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Angel of the Deep On Display

Angels Show

I’m pleased to say my latest watercolor and gouache painting “Angel of the Deep”  will join other artworks in the Fourth Annual Angels Show at GoodBean Coffee in Jacksonville OR for the month of December.  GoodBean Coffee is located at 165 S Oregon St in historic Jacksonville, OR.

Angel Of The Deep by M. Stermer-Cox

About the Show

Hosted by GoodBean Coffee Company, Hannah West Designs and Southern Oregon Artists Resource, the Angels Show features artwork by local artists using a variety of media.  You are invited to see the display of fine art daily during normal business hours (6am to 6pm).

Opening Reception

The show’s special opening reception is on Saturday, December 3rd, from noon to 4pm.  If you are in the area, your are heartily invited to come in and join in the festivities.  You will be able to meet many of the artists while enjoying stories of angels and, naturally, the artwork.

Angels Show Quote by Hannah West

About My Mermaid-Angel

I created my mermaid-angel design just for fun.  To explain, I enjoy seeing what my imagination can come up with once an idea pops into my head.  I have a dialogue, so to speak, with my pencil, paper and paint.  We work together until the crazy idea of a mermaid-angel starts to take shape. And, the more I think about my subject, the mermaid-angel in this case, stories form in my head.

Consider this, wouldn’t it be nice to be able to be at home at sea or in the air; to swim, or fly?  My mermaid-angel can move between air, land and water, which I think would be exciting.

And, what would a mermaid-angel do?  I think of my mermaid-angel as an empathetic care-taker and protector of the oceans and all the sea creatures.  I can see her helping turtles, dolphins and other animals caught in nets, for example.

A Little About the Painting

This is one of the few paintings I’ve done where I use gouache along with watercolor.   I had a moment of inspiration, a “what if I do this” moment.  So, I pulled out a tube of gouache and started painting away.  Fun!

For those of you not familiar with gouache, it is an opaque watercolor and mixes well with “regular” transparent watercolor.  I used it on the wings and on the figure’s skin.

Oh, yes, I framed the painting and you may purchase my mermaid-angel during the show for $275.  Happily.  *Update!  My “Angel of the Deep” is sold!  Thank you Hannah West and GoodBean Coffee!  (Woohoo!)

 

Please Stop By

I do hope you will stop by the Good Bean Coffee this December and see all the festive angels.  I’m closing with the official publicity poster for the Angels Show.  Thank you Hannah West for permission to include the poster!

Angels Show

 

 

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The post Angel of the Deep On Display appeared first on Margaret Stermer-Cox.

“Mermaid With Net At Night” At The “Icons” Exhibition

Mermaid As Icon

I am pleased to say that my painting “Mermaid With Net at Night” is showing at the Rogue Gallery and Art Center in Medford, OR.  To clarify, it is one painting among over 60 works of art in the Annual Member’s Exhibition.

Mermaid With Net At Night by M. Stermer-Cox

Most of all, if you are in the area, I invite you to please attend the artist’s reception on Friday, November 18th from 5 to 8 pm.

Should you miss the opening reception, you may see the exhibition through December 21st.  Plus, you can see the exhibition multiple times if you wish!  If you might like more information about the exhibition, including location and hours, please see the Rogue Gallery and Art Center’s Website.

To explain, every year the Rogue Gallery has a Member’s Exhibition from mid November through mid December.  For fun, creativity, and consistency, the show has an assigned theme.  So, the theme for this year’s member exhibition is “Icons”.

I’d like to share with you the show statement by the Rogue Gallery is as follows:

” Icons as signs, symbols or personalities can signify the eternal, a particular time, or the ephemeral. In the 2016 Annual Members’ Exhibition, over sixty artists present their icons using a variety of media and styles”.

I like that the gallery encourages a broad interpretation of “icons”.  I can hardly wait to see how other artists interpreted this particular theme.

Icons, Symbols or?

I had a difficult time with this particularly theme.  In my mind, I kept seeing Byzantine era icons.  So I tried to brain storm for new ideas.  Then, I had the problem of deciphering what is a symbol or icon.  Or, how about the word “iconic”?  Iconic women of myth?  Or modern day female icons?  Or, really are they symbols or metaphors?

As you might imagine, I can twist my brain in knots for a long time over the entire “icon” theme.  Do you suppose that is why the gallery gave artists a year to think about the theme?  So, yes I’m still thinking!

Icon or symbol, regardless, I am happy to have my mermaid share gallery space with so many other fine works of art.

Artist Statement

My own artist statement about this particular “Mermaid with Net At Night” is as follows:

“What can be more romantic than a mermaid alone at night?  I imagined that a mermaid in today’s seas would find lots of debris, some being quite useful.  In this case, she is examining a net.  Is she using it for herself, or is she caught in the net?  I expect that the story might go either way.

I like to think that my mermaid is protecting her fellow creatures of the sea.”

Details

Now for a little bit of technical data, I painted my mermaid with watercolor and the image size is 10×7.  I have enclosed it in a white mat and black frame.

If you would like to collect my mermaid, you may purchase the painting through the gallery for the next month.

And, naturally, you may always contact me if you’d like more information!

In the meantime, please enjoy my painting and thank you for your time!

 

 

Share

The post “Mermaid With Net At Night” At The “Icons” Exhibition appeared first on Margaret Stermer-Cox.

“Mermaid With Net At Night” At The “Icons” Exhibition

Mermaid As Icon

I am pleased to say that my painting “Mermaid With Net at Night” is showing at the Rogue Gallery and Art Center in Medford, OR.  To clarify, it is one painting among over 60 works of art in the Annual Member’s Exhibition.

Mermaid With Net At Night by M. Stermer-Cox

Most of all, if you are in the area, I invite you to please attend the artist’s reception on Friday, November 18th from 5 to 8 pm.

Should you miss the opening reception, you may see the exhibition through December 21st.  Plus, you can see the exhibition multiple times if you wish!  If you might like more information about the exhibition, including location and hours, please see the Rogue Gallery and Art Center’s Website.

To explain, every year the Rogue Gallery has a Member’s Exhibition from mid November through mid December.  For fun, creativity, and consistency, the show has an assigned theme.  So, the theme for this year’s member exhibition is “Icons”.

I’d like to share with you the show statement by the Rogue Gallery is as follows:

” Icons as signs, symbols or personalities can signify the eternal, a particular time, or the ephemeral. In the 2016 Annual Members’ Exhibition, over sixty artists present their icons using a variety of media and styles”.

I like that the gallery encourages a broad interpretation of “icons”.  I can hardly wait to see how other artists interpreted this particular theme.

Icons, Symbols or?

I had a difficult time with this particularly theme.  In my mind, I kept seeing Byzantine era icons.  So I tried to brain storm for new ideas.  Then, I had the problem of deciphering what is a symbol or icon.  Or, how about the word “iconic”?  Iconic women of myth?  Or modern day female icons?  Or, really are they symbols or metaphors?

As you might imagine, I can twist my brain in knots for a long time over the entire “icon” theme.  Do you suppose that is why the gallery gave artists a year to think about the theme?  So, yes I’m still thinking!

Icon or symbol, regardless, I am happy to have my mermaid share gallery space with so many other fine works of art.

Artist Statement

My own artist statement about this particular “Mermaid with Net At Night” is as follows:

“What can be more romantic than a mermaid alone at night?  I imagined that a mermaid in today’s seas would find lots of debris, some being quite useful.  In this case, she is examining a net.  Is she using it for herself, or is she caught in the net?  I expect that the story might go either way.

I like to think that my mermaid is protecting her fellow creatures of the sea.”

Details

Now for a little bit of technical data, I painted my mermaid with watercolor and the image size is 10×7.  I have enclosed it in a white mat and black frame.

If you would like to collect my mermaid, you may purchase the painting through the gallery for the next month.

And, naturally, you may always contact me if you’d like more information!

In the meantime, please enjoy my painting and thank you for your time!

 

 

Share

The post “Mermaid With Net At Night” At The “Icons” Exhibition appeared first on Margaret Stermer-Cox.

Contemplating Nature and Titles

Contemplating nature – as in spending a few days out camping, being quiet and thinking about life, trees, birds and painting titles.

While contemplating, an exciting thing happened.  I had a moment of insight in how titles can suggest different meanings for paintings.  I wondered, how had I not had this insight before?

 

Contemplating Nature: Young Pine Hyatt Lake, Southern Oregon

Contemplating Nature

So, to explain, my husband and I spent a few days last week being out by ourselves camping up in the mountains of southern Oregon.  It was wonderful!  We had our favorite spot on one of the small lakes nestled among the mountains.

I think the “contemplating nature” statement might need some elaboration.  Before we went on our camping trip, I read John P Weiss’ blog post on embracing solitude.  I took the idea of embracing nature and solitude with me on our trip.  The words rolled around in my brain looking for a place to sit and add meaning.

No Television, Cell Phones Or Computers

In the meantime, it was a pleasure to be away from television, cell phones and computers.  I was engaged instead in watching the behavior of the birds, of which there were plenty.  We saw a bald eagle, and an osprey.  Also, several herons, egrets, cormorants, white pelicans, geese, ducks, flickers, juncos and yellow rump warblers graced us with their presence.  We were greeted in the evening by the snorts from deer and hoots from owls.

Put another way, we saw lots of action!

Watercolor & Ink

Naturally, while we were out camping I had to do some watercolor and ink studies.  We have camped at this particular sight three times this summer.  So, after setting up, I drew my favorite young pine (above), which I have posted previously in July.   If you take a look at the previous posting, you might notice that the vegetation was nice and green earlier this summer.  This time, the grasses and vegetation around the young ponderosa were all shades of gold.

Summer was ending and fall was beginning.

Ponderosa Pine And Hornet Trap

Yes, the young ponderosa pine has a hornet’s trap attached to one of its lower limbs.  It seems that the hornets come out in August and September.  At least, that’s when the young pine was adorned with a hornet trap.  If you look at the drawing below, there is a squiggly line with some yellow to indicate the hornet trap.  If you’re having trouble seeing the trap, look at the lower right limbs.

The first drawing of the day, (see above) I deleted the hornet trap as part of “artistic license”.  When my husband looked at the pine, he suggested a title of “Hornet Trap”.  But, I hadn’t drawn any indication of the hornet trap, so I thought I best draw it again.  This time, I drew some squiggles for the trap.

Contemplating Nature: Hornet Trap On Young Pine, Hyatt Lake Reservoir, Southern Oregon

Titles And Meaning

Huh?  And hmmm.  The suggestion started a discussion about titles.  Does a title of “Hornet Trap” make one think a little?  Does it change the meaning of a painting of a pine?

In front of our camp site, there was a field of drying mullein.  Beyond the mullein was the lake with a row of snags.  Robert suggested a title of “Abandoned Water Wells”.

Abandoned Water Vessels or Mullein and Snags

What?  Abandoned water wells?  I don’t see any water wells, I thought to myself.  And, then, I got it and I liked it.  Yes, there are lots of abandoned water wells right in front of me!  Didn’t the mullein collect water from the earth by its roots and carry the water to its crown?  How about the snags – when they were living trees, did they not transport water up the tree to the leaves or needles?  I was beginning to see!  And, the more I contemplated the life of the mullein and the snags, the more I smiled.

Doesn’t “Abandoned Water Wells” sound more interesting than “Mullein and Snags”?  We played with words a bit and decided on “Abandoned Water Vessels” since plants are vessels.  That is to say plants are containers or receptacles for water.  Plus, the water is carried up the plant to the top by vessels.  Kind of exciting; isn’t it fun how word can have multiple meanings?

Contemplating Nature: Abandoned Water Vessels

Applies to Blog Titles Too!

The discussion had me thinking about titles and how they can add meaning or cause us to look at the subject different.  Speaking of titles, the same thought might apply to blog titles, titles of books or songs; pretty much anything that has a title.

Oh, I just had a thought, does the inverse hold true?  What I mean is, does a painting without a title lose potential meaning?

Good Bye Summer, Hello Fall

I wonder if the relative solitude of the lakes and mountains added to our free-thinking discussion about titles and meaning.  It certainly seemed to help.

All in all, embracing solitude and contemplating nature was an excellent way to end the summer and greet the fall.  I came home rested and happy.

PS: Website Update

Since we have come home, my husband has been working hard at updating my gallery website, Dancing Clouds.  I’d like to invite you to take a look and I hope you enjoy the view!  Thank you!

Share

The post Contemplating Nature and Titles appeared first on Margaret Stermer-Cox.

Contemplating Nature and Titles

Contemplating nature – as in spending a few days out camping, being quiet and thinking about life, trees, birds and painting titles.

While contemplating, an exciting thing happened.  I had a moment of insight in how titles can suggest different meanings for paintings.  I wondered, how had I not had this insight before?

 

Contemplating Nature: Young Pine Hyatt Lake, Southern Oregon

Contemplating Nature

So, to explain, my husband and I spent a few days last week being out by ourselves camping up in the mountains of southern Oregon.  It was wonderful!  We had our favorite spot on one of the small lakes nestled among the mountains.

I think the “contemplating nature” statement might need some elaboration.  Before we went on our camping trip, I read John P Weiss’ blog post on embracing solitude.  I took the idea of embracing nature and solitude with me on our trip.  The words rolled around in my brain looking for a place to sit and add meaning.

No Television, Cell Phones Or Computers

In the meantime, it was a pleasure to be away from television, cell phones and computers.  I was engaged instead in watching the behavior of the birds, of which there were plenty.  We saw a bald eagle, and an osprey.  Also, several herons, egrets, cormorants, white pelicans, geese, ducks, flickers, juncos and yellow rump warblers graced us with their presence.  We were greeted in the evening by the snorts from deer and hoots from owls.

Put another way, we saw lots of action!

Watercolor & Ink

Naturally, while we were out camping I had to do some watercolor and ink studies.  We have camped at this particular sight three times this summer.  So, after setting up, I drew my favorite young pine (above), which I have posted previously in July.   If you take a look at the previous posting, you might notice that the vegetation was nice and green earlier this summer.  This time, the grasses and vegetation around the young ponderosa were all shades of gold.

Summer was ending and fall was beginning.

Ponderosa Pine And Hornet Trap

Yes, the young ponderosa pine has a hornet’s trap attached to one of its lower limbs.  It seems that the hornets come out in August and September.  At least, that’s when the young pine was adorned with a hornet trap.  If you look at the drawing below, there is a squiggly line with some yellow to indicate the hornet trap.  If you’re having trouble seeing the trap, look at the lower right limbs.

The first drawing of the day, (see above) I deleted the hornet trap as part of “artistic license”.  When my husband looked at the pine, he suggested a title of “Hornet Trap”.  But, I hadn’t drawn any indication of the hornet trap, so I thought I best draw it again.  This time, I drew some squiggles for the trap.

Contemplating Nature: Hornet Trap On Young Pine, Hyatt Lake Reservoir, Southern Oregon

Titles And Meaning

Huh?  And hmmm.  The suggestion started a discussion about titles.  Does a title of “Hornet Trap” make one think a little?  Does it change the meaning of a painting of a pine?

In front of our camp site, there was a field of drying mullein.  Beyond the mullein was the lake with a row of snags.  Robert suggested a title of “Abandoned Water Wells”.

Abandoned Water Vessels or Mullein and Snags

What?  Abandoned water wells?  I don’t see any water wells, I thought to myself.  And, then, I got it and I liked it.  Yes, there are lots of abandoned water wells right in front of me!  Didn’t the mullein collect water from the earth by its roots and carry the water to its crown?  How about the snags – when they were living trees, did they not transport water up the tree to the leaves or needles?  I was beginning to see!  And, the more I contemplated the life of the mullein and the snags, the more I smiled.

Doesn’t “Abandoned Water Wells” sound more interesting than “Mullein and Snags”?  We played with words a bit and decided on “Abandoned Water Vessels” since plants are vessels.  That is to say plants are containers or receptacles for water.  Plus, the water is carried up the plant to the top by vessels.  Kind of exciting; isn’t it fun how word can have multiple meanings?

Contemplating Nature: Abandoned Water Vessels

Applies to Blog Titles Too!

The discussion had me thinking about titles and how they can add meaning or cause us to look at the subject different.  Speaking of titles, the same thought might apply to blog titles, titles of books or songs; pretty much anything that has a title.

Oh, I just had a thought, does the inverse hold true?  What I mean is, does a painting without a title lose potential meaning?

Good Bye Summer, Hello Fall

I wonder if the relative solitude of the lakes and mountains added to our free-thinking discussion about titles and meaning.  It certainly seemed to help.

All in all, embracing solitude and contemplating nature was an excellent way to end the summer and greet the fall.  I came home rested and happy.

PS: Website Update

Since we have come home, my husband has been working hard at updating my gallery website, Dancing Clouds.  I’d like to invite you to take a look and I hope you enjoy the view!  Thank you!

Share

The post Contemplating Nature and Titles appeared first on Margaret Stermer-Cox.

Contemplating Nature and Titles

Contemplating nature – as in spending a few days out camping, being quiet and thinking about life, trees, birds and painting titles.

While contemplating, an exciting thing happened.  I had a moment of insight in how titles can suggest different meanings for paintings.  I wondered, how had I not had this insight before?

 

Contemplating Nature: Young Pine Hyatt Lake, Southern Oregon

Contemplating Nature

So, to explain, my husband and I spent a few days last week being out by ourselves camping up in the mountains of southern Oregon.  It was wonderful!  We had our favorite spot on one of the small lakes nestled among the mountains.

I think the “contemplating nature” statement might need some elaboration.  Before we went on our camping trip, I read John P Weiss’ blog post on embracing solitude.  I took the idea of embracing nature and solitude with me on our trip.  The words rolled around in my brain looking for a place to sit and add meaning.

No Television, Cell Phones Or Computers

In the meantime, it was a pleasure to be away from television, cell phones and computers.  I was engaged instead in watching the behavior of the birds, of which there were plenty.  We saw a bald eagle, and an osprey.  Also, several herons, egrets, cormorants, white pelicans, geese, ducks, flickers, juncos and yellow rump warblers graced us with their presence.  We were greeted in the evening by the snorts from deer and hoots from owls.

Put another way, we saw lots of action!

Watercolor & Ink

Naturally, while we were out camping I had to do some watercolor and ink studies.  We have camped at this particular sight three times this summer.  So, after setting up, I drew my favorite young pine (above), which I have posted previously in July.   If you take a look at the previous posting, you might notice that the vegetation was nice and green earlier this summer.  This time, the grasses and vegetation around the young ponderosa were all shades of gold.

Summer was ending and fall was beginning.

Ponderosa Pine And Hornet Trap

Yes, the young ponderosa pine has a hornet’s trap attached to one of its lower limbs.  It seems that the hornets come out in August and September.  At least, that’s when the young pine was adorned with a hornet trap.  If you look at the drawing below, there is a squiggly line with some yellow to indicate the hornet trap.  If you’re having trouble seeing the trap, look at the lower right limbs.

The first drawing of the day, (see above) I deleted the hornet trap as part of “artistic license”.  When my husband looked at the pine, he suggested a title of “Hornet Trap”.  But, I hadn’t drawn any indication of the hornet trap, so I thought I best draw it again.  This time, I drew some squiggles for the trap.

Contemplating Nature: Hornet Trap On Young Pine, Hyatt Lake Reservoir, Southern Oregon

Titles And Meaning

Huh?  And hmmm.  The suggestion started a discussion about titles.  Does a title of “Hornet Trap” make one think a little?  Does it change the meaning of a painting of a pine?

In front of our camp site, there was a field of drying mullein.  Beyond the mullein was the lake with a row of snags.  Robert suggested a title of “Abandoned Water Wells”.

Abandoned Water Vessels or Mullein and Snags

What?  Abandoned water wells?  I don’t see any water wells, I thought to myself.  And, then, I got it and I liked it.  Yes, there are lots of abandoned water wells right in front of me!  Didn’t the mullein collect water from the earth by its roots and carry the water to its crown?  How about the snags – when they were living trees, did they not transport water up the tree to the leaves or needles?  I was beginning to see!  And, the more I contemplated the life of the mullein and the snags, the more I smiled.

Doesn’t “Abandoned Water Wells” sound more interesting than “Mullein and Snags”?  We played with words a bit and decided on “Abandoned Water Vessels” since plants are vessels.  That is to say plants are containers or receptacles for water.  Plus, the water is carried up the plant to the top by vessels.  Kind of exciting; isn’t it fun how word can have multiple meanings?

Contemplating Nature: Abandoned Water Vessels

Applies to Blog Titles Too!

The discussion had me thinking about titles and how they can add meaning or cause us to look at the subject different.  Speaking of titles, the same thought might apply to blog titles, titles of books or songs; pretty much anything that has a title.

Oh, I just had a thought, does the inverse hold true?  What I mean is, does a painting without a title lose potential meaning?

Good Bye Summer, Hello Fall

I wonder if the relative solitude of the lakes and mountains added to our free-thinking discussion about titles and meaning.  It certainly seemed to help.

All in all, embracing solitude and contemplating nature was an excellent way to end the summer and greet the fall.  I came home rested and happy.

PS: Website Update

Since we have come home, my husband has been working hard at updating my gallery website, Dancing Clouds.  I’d like to invite you to take a look and I hope you enjoy the view!  Thank you!

Share

The post Contemplating Nature and Titles appeared first on Margaret Stermer-Cox.

Get to the Morgan by Sunday

Judas Returning the Thirty Pieces of Silver, Rembrandt, oil on panel, detail

Judas Returning the Thirty Pieces of Silver, Rembrandt, oil on panel, detail

I rarely go out of my way to see a Rembrandt. He’s one of those painters you assume you know inside and out. What more is there to know? Yet, every time I spend time with one of his paintings, I walk away almost in disbelief at his genius and his flawless skill. Nothing about Rembrandt’s approach to painting appeals to me, personally: the staging and use of darkness to create cinematic effects, the way in which his chiaroscuro banishes most color from his palette, except in subtle concentrations, and even then it’s usually a world of brown and gray. I don’t live in a world that looks this way unless I’m glancing around a room lit only by the glow of a flat-screen TV. Yet when you stand before one of his great paintings, it’s jaw-dropping and almost dumbfounding. I felt that way in 2014 at The Frick, when I saw Simeon’s Song of Praise, a small canvas depicting a scene that feels enormous, and I had an even more intense reaction last week to Judas Returning the Thirty Pieces of Silver, on view until Sunday at The Morgan Library. The two paintings were completed two years apart, the latter when Rembrandt was only 23. How does a kid paint something this masterful, not only in technical skill but in its depth of understanding and empathy? When I saw this painting, it finally struck me that Rembrandt belongs in that cohort of rare, black swans who achieved effortless perfection at the earliest ages: Mozart, Rimbaud, Hendrix, Keats. In the case of both paintings I was astonished, the way I was six years ago when I saw how El Greco rendered the faces in The Coronation of the Virgin in a show at Onassis Cultural Center–overwhelming emotion and thought conveyed in faces that required, at best, a couple square inches of painted surface.

This show is built around only one painting, as the Frick show was primarily a way to offer the public a view of  Vermeer’s Girl with a Pearl Earring, and the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s show in 2009 offered access to his Milkmaid. In all three instances, the exhibitions were devoted to work on loan from European collections, and they all gave a single painting its own stage supplemented by collateral work that helped put it into historical perspective. Of the three, the Morgan’s is the most effectively curated. More than two dozen drawings and prints line the walls around the central painting, and they are equally exhilarating. It’s one thing to know that Rembrandt was a masterful draftsman, but it’s another to see evidence of his preternatural facility repeatedly, in one drawing and print after another.

In conversation with Lawrence Weschler, for a catalog that accompanied his 2005 watercolor show at LA Louver in 2005, David Hockney rhapsodized about the irrevocable brushwork, the once-and-done, Asian quality of a single Rembrandt drawing,  A Child Being Taught to Walk:

Look at the speed, the way he wields that reed pen, drawing very fast, with gestures that are masterly, virtuoso, not calling attention to themselves but rather to the very tender subject at hand, a family teaching its youngest member to walk. The face of the baby: how even though you can’t see it, you can tell he is beaming. This mountain of figures, and then to balance it all, the passing milkmaid, how you can feel the weight of the bucket she carries in the extension of the opposite arm. All of it conveyed, magically. But look at the speed, the sheer mastery. The Chinese would have recognized a fellow master.

Hockney called it “the single greatest drawing ever made.” This show will evoke the same kind of superlatives over and over, as you move from one drawing and print to the next. One technique Rembrandt file_0001used consistently was to drench a focal point in bright light by doing nothing but line drawings of the figures–outlines, almost cartoons, while rendering everything in shadow with a grisaille of light and dark. At first glance, you think, it’s unfinished, but then you realize that it simply indicates that the shaft of light is so intense that it washes away nearly all the detail in the spotlit figures. The contrast it creates makes the drawing seem even more spontaneous and alive. Ironically, Rembrandt had to fall back on only his unerring sense of line, without modeling, to show all he needed to show when it came to the most crucial individuals in the depicted event.

Colin Bailey, the Morgan’s director, in an interview with Leonard Lopate, pointed out that Judas Returning the Thirty Pieces of Silver went through many revisions as Rembrandt painted. Xray studies of the painting have shown how he changed his mind about the composition even in the advanced stages of his work on it. The intense light streaming into the scene from the left, which is fundamental to the entire image–the light source is what visually unifies most representational images, after all–was a late modification, at least in the way it makes the open Bible the brightest object in the painting and highlights the coins strewn on the floor. Everything in the painting is rendered with magical skill, from the faces of the participants–somehow the likeness of Judas is so distinctly individuated that the tiny features reminded me of Ezra Pound’s profile–to the little bits of glinting chain link dangling from the bottom of the mounted shield or breastplate overhead.

In reference to the fact that this painting has rarely been available to the public, having belonged for years in a private European collection, Lopate asked: “How does someone like you respond to some pretty great paintings hidden away in warehouses? It seems to me to go against our whole idea of what art is about–if people buy it as an investment and keep it in a warehouse as a way of avoiding taxes–Van Gogh, Picasso, Leonardo, works that should be seen. That has to cause pain for someone whose life is devoted to exhibiting.”

Bailey said: “Whatever we think of these warehouses, the works are safe and are not deteriorating, but from the museum’s perspective, public access is something we’re committed to. The depth, vitality of the Morgan is interdisciplinary. It’s an encyclopedic institution in miniature.”

I’m drawn more and more to The Morgan when I come into the city, on the strength of the shows I’ve seen there: William Blake’s work in A New Heaven is Begun, in 2009, the sui generis Emmett Gowin show last year, Hidden Likeness, and now this exhibition. If you want to see the outcome of concentrated curatorial passion combined with deep insight and archival resources, The Morgan is the place to go. From these shows, I come away feeling as if I’ve connected more deeply, not simply with great art, but with myself.

Showing Peggy’s Ladies At Rogue Gallery

Announcement

Greetings!  I’m happy to announce that I am showing three of my ladies at the Rogue Gallery and Art Center in Medford, OR.

Showing: Peggy's Three Ladies

The Members Gallery will hang the ladies through January 10th, 2017 and the paintings are available for purchase.

About The Ladies

Ladies: I Can't Hear You

I Can’t Hear You,  Watercolor, Image Size 15×12

This painting was based on my ninth drawing in the “Just Sayin’…” series.  I am fascinated by how the use of a cell phone has effected our culture.  One of the more amusing gestures I notice is the finger put to the ear in order to hear better.   In this painting, my thoroughly modern lady is talking on her cell phone, using the thoroughly modern gesture of finger to her ear.

Ladies: Just Sayin'...V8

Just Sayin’…V8, Watercolor, Image Size 10.5×7

The “Just Sayin’…” series of paintings is inspired by the ubiquitous cell phone.  One can scarcely be in public without noticing someone talking on the cell phone and overhearing the conversation.  In this variation, my subject is an “upscale” lady, perhaps dressed for a special occasion like afternoon tea.  Even she has a finger to her ear as she talks on her cell phone.

 

Ladies: Irish Maiden

Irish Maiden, Watercolor, Image Size 10×7

With Irish Maiden, I wanted to combine symbols of Ireland in a Cubist-inspired designed.  The maiden’s crown eludes to the triple spiral and triskel, symbolizing unity of mind, spirit and body.  Naturally, I included shamrocks, the easily recognised symbol of luck.  The shamrocks and the color green together remind me of every St. Patty’s Day in elementary school.  Green was my favorite color and I made sure to wear plenty of green clothing.  Add a shamrock pin and I was ready not to get “pinched”.

Third Friday

If you are in the southern Oregon area, I hope you will stop by the Rogue Gallery and view the paintings.  Every third Friday of the month, the gallery holds a reception.  This is a particularly festive time to visit the gallery.

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The post Showing Peggy’s Ladies At Rogue Gallery appeared first on Margaret Stermer-Cox.

Showing Peggy’s Ladies At Rogue Gallery

Announcement

Greetings!  I’m happy to announce that I am showing three of my ladies at the Rogue Gallery and Art Center in Medford, OR.

Showing: Peggy's Three Ladies

The Members Gallery will hang the ladies through January 10th, 2017 and the paintings are available for purchase.

About The Ladies

Ladies: I Can't Hear You

I Can’t Hear You,  Watercolor, Image Size 15×12

This painting was based on my ninth drawing in the “Just Sayin’…” series.  I am fascinated by how the use of a cell phone has effected our culture.  One of the more amusing gestures I notice is the finger put to the ear in order to hear better.   In this painting, my thoroughly modern lady is talking on her cell phone, using the thoroughly modern gesture of finger to her ear.

Ladies: Just Sayin'...V8

Just Sayin’…V8, Watercolor, Image Size 10.5×7

The “Just Sayin’…” series of paintings is inspired by the ubiquitous cell phone.  One can scarcely be in public without noticing someone talking on the cell phone and overhearing the conversation.  In this variation, my subject is an “upscale” lady, perhaps dressed for a special occasion like afternoon tea.  Even she has a finger to her ear as she talks on her cell phone.

 

Ladies: Irish Maiden

Irish Maiden, Watercolor, Image Size 10×7

With Irish Maiden, I wanted to combine symbols of Ireland in a Cubist-inspired designed.  The maiden’s crown eludes to the triple spiral and triskel, symbolizing unity of mind, spirit and body.  Naturally, I included shamrocks, the easily recognised symbol of luck.  The shamrocks and the color green together remind me of every St. Patty’s Day in elementary school.  Green was my favorite color and I made sure to wear plenty of green clothing.  Add a shamrock pin and I was ready not to get “pinched”.

Third Friday

If you are in the southern Oregon area, I hope you will stop by the Rogue Gallery and view the paintings.  Every third Friday of the month, the gallery holds a reception.  This is a particularly festive time to visit the gallery.

Share

The post Showing Peggy’s Ladies At Rogue Gallery appeared first on Margaret Stermer-Cox.

After Action Review (AAR) of Watercolor & Ink Demonstration

Review Time!

Greetings!  Yes, it is time I did a review.  It has been about two weeks since I did my watercolor and ink demonstration (demo) for the Southern Oregon Society of Artists (SOSA) in Medford.  I had a wonderful time!  The organization treated me well and I had an enthusiastic audience.   It was an exciting and memorable event for me.  So much to think about!

Review of Watercolor & Ink Demo

Here I am in mid sentence; all set up and ready to go! Southern Oregon Society of Artists; August 2016

Thank You!

First, I’d like to extend a huge THANK YOU to the following:

  • Lori Garfield for all the coordination before hand; it was great and most helpful! Thanks for the introduction.
  • Marilyn Foreman, for inviting me to do the demo; what an honor!
  • To the members of SOSA for their warm and enthusiastic welcome.

After Action Review

My purpose for conducting this after action review is to put down on paper all those things I am thinking about (so much to think!)  The great thing is that next time I need to do a demonstration, I can review what happened this time.  Remembering what went well and where I might improve is important to me.  I hope to do more demos in the future!

After Action Review Format

This is the AAR format I used. Feel free to copy if you like.

What Was Supposed To Happen

  • The Society of Southern Oregon Artists SOSA) invited me to give a demonstration on watercolor and ink techniques. My audience represented artists of different media and different skill levels. I had roughly an hour and a half to show how I work with watercolor and ink.
  • My intention was to show how I create a watercolor & ink painting from start to finish. I divided my work process into three phases based on the media I use: graphite, ink and watercolor. Each phase was to take twenty minutes.
  • Throughout the demo, I planned to talk and explain the development of the painting. Talking points were to include ideas, materials, working with the media, etc.

What Happened

  • I was able to follow my plan of roughly 20 minutes per medium: graphite, ink then watercolor.
  • After a nervous start, I dove in and did my best. By mentally diving in, I was able to relax and get down to the task of drawing and painting!
  • Artist members asked questions as I worked.  I was pleased to answer questions as I worked, and even more pleased that I was able to keep my focus!
  • The audience was so warm and attentive that I had a great time!  So much fun to be with a wonderful group of fellow artists!
Review - Organic Grind Demo Painting WIP

First state:  Organic Grind Coffee at the end of the SOSA demo session; August 2016

What Went Well

  • I had prepared; I had a plan and it worked.
  • Having a time line set for the demo worked well for me. I had a watch with a timer so that when 20 minutes was up I could move on to the next stage of the painting development. This method of chunks of time ensured I didn’t get bogged down in one task.
  • To my surprise, I worked on one painting throughout the demonstration. I had “work-in-progress” type paintings prepared in case I became stuck or had problems. However, I was able to work on one painting throughout.
  • Having multiple “work-in-progress” type paintings prepared facilitated the flow of the demo. I used the “work-in-progress” pieces to emphasize points about the development of a painting using watercolor and ink.
  • I was able to adjust on the spot. For example, I started the drawing phase of my demo painting using an HB pencil, true to my normal practice. Unfortunately, I draw too lightly with an HB. Once the audience told me they couldn’t see, I was able to pull out an 8B pencil which was much easier to see.
  • Having prepared and rehearsed talking out loud while painting, I was able to speak without referring to my talking points, at least after the first few minutes.
  • Another surprise was that the audience appreciated seeing me go through the drawing phase with graphite.  I had almost decided to cut out the drawing, but the audience was glad I did the drawing.
SOSA Demo Review. Final state of demo painting - Organic Grind Coffee

“Organic Grind Coffee Shack”; final state. Completed after the demo. 2016

What I Might Want To Do Better*

  • Get more of the plan on paper ahead of time.  I had a checklist and a narrative typed out.  But, I could have been more detailed on paper; I relied on too many things being in my head.  It might have been a disaster if I had stage fright!
  • I still get nervous when asked to do a demonstration. Practice, practice practice!
  • I might want to consider something like adding a simple PowerPoint presentation to keep the audience and me focused on key points. This is a “nice to do”; equipment will be the limiting factor.
  • Timing. I kept to my timeline, though I did not plan for a question period at the end. I think next time I might want to allow a period for questions. Could it be I was a bit nervous about questions?

*Note: My husband video recorded the demo session. He is preparing it for my review. I may identify a few more things I want to do next time around!  I hope to post a link to the video soon

After Action Review Conclusion

Review - Keys to success

For me, reviewing my preparation for and conduct of a watercolor and ink demonstration was important.  By evaluating where I am now, I can see what I might want to do to improve.  Its also good to stop and acknowledge what a grand time I had thanks to the members of SOSA.

Your Input

Your insight and opinion is valuable to me!  If you would like, please share your experiences!

Review of SOSA Demo

Thanks!

Update

My husband video recorded my demo and it can be seen online.  Please see below!

SOSA Part 1

 

SOSA Part 2

Sit back with a cup of coffee, tea or… and enjoy!  🙂

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