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Dana Feagin Art News – January 2017

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Plein Air Painting vs Painting in The Studio

in this video Baumann discusses Plein Air Painting vs Painting in The Studio. What should one do? In this conversation we ask the hard question do you have to paint on location, from life or from photos. Inspiring Millions to paint outdoors This video is about Touch Move and Inspire. Get a free Book at his website www.StefanBaumann.com. The paintings of Stefan Baumann reveal the true spirit of nature by transporting the viewer to distant lands that have gone unseen and undisturbed. With the huge success of Baumann’s weekly PBS television series “The Grand View: America’s National Parks through the Eyes of an Artist,” millions of people witness for themselves the magic Stefan portrays on canvas, his passion for nature and the American landscape. By distilling his love of nature into a luminous painting of brilliant, saturated color that transcends conventional landscape and wildlife art, Baumann has captured the hearts and imaginations of a generation. Each painting becomes an experience rather than merely a picture – a vivid manifestation of his special and personal union with nature and the outdoor world. Through his mastery of light, color and artful composition, Baumann invites you to experience nature in its purity. It is no wonder that for many years distinguished American collectors, including former presidents and financial icons, have sought out his work.

The post Plein Air Painting vs Painting in The Studio appeared first on Stefan Baumann – The Grand View: Paintings by Stefan Baumann.

Its Not Your Subject Your Painting It is what you do to with it!

Its Not Your Subject Your Painting
It is what you do to with it! I Smell Something Fishy…
In this video Baumann discusses insights to how to take you painting to the next level using composition and light. Baumann also talks about changing your prospective about the subject
Inspiring Millions to paint outdoors This video is about Touch Move and Inspire. Get a free Book at his website www.StefanBaumann.com. The paintings of Stefan Baumann reveal the true spirit of nature by transporting the viewer to distant lands that have gone unseen and undisturbed. With the huge success of Baumann’s weekly PBS television series “The Grand View: America’s National Parks through the Eyes of an Artist,” millions of people witness for themselves the magic Stefan portrays on canvas, his passion for nature and the American landscape. By distilling his love of nature into a luminous painting of brilliant, saturated color that transcends conventional landscape and wildlife art, Baumann has captured the hearts and imaginations of a generation. Each painting becomes an experience rather than merely a picture – a vivid manifestation of his special and personal union with nature and the outdoor world. Through his mastery of light, color and artful composition, Baumann invites you to experience nature in its purity. It is no wonder that for many years distinguished American collectors, including former presidents and financial icons, have sought out his work.

The post Its Not Your Subject Your Painting It is what you do to with it! appeared first on Stefan Baumann – The Grand View: Paintings by Stefan Baumann.

The Secret of Painting from Life

The Secret of Painting from Life

If you want to see the world as spectacular as it is, take a walk in the forest with an artist. The painter’s eye is more sensitive and receives a vast amount more information than a normal person who is seeing the same view. When students first come to my classes, within weeks they report that they have never before seen the world “in color” as they are able to do now and that painting has opened their eyes to the beauty that surrounds them.

The first assignment for new students who come to my classes is to paint a white egg on a white plate that is sitting on a white table cloth. This exercise requires that they really look at their subject before beginning to paint. Most students look at the setup and only see white. Then, with coaching, they look deeper and see that white has little to do with painting eggs at all. At this point, their consciousness has undergone a small expansion and the artist has increased awareness about the painting process. Once the shadows are discovered, then and only then, can the student focus his awareness on the effects that light has on the subject matter.

After that, it is the composition that commands the focus. Gradually or suddenly, the realization that the artist is the one directing the viewer’s perception and that perception can be directed to only one thing at a time. We can not see light, shadow and color at the same time.  And we cannot see composition, temperature, and air with just a single glance. We cannot see the windshield and the road at the same time. Creating art is like juggler trying to keep 15 balls in the air.  It’s no wonder that artists begin painting from photos just to make the process easier. But when an artist paints from photos, something is lost, and the connection between the artist and subject is disconnected, filtered and dumbed down.

When setting up a still life in your studio, the setup must be created just as it you want it to appear in your painting. If you want your painting to have a dark wall with Japanese print wallpaper in the background, you must carefully set up the still life subject using the same objects, values and colors. If you are going to add something red, it must be placed into the composition you are working from before you begin your painting so that everything appears on the “stage” just as you want it to appear in your painting.

Also, when painting a still life, lighting the stage is as complicated and as important as setting up the composition. I am amazed that many artists who paint from life often don’t have a proper light to work with.  Having a light that can be adjusted to be brighter or dimmer, that is easy to move around the studio, and that has a stand that allows the light to be moved up and down is as essential as setting the stage. It is also helpful to have a light that has a barn door attachment that can dim and focus the light stream, or a light that can be dimmed or made stronger with a dimmer switch. Without the ability to adjust the lighting, you can not produce a masterpiece.

All of these elements and many more are important to your success as a still life painter long before you even lay your first brush stroke down. Imagine what it would be like to be that familiar with your subject before you start painting!  Then, you can enjoy experimenting and noticing what happens as you really see what you are painting; and once you do,  you may never work from photos again!

 

The post The Secret of Painting from Life appeared first on Stefan Baumann – The Grand View: Paintings by Stefan Baumann.

The Secret Key To Painting – Painting from life

in this video Stefan Baumann reveals The Secret Key To Painting ,
Painting from life. Baumann talks to a group of artist about his experiences to master painting in his classes. You can get more information by going to his website www.StefanBaumann.com The Secrets of Painting from Life
If you want to see the world as spectacular as it is, take a walk in the forest with an artist. The painter’s eye is more sensitive and receives a vast amount more information than a normal person who is experiencing the same view. When students first come to my classes, within weeks they report that they have never before seen the world “in color” as they are now able to do and that painting has opened their eyes to the beauty that surrounds them. The first assignment for new students who come to my classes is to paint a white egg on a white plate that is sitting on a white table cloth. This exercise requires that they really look at their subject before beginning to paint. Most students look at the setup and only see white. Then, with coaching, they look deeper and see that white has little to do with painting eggs at all. At this point, their consciousness has undergone a small expansion and the artist has increased awareness about the painting process. Once the shadows are discovered, then and only then, can the student focus his awareness on the effects that light has on the subject matter.

After that, it is the composition that commands the focus. Gradually or suddenly, the realization that the artist is the one directing the viewer’s perception and that perception can be directed to only one thing at a time. We can not see light, shadow and color at the same time. And we cannot see composition, temperature, and air with just a single glance. We cannot see the windshield and the road at the same time. Creating art is like juggler trying to keep 15 balls up in the air and it’s no wonder that artists begin painting from photos just to make the process easier. But when an artist paints from photos, something is lost and the connection between the artist and subject is disconnected, filtered and dumbed down. When setting up a still life in your studio, the setup must be created just as it will appear in your painting. If you want your painting to have a dark wall with Japanese print wallpaper in the background, you must carefully set up the still life subject using the same objects, values and colors. If you are going to add something red, it must be placed into the composition you are working from before you begin your painting so that everything that appears on the “stage” is just as it appears before you begin to paint it. Also, when painting a still life, lighting the stage is as complicated and important as setting up the composition. I am amazed that many artists who paint from life often don’t have a proper light to work with. Having a light that can be adjusted to be brighter or dimmer, that is easy to move around the studio, and that has a stand that allows the light to be moved up and down is as essential as setting the stage. It is also helpful to have a light that has a barn door attachment that can dim and focus the light stream, a light that can be dimmed or made stronger with a dimmer stitch. Without the ability to adjust the lighting, you can not produce a masterpiece. All of these elements and many more are important to your success as a still life painter long before you even lay your first brush stroke down. Imagine what it would be like to be that familiar with your subject before you start painting! Then, you can enjoy experimenting and noticing what happens as you really see what you are painting; and once you do, you may never work from photos again!

The post The Secret Key To Painting – Painting from life appeared first on Stefan Baumann – The Grand View: Paintings by Stefan Baumann.

Rainbow Bridge, 12″x12″, oil on wood, Collection of the…

Rainbow Bridge, 12″x12″, oil on wood, Collection of the Artist

Number 7. The Heptad symbolizes the completion of a divine journey. The title
“Rainbow Bridge” refers to the Buddhist term for the path traveled from
the lower path the the higher path through the seven chakras. The
imagery of the painting is mainly drawn from The Pythagorean concept of
the Music of Seven Spheres, the musical vibration of the seven planets
in ancient alchemy.

Dream Symbols, oil on wood, 12″x12″, SOLDNumber six. The …

Dream Symbols, oil on wood, 12″x12″, SOLD

Number six. The
Hexad’s principle indicates efficient structure, function and order.
Every whole event occurs at the intersection of these three aspects.

Sky Burial, oil on wood, 12″x12″, $450Number five. The Pentad,…

Sky Burial, oil on wood, 12″x12″, $450

Number five. The
Pentad, or “Quintessence”, encompasses the four elements of matter,
infusing the force of life and representing nature’s fecundity. The
pentagram’s self replicating growth is reflected in the Fibonacci
sequence. 

Create Better Painting “But, What If?”

In this video Stefan Baumann talk to his class about Create Better Painting “But, What If?”Create Better Painting “But, What If?”

Inspiring Millions to paint outdoors This video is about Touch Move and Inspire. Get a free Book at his website www.StefanBaumann.com. The paintings of Stefan Baumann reveal the true spirit of nature by transporting the viewer to distant lands that have gone unseen and undisturbed. With the huge success of Baumann’s weekly PBS television series “The Grand View: America’s National Parks through the Eyes of an Artist,” millions of people witness for themselves the magic Stefan portrays on canvas, his passion for nature and the American landscape. By distilling his love of nature into a luminous painting of brilliant, saturated color that transcends conventional landscape and wildlife art, Baumann has captured the hearts and imaginations of a generation. Each painting becomes an experience rather than merely a picture – a vivid manifestation of his special and personal union with nature and the outdoor world. Through his mastery of light, color and artful composition, Baumann invites you to experience nature in its purity. It is no wonder that for many years distinguished American collectors, including former presidents and financial icons, have sought out his work.

The post Create Better Painting “But, What If?” appeared first on Stefan Baumann – The Grand View: Paintings by Stefan Baumann.

The fourth painting in my exploration of the nature of numbers….

The fourth painting in my exploration of the nature of numbers.

In geometry, three points define a flat surface. The fourth point defines depth, volume, and 3-dimensional space.  Alchemy describes these four points as the four
elements: air,
fire, water and earth.