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TMI

Zero TheoremFrom an interview with Terry Gilliam at Slate, about his new movie, which sounds more like something Aronofsky would have made: “His new movie, “The Zero Theorem,” starring Christoph Waltz as an isolated computer programmer searching for the meaning of life in an overloaded info-society not far removed from our own, has been in the works for at least six years.”

Going back to the character that Christoph plays in this film, there’s so much going on on the surface, but what really got to me was the tremendous sadness. This person who has a creative drive, a creative urge, and is in a situation where there’s no way for him to fulfill that. That struck me as a situation of extreme pathos.

Well that’s how I see the film. It’s very funny but it’s basically tragedy. It’s very sad. It does move me. You can sort of do the parallels between me and that guy, but at heart that’s not really what it is. Not getting to do what you want to do is one thing, but his problem is that he lets life and relationships fall apart because he can’t grasp them. He’s so damaged — I think the scene when Bainsley [a femme fatale played by French actress Mélanie Thierry] leaves and offers for him to come along, he can’t do it. For me that’s the core scene of the film. What happened to this guy? So in the end, I had to leave him with some kind of sense of dignity and a kind of peace. It may only exist in a virtual world and at least he can let the sun set. He can control that much. I mean, when I make a film, there’s always a big autobiographical element in it, that’s the only way I know how to make films. I have to identify with the character in one way or another. And this one, in retrospect, ended up being quite interesting because when I started it I didn’t think it was going to be that film exactly, but that’s what it became.

Your portrayal of the world is so interesting, people will inevitably look back to your earlier films and other people’s. I felt like you were referencing “Blade Runner,” which came out just before “Brazil,” more directly than you ever have before. But the important thing to me was that this portrait of the informational clutter of the world is almost not a satire or an exaggeration. It’s maybe a tiny bit exaggerated, but it’s almost a portrait of the real world.

Yes. Thank you for that. People talk about it in some sort of future, dystopic view. No! It’s exactly what’s going on right now as far as I’m concerned. [Laughs.] When I walk out onto the streets of London, I’m bombarded exactly like Qohen is at the beginning of the film. It’s endless, it seems to me. And that’s why I sort of built that world around him. Everything in the world out there is colorful and people seem to be having a good time and shopping is bubbling away and things are being offered to you left, right and center. The workplace is a colorful place with people zipping around having a great time. There’s only one bit of darkness and grayness in the thing and that’s Qohen. And that’s what intrigued me about him. He’s very much like a monk. He’s in a burned-out church and it’s a church that has no meaning anymore. That particular construct of life has passed him by. And yet, that’s why I love when another character tells him, “Nonetheless, you’re a man of faith. And that is the very thing that has made you not live your life.”

2 Hour Parking

These cars were parked in a Medford, Oregon lot.

Crying Gull

This gull is protecting a nearby piece of salmon at Ocean Park, WA

Transparent Watercolor Paintings of the Watercolor Society of Oregon

Near Carlton, watercolor painting by Lane Hall

Near Carlton, watercolor painting by Lane Hall

October 4 – November 14, 2014

Watercolor Society of Oregon Public Reception: October 4th , 4:00 – 6:00pm

Rogue Gallery & Art Center Public Reception: October 17th , 5:00 – 8:00pm

 

By the Light of the Moon, watercolor painting by Betty Barss

By the Light of the Moon, by Betty Barss

The Rogue Gallery will display in the Main Gallery 80 transparent watercolor paintings selected from the fall 2014 convention of the Watercolor Society of Oregon. The Watercolor Society of Oregon was established in 1966 with the mission “to further the interest of transparent watercolor painting and to encourage a wider experience, enjoyment, and education to the painter and the viewing public.” This exhibit reflects the artistic diversity of the society’s talented members.

Southern Oregon artists represented in the exhibit include Linda Boutacoff, Betty Barrs, Lane Hall, Linda Hagen, Marilyn Hurst, Cecilia Pestlin, Peggy Stermer Cox, and Eve Withrow. “The expertise of the artists using the medium of transparent watercolor is impressive. The range of style and expression is inspiring,” says Rogue Gallery Executive Director Kim Hearon.

 

 

Rio Del Oro, by Linda Boutacoff

Rio Del Oro, by Linda Boutacoff

The Watercolor Society of Oregon (WSO) is a statewide organization and consists of almost 1000 members. WSO’s primary goals are giving members the chance to display their work, and provide education opportunities. The WSO features semi-annual shows, which are juried by nationally recognized artists. Over 320 works were submitted for this exhibit, 80 paintings were chosen. Of these, 20 works have been selected by to travel throughout the state for six months. The Watercolor Society’s fall convention is being held in downtown Medford from October 3 through October 5th. Many of the activities are hosted at the Inn at the Commons and the Rogue Gallery & Art Center.

The Rogue Gallery & Art Center is a non-profit community art center, founded in 1960 to promote and support the arts in the Rogue Valley. The center exhibits a wide range of artistic styles and mediums from local and national artists. Programming includes art educational opportunities for children and adults. Hours of operation are Tuesday through Friday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Saturday from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Call (541)772-8118 for more info or visit www.roguegallery.org.

8th Annual Empty Bowls Event Coming October 13

Empty Bowls Event Featured Image_2014

The 8th Empty Bowls event

in Grants Pass, Oregon will again be held at Parkway Christian Center located at 229 NE Beacon Drive in Grants Pass on Monday, October 13th from 6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. Guests choose a handcrafted bowl and are then served a simple meal of soup and bread. The handmade bowl is yours to keep as a reminder of hunger in our community.

Options is collaborating with the Josephine County Food Bank and the Gospel Rescue Mission to host the annual Empty Bowls event. The three agencies see a great need to provide food and access to food for an increasing number of people in our community, especially children and their families.

Josephine County is one of the five most food insecure counties in all of Oregon. With the still high unemployment rate and poverty level, the need for access to food is greater than

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Average and ordinary

Alain de Botton on Vermeer: “But he had communicated a crucial – and hugely sane – idea: much of what matters to us is not exciting, urgent, dramatic or special. Most of life is taken up dealing with things which are routine, ordinary, humble, modest and (to be honest) a touch dull. Our culture should […]

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Ephemera

For those of you who have wondered what goes on in that nifty blue building on the Phoenix, OR main drag —- > click. I kind of like the preliminary drawing too – Filed under: Landscape, painting, Paintings, Uncategorized Tagged: 2014, art, ephemera, fine art, landscape, oil, oil painting, oregon, phoenix, plein, plein air, rogue […]

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High Tide

High Tide

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On Writing a Solo Art Show Statement

Art Show Coming Up In my head I’m having a discussion with my sister Dorothy about art show statements.  Dorothy is in the process of putting together a solo show of my Dad’s work, artist John H. Stermer (1920-1991).  The show will be at the University of New Mexico’s Popejoy Hall (Albuquerque, NM) this November. The […]

The post On Writing a Solo Art Show Statement appeared first on Margaret Stermer-Cox – Watercolor Artist.

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i·chor ˈīˌkôr/ noun Greek Mythologynoun: ichorthe fluid that…

i·chor
ˈīˌkôr/
noun
Greek Mythology

noun: ichor
the fluid that flows like blood in the veins of the gods.

Continue reading i·chor
ˈīˌkôr/
noun
Greek Mythology

noun: ichor

the fluid that…