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Small Drawings Part 4, "Tea & Toast" , pen and ink by Katy Cauker

From the Drawing book
3.5 x 5.5
This piece is the influenced by spending a couple of days studying the
paintings by Nelson Sandgren at the Schrager & Clark Gallery in Eugene, and the figurative pieces of Bets Cole in a three person show at Maude Kerns, also in Eugene, OR.
Viewing work by other artists always helps me clarify my thinking about my own work.
Everything from the type of marks I want to make, to the imagery itself, the display and pricing.
As nearly as I can tell,
 the majority of work that sells in the NW is priced under $400.
A good amount to spend for many but not much to get paid when you consider framing, transport, and the venue percentage or marketing expense that must come out that plus the right of the artist
to expect payment for the years of hard work and thought that go in to
each piece.
I do purchase work by other artists from time to time, in part out of a passion for looking and living around original art, in part out of need to look at other images, than the ones I paint, on a daily basis;
and in part to participate in the role of the collector so that I better understand
that perspective.
Some years ago through my reading, I came across the idea that if you purchase just one piece of original art every year eventually you have a collection.
The idea appealed to me.
It is also a way to support the arts.
I like to understand how it feels to want a painting the artists isn’t ready to sell despite knowing full well how it feels as an artist to not be ready to sell a piece, at any price.
There is a gulf of difference.
I like to observe my own response to work I like, am truly engaged by but unwilling to lay out money for, no matter the price.
More on that another time, perhaps.

Nelson Sandgren was certainly for me “The” master when it comes to leaving white paper in a shape that commands the stage, and sparks the composition.
He also managed to wield the same powerful white shapes in oils, acrylic, and print media equally well.
He is the standard by which I set my own use of white, whether paper or paint.
Too often it appears as amorphous form that supports and sparkles but hardly commands the lead.
Small format pen and ink drawings are my current favorite way to strengthen my game plan.

The above piece “Tea & Toast” has yet to fully develop the white space.
I will work back into it with color wash to do that, in a while.
I need to let it sit for now.
 This is a quasi political response to the homeless situation.
 I know 20 year olds who choose to sleep out rather than work jobs
 they have no interest in, other than income.
But grey haired men sleeping in coffee shops before the rush most likely do not
choose to be there for the same reasons.
I had the tea, the man sleeping in the next booth seemed to be toast, and cold at that.  I gave him tea, warned him of the police about to approach to roust another hapless individual who was creating problems by verbally assaulting the very humming environs with a seemingly meaningless stream of unintelligible verbiage.
He had been asked to return to the cold outside to make room for customers to use his table but with the tea in hand he had yet to move.
I could imagine a man of his age having trouble getting warm and
once again considered the many people on the edge;
because of the general path society takes to further divide
into poor and rich classes without much in between.

Nelson’s monotype ” Trickledown Street People ” had launched me this direction.

This is a detail view –  notice his use of the pleasing white shape to bring your attention to the faces and their poignant expressions.
This is a detail of the monoprint by Nelson Sandgren, 
last shown at the Schrader Clarke Gallery in Eugene, OR,
contact the gallery for a better look.
http://www.karinclarkegallery.com
Thanks for visiting, to make comments scroll over the dark line on the right side
or email me at      katyatkatycaukerdotcom

Katy
for more news and images of my work please visit me at 
www.katycauker.com

Small Drawings Part 3 – Haida Canoe & Figures – by Katy Cauker

This piece is a drawing of a Haida sculpture dated 1885.
The piece is in the Portland Art Museum and is carved in wood.
It depicts a canoe filled with figures, 
men, women & children.
I did the pen drawing while standing in front of the show case at the museum
in 2011
but only this morning added the watercolor to bring it to 
fruition.
It is 3.5 x 5.5 inches
on watercolor paper
Thanks for visiting
Katy
To see more of my work and hear studio news visit my website at 
www.katycauker.com

Small Drawings Part 2, by Katy Cauker – with images from the work of Nelson Sandgren

“the gods are watching” 
pen and ink by Katy Cauker
3.5 x 11

I seized a last minute chance to see 
 the Schrader Clark Gallery’s recent exhibition
Nelson Sandgren: Another Look
(1917 -2006)

I had been traveling since the show opened in late February
and I thought I would miss it all together. Opportunities to see Nelson’s work are rare and the expressive power of Nelson’s mark making is a source of great interest to me; 
so late in the week Jerry and I hit the road again with an iPod full of music.
My husband is an avid amateur musicologist.
He has an extensive collection, including early R&B, jazz, Rock & Roll, Blues, some Country, a good selection of Latin and music from other cultures. He has a great memory for lyrics and 
historical details. His voice brings them all to life.
We always travel with his compilations of favorite songs.
Given enough time with an exhibition I revisit each piece multiple times, eventually taking out my drawing book.
I most often draw the compositions, feeling my way across each piece and finding the marks that the eye skips over but are in fact pivotal to the success of the piece.
Recently I’ve returned to the idea of combining multiples of an image, and random images in one piece so I did this drawing pulling images from several of Nelson’s, rather than isolating the images.
The drawings allow me time to reflect on how color changes a piece.
I thought this piece begged for the muted red in Nelson’s Wigwam piece, but now that I’ve added the wash I see how it shifted the impact away from the couple. 
I’m not so sure that’s an improvement.
Perhaps it is because I did nor give it the weight he did and failed to
duplicate the shift from dark to light.
Though I have to say in the actual piece (not the jpg) the emphasis is better.

 The title for the drawing is based on Nelson’s lithograph ” Sea God”.
It is a squared format completely filled with the powerful face of a quintessentially Greek sea god.
I also used his image of a woman’s face 
which in my transposition reminds me of a goddess.  Nelson’s piece is titled simply but his drawing described the circumference her face with a white line, an unusual mark which drew attention while it separated her as though she were special.
Two other images are taken directly from Nelson: 
the Wigwam burner from Oregon’s logging past is the keystone in the most elegant of watercolors, and the couple asleep on street mats with a turned over cup is from a monoprint.
 ”Trickledown Street People” from 1994 is
one of the few formal political pieces I have seen of Nelson’s. 
 It is a dramatic dark piece, which has detail within the dark areas made more commanding by his use of the red ink, linking the figures as he highlights them within the composition.
I believe images of some of these pieces can still be seen on the gallery website even though the show came down on March 22, 2014.
Here is one from the website;
http://www.karinclarkegallery.com/NS-Another-Look.html
Many other of the pieces were equally engaging. Nelson worked in many different media, and tackled a wide range of imagery.  If you have the rare opportunity to see and purchase his work I highly recommend you take it.
Thanks for visiting, 
Katy

For studio news and more of my work visit me at 
www.katycauker.com

Small Drawings Part 1 by Katy Cauker

This group is from a few years ago at the Portland Art Museum.  There was an exhibition of Japanese Prints and I have a long time interest in motifs developed around people viewing art in museums.
I’ve posted them as small format because they are, and all done while standing in the exhibition. 
The winter months are times of change for me.  I become introspective, is that a change!  Well, in the winter one curls inside, considers the world from the warmth, and isolation of protected space, providing time to reflect on the passage of time, the value of friendships, and the ensuing personal dilemmas of how we inadvertently offend and are offended by our dearest friends;
such things as
“Why did you not join me at the……?” &
“How could you not tell me about ……
whatever it was you felt was important to be shared that they apparently did not?”.
We often travel.
For me this generally means I transport some version of my studio,
 reminiscent of George Carlin’s “My Stuff” monologue. 
Many times all I do is transport it while falling back on the ever present small drawing book and pen I keep in my purse.
With these two tools I record our travels, engage my brain while driving  actually while Jerry drives), and explore artistic concepts that only empty space in time allows for.
I have dozens of these books; they effectively track my progress as a draftsman over the last 20 years as they tell the story of how I spend my time. 
While I have done this type of drawing since I was very young the focus and consistency developed around an initial admonition from my first encounter with Nelson Sandgren,
“Draw everyday!”
Perhaps it was rather the opening question,
“Do you draw everyday?”
That was the phrase he used to test your mettle as an artist.
With that in mind, and the restrictions of being the mother of a young child, I began to have a drawing book that fit in my purse with me at all times.
Drawing became for me what I did while waiting; in the car,
tumbling class, airports, coffee shops, doctors offices, play grounds, ….
extending into bars, restaurants, museums, galleries,
and while traveling – on airplanes, cars, boats, and hiking – the long and short of it is everywhere I go and anywhere I end up in limbo for minutes at a time.
The beauty of this type of work is in the lack of judgement that occurs. The work is intended as a way to improve my skill, keep my hand in tune, explore ideas for larger work, 
deepen my grasp of the art of others, and allow me to draw every single day.

All drawings are in a 3.5 x 5.5 inch 
Moleskine notebook
heavy grade paper
or 
watercolor paper
Thanks for visiting, 
Katy
hear the news and see more of my work at 
www.katycauker.com

Small Drawings Part 1 by Katy Cauker

This group is from a few years ago at the Portland Art Museum.  There was an exhibition of Japanese Prints and I have a long time interest in motifs developed around people viewing art in museums.
I’ve posted them as small format because they are, and done while standing in the exhibition. 
The winter months are times of change for me.  I become introspective, is that a change!  Well, in the winter one curls inside, considers the world from the warmth, and isolation of protected space, providing time to reflect on the passage of time, the value of friendships, and the ensuing personal dilemmas of how we inadvertently offend and are offended by our dearest friends;
such things as
“Why did you not join me at the……?” &
“How could you not tell me about ……
whatever it was you felt was important to be shared that they apparently did not?”.
We often travel.
For me this generally means I transport some version of my studio,
 reminiscent of George Carlin’s “My Stuff” dialogue. 
Many times all I do is transport it while falling back on the ever present small drawing book and pen I keep in my purse.
With these two tools I record our travels, engage my brain while driving  actually while Jerry drives), and explore artistic concepts that only empty space in time allows for.
I have dozens of these books; they effectively track my progress as a draftsman over the last 20 years as they tell the story of how I spend my time. 
While I have done this type of drawing since I was very young the focus and consistency developed around an initial admonition from my first encounter with Nelson Sandgren,
“Draw everyday!”
Perhaps it was rather the opening question,
“Do you draw everyday?”
That was the phrase he used to test your mettle as an artist.
With that in mind, and the restrictions of being the mother of a young child, I began to have a drawing book that fit in my purse with me at all times.
Drawing became for me what I did while waiting; in the car,
tumbling class, airports, coffee shops, doctors offices, play grounds, ….
extending into bars, restaurants, museums, galleries,
and while traveling – on airplanes, cars, boats, and hiking – the long and short of it is everywhere I go and anywhere I end up in limbo for minutes at a time.
The beauty of this type of work is in the lack of judgement that occurs. The work is intended as a way to improve my skill, keep my hand in tune, explore ideas for larger work, 
deepen my grasp of the art of others, and allow me to draw every single day.

“walking” -d.landry

“walking” -d.landry

“in time” -d.landry

“in time” -d.landry

d.landry

d.landry

Katy Cauker to Show at Pashal Winery

 

Flyer for "A Show of Pairs" apintings by Katy Cauker at Paschal Winery, Ashland, Oregon, from January 31 - March 26, 2014. Katy Cauker’s new work in watercolor and acrylic is a mix of landscapes, seascapes, still life, and image based abstractions. Influenced by the American Modernist as well as other more contemporary artists, Ms. Cauker’s work reflects a search for the metaphor in images, for the abstract emotions that connect us, and a way to give solid form to thoughts and feelings. For her, words and images pair together to further develop an idea, and deepen communication.

“A SHOW OF PAIRS”

Opening at Paschal Winery Friday Jan 31, 2014 6PM to 8PM

Brief Artist Talk at 6:30PM

Show will be up through March 26

Visit http://www.paschalwinery.com for regular hours.

Katy Cauker’s new work in watercolor and acrylic is a mix of landscapes, seascapes, still life, and image based abstractions. Influenced by the American Modernist as well as other more contemporary artists, Ms. Cauker’s work reflects a search for the metaphor in images, for the abstract emotions that connect us, and a way to give solid form to thoughts and feelings.
For her, words and images pair together to further develop an idea, and deepen communication.

Visit www.katycauker.com

contact katycaukeratmedotcom

New Acrylic Study

Red Swedish Candlestick Wow!  Already we are one week in to the new year and this is my first posting.  I had great intentions for the start of the year, but I caught a cold.  It doesn’t matter, though, the intentions are still worthy.  We can always slip things a week here or there.  The point is to keep on working at it.

 

One thing I thought I try again is working with acrylic paint.  This first study is done on 300 lb watercolor paper that I prepared with gesso over a failed painting.  I had great fun working the acrylic paint, though I feel clumsy.  I had an idea what I wanted to do and, well, things went differently.  And, it was exciting to let things develop.

 

I hope you enjoy this study of my red Swedish candle holders.

 

The post New Acrylic Study appeared first on Dancing Clouds Gallery -The Artistry of Margaret Stermer-Cox.