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Valentine Girl & BlogLovin

 

Hi! Happy Day before Valentine's!

 

Valentine Girl

Since its Friday the 13th and the day before Valentine's Day, I thought I'd share a little heart day Valentine Girl.  This is from a card I created for my Mom.  She gave me the toy that was my model.  I think she received it in a happy meal of some sort.  In any case, I've had it for about 20 years.  Silly, but fun!  

Enjoy!  Thanks!

PS.   I'm joining "Bloglovin" to try its reader function and network with other blogs.  This post was used to "claim" my blog and as a test post.  Thanks!

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How To Draw

The "Draw" Question

I've been wondering about what people mean when they say someone knows how to draw.  Draw what?  Draw how?  How did they learn?  Do we every finish learning?

Drawing: Vase and boxes

Drawing Approaches

I think there are all sorts of drawing approaches.  Just as in painting, there is the classical approach where the drawing looks like the subject; ie a chair looks like  a chair.  On the other side of the spectrum, there is the non-objective approach, where the drawing doesn't look like an object.  Instead, it relates to a feeling, impression or maybe something else entirely.  

Common Comments

Back to this idea of "knowing how to draw".  Hanging around artists, art shows and art organzations, one hears the comment "oh, that person really knows how to draw".  And the opposite is common too, "that person doesn't know how to draw…"  The funny thing is that it is assumed that we know what these two comments mean.   Perhaps the speaker would be clear if he or she said instead, "I like the drawing" or "I don't like the drawing".  

Drawing Study: Egg and Box

My Thoughts

It seems to me that knowing how to draw is something we might strive for.  Some of us might become accomplished and masterful at drawing.  But, do we ever reach a point where we can say definitively "I know how to draw?"

Or, maybe we can.  Is a simple line, drawn on a piece of paper, evidence of being able to draw; of knowing "how to draw"?

Drawing Class

OK, you say, what is this really about?  I love drawing and I strive to learn more about the art of drawing.  Currently, I am enrolled and participating in a classical drawing class taught at one of the local art centers.  I am studying the fundamentals with desires to improve technical and artistic skills.  Its all part of my larger goal to "see as an artist sees".

But, even as I draw boxes, eggs and vases, I wonder, is one approach to drawing more valid than another?  Is drawing from life more artistic than drawing from imagination or emotion, or the other way around?  Which is right, true or authentic?

Answers?  Relax!

I don't have all the answers.  My husband suggests I just relax and enjoy drawing.  Could be he has a point.

Drawings

Just for fun, I'm including three drawings that I worked this first week of drawing.  Maybe we'll compare in April when I've completed the class.  These are academic drawings done with a specific purpose in mind.  I'm studying proportions, placement, perspective and structure in the drawings shown her.

Opinion

What do I think?  I hope learning how to draw never ends!  And, mastering the art and skill of drawing would good.

Class Acknowledgement

The class I'm taking is called "Academic Approach to Still Life Drawing and Painting with Sarah F. Burns".  It is being taught at the Ashland Art Center, Ashland OR.

PS.  I adjusted the contrast in the digital files of these drawings so you can see the pencil work better.  

Drawing: Column and boxes

 

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Vivisection, 10”x10”x1.5, oil & ink on wood…

Vivisection, 10”x10”x1.5, oil & ink on wood panel, SOLD

Organic form and it’s emergence from geometry. This painting has sold but there are a few available in this style in my online store! www.animaanimus.org.

Elaine Witteveen Artist Talk - Life Drawing - Show Your Art on an RVTD Bus!!

MAIN GALLERY ARTIST TALK FOR THE SHOW:
WINGS: CELEBRATING THE LIFE AND WORKS OF ELAINE A. WITTEVEEN
January 10– February 13, 2015

For over six decades Elaine A. Witeveen has been active in the arts. Her rich history is filled with stories of bringing artists together in the Northwest, and many travels at home and abroad. Come hear local artist Elaine A. Witteveen talk about her work and life as an artist next Wednesday, February 4th at 1pm in our Main Gallery.

Learn More About The Exhibit >>>

eileen Witteveen

Life Drawing: Academic Approach begins this Tuesday!

Only two spots left!
In this ten week class well-known local artist Sarah F. Burns will guide you in developing the skills to capture the expression of the human figure using a live model.Sarah’s extensive training includes study in contemporary art at Pacific Northwest College of Art in Portland, academic realist drawing and painting at Ashland Academy of Art in Ashland, and intensive workshops with Ben Fenske, Michael Grimaldi, Andrew Ameral in contemporary classical painting, drawing and anatomy.

An incredible class with an amazing artist that you will not want to miss!

SIGN UP TODAY! Register here>>

Visit www.roguegallery.org/adult_classes
to see our full list of adult classes, and
www.roguegallery.org/art_kids.html to see our classes for youth.
Sarah_Burns_aja-at-bacaa-workshop-with-dan-thompson-web

A Chance to Exhibit Your Art on a RVTD Bus

A panel of judges will pick up to 10 winners whose art will be applied to one of RVTD’s new Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) powered buses in the summer of 2015, and remain on the buses for seven years. Submit your work on paper no larger than 11″x17″ and turn it in to RVCOG or RVTD during normal business hours. The theme is what you love about the Rogue Valley and outdoor activities. All submissions must be turned in by the end of March, 2015. Please contact Mike Bowman at [email protected] or 541-608-2420 or Greg Staback at [email protected] for more information. See www.roguevalleycleanair.org for information about their programs.

Lithia Park – Paintings From A Different View

The Park

Lithia Park is an historic place Ashland, Oregon.  Its a beautiful park designed by the same person who designed Golden Gate Park.  It has lots of varieties of trees.  A creek runs through it.  Rhododendrons and azaleas bloom profusely in spring.  There are two duck ponds.  But, I chose a different viewpoint – looking down at my feet.

Autumn In Lithia Park

The Challenge

My choices for day five of the 3 paintings/day for 5 days FB challenge* date back to 2003.  These early paintings are still among my favorite, plus I think its instructive to see them again.  I contemplate how far I have traveled on this artistic journey.  The four paintings and drawing in this small series were purchased as a collection and I am happy knowing that they are together.

Autumn in Lithia Park

Back to the park.  It is a favorite place to visit for my husband and me.  One day in October of 2003, we were walking along one of the park trails and there were butterflies and baby skinks (a type of lizard) all over the place.  It was like a final bursting of life on that autumn day.  The coloration of the butterflies and baby skinks was similar to the colors I used in "Autumn in Lithia Park".  The butterflies were dark, almost black with orange and white spots.  The baby skinks and bright blue tails and yellow stripes running down the body.  What glorious color.

Autumn In Lithia Park II

Oddly enough, I have never seen the skink and butterfly combination in such profusion again in Lithia Park.

I did not draw on location.  I didn't have paper or pencil.  Instead, I took mental notes and when we returned to our hotel room (we had been visiting), I quickly drew my impressions and notes of what I had seen.  From these notes, I created four designs that became the paintings and drawing shown here.

Autumn in Lithia Park IV

A Word About the Colored Pencil Piece

Oh, I almost forgot, in the early days of my art "career", I worked colored pencil side-by-side with watercolor.  For the past five years or so, I have focused on my watercolor work.

Retrospective

I have enjoyed doing this mini, on-line retrospective of my work.  In thinking about my drawings and paintings, I am reminded of my goals and intentions I set to paper back in 2002 when I first started my artistic journey.  I have wanted to express what I see and feel in a personal way.  Inspired by nature, people, relationships and pets, the paintings are my own vision.  I suppose that's not particularly profound.  I'm thinking this is pretty much true of any artist.  We can't help but paint our own vision.

That being said, I've learned tremendously from other artists and I hope to continue to do so.  

Thanks!

I hope you enjoy the four views of "Autumn in Lithia Park".  Thank you Myrna Wacknov for inviting me to take part in the three-for-five FB challenge.

Autumn in Lithia Park III

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“Torsten On Bass” Watermedia Painting Series

Challenge

Welcome to Day Four of the 3-paintings-per-day-for-five-day (3-4-5) FB challenge!  Today I'm featuring my "Torsten on Bass" series, and for a blog bonus, I'm adding a fourth piece.  (Thank you Myrna Wacknov for inviting me to participate in the challenge).  

 

Inspiration

The paintings in the series "Torsten on Bass" were inspired by photographs my husband took of some of our musician friends from Germany.  We lived in Germany during the 1990's.  We met and became friend with a local rock and roll band.  They called themselves the "Lunatics United".  I would say they were not "lunatics" but they were a fun, hard rock band.  They had a vocalist, two guitarists, a bassist and drummer.  Torsten played bass.  

Lesson Learned

These paintings were done in 2008.  I learned a lesson during the process of developing the designs that has served me well.  I started by drawing from the photograph.  I became frustrated because the drawing from the photograph did not express what I felt about the band or music.

After a few drawings, I put the photographs away.  I created new drawings from memory, imagination and as a response to how music makes me feel.  Oddly enough, the first "Torsten on Bass" has as much to do with the blues as it does with rock and roll.  I liked the resulting figure and the muted colors.

After successful design number one, I naturally had to do some more.  In designs II (Rock and Roll), III & IV, I thought about going to rock and roll concerts, the heat of the lights, the sound of the music and how it made me feel.  Plus, I took more liberties with the figure.

What did I learn?  By drawing from life or photographs first, I get the feel of the subject.  Then, I let myself loose with memories, imagination and emotion.  I create something that says what I feel about the subject.  Plus, I have a great time.

Exhibiting

I have rarely shown these works, although "Torsten on Bass" was exhibited in a juried show in Springfield, OR.  In looking back at the images, I am pleased with the work.  I wonder why I stopped!  

Two of the pieces are in private collections:  "Torsten on Bass – Rock and Roll" and "Torsten on Bass III".  "Torsten on Bass IV" has never been shown, oddly enough.  I did more drawings, but all of them are in sketchbooks put away in storage.

Its wonderful to be able to pull these paintings out and share them with you.  I hope you enjoy them!  Thanks!

 

The post “Torsten On Bass” Watermedia Painting Series appeared first on Margaret Stermer-Cox – Watercolor Artist.

I Heart Kinesiology!

Back to School with Kinesiology at Ashland Institute of Massage!

My ongoing obsession with knowing specifically the origin, insertion, action and shape of muscles has led me to take a rather in-depth kinesiology class.  Over 100 class hours, plus out of class study time will keep me busy til April.  And, of course I’m translating a lot of this stuff from massage application to artist application.  I feel so fantastic when I’m in a class I love.

 

Filed under: Drawing, figure Tagged: 2015, anatomy, art, figurative, figure, fine art, kinesiology, Sarah burns, sarah f burns, sketch, work of sarah f burns

Still Life With Toy Pony – Three Watercolors & A Drawing

Toy Pony Series

On day three, its three paintings and a drawing from my "Still Life With Toy Pony" series.  Day three refers to the "three paintings a day for five days" challenge being carried out on Facebook.  Artist and friend Myrna Wacknov invited me to join in on the fun.

I chose "Still Life with Toy Pony" because I have worked on this particular series of paintings since 2009.  It has been a major part of my artistic growth.

The series followed the "KittyKitty" series.  This series is a creativity and design problem.  I borrowed the idea from artist Mike Bailey, who I discovered through Mryna Wacknov's blog.  

Here's the problem. 

Pick three things that are alike and one thing that is different.  Set up a still life.  Develop 20 designs.  Develop 20 more.  If you're really into the problem, draw 40 more.  I think Mr. Bailey is over 100.  

What you learn.  

By doing the same subject 20 times, you force yourself to start being creative.  To use a phrase from Mr. Bailey, you go beyond the obvious.  You start being experimental.  Simplying, stylizing, embellishing, reorganizing: these are the types of approaches that went through my head.  

What I Did.

I picked three "geometric" items hanging around my house.  The espresso cup – because I like espresso.  The candlestick was a wedding gift.  The vase was a little clay thing I picked up in Germany.  They have the "cup" type form in common.  They're variations on a column.  I added one "organic" shaped object – a small toy pony I picked up in San Francisco's China Town when visiting in the late 70's.  Its made of satin.

I started drawing and numbering each as I went.  After a few drawings were done, I enlarged my favorites and started painting.  (The first drawing is included at the bottom of the page).

Eventually, I started looking at design considerations to create variations.  I learned about formats, colors, values, shapes, repetition, lines, patterns.  I did 80 drawings of which 19 are paintings.  I used watercolor primarily, though there are a few mixed water media pieces.  If you'd like to see most of the collection, I invite you to see it on my website Dancing Clouds.

Three Paintings

Today's three paintings were chosen because they each have some personal significance.  I am also including drawing number one so you can see the starting point. 

The green variation is the first painting of the series and was based on drawing number four.  You can easily see the still life objects:  espresso cup, candlestick, vase and toy pony.  There is some stylization.  This paintings was done in 2009.

The next one I chose was design 53.  I painted this one in 2010; it pre-dates the painting of design 39, the third painting (2012).  The still life shapes in design 53 are flattened, but you still get a feeling of three dimensional objects.  With design 39, the objects are flattened and may be hard to recognize.

If you look at the three paintings, you will notice that I shifted from color schemes being dominant to value patterns being dominant.  ("Value" here refers to the relative lightness and darkness of shapes).

I chose the paintings specifically to illustrate the kind of artistic growth one can gain by studying in this manner.  I hope you enjoy them!

 

 

 

 

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Three Lighthouses – Watercolor Paintings

The Challenge

Lighthouses are my theme for Day Two.  This is part of the art tag challenge on facebook:  Three Paintings a Day for Five Days.  (My thanks to artist Myrna Wacknov for inviting me to participate in this challenge).  

Lighthouses & Childhood

I grew up in a house with lighthouse paintings.  My father had done several paintings of the subject and they lined the walls of our house.  I think some were of lighthouses in Maine and some in Spain.  In any case, I thought they were exotic, fascinating paintings.

My childhood home was in the desert Southwestern United States.  The ocean and lighthouses belonged to a different world and fired my imagination.  I wanted to visit lighthouses and own a painting or two myself.

Since childhood, I've seen and visited several lighthouses in this country and abroad.  

Grays Harbor Lighthouse

There are many along the Washington and Oregon coast, where I live these days.  Also, a friend gave me an ornament of the Grays Harbor (Washington) Lighthouse.  The lighthouse became my model, along with some broken sea shells from the beaches of Grays Harbor.

Naturally, a little Peggy-style Cubism creeps in to my design as does a lot of imagination.  There are more versions.  I think these three have a sense of the storms that visit the Northwest United States Coast.

A word about my naming system, "D" in the title refers to "design", as in "D10" means "Design 10".  Thanks!

The post Three Lighthouses – Watercolor Paintings appeared first on Margaret Stermer-Cox – Watercolor Artist.

Three Lighthouses – Watercolor Paintings

The Challenge

Lighthouses are my theme for Day Two.  This is part of the art tag challenge on facebook:  Three Paintings a Day for Five Days.  (My thanks to artist Myrna Wacknov for inviting me to participate in this challenge).  

Lighthouses & Childhood

I grew up in a house with lighthouse paintings.  My father had done several paintings of the subject and they lined the walls of our house.  I think some were of lighthouses in Maine and some in Spain.  In any case, I thought they were exotic, fascinating paintings.

My childhood home was in the desert Southwestern United States.  The ocean and lighthouses belonged to a different world and fired my imagination.  I wanted to visit lighthouses and own a painting or two myself.

Since childhood, I've seen and visited several lighthouses in this country and abroad.  

Grays Harbor Lighthouse

There are many along the Washington and Oregon coast, where I live these days.  Also, a friend gave me an ornament of the Grays Harbor (Washington) Lighthouse.  The lighthouse became my model, along with some broken sea shells from the beaches of Grays Harbor.

Naturally, a little Peggy-style Cubism creeps in to my design as does a lot of imagination.  There are more versions.  I think these three have a sense of the storms that visit the Northwest United States Coast.

A word about my naming system, "D" in the title refers to "design", as in "D10" means "Design 10".  Thanks!

The post Three Lighthouses – Watercolor Paintings appeared first on Margaret Stermer-Cox – Watercolor Artist.