Trending Articles

Friends of SOAR

For great posts about the business of art, check out The Artsy Shark HERE!
ArtistsBillofRights.org reviews competitions and appeals seeking creative content, listing those that respect your copyrights and highlighting those that don't. Art Matters! publishes calls to artists, and not all of them may be compliant with ABoR's standards. Visit their site to learn more.
We support the Embedded Metadata Manifesto.  Metadata is information such as copyright notice and contact info you can embed in your images to protect your intellectual property, save time when uploading to social sites and promote your art. Click to visit the site and learn more.

JuarezX: Dragged Across Borders

JuarezX: Dragged Across Borders art exhibition, center on contemporary art, seattle, washington, may 2016Center on Contemporary Art presents “JuarezX: Dragged Across Borders”

Politically Charged Art Exhibition Challenges Socio Political Borders

Seattle, WA: From May 5 – 28, 2016 CoCA presents “JuárezX, Dragged Across Borders,” co-curated by Joseph C. Roberts and Peter Bill.  The exhibit presents work by undocumented immigrants and artists from Juarez, Mexico to explore the intersection of race, class, and migrant status at the US and Mexico border.  Simultaneously, the exhibit presents readings and interactive workshops that invite visitors to consider social norms, or borders, created around gender and sexuality.  CoCA is proud to present an exhibition and support artists that dissolve boundaries and invite visitors to question borders as places that allow fixed notions of identity to bend, stretch, and even disappear.
The exhibit features work by artists from Juárez, Mexico who have literally and conceptually been “dragged” across borders. Yorch Otte, an urban muralist, serigrapher and leader of the Art Collective “Rezizte”, presents graffiti art on panel depicting life on the border. Gabriela Hernandez, an undocumented Seaburry Fellow and New Mexico Highlands University alum, features a series of 6’x3’ banners that represent struggles of LGBTQ and undocumented people. Mario Romero juxtaposes topics of the occult, scientific and astronomical with the border. Pulsoans Ans, graffiti artist and ANS Art Gallery owner, commands spray paint canisters to produce pieces that play with the idea of life and death as they apply to the identities in the margins. Peter Bill, Assistant Professor of New Media at Western New Mexico University, and Héctor Domínguez Ruvalcaba, Associate Professor of Queer & Border Studies at The University of Texas at Austin, documented their projections of guerrilla video texts onto the streets of Ciudad Juarez. Sarita Corderito adds witty political commentary and tasty painting/collage chops to the mix.
Special presentations include Héctor Domínguez Ruvalcaba, PhD’s reading from his work “Aesthetics and Politics of the US-Mexico Border urban art,” at 7pm during Pioneer Square artwalk on May 5.  At Noon on Friday, May 6, Gabriela Hernandez will present Jotería Undocumented Workshop, a participatory workshop exploring gender identity and immigration. CoCA is able to bring this important conversation to Seattle audiences and acknowledge LGBTQ individuals in the fight for immigration rights with the support from Seattle’s Office of Arts and Culture.

Exhibition opens May 5 and runs through May 28 at CoCA PS35, 106 Cherry St., Seattle, WA. Gallery hours are Friday and Saturday, 1-7pm.

Premiere of Student Films about Drugs and Bullying in McCloud Feb 19

“Drugs” and “Bullying”

Premiere Showing in McCloud of 2 Video Shorts by Local Students, February 19th

 

Complex personal subject matters were the learning theme for Mccloud High School students during their digital workshops with Christina Schmidlin while creating two short videos on “Drugs” and “Bullying” .  Ms Schmidlin is a videographer and film maker in her professional life and was contracted by the Mccloud Resource Center and the Mccloud ARTS Society to work creatively with our high school students.. For the last two years McCloud students had the privilege to work with her in developing the storyline for the two short videos.  Utilizing their input, talent, and their personal experiences these two short videos represent the efforts for over the two years.   Students were enthusiastic participants in all aspects of the project including learning to act with drama coach Bennett Gale. The acting recreates some of their personal experiences regarding these vital social issues which youth everywhere are addressing on almost a daily basis.

 

In Bullying, “The story focus for this particular project was on the “making of” and “unraveling of” a bully. It is mostly told from the bully’s perspective. Most students in the class experienced bullying both as perpetrators and victims, so we chose this particular, and in my opinion, very effective perspective for the story narrative. There was also one student in the class who experienced a bullying related suicide and ensuing drug use, which lent a powerful story element to the narrative.” said Christina Schmidlin.  She further explained that “all participating students linked the experience of bullying or being bullied to the risk of drug use and teenage suicide. Consequently, all the students wanted to explore this topic in depth in the story sessions.”

 

The Premiere Video Showing of McCloud High Student’s   2 Video Shorts will be Friday, February 19, 2016,  7 – 8:30 pm upstairs in the Mercantile Building. Admission is free in support of the students.  The event is being organized by the McCloud ARTS Society.  Jeff Wescott and some of the high school band members will provide musical entertainment to showcase their talents.  The community is invited to come to the premiere showing and support the students in the first effort to develop a meaningful video short that may later to useful to other students that may or may not be experiencing similar circumstances.

SOAR Welcomes Art 4 Joy!!

Art 4 Joy: Fun Arts Program Opens in Central Point

Create Fun Art!

Central Point, November 18, 2015: “Sip and Paint” classes have been spreading across the U.S. like wild fire, but more often than not these venues are limited to availability in larger cities. “Sip and Paint” classes are a new social scene for adults who enjoy painting in a social atmosphere often served up with alcoholic (and non-alcoholic) beverages while guests are guided through a pre-determined painting project from start to finish in about 2 hours. At these events all supplies are included for the project and guests go home with their finished “masterpieces”.

Kim Samitore, Art Director/Owner of Art 4 Joy, located in Central Point has brought big city fun to small town America in the heart of downtown Central Point! Art 4 Joy, which offers not only “sip and paint” style classes but a full schedule of youth programs, quietly opened their doors Oct. 12, 2015, at 63 S. 4th Street in Central Point. Samitore chose to start her company as a grassroots project,rather than buying into the popular franchises offering similar services so that she could bring arts and crafts to children and adults of all ages within the Rogue Valley with her own unique program plan!

In late November 2015, Samitore moved her business to a larger location just around the corner at 425 Oak Street in Central Point (still located in 4 Oaks Centre) to accommodate for the community’s growing desire of different class offerings. Art 4 Joy has classes for children 5 years old and under that focus on tactile and motor skill development through creative art play, as well as weekly youth painting classes for first grade on up. Other classes offered include classes for Seniors 55+, some of which have never painted before, but are very excited to learn! Jim DeKorte (73), Samitore’s father, has Parkinson’s Disease and enjoys his art classes as his tremors subside and his cognition increases during art class. Other Seniors attend for increased social activity, for relaxation or mood elevation, etc. “Art is very therapeutic for mind, body and spirit,” says Samitore. She feels strongly that art classes can be an important part of a healthy lifestyle no matter what age or experience level you have. “Studies have shown that art is a valuable therapy for stress, anxiety, depression and more. Our classes are very social and always educational in a fun way, so whether a guest is young or young at heart, they leave with very positive feelings,” says Samitore.

Samitore has been fielding calls and emails for work parties, birthday parties, potential partnerships with local schools and non-profits who provide services to foster care children and more. Her goal is the bring art back to the community due to reduced art activities within the schools and to inspire adults to take a night out for social time in a new and fun way that is different and healthy for body, mind and spirit. She wants to help people feel good about themselves through creativity.

Art 4 Joy is currently working with the City of Central Point’s Recreation Department to expand their arts and crafts offerings during Community Christmas, scheduled for Dec. 5th, 2015. Art 4 Joy will be open to the public for free arts and crafts to all kiddos who attend Community Christmas, just 1 block east of City Hall so that families can enjoy the celebration a little longer where they can get out of the cold.

Samitore recently retired from teaching horse back riding lessons at Samitore Stables, also of Central Point, to children and adults with and without disabilities/learning/behavior disorders since 2005, to pursue her other love in life – CREATIVITY! She hopes to keep working with special needs children and adults as well as those without them. “What’s neat about this new learning opportunity is that no level of physical fitness, or experience is required and fees are lower (than horse back riding) so I can work with a larger population within our community,” says Samitore. She loves teaching and sharing the joy of expanding one’s horizons of what’s possible when you give something new a try!

Samitore is planning a Grand Opening/Christmas Open House in December (TBD), as well as a ribbon cutting ceremony (still to be scheduled) with the Central Point Chamber of Commerce.

Photo Opportunity: Saturday, November 21, 2015, 4:30-6:30pm, a promotional free class will be held at Art 4 Joy to introduce the community to our Taste and Create classes.

Call to Artists - National Art Project

Call to Artists – National Art Project

Call to Artists - National Art Project on Gun Violence
A group of citizens in the Rogue Valley are so concerned about the gun violence in this country they are proposing a VISION QUILT project to cultivate compassionate change and help create a country that embraces gun sense not gun violence. We call to artists for entries to our national art project.

We need diversity.  We need art.  We need you!

Create a cloth panel with a message that resonates with you on this issue.  You can do this solo at home or join us at Art Presence on November 4th from 1:00 to 4:00 p.m.   Space is limited that day to the first 15 people who sign up. Please RSVP to the email address below to 1) sign up or 2) let us know you plan to make a panel on your own.
Canvas panel blanks (gessoed or plain) will be available for purchase for $5 on November 4th or bring your own fabric.  However, artists need to provide their own materials to create their designs.  Panels will be collected, juried and displayed locally and nationally as the project unfolds.

A FEW DETAILS:

Final dimensions:  18″ X 24″ with finished edges.
Media:  oil or acrylic painting, sewing, quilting, embroidery, silkscreen, stencils, digital printing.  Please, no glues, however.
Final Deadline:  By November 29 to Art Presence from 11 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.

To RSVP or Questions…… [email protected]

Thank you so much for thoughtfully considering to add your unique voice to this collaboration of concerned and compassionate humans.

LightGarden's Flowers of Hope A Success!

 

Light Garden Glass Art Banner

1086 Washburn                            September 2015
Medford, OR                                   Tues-Fri 10-5pm
www.lightgarden.net                     Sat  10-1p
(541) 779-0272                                 Closed:  Sun & Mon.

Val Dann’s
 abstract bouquet 
won by a big margin
in our popular vote!
People's Choice Winner at the LightGarden Glass Art Flowers of Hope 2015 reception!
 
Congratulations, Val!
 
You won a $50 gift certificate
to
LightGarden Glass Art!

Best Flowers of Hope

Artists’ Reception EVER!

 
Thank you to Traute Moore, Porscha Schiller and all of the wonderful people at South Stage Cellars for making this the best reception ever!
 
The biggest
THANK YOU
goes to all the wonderful artists that helped us make
115 panels
this year!
 
Ginny Nosal came all the way from Klamath Falls almost every month to make 10 panels
Diane Kobal made 7 panels
Barbara Kelberlau made 6 panels
Melanie Dines made 4 panels
 
and a
BIG FAT APOLOGY
for saying no men contributed!
(I was running on serious lack of sleep)
 
Steve (age 7) made 1 panel
(even though he really doesn’t like art)
Kevin Smith made 1 panel
Cole Smith made 1 panel
Mitch Sherman made 1 panel
 
so ok…111 made by women
4 made by men.
 
So we could even that out a little next year?
(still a challenge to you guys!!)
 
or how about this challenge?
 
Everyone that made one this year…
next year bring a friend and see how many we
can collect!
 

 How Art Therapy Is Being Used to Help Syrian Children in Lebanon

Ninety-five thousand Syrian children in Lebanon have been traumatized by the conflict—can painting help them?

BARJA, LEBANON–Anita Toutikian stands alone in a bare-bones classroom, huddled over a table covered in art supplies. She carefully arranges paint bottles and brushes, and sets out a sleeve of plastic cups for pallets.

In a few minutes, 22 students, five of whom are Syrian refugees, will burst into this room for a two-hour art therapy session. Toutikian, a working artist and a clinical psychologist, is there to help alleviate tensions between the refugees and their Lebanese classmates. According to the UN, at least 1.3 million Syrians refugees are currently living in Lebanon, which has led to a crisis-level strain on resources that impacts virtually every facet of society – and education is no different. This is the second time Toutikian has come to the Barja Technical School, a secondary school in this costal town 30 minutes south of Beirut. The first time the students all drew a figure – a firefighter, to be specific – individually. But today the students will be painting in groups.

Barja Technical School is one of the hundreds of schools in Lebanon that are struggling to accommodate the nationwide surge of Syrian children into the Lebanese school system, which the UN has called “under served prior to the Syria crisis.” As a result, Syrian children all over Lebanon are facing a crippling lack of access to education. A recent UN report found that only 22 percent of school-age children are receiving a formal education. “The Syrian influx has increased the demand on the limited public school places by almost 134 per cent,” according to the report.Art Therapy Helps Syrian Children Recover from Trauma of War: Anita Toutikian leading a class of Syrian children in Lebanon. Image by John Knefel.

Anita Toutikian leading a class. (Image Credit: John Knefel)

“There’s an education crisis,” in Lebanon, says Amnesty International’s Lama Fakih. And that current crisis could result in a heightened susceptibility to recruitment to violent groups. “When you talk about a person’s ability to care for himself and his family and have a fulfilling life, obviously the opportunities are very limited without an elementary education,” adds Fakih.

Even those who are enrolled in school face significant barriers. Lebanese classes are often taught in either French or English, which most Syrians don’t speak. That’s an issue at the school in Barja. “This is one of the challenges, but teachers who teach languages are helping with this, are working with Syrians,” says Haifa Abu Hader, who works for the school. “It’s not easy. They’re very brave,” he says, referring to the harassment Syrians often encounter in schools across Lebanon. Prejudice against Syrian children and even some teachers is a growing concern for the U.N. Refugee Agency. “Syrian girls and boys face blatant discrimination, bullying and violence,” the agency noted in a recent report. “Violence against boys can be serious—in Mount Lebanon a 13-year-old was hospitalized after being beaten up outside his school.”

At Barja Techincal School, many of the refugee students initially fled Syria to the northern Lebanese city Arsal. Regular cross-border fighting between the Lebanese army and jihadi groups, including ISIS, then pushed those families deeper into Lebanon. Between the trauma of the war and the continuing struggles that come from a precarious living situation, many students aren’t receiving the support they need. The U.N. estimates that there are 95,000 Syrian children in Lebanon who have been traumatized by the conflict, which has diminished their learning abilities. “There is a lot of pressure on Syrian children in schools,” says Chantal Chedid, prevention coordinator at Skoun, a Lebanese NGO that works with adult drug users as well as young people through their early intervention program. Though Skoun – who organized the session I’m observing – doesn’t see some of the worst manifestations of trauma, school administrators say many of the Syrian students struggle with a variety of issues related to fleeing the war. “We see dropouts of Syrians, many are feeling sad, or depressed,” says Chedid. She adds that other common symptoms are “insomnia, [and] trouble concentrating.” An estimated 20 percent of Syrian refugee children in Lebanon dropout of school.

After the 22 students file in, Chedid breaks them into three groups of seven or eight, and each group crowds around a canvas roughly three feet by four feet. For the next hour, the students paint brightly colored landscapes full of sailboats, cars, and trees. “We are not teaching art here, and we are not doing full therapy. It is a psychosocial support with art, therapeutic art, we can say, because we are not addressing the problem of each child,” says Toutikian. “We are offering them the opportunity to express themselves freely, without judgment, without evaluation of their work.”

“In this work, we are not exploring the trauma,” she adds. “We are working in a group setting, and in a group setting it is not easy to address individual traumatic experience. We are giving them the opportunity to release the trauma.” One can’t help but wonder what some of the young adults who have fled the war might paint given a darker palette, but that answer isn’t for today. “When they’re happy, they all become children,” says Toutikian.

Observing the group, which is assembled from several different classes, there’s no question they are enjoying themselves. How well does it work to combat bullying? “Usually when someone from outside the school comes to the school, the students are commenting, ridiculing them, etc,” says Hader, the school employee, through a translator. “We didn’t see this today.”
Art Therapy Helps Syrian Children Recover from Trauma of War

“We are offering them the opportunity to express themselves freely, without judgment, without evaluation of their work, says Toutikian. (Image credit: John Knefel)

I take out my camera to take close ups of the paintings, which initially doesn’t elicit much of a response. “It’s good, right?” says one girl. But when I take out my phone to snap a few more, the kids immediately strike poses. “Selfie!” yells one of the boys. Many of the students speak English very well, but even those who don’t know the word “selfie.” I pose with several of the students for a shot, not realizing that I’ve now opened the door for a new distraction – a picture with a native English-speaking interloper – that virtually every one of their classmates finds irresistible. By the end of the hour I’ve snapped over a dozen selfies with a rotating cast of characters, and, inexplicably, signed the tops of several students’ outstretched hands.

One of the students, who I’ll give the pseudonym Ali because he’s a minor, is excited to practice his English on me. “My favorite subject is electricity,” he says, and explains that he works at his father’s shop repairing washing machines. Does he like painting? “I like it, but this is kid stuff for my friend,” he jokes, bopping a boy lightly on the back of the head.

As the students file out, and return to their regular schedule, several complain and plead for Toutikian not to leave. After a few more requests for selfies all but a few students have cleared the room. One boy extends his hand to me, like many of the others, excited to practice his English. “I love you,” he says, as we shake hands goodbye. Then adds: “Nice to meet you,” and walks out the door.

Flowers of Hope Artist Reception

1086 Washburn                            August 2015
Medford, OR                                   Tues-Fri 10-5pm
www.lightgarden.net                     Sat  10-1p
(541) 779-0272                                 Closed:  Sun & Mon.

 
Flowers of Hope
Artists’ Reception
is
less than a month away!
 
Come join us on the beautiful patio at
South Stage Cellars!
 
Support the artists that help make this happen!
 
 
This is our tenth year
with this incredible program
and thanks to your hard work it has been
wonderfully successful!
 
 A BIG thank you to
South Stage Cellars for donating their beautiful venue.  If you’ve never been there, this is the perfect time to treat yourself to an awesome experience.

 

 

 We’ve had full workshops for the last few weeks filling up boxes with new
Flowers of Hope
panels!
 
THANK YOU!!
 
We still have a few spaces open on
September 5 & 12
 
September 12  will be the last workshop
that will be fired in time for this year’s donation.
 
Any Wednesday or Saturday
we have a workshop scheduled
you can come in and make a
 
Flowers of Hope
or
Try Fusing!  panel
call or email to save your space
 
 
 Flowers of Hope Fusing Workshop

Even if you’ve never done any glass fusing before you can make an 8″ x 8″ fused panel to donate to Flowers of Hope.

NO EXPERIENCE NECESSARY!

$10 buys you a base piece of glass, access to all frits, stringers and scrap glass, hanging hardware and firing. Come in and try your hand at fusing and find out how easy and fun it can be. You’ll also be doing a wonderful thing for a woman going through a tough time.
OR
TRY FUSING!  Workshop
The same class only you get to keep it!  Try fusing and see if you like it!  Learn about using frits, stringers and noodles in this easy workshop!    $15
September 5                     10-12
September 12                   10-12
*For 5 or more people we can schedule a private party!
(We will not be able to schedule any more private parties until after this year’s reception.)

 
Fun and Easy Projects
in
Fused Glass!
 
 
These table lamps are such a decorative feature in any room.  A $35 value ceramic lamp base that you get to paint yourself, is included in the price of the class.  Patterns available or make your own.
You will need to buy a small amount of glass
and frit.
September 12
1-4pm 
 
$55

 
Painting with Frit
 
 
Learn to use frit, hand pulled stringers and scrap glass to quickly add dimension and a painterly quality to your fused glass art.  We’ll explore different techniques through 3 small panels, focusing on clouds, trees, water and layering backgrounds. We’ll also address combining colors and picture composition.

Find out how easy it is to develop your sketches from photos and other inspiration. These panels can be a great reference guide for future projects.


All frit, scrap glass, stringers, and lunch from Peruvian Point is included. 

     Glass fusing: Basics or equivalent is required.

September 26
10-3pm with an hour lunch break
 
$125

 
Glass Fusing Basics
 
 
 
Learn one of the fastest growing mediums in glass!
If you’re considering buying a kiln, or have one and not sure how to use it, this class is for you.
  In this two week class you’ll complete a 4″ tile and a 8″ fused & slumped plate. Covers firing programs, volume control, trouble shooting, prepping kiln shelves and ware and much more!  
October 10 & 17th
1-4pm
 
$85     
 

 
Glass Fusing : Dichroic Jewelry
 
 
 
Grab attention with beautiful dichroic glass jewelry you make yourself! Cabochons for necklaces or earrings; they all will dazzle your friends!

Learn to cut them so they fuse perfectly every time. Compatible glass and lots of dichroic glass is included.

Make several pieces for $55

 
October 24
1-4pm
 

 
Fused Glass Christmas Ornaments
 
 
 
Snowflakes, poinsettia’s, angels and more. Put them together and we’ll fire them for you. Get in the holiday spirit with this fun project class.

$30 class fee includes a package of holiday glass, high fire wire, patterns and firing. Make as many as you like!

 
November 14th
1-4pm
(Can also be done during a workshop time)
Is there a class listed on our website that you would like to take that isn’t scheduled yet?  Send me an email and let me know.  That’s how I know when to schedule our classes.  If you have

 5-6 people we can schedule private parties.

click here to check out our classes

 

 

Need a Kiln?  Rent one of ours!

 

Bring in your fused work and we will fire it for you!

 

Projects small enough to fit on a 7″ shelf:              $   5.00

One or more projects on a 13″ round shelf:                8.00

Fuse + Slump on 13″ shelf:                                         12.00

Projects on a 20″ shelf:                                                11.00

Fused + Slump on a 20″ shelf:                                    14.00

Long Bubble Squeeze  add                                            3.00

 

  

 Morning Workshops:

 

Come join our morning workshops on Wednesday and Saturday mornings from 10a – Noon.  Use our tools and workshop space.  $10 for 2 hours!  Call to reserve your space.  You can do a Flowers of Hope panel during any of our workshops…or a “Try Fusing” panel to get you started in fusing.  You can also schedule bigger projects.  Contact us for more information.

LightGarden Glass Art New Classes & Events

1086 Washburn                            July 2015
Medford, OR                                   Tues-Fri 10-5pm
www.lightgarden.net                     Sat  10-1p
(541) 779-0272                                 Closed:  Sun & Mon.

 
We will be closed
August 4 – 8th!
 
I’m finally getting a vacation!
 

 
Here’s Diane’s rendition of Crater Lake!
 
 
 
Isn’t it gorgeous?
Barbara and Diane have been coming in most Wednesday mornings  working on their frit painting skills during workshop time.  They are getting really good!  Many of the panels they are making are going to Flowers of Hope.  Thank you, Ladies!

 
I have some new bowl molds in
 and they are so cool !
 
  
 
There has always been a challenge with deeper bowl molds falling straight and forming a flat bottom.
These are the new bottomless molds by Laurie Spray at Bonny Doon Glass Tools in Santa Cruz.
They allow the glass to fall and hit the shelf.
So far I’ve made several different size bowls and they’ve all come out perfectly!
Schedule a workshop to come in and make a bowl!
We have 8″, 11″ and 12″.

 

 

 Time is running short
to make
a
Flowers of Hope
panel for
2015!
 
Everyone always waits until the last minute and then we don’t have time to fire them all.
 
 
This year is our 10th year
help us make it the best year ever!
 
Any Wednesday or Saturday
we have a workshop scheduled
you can come in and make a
Flowers of Hope
or
Try Fusing!  panel
call or email to save your space
 
 
 Flowers of Hope Fusing Workshop

Even if you’ve never done any glass fusing before you can make an 8″ x 8″ fused panel to donate to Flowers of Hope.

NO EXPERIENCE NECESSARY!

$10 buys you a base piece of glass, access to all frits, stringers and scrap glass, hanging hardware and firing. Come in and try your hand at fusing and find out how easy and fun it can be. You’ll also be doing a wonderful thing for a woman going through a tough time.
OR
TRY FUSING!  Workshop
The same class only you get to keep it!  Try fusing and see if you like it!  Learn about using frits, stringers and noodles in this easy workshop!    $15
August 15                     10-12    Only 3 spots left
*For 5 or more people we can schedule a private party!

 
Summer is a great time to
learn mosaics!
 
 
This two week class teaches you everything you need to know about mosaics by making your own 10″ birdbath or birdfeeder.  We cover adhesives, ways to lay out your tiles, grouts, colorants and sealants.  Mosaics is easy, relaxing and makes use of all that glass scrap you have saved up!
August 22 & 29
10-1pm
$75
Tentatively full

 
Fun and Easy Projects
in
Fused Glass!
 
 
These table lamps are such a decorative feature in any room.  A $35 value ceramic lamp base that you get to paint yourself, is included in the price of the class.  Patterns available or make your own.
You will need to buy a small amount of glass
and frit.
September 12
1-4pm
$55

 
Painting with Frit
 
 
Learn to use frit, hand pulled stringers and confetti to quickly add dimension and a painterly quality to your fused glass art.  We’ll explore different techniques through 3 small panels, focusing on clouds, trees, water and layering backgrounds. We’ll also address combining colors and picture composition.

Find out how easy it is to develop your sketches from photos and other inspiration. These panels can be a great reference guide for future projects.

All frit, confetti, stringers, glass and lunch from Peruvian Point is included.
Glass fusing: Basics or equivalent is required.

September 26
10-3pm with an hour lunch break
$125
Is there a class listed on our website that you would like to take that isn’t scheduled yet?  Send me an email and let me know.  That’s how I know when to schedule our classes.  If you have

 5-6 people we can schedule private parties.

click here to check out our classes

 

 

Need a Kiln?  Rent one of ours!

 

Bring in your fused work and we will fire it for you!

 

Projects small enough to fit on a 7″ shelf:              $   5.00

One or more projects on a 13″ round shelf:                8.00

Fuse + Slump on 13″ shelf:                                         12.00

Projects on a 20″ shelf:                                                11.00

Fused + Slump on a 20″ shelf:                                    14.00

Long Bubble Squeeze  add                                            3.00

 

  

 Morning Workshops:

 

Come join our morning workshops on Wednesday and Saturday mornings from 10a – Noon.  Use our tools and workshop space.  $10 for 2 hours!  Call to reserve your space.  You can do a Flowers of Hope panel during any of our workshops…or a “Try Fusing” panel to get you started in fusing.  You can also schedule bigger projects.  Contact us for more information.

Congress Considers Level Funding for NEA

It’s been a fast-paced appropriations season so far! On June 16, the U.S. Senate approved legislation (for the first time in six years!) in subcommittee to level fund the National Endowment for the Arts.The U.S. House also kept its pace for rapid consideration, approving its NEA funding bill in full committee today as well. Tomorrow, the bill that funds the federal museum agency and arts education is on tap for consideration (first time in three years!) in another House subcommittee. And on Thursday, the Senate returns to consider its bill to fund the NEA in full committee.Despite the substantial effort in Congress to advance bills in a timely way, the Administration last night issued a veto threat to the bill because of its numerous policy riders, thwarting any expected advancement.

What you need to know

Last week, the House Interior Appropriations Subcommittee approved a bill providing sustained funding for the National Endowment for the Arts. All the cultural institutions, like the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Smithsonian Institution, also were proposed at level funding.

June 16, the full committee reported out this legislation on a 30-21 vote, enabling it to next be considered on the House floor.

Rep. Steve Israel (D-NY) offering amendment to increase funding for NEA by $2 million to full committee
Rep. Steve Israel (D-NY) offers amendment to increase funding for NEA by $2 million to full committee

During full committee consideration, Rep. Steve Israel (D-NY) offered an amendment to boost funding for both the NEA and the NEH to the President’s request. This is roughly a $2 million increase to $148 million. Although his amendment did not receive a vote, Reps. Chellie Pingree (D-ME), David Price (D-NC), and Rosa DeLauro (D-CT) all spoke favorably on his amendment. Rep. Pingree noted the work of the Maine Humanities Council in her district; Rep. Israel spoke about Operation Homecoming: Iraq, Afghanistan, and the Home Front in the Words of U.S. Troops and Their Families, a publication of the NEA. A writer himself, Rep. Israel shared his interest to scale up healing arts therapy work with veterans going forward and in more areas across the country. Rep. Price shared with his colleagues another publication, the Heart of the Matter, tucking it in also as recommended reading. Rep. Price also shared with all appropriators that NEA and NEH are funded well below their historical levels. He compared funds to 1992 and said with just inflation, we’d be investing nearly double had we just retained those levels. You can watch the June 16 proceedings at this webcast link, in which Rep. Israel’s amendment can be found at the 2:57 timestamp.

The Senate subcommittee also considered their version on June 16. Both NEA and NEH are also proposed for level funding. The subcommittee’s statement can be found here. The full committee considered the bill June 16.

What’s next

House floor votes could occur as soon as the last week in June, prior to the 4th of July congressional recess. As the process moves forward, the NEA and other cultural agencies may be prime targets for proposed cuts, if history is any lesson. We will keep you posted on any harmful amendments as the bills head toward the House or Senate floor.

Help us continue this important work by becoming an official member of the Arts Action Fund. If you are not already a member, you can play your part by joining the Arts Action Fund today—it’s free and easy to join.

Thank you for your support of the arts!


1000 Vermont Avenue NW
6th Floor
Washington DC . 20005
T 202.371.2830
F 202.371.0424
One East 53rd Street . 2nd Floor
New York NY . 10022
T 212.223.2787
F 212.980.4857
[email protected]
www.AmericansForTheArts.org
www.ArtsActionFund.org

Editor’s Note: Yesterday we sent a message to Oregon House Representative Greg Walden via an ArtsUSA petition. It began with the petition text written by ArtsUSA advocates, but we wanted to add more. We hope you will also send your own message to our representatives about why level or increased funding for NEA programs—which fund Oregon state arts programs—before Congress votes on the proposed budget next week. Feel free to copy ours (below) if it resonates with you. We received a message back from Rep. Walden this morning indicating that he will keep our priorities in mind throughout the budget and appropriations process, but if he needs to hear from more of us. In his words, “At the end of the day, it’s your money that we’re talking about—you ought to have a say in how it’s being spent.” If hears from many, many more of us, we may actually get a $2 million increase in funding as proposed by Rep. Steve Israel of New York last week, but you need to know that continued efforts to cut funding to the National Endowment completely are still threatening this agency so vital to arts funding across the country and in our own home state.
“As your constituent, I urge you to increase or support a budget of $146 million for the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) in the FY 2016 Interior Appropriations bill to preserve citizen access to the cultural, educational, and economic benefits of the arts and to advance creativity and innovation here at home.

The arts mean jobs for our district! The nonprofit arts industry generates $135.2 billion annually in economic activity, supports 4.13 million full-time equivalent jobs in the arts and related industries, and returns $9.59 billion in federal income taxes.

Earlier this year, the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis and the NEA announced the latest figures on the arts and cultural sector’s contributions to U.S. gross domestic product (GDP), proving that the arts are a significant part of the GDP. Arts and culture activity produced $698.7 billion in goods and services annually or 4.32% of GDP – more than both the construction or transportation sectors.

Grants through the NEA are widely distributed to strengthen arts infrastructures and to ensure broad access to the arts. The NEA makes grants in every congressional district. Furthermore, the NEA distributes 40 percent of its program dollars to state arts agencies, on the condition that each state devotes its own appropriated funds as well. In partnership with the NEA, state arts agencies have awarded 22,000 grants to more than 18,300 organizations, schools, and artists in nearly 4,800 communities across the United States.

With funding for the arts having been cut from most of our schools, I am very concerned that our children are not getting enough exposure to the arts to help them achieve their goals and become productive member of society. I heard a parent recently tell me that her son, who is studying a pre-med curriculum in high school, was having trouble getting decent grades in biology classes because he couldn’t draw an accurate line drawing of an anatomical feature! That’s of grave concern, and this example makes a case for supporting availability and access to the arts outside of the school system. The NEA improves access to the arts, supports artistic excellence and fosters lifelong learning through grants, partnerships, research and national initiatives. The current level funding of $146 million amounts to just 45 cents per capita, as compared to 70 cents per capita in 1992. I am counting on you as my Representative to support at least level funding of $146 million for the NEA.

On a side note, I urge you to support the NEA’s STEAM educational model for our schools. This would add steam to the STEM program and improve student’s ability to learn, retain, and effectively apply information in a broad range of subjects by incorporating the arts into the curriculum. A society that does not value the arts beyond pretty pictures on the walls is NOT a world I want to live in! Numerous studies have proven that including the arts in education does far more than teach kids how to draw or paint or play the piano, but results in important enhancements to executive function and neurological development during a child’s formative and educational years, not to mention creative/collaborative problem solving (and oh do we need more people with those abilities active in our society!), and the fact that high school students with four years of art classes average 100 points higher on their SAT scores than those whose studies included one semester or less of art. And that’s just the tip of the iceberg of the many ways art can contribute tangibly to our lives. We should respect the truth these studies have discovered and give our kids every opportunity possible to excel in school and in their professional lives after school by reintroducing funding for the arts in education. It is deeply troubling, embarrassing and a poor reflection on the priorities of our society that they were ever cut to begin with.

Approving level funding for the NEA right now is a healthy start. Please commit to continuing funding for the NEA right now, and make it a part of your fight for preserving the quality of life in our country and our ability to complete on the global stage with creative innovations and solutions that only come when kids learn how to think creatively and effectively express their ideas by increasing the NEA’s funding from flat to being up-to-date with the increases in inflation and on par with historical levels at a minimum, and restoring funding for the arts in our schools.”

UCLA Medical School's 'Guest Artist' Is Helping To Teach Doctors About Disease

Reposted from Huffington Post Arts & Culture

amp

Ted Meyer, Scarred for Life: Meyer uses block-print ink to transform human scars into vibrant colorful abstractions in his “Scarred for Life” series, inviting others to share the physical remnants of their survival stories.
 

Ted Meyer is the guest artist at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA. If you weren’t aware that medical schools had guest artists, you’re not alone. But this initiative is very real, aiming to teach doctors about illness through the practice of art.

Yes, Meyer’s work brings artists together to help educate future physicians and epidemiologists on the more human aspects of disease. “The artists use their work to tell a story,” Los Angeles-based Meyer told The Huffington Post. “It helps the doctors look at people as more than something to cure.”

avian

Daphne Hill, Avian Flu: “Daphne does work about germs and her fears of them sickening herself and her children. Her talk was interesting as she explained how her fears developed and how doctors might talk with someone like her who has already been checking the Internet and read the possible worst case scenarios.”
Meyer began his stay at the medical school in 2010, though the foundation of his ongoing project began much earlier — in fact, his inspiration dates back to his birth. “I was born with a very rare genetic condition,” said Meyer, who grew up with Gaucher’s disease, a disorder in which fatty substances accumulate in cells and organs. “There was no treatment for it. Starting at about age 6 I was in and out of the hospital all the time. I grew up thinking maybe I’d make it to thirty, maybe not.” Among other things, manifestations of the illness include bruising, fatigue, anemia and skeletal disorders.

During his time in the hospital, Meyer turned to art as a means of expression, release and inner healing. Creating imagery filled with skeletal bodies contorted in pain, Meyer’s resulting series was titled “Structural Abnormalities.” He often made use of the materials around him, incorporating bandages and IVs into his images, all revolving around the idea of, in Meyer’s words, “being in a body that didn’t work particularly well.”

Bandaid, by Damienne Merlina

Damienne Merlina, Bandaid
And then, something unexpected happened. Meyer’s health began to improve. “I really hit a point where, thanks to Western technology, there was a new treatment. Almost all of my symptoms disappeared,” he said. “I had my hip replaced so I could walk normally.” Although undoubtedly a miracle in terms of his life and wellbeing, the sudden shift left Meyer directionless as an artist.

After a period of uncertainty, Meyer resolved to shift his artistic perspective entirely. While still focused on the body, his work shifted from its “singular and isolated” mode to one more “happy and sexual.” More importantly, instead of sharing his own story, he began inviting others to share theirs.

For this series, which Meyer dubbed “Scarred for Life,” he applies block-print ink to human scars and the skin surrounding them. He then proceeds to press paper to skin, and subsequently accents the images with paint and pencil, turning physical remnants of suffering into inimitable splashes of color and line. Although the project center around scars, the art is less about suffering and more about survival. “I make these prints that look like Rothkos — color field prints,” he said. “I don’t want [to emphasize] the shock value of, ‘Oh, look how disfigured they look.’ For me, it’s a story more like mine: let’s make the best out of this that we can from this point forward.”

breast

Ted Meyer, Breast Cancer-Mastectomy
Meyer explained the intense reactions he received in response to the works, which toured everywhere from the United Nations to the Pasadena Armory; reactions of an intensity he never experienced when painting. “People would come look at my work and just sort of break down crying,” he said. “Others came up to me and said, ‘Look at my scar, let me tell you about my scar.'” He was receiving emails twice a week from people all around the world, all wanting to share their personal scar story.

This gave Meyer an idea. With so many people grappling with illness and using art as an outlet, perhaps their creative efforts could serve as a means of unorthodox education as well. “It became very apparent to me that all these people who do work about their illnesses, really have a lot to say,” Meyer said. “Maybe they could teach something to medical professionals. There has been art therapy designed to help patients, but I thought maybe there is something to teach the doctors here. Perhaps they can look at patients’ artworks and see something beyond the clinical. It’s not just ‘oh, they have multiple sclerosis’ or ‘it’s a broken neck.’ In a way, it’s like art therapy for doctors.”

As a result, for the past five years, Meyer has served as a guest artist at the UCLA’s medical school, a position he carved out and created for himself, curating artist talks and exhibitions that serve to educate the medical staff. In particular, Meyer’s programming is designed for first and second year medical students, most of whom have not yet had an opportunity to work with patients in person. To provide future doctors with more tangible understanding of living with certain afflictions, artists speak about their condition, their artworks, and the relationship between the two.

susan

Susan Trachman, Order #2
Susan has MS and does work about organization and control as she has less control over her body. He media is all the old medical supplies used in her treatment
Mainly, his position entails recruiting and curating a network of artists exploring issues of illness and identity, inviting them to show their work and tell their stories. The conditions represented are as diverse as the artistic media explored. “There is a woman Susan who has multiple sclerosis,” Meyer said, “and for 25 years she’s been keeping all the bottles she’s used — all the saline and everything — she takes them and she organizes them in patterns. She explained to the medical students that when you have MS you have absolutely no control over your body. You can’t predict your own movements. But by organizing these bottles, she had found one area she could control.”

Meyer’s program caters to doctors who, though familiar with all the technicalities of medical proceedings, aren’t as well versed in the human aspects of the profession. “There are a number of doctors who are very smart but when they get on the floor and have to start dealing with patients they break down,” he said. Especially today, many doctors don’t have the proper time to truly get to know their patients, the ways their various struggles have shaped the people they are.

“There was another woman who had a headache for around four years. During that period she had lost her ability to name things, she couldn’t remember the nouns. When she finally got rid of her migraine, she went back and photographed all the things she couldn’t remember. For someone to tell their story to first year med students — it’s not just, ‘Oh, you have a headache, what medicine should I give you?’ It’s a new way to understand the life process of living with an illness.”

Meyer’s unorthodox merging of art and medicine proves that art therapy isn’t only helpful for patients, but doctors as well. “It’s a new way to connect,” Meyer said. “We are making positive things out of these horrible situations.”