusing!  panel
call or email to save your space
 
 
 Flowers of Hope Fusing Workshop

Even if you’ve never done any glass fusing before you can make an 8″ x 8″ fused panel to donate to Flowers of Hope.

NO EXPERIENCE NECESSARY!

$10 buys you a base piece of glass, access to all frits, stringers and scrap glass, hanging hardware and firing. Come in and try your hand at fusing and find out how easy and fun it can be. You’ll also be doing a wonderful thing for a woman going through a tough time.
OR
TRY FUSING!  Workshop
The same class only you get to keep it!  Try fusing and see if you like it!  Learn about using frits, stringers and noodles in this easy workshop!    $15
June 13                         10-12
July  18                         10-12
August 15                     10-12
*For 5 or more people we can schedule a private party!
I have a few events scheduled on Saturdays coming up.  I will keep the calendar current so you can Check Here to see where we are: 

June 6th  12 – 4pm Taste of Summer   Britt Festival

 

June 13th  1-4pm   Valley View Winery    Demonstration with Dawn Lucero of Glass Village.

 

Is there a class listed on our website that you would like to take that isn’t scheduled yet?  Send me an email and let me know.  That’s how I know when to schedule our classes.  If you have 5-6 people we can schedule private parties.

click here to check out our classes

 

Need a Kiln?  Rent one of ours!

 

Bring in your fused work and we will fire it for you!

 

Projects small enough to fit on a 7″ shelf:              $   5.00

One or more projects on a 13″ round shelf:                8.00

Fuse + Slump on 13″ shelf:                                         12.00

Projects on a 20″ shelf:                                                11.00

Fused + Slump on a 20″ shelf:                                    14.00

Long Bubble Squeeze  add                                            3.00

 

  

 Morning Workshops: 

Come join our morning workshops on Wednesday and Saturday mornings from 10a – Noon.  Use our tools and workshop space.  $10 for 2 hours!  Call to reserve your space.  You can do a Flowers of Hope panel during any of our workshops…or a “Try Fusing” panel to get you started in fusing.  You can also schedule bigger projects.  Contact us for more information.

LIFE Art - LIVE. INSPIRE. FREEDOM OF EXPRESSION. at South Stage Cellars

"Mulholland Drive," by Brandy Gibbins

“Mulholland Drive,” Brandy Gibbins

Reception Saturday, February 7 from 6–7:30pm

The art exhibit on display at South Stage Cellars right now is a truly special one. Every year the Cellar’s “Rising Stars” music competition benefits a local nonprofit, and this year they chose LIFE Art, a Medford-based program helping Rogue Valley youth overcome a wide range of difficulties by learning to paint with guidance from artist mentors. I had the opportunity to meet Phil Ortega, founder of LIFE Art, when he and several of the program’s mentors and students were hanging their show. I was deeply moved by the story of LIFE Art and impressed not only by the caring and generous heart of this compassionate man, but the overall quality, ingenuity and expression in the youths’ paintings.

In the spring of 2010, Mr. Ortega was working late at night in the shop where he fixes old cars as a hobby when he heard a sound behind the building. Stepping outside, he discovered a group of teens tagging abandoned rail cars. He asked what they were doing, and they told him they were painting the tag name of a youth who committed suicide in 2009.  Among the taggers were the late youth’s brother and cousin.  Recognizing their genuine need to create a memorial for their deceased relative and friend, as well as some real artistic talent, Mr. Ortega bought the boys blank canvases, brushes and paint that very day to help them channel the memory of their loved one onto something permanent. He then began thinking about how he could develop a program to support kids like these.

Painting by Nicole Paradis

Painting by Nicole Paradis

The LIFE Art program uses visual and creative arts as a means for youth to express their feelings and communicate with others about their experiences. Art projects address the multiplicity of the issues young people are involved in. Factors including difficult family relationships and school experiences, substance use, community risk factors (i.e., gangs, criminality) and cultural pressures are all addressed through guided discussions with caring adults and LIFE Art Mentors.

South Stage Cellars Rising Stars has chosen to donate all the profits from the 2015 music competition to this amazing local nonprofit. We hope you plan to come to Jacksonville on February 7, 2015 to enjoy our Chinese New Year parade and celebration. There will be additional arts and cultural opportunities, including an authentic Origami class at Art Presence Art Center, next to the historic Courthouse. But whatever you do, come to South Stage Cellars at 125 S. Third Street from 6–7:30pm for a reception for the LIFE Art youth artists! Join the teens, mentors and director of LIFE Art, enjoy their work along with live music and complimentary appetizers, and consider helping to empower one of their young artists with a purchase—If there are any left to buy! Paintings were selling as they were placed on the walls. Ortega looks forward to the event, and to highlighting the art and mentorships LIFE Art encourages. “We might even have some poetry or a short story reading by a teen if we can,” he added. The LIFE Art exhibition will continue through the end of March at South Stage Cellars Tasting Room.

YMCA Mural Work, Jose and EMA

YMCA Mural Work, Jose and EMA

SSC Rising Stars, now in its 4th year, was the brainchild of Porscha Schiller, Tasting Room and Marketing Events Manager of South Stage Cellars. The competition has grown every year until it outgrew the tasting room altogether. It will now be held across the street, upstairs in historic Redmen’s Hall. Schiller was quoted in the Jacksonville Review as saying, “Everyone involved in the music competition and LIFE Art is extremely proud of the work these kids are doing and so very grateful to the community for the amazing support this life-changing nonprofit group is getting!”

Tickets for the 4th-annual South Stage Cellars Rising Stars Competition are on sale now at South Stage Cellars in Jacksonville, the Music Coop in Ashland and online at www.southstagecellars.com. For more information, call 541-899-9120.

Mello Saldivar Anaya Working on Mural

Mello Saldivar Anaya Working on Mural

More About LIFE Art

Mr. Ortega wrote us, saying, “We started with the support of the Garrett Lee Smith Suicide Prevention Grant and Jackson County Suicide Prevention Coordinator Michelle Morales. Their guidance was instrumental in creating something unique. We started with a few kids and have grown to serving over 200 local kids every month. We help kids cope with a multitude of stresses. Suicide prevention was our starting focus, but we have grown to include any kid with the idea that group art projects create a certain climate so that the kids are not identified as fragile, but as artists.”

The Garrett Lee Smith (GLS) Memorial grant was awarded to several counties in the state of Oregon from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) in 2010. The grants became available through the Garrett Lee Smith Memorial Act of 2004, the first federal suicide prevention program targeted towards youth. The Act is named after the son of former Oregon senator Gordon H. Smith, who took his own life in 2003.

 

 

Front (l-r): LIFEArt student Adrian Chavez, student Karla Lopez, mentor Aaron Dykstra, student Mello Saldivar-Anaya who painted the murals in the background of our February 2015 cover photo. Back (l-r): LIFEArt founder Phil Ortega, mentor Caroline Wasick, mentor Nicole Paradis, student Luis Rodriguez. Photo by Ezra Marcos.

Front (l-r): LIFE Art student Adrian Chavez, student Karla Lopez, mentor Aaron Dykstra, student Mello Saldivar-Anaya. Back (l-r): LIFE Art founder Phil Ortega, mentor Caroline Wasick, mentor Nicole Paradis, student Luis Rodriguez. Photo by Ezra Marcos.

 

 

 

“I manage LIFE Art so that kids can learn coping skills through art and guided mentorships. I believe that art tells a story, and when kids can demonstrate their voice through art, it relives a sense of hurt for some, joy for most…but when people admire the art they have created, it Validates Their Feelings! That is the LIFE Art mission in a nutshell.” ~Phil Ortega

 

 

 

LIFE Art Today

Thanks to a grant from The Providence Health Plan Community Benefit Fund of the Oregon Community Foundation, LIFE Art in partnership with On Track opened the LIFE Track Youth Center & Art Gallery at 106 S. Grape Street in Medford. This project gives youth a space to express themselves creatively, as well as having a place where they can drop in and find the support of caring mentors. In addition, the center offers FREE art classes every Saturday for youth 10-22 years old. “It’s a cool project, but it is coming to an end this year. LIFE Art is looking for a new place to call home starting this summer. My house served as a place for the kids for a few years, but we are way too big for that anymore!” says Ortega, “Hopefully we will find a place where we can partner with other artists for various art projects and a sharing of experiences and skills can take place. Maybe one of your readers has a space in mind we could lease.”

LIFE Art student Adrian Chavez, mentor Aaron Dykstra and student Luis Rodriguez. Photo by Ezra Marcos.

LIFE Art student Adrian Chavez, mentor Aaron Dykstra and student Luis Rodriguez. Photo by Ezra Marcos.

Ortega tells us that new LIFE Art mural projects are underway, in partnership with the Gang Task Force, which is comprised of many Jackson County agencies working to help connect teens to programs that encourage better lifestyle choices. The murals, painted on large scale canvases, will be displayed around our community starting with Central Art Supply in Medford. They will help us display the art on the exterior of their building as a way to encourage teens to create more ART ON Canvas. The art will also be used as the backstage art to SSC Rising Star Events.

“We believe that when artists (teens) see their art displayed in our community they will feel validated and accepted. More artists will seek programs like LIFE Art to join. It is up to the adults in our community to create a caring environment for our youth to connect with and it starts with setting a positive example. We believe the art will stimulate conversation and empower our youth,” Mr. Ortega says.
The funding for these murals are through the YDC and the KEY ( Keep Encouraging Youth) Project in partnership with LIFE Art, Spartan Boxing, Juvenile Justice and Kids Unlimited.
"Bubbles," by Alondra Flores

“Bubbles,” by Alondra Flores

Funding ends October 15, 2015 for LIFE Art’s other programs:

G.E.M.S.

G.E.M.S. (Girls Expressing Many Strengths) is an after school program geared toward helping young teens learn to cope with life stressors through artistic expression and group support. The program is in partnership with Eagle Point School District and Medford School District.

One–2–One Mentorship Program

One-2-One Mentorship is designed to connect with students who need attention beyond group activities. Many of our participants are dealing with real life issues and struggles around poverty, relationships, family, substance abuse, and education. Connecting with certain students on a regular basis establishes a dependable connection with a caring adult role model.

LIFE Art New Logo

LIFE Art New Logo

Art With A Purpose

The Art with a Purpose sessions are about creating art that is focused on social issues that students face daily. Suicide prevention, self-image, anti-bullying campaigns, gang prevention and promoting civility are all topics that can be better addressed by our model: “Marketing for Kids Created by Kids.”

 

 

 

 

 

Now five years old, the LIFE Art program is in partnership with United Way, Jackson County Health and Human Services, Una Voz, Eastburn Photography LLC, Lenart Art Education Foundation and Oregon Community Foundation (Latino Partnership Project). Mr. Ortega and the LIFE Art staff and mentors thank Jackson County School District 9 Leadership and Staff for making it possible to offer their services within our schools and for the partnerships that support our students.

Come to the reception ~ meet Phil Ortega and the LIFE Art youth artists and mentors in person to learn more! You can help…come to the Rising Stars music competition nights, from which 100% of the profits will benefit LIFE Art!

New Ideas for the New Year From LightGarden Glass Art!

1086 Washburn                            January 2015
Medford, OR                                   Tues-Fri 10-5pm
www.lightgarden.net                 Sat  10-1p
(541) 779-0272                                 Closed:  Sun & Mon.

 

We have a free new resource for you!

     

Check out LightGarden’s Page on Pinterest!

Click here!

Pinterest makes it easy to share pictures and ideas for hundreds of new projects!  There are also free patterns that can be used for stained, fused or mosaic art as well as free instructional videos! 
New ideas added every week! 
 
Click and follow us now to find your next project, and keep inspired throughout the year!
 

 Flowers of Hope Fusing Workshop

Even if you’ve never done any glass fusing before you can make an 8″ x 8″ fused panel to donate to Flowers of Hope.
$10 buys you a base piece of glass, access to all frits, stringers and noodles, hanging hardware and firing. Come in and try your hand at fusing and find out how easy and fun it can be. You’ll also be doing a wonderful thing for a woman going through a tough time.
OR

TRY FUSING!  Workshop

The same class only you get to keep it!  Learn about using frits, stringers and noodles in this easy workshop!    $15
February 7                   10-12
March  14                    10-12
April 11                        10-12

 Painting with Frit

January 17
10a-12N
Lunch (by Peruvian Point)
1-3pm
 (two spaces left!)
Learn to use frit, hand pulled stringers and confetti to quickly add dimension and a painterly quality to your fused glass art.

Find out how easy it is to develop your sketches from photos and other inspiration. These panels can be a great reference guide for future projects.
All frit, confetti, stringers, glass and lunch are included.

Glass Fusing Basics or equivalent is required.
$125

 Glass Fusing: Basics 

January 24 & 31
1-4pm

Learn one of the fastest growing mediums in glass! In this two week class you’ll complete a 4″ tile and a small fused & slumped plate. Covers firing programs, prepping kiln shelves and ware and much more!

All supplies are included.
$85

 

 Fused Glass Switch Plates

February 7
1-4pm

Learn how easy it is to make these very cool fused glass switch plates. All the instructions, materials and firing are included in the $20 fee.  A small amount of 96 glass is required.      

Basic fusing or equivalent is required.     

 

 Fused Glass: Dichroic Jewelry

February 21
1-4pm

Grab attention with beautiful dichroic glass jewelry you make yourself! Cabochons for necklaces or earrings; they all will dazzle your friends!

Learn to cut them so they come out perfect every time. Compatible glass and lots of dichroic glass is included.

  Make several pieces for $55

 
Is there a class listed on our website that you would like to take that isn’t scheduled yet?  Send me an email and let me know.  That’s how I know when to schedule our classes.  If you have 5-6 people we can schedule private parties.click here to check out our classes

Need a Kiln?  Rent one of ours!

Bring in your fused work and we will fire it for you!

Projects small enough to fit on a 7″ shelf:              $   5.00

One or more projects on a 13″ round shelf:                8.00

Fuse + Slump on 13″ shelf:                                         12.00

Projects on a 20″ shelf:                                                11.00

Fused + Slump on a 20″ shelf:                                    14.00

Long Bubble Squeeze  add                                            3.00

 Morning Workshops:

Come join our morning workshops on Wednesday and Saturday mornings from 10a – Noon.  Use our tools and workshop space.  $10 for 2 hours!  Call to reserve your space.  You can do a Flowers of Hope panel during any of our workshops…or a “Try Fusing” panel to get you started in fusing.  You can also schedule bigger projects.  Contact us for more information.

Classes and Workshop at LightGarden Glass Art

 Flowers of Hope Fusing Workshop

Even if you’ve never done any glass fusing before you can make an 8″ x 8″ fused panel to donate to Flowers of Hope.
$10 buys you a base piece of glass, access to all frits, stringers and noodles, hanging hardware and firing. Come in and try your hand at fusing and find out how easy and fun it can be. You’ll also be doing a wonderful thing for a woman going through a tough time.
OR
TRY FUSING!  Workshop
The same class only you get to keep it!  Learn about using frits, stringers and noodles in this easy workshop!    $15
January  17                 10-12
February 7                   10-12

 Painting with Frit

January 17
10a-12N
Lunch (by Peruvian Point)
1-3pm
 
Learn to use frit, hand pulled stringers and confetti to quickly add dimension and a painterly quality to your fused glass art.

Find out how easy it is to develop your sketches from photos and other inspiration. These panels can be a great reference guide for future projects.
All frit, confetti, stringers, glass and lunch are included.

 

Glass Fusing Basics or equivalent is required.
$125

 Glass Fusing: Basics 

January 24 & 31
1-4pm
Learn one of the fastest growing mediums in glass! In this two week class you’ll complete a 4″ tile and a small fused & slumped plate. Covers firing programs, prepping kiln shelves and ware and much more!All supplies are included.
$85
 

 Fused Glass Switch Plates

February 7
1-4pm
Learn how easy it is to make these very cool fused glass switch plates. All the instructions, materials and firing are included in the $20 fee.  A small amount of 96 glass is required.Basic fusing or equivalent is required.
 

 Fused Glass: Dichroic Jewelry

February 21
1-4pm
Grab attention with beautiful dichroic glass jewelry you make yourself! Cabochons for necklaces or earrings; they all will dazzle your friends!Learn to cut them so they come out perfect every time. Compatible glass and lots of dichroic glass is included.Make several pieces for $55

 
Is there a class listed on our website that you would like to take that isn’t scheduled yet?  Send me an email and let me know.  That’s how I know when to schedule our classes.  If you have 5-6 people we can schedule private parties.click here to check out our classes

 

Need a Kiln?  Rent one of ours! 

Bring in your fused work and we will fire it for you!

 

Projects small enough to fit on a 7″ shelf:              $   5.00

One or more projects on a 13″ round shelf:                8.00

Fuse + Slump on 13″ shelf:                                         12.00

Projects on a 20″ shelf:                                                11.00

Fused + Slump on a 20″ shelf:                                    14.00

Long Bubble Squeeze  add                                            3.00

 

  

 Morning Workshops:

Come join our morning workshops on Wednesday and Saturday mornings from 10a – Noon.  Use our tools and workshop space.  $10 for 2 hours!  Call to reserve your space.  You can do a Flowers of Hope panel during any of our workshops…or a “Try Fusing” panel to get you started in fusing.  You can also schedule bigger projects.  Contact us for more information.

 LightGarden Glass Art is located at:

1086 Washburn                            December 2014
Medford, OR                                   Tues-Fri 10-5pm
www.lightgarden.net                 Sat  10-1p
(541) 779-0272                                 Closed:  Sun & Mon.

11 Art Destinations That Double As Therapeutic Retreats

There are many reasons to see art — to get a taste of something beautiful, to engage in new ways with today’s pressing questions, to escape to another era of the past, to see for a moment through another person’s eyes. Yes, there are probably infinite reasons to spend some one-on-one time with an artwork or four this holiday season, but today we’re focusing on one reason: healing.

Art can reveal, shock and delight, that much we know — but sometimes it has the ability to go deeper than the senses, to shift something inside us that is hard, if not impossible, to pinpoint or explain. For some, art has a certain spiritual or therapeutic power to change the viewer just by holding them in a certain time and place. Experiencing art can often be more otherworldly than a church, restorative than a yoga retreat, soothing than a day at the spa. We’ve compiled a list of 11 art destinations that, more than the average museum, intentionally cater to both the senses and the soul, in one way or another.

Check one out if you’re feeling particularly tapped out this holiday season, or whenever you want to treat yourself to a transcendent aesthetic experience. Behold, 11 art spots that will please your senses and soothe your insides. Let us know what we missed in the comments.

1. Rothko Chapel

rothko chapel

Visitors at the Rothko Chapel, Houston, 1977. Completed in 1971, it was designed in collaboration with American painter Mark Rothko and contains fourteen of his black paintings. (Photo by Romano Cagnoni/Hulton Archive/Getty Images)
Where: Houston, Texas
What: Founded by Houston philanthropists John and Dominique de Menil, Chapel is a non-denominational sanctuary combining the powers of spirituality and art. It is part spiritual retreat, part modern art museum, part human rights center, featuring a series of dark purple and black works by Mark Rothko.
Vibes:We are reasserting man’s natural desire for the exalted, for a concern with our relationship to absolute emotions,” wrote Barnett Newman, whose sculpture “Broken Obelisk” sits outside the chapel.

“[The paintings are] sort of a window to beyond,” explained Suna Umari, whose worked at the Chapel for over 30 years. “[Rothko] said the bright colors sort of stop your vision at the canvas, where dark colors go beyond. And definitely you’re looking at the beyond. You’re looking at the infinite.”

2. Salvation Mountain

salvation mountain california

Where: Niland, California
What: Leonard Knight’s adobe clay masterpiece, which is 50 feet high and 150 feet wide, revolves around the simple idea: “God Is Love.” The outsider art mecca features paintings of trees, sculpted flowers, biblical quotes, bluebirds and a giant red heart, made from over 100,000 gallons of donated paint.
Vibes:The resulting lumpy, undulating structure, saturated with biblical verses and sayings, is a testament, as its name implies, to Knight’s religious salvation,” said Sam Lubell of The New York Times. “But it seems more inspired by Candy Land and LSD. Swirling and striped reds, whites, yellows, greens, aquas and blues surround you.”

3. The Lightning Field

walter de maria lightning field

Where: Catron County, New Mexico
What: The piece of land art, made by sculptor Walter De Maria, features 400 stainless steel poles with pointed tips arranged in a rectangular grid amidst a vast New Mexican vista. The sculpture, which is meant to be both walked through and viewed, interacts with the surrounding landscape, creating an immersive experience best seen at sunrise and sunset.

Vibes:Seen from the porch, the rods marched away in phalanxes to the south. As the sun sank over our right shoulders, the metal spikes started to glow in the golden light. Their pointed tips took fire first, like candles, but soon the spikes themselves lighted up, top to bottom, as if glowing from within,” wrote Cornelia Dean in The New York Times. “For me, it was as if a piece of formal music, a Bach invention, perhaps, had taken material form and was playing before my eyes, not my ears.”

4. The Great Gallery of Horseshoe Canyon

horseshoe canyon

Where:Canyonlands National Park Maze District, Utah
What: This remote Utah canyon is known for its collection of Barrier Canyon Style rock art — a distinctive style of pictographs and petroglyphs thought to be over 6,000 years old. The mecca of ghostly figures has been dubbed The Great Gallery, though the space feels more like a forbidden sandstone temple.
Vibes:They were strangely shaped with neither arms nor eyes and standing up to 4 feet high,” said David Kelly in The LA Times. “One figure had feathers dangling from his arms. There were insect-like creatures and butterflies. Were they men, spirits, symbols? No one knows, so scientists refer to them as anthromorphs and describe the art as Barrier Canyon style, after the original name of this place.”

5. Storm King Art Center

storm king

Where:Hudson Valley, New York
What: 500-acres of hills, fields and endless green expanses serve as home to 100 massive sculptures, yielding an adult art lover’s version of a giant, zenned-out playground.
Vibes: “The view made me think that Ralph Waldo Emerson, an inspiration to the Hudson River School painters (whose work Storm King’s founders originally intended to house here in the 1960s), must have been nearby when he wrote: ‘The health of the eye seems to demand a horizon. We are never tired, so long as we can see far enough,'” wrote John Motyka.

6. ‘Twilight Epiphany’

james turrell twilight epiphany

Where: Houston, Texas
What: This site-specific installation is James Turrell’s 73rd “skyspace,” which performs with 40-minute light shows that lead up to sunrise and follow sunset, with slight variations depending on the weather and season. LEDs sync up with the changing colors of the sky, yielding a magical experience that feels like looking out unto infinity.
Vibes:If you take a photo of the sky in this skyspace, the color you see in the opening is not actually going to show up in your camera because in fact it is not there,” Turrell told Here Houston. “We do create the world in which we live to a much larger extent than we are willing to take responsibility for.”

7. The Dream House

mela foundation dream house

Where: TriBeCa, New York
What: The collaborative Sound and Light Environment, made by composer La Monte Young and visual artist Marian Zazeela, lives on the third floor of a TriBeCa building, housing within it “a time installation measured by a setting of continuous frequencies in sound and light.” The very long term, ongoing exhibition opened in 1993 and runs until 2015.
Vibes:Visiting The Dream House can be a baffling, delirious experience,” wrote The Observer’s Andrew Russeth. “The room is soaked in purple light. Huge speaker stacks emit a constant, potent drone, which music critic John Rockwell called a ‘cosmic throb.’ It is often very hot, but it is not uncomfortable. There are pillows, and you can recline, letting the sound work on you. It’s really something.”

8. The Integatron

integ

Where: Landers, California
What: In 1957, believing that he was following orders of visitors from planet Venus, George Van Tassel built a structure supposedly capable of rejuvenation, anti-gravity and time travel due to the intermittent magnetic fields inside the space. The large white dome now serves as a site for quartz sound baths, where visitors can recline in the acoustically perfect sound chamber and feel the vibrations of musical quartz bowls.
Vibes:It’s 105 degrees outside, and sunlight is streaming in through 15 windows ringing the rotunda,” wrote The LA Times’ Scott Gold. “Somehow, it is not hot, not in here. The notes clash over your head, some in breathtaking harmony, some in startling dissonance. Just when you’re starting to see patterns in the grain of the wood in the soaring ceiling, it’s over. There is silence, and no one moves. The acoustics are so good you can hear a man swallow from across the room. It has been either the shortest or the longest half-hour of your life.”

9. The Isamu Noguchi Playscape

noguchi playscape

Where: Atlanta, Georgia
What:Noguchi constructed this severe, minimalist playground in 1976 in Atlanta’s Piedmont Park, discarding prescribed methods of “playing” for something more imaginative and exploratory. The avant-garde sculptor toys with the space between art and experience, equipment and sculpture, object and landscape, seriousness and play, letting each viewer — kid or adult — encounter the unusual art experience in his or her own spontaneous way.
Vibes:Kids are challenged to decide how to creatively play with these oversized objects,” said Robert Witherspoon of the City of Atlanta’s Public Art Program. “It’s not scripted what to do on the climbing cubes, play mound, and jungle gyms — you have to improvise.”

10. International Car Forest of the Last Church

car forest nevada

Where: Goldfield, Nevada
What:Artists Chad Sorg and Mark Rippie have turned the desert into a museum, installing over 40 automobiles tipped on their heads and stacked on top of each other, like a set of rotting Hot Wheels for the gods.
Vibes:The dream project of two Nevada artists, the International Car Forest of the Last Church looks more akin to a druidic henge of junkers than any Christian chapel,” reads a description from Atlas Obscura

11. The Chinati Foundation

the chinati foundation

Where: Marfa, Texas
What:In 1986, artist Donald Judd opened a contemporary art museum with permanent and public exhibitions which are linked to (and inseparable from) the surrounding landscape, turning the entire city of Marfa into a dreamy space somewhere between an artistic fabrication and real life. It includes John Chamberlain’s mangled automobiles and Judd’s maze of 100 milled-aluminum boxes, each the same size yet with slightly different interiors.
Vibes: “It takes a great deal of time and thought to install work carefully,” Judd wrote in his first catalogue. “This should not always be thrown away. Most art is fragile and some should be placed and never moved again. Somewhere a portion of contemporary art has to exist as an example of what the art and its context were meant to be. Somewhere, just as the platinum iridium meter guarantees the tape measure, a strict measure must exist for the art of this time and place.”

Artists Prove SocialValue of Art in Ferguson, St. Louis

A few weeks after Michael Brown’s death rocked residents in and around Ferguson, Missouri, a small printshop in St. Louis took action. The graphic design studio, dubbed Firecracker Press, began hand printing posters emblazoned with the words “Promote peace in St. Louis.”

Amidst protests and heightened police presence in the city, the posters were made available to customers free of charge. Not surprisingly, the shop “sold out” of the wood type creations, though the print continues to live on in photos across sites like Twitter and Instagram. “Tell the world you support the debate that’s happening in Ferguson, MO and in the St. Louis region,” Firecracker wrote on its website. “Issues of inequality touch everyone… some more than others. Making posters is our small way of sharing our voice.”

Firecracker post in St Louis, MO 2014

Firecracker began offering its “Peace Posters” online, charging only for shipping and handling. “FedEx got its cut,” Firecracker owner Eric Woods explained. “But we didn’t make a penny off the posters. Some people wanted to donate money. And that money went to our nonprofit, Central Print.” (Images courtesy of Firecracker Press)
Firecracker owner Eric Woods, the mind behind the design, is one among many artists who spoke out after the shooting of an unarmed 18-year-old three months ago. From street art to paintings, murals to illustration, artists have been quick to echo the nation’s near constant calls for justice and clarity in the wake of Brown’s killing. The landscape of West Florissant might be marred by isolated acts of vandalism and law enforcement crackdowns, but art is still flourishing.

“I was so upset seeing Michael Brown’s mother on TV… that I felt I had to do something to express my grief and anger at the way the police handled the situation,” painter Mary Engelbreit recalled to HuffPost over email. Her illustration, “In the USA,” made headlines in August. The image depicts a black mother and her young son sitting over a newspaper headline that reads “Hands Up! Don’t Shoot.” Above the cartoon are the words: “No One Should Have To Teach Their Children This.”

I will not stay silent so you can stay comfortable

Images courtesy of Mary Engelbreit
“Art has been used to express feelings about every kind of situation since people could make marks on cave walls,” Englebreit added. “I was happy to be able to do something that helped the Brown family even in a small way. And it’s not over. It will never be over until black lives matter as much as white lives.”

Street artist Damon Davis agrees. “Artists play a vital role, telling these stories and keeping history alive,” he proclaimed in an interview with Mic. Like Firecracker, Davis created a series of posters; his also inspired by the popular “Hands up, don’t shoot” rally cry. Taped onto local businesses that have closed after an outbreak of violent protests in Ferguson, the massive photos showcase a simple pair of hands, raised in solidarity with the gesture Brown allegedly made when Officer Darren Wilson shot him.

“[The posters] are important for people who may be on the fence to see,” he explained. “Maybe they’ll change their minds [and start supporting us]. And for those who aren’t on our side … now they know we’re still here. And we’re not going to back down.”

Damon Davis posters

St. Louis artist Damon Davis installs posters from his Push Forward Project on a boarded up business along West Florissant Street on November 19, 2014 in Ferguson, Missouri. (Photos by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
Along with Woods’ and Davis’ work, an organization called Paint for Peace has been bringing art to the walls of Ferguson as well. Using boarded up businesses as canvases, the group aims to spread messages of hope and love with the help of local artists.

Paint for Peace St Louis

St. Louis is a beautiful and resilient city. It is my home,” Artbar STL owner and Paint for Peace founder Tom Halaska wrote in a message on Facebook. “I believe we are strong enough to come out the other side better than we started if people can listen, have compassion, and work to change what needs to be changed on so many levels. I have high hopes and expectations for our city. I know I won’t be disappointed.”

 

Some art projects that originated prior to the events in Ferguson have since been appropriated for the cause. For example, New Orleans-based artist Candy Chang has been encouraging individuals to replicate her “Before I Die” mural, first painted on a chalkboard on the streets of her hometown. The work prompts passersby to complete the sentence “Before I die I want to…” In Ferguson, a group of local teachers took up Chang’s torch. The chalkboard posters have collected responses like “see equality for all” and “see systematic reform.”

Before I die I want to see justice

Image courtesy of Huffington Post reporter Ryan Reilly
Artists outside of St. Louis have responded in kind. In particular, New York-based artist Molly Crabapple recently debuted a time-lapse of illustrations detailing the controversial police response to demonstrators over the past few months. The video was released days before a grand jury decided not to indict Officer Wilson in Brown’s death. Crabapple has also lent her images to apparel company Teespring, which is selling hoodies in support of a Ferguson bail fund.

The power of the Internet has allowed works based in and out of St. Louis to reach national audiences. Firecracker’s Woods estimates that around 500 posters left his shop, some shipped to individuals living as far away as California and New York. “The design was born out of frustration. Some people want to yell and protest, which we fully support. Other people, for whatever reason, they don’t feel safe or they don’t want to add to the chaos. And they wonder what they can do. They still want to contribute.”

“Printers have a history of being rabble-rousers,” he added. “We wanted to spread as much positive vibes across St. Louis and other places as we can.”

The original “Peace Poster” is no longer in print — the handset design, like many of Firecracker’s creations, was meant for a limited run. But Woods has ideas for a new image. As the nation reels over Eric Garner’s death, and yet another grand jury’s decision not to indict a police officer in the death of an unarmed black man, frustration continues to be felt. But as Ferguson proves, art will thrive in the face of frustration.

Do you know of more activist art in your area? Whether you live in Kiev or Hong Kong, New York City or St. Louis, send your submissions to photos@huffingtonpost.com below. (Art Matters! Editor’s Note: Sadly, I know of little activist art in our area, and none concerning the Ferguson issue. Wish there were  more…)

This article originally posted at the Huffington Post: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/12/05/ferguson-art_n_6257340.html?utm_hp_ref=arts

I Remember Better When I Paint

Editor’s Note: As an advocate for the arts, it’s important to me that the power of the arts for healing gets the attention it deserves. I have not seen this documentary (though it is not newly released), but it was recommended to me by a fan of one of my clients. The reviews are so impressive, and the memory loss associated with Alzheimer’s is such a concern for so many, that I wanted to share it with you.

I Remember Better When I Paint, narrated by Olivia de Havilland, is the first international documentary about the positive impact of art and other creative therapies on people with Alzheimer’s and how these approaches can change the way we look at the disease. A film by Eric Ellena and Berna Huebner, presented by French Connection Films and the Hilgos Foundation. Among those who are featured are noted doctors and Yasmin Aga Khan, president of Alzheimer’s Disease International and daughter of Rita Hayworth, who had Alzheimer’s.

The Hilgos Foundation’s mission is to support and encourage the ongoing process of artistic creation with people who have memory problems and/or Alzheimer’s and who require assistance in creating art that is meaningful and enriching. The Hilgos Foundation was created in memory of Hilda Gorenstein, an accomplished painter whose career spanned 75 years. She died at age 93 and left behind her the legacy of an inspired artistic life. Choosing to call herself Hilgos, Ms. Gorenstein was known for her beautiful marine paintings, which are now in collections all over the world. She was such a skillful painter of water vessels she was chosen to paint an enormous mural depicting the history of the U.S. Navy for Chicago’s Century of Progress celebration in 1933. She completed hundreds of paintings in the last three years of her life, while she struggled with profound memory loss. The vestiges of her early, masterful renderings of waves, birds, and boats remain, but have been transformed into a new system of spontaneous, personal gestures, bordering on the abstract. The sophisticated color choices and compositions of these late works reveal how sharp her artistic eye remained up until the very end of her life.

The Hilgos Award provides student funding at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago to support and encourage the ongoing process of artistic creation. The award was established by family and friends in memory of the artist Hilgos, who studied at the Chicago Art Institute as a young woman, graduated in the 1920s, and became a well respected painter and sculptor, specializing in marine themes. Hilgos painted well into her 90’s. She returned to painting with several Art Institute students even after suffering memory loss, which almost forced her to stop painting. An award has been created in her spirit and memory at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago.

See a gallery of Hilgos’ watercolors at the Hilgos Foundation website for inspiration and hope for those who struggle with, or who are caring for a loved one who struggles with, Alzheimer’s and/or memory loss.

The website has a link to an article with fascinating insights on the connection between art and a brain failing due to Alzheimer’s, which you can access directly here: http://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2013/01/creative-aging-the-emergence-of-artistic-talents/266799/

I Remember Better When I Paint has been released as part of a DVD package which includes the documentary as well as a series of short supplemental films that further highlight special programs and flesh out the how-tos of organizing an outing, a creative workshop or recreating social bonds between people with Alzheimer’s and their families.

To buy a copy of the DVD package: http://www.amazon.com/REMEMBER-BETTER-WHEN-PAINT/dp/B003UN4CIA

Learn more and read reviews and comments on the film’s website: http://irememberbetterwhenipaint.wordpress.com/about/

Be sure to check out the blog – this film is still touring 4 years after its initial release, and most screenings are free!